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The Wallace miner. (Wallace, Idaho) 1907-current, January 30, 1919, Image 5

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BUDS M STOGt MARKET
BROKER GIVES AN INTERESTING
« .uiTinu etc "ft moot"
EXPLANATION ui- anon i
OPERATIONS.
<*» 8 JbSST , o'TSL, b S';
erage department of O. A. Olin Co.)!
Brokers and professional traders
who sell the market short and then
.,„dhop.».«»■.....p«..
of the securities they have sold short
ARE A NECESSARY EVIL
called ''bears." The "bears" of the
are
market can operate only in one way.
They depend on a decline in stocks to
make their profit, for it is obvious that
one could make a profit by buying
stock in the anticipation of a fall
in its value. The public as a rule does
not speculate on the short side of a
market or buy on a falling market, so
the brokers and professional traders
are more frequently the "bears." The
methods by which the "bears" operate
is known as selling "short." The rules
of most exchanges prohibit a man
from selling a stock which he does not
possess, nevertheless this practice is
carried on very extensively.
no
i
A Short Sale.
In order to understand a short sale
let me give you an illustration. Sup
pose a man believes that he has inside
information that a certain stock will
not pay a dividend that has been an
nounced. He argues that as soon as
this information reaches the public
the market value of the stock will
immediately decline. He also knows
that the market is very quick to learn
of every favorable or unfavorable
news. So this broker, we will say,
sells 10,000 shares of this company's
stock short.
IWhen he goes on the open market
to sell this stock he knows th^t he
does not own or even have It in his
possession, so he either makes ar
rangements with the purchaser to
wait until a future date for the deliv
ery, which is called a "seller contract"
or else, which is the most common
way, he borrows the stock.
Profit in Loaning Stock.
There are firms connected or uncon
nected with all exchanges who make
a business of loaning stocks to brok
ers who desire to put through short
sales. For example, in the New York
stock exchange, these firms who bor
row and loan stock have a trading
post on the floor of the exchange,
around which brokers desiring to loan
stock or to borrow it can gather and
effect their transactions. It probably
seems strange that anyone should
loan his stock, especially when be
knows it is to be thrown on the mar
ket, which tends to lessen its value,
yet such a transaction Is not without
its advantages. The borrower of the
stock must deposit with the lender a
sum of money equal to the market
value of the stock at that time and if
the market advances after that,
the borrower Is obliged to put up more
in keepirife with the advances
money
the stock may make. The lender also
In most cases, unless he is in need of
money, charges the borrower of the
stock interest based on the stock's
market value. In other words,
lender charges the borrower interest
the money left with him as secur
Novv
the
on
ity for the return of the stock,
if the lender was in need of money and
instead of loaning the stock had to
take it to the bank as collateral on
his loan, Instead of receiving its full
market value, be would perhaps
celve about 80 per cent of this amount
which he would have to pay inter
est Instead of receiving Interest
when he loans the stock.
re
on
as
It Is for
short" broker
these reasons that a
can usually find a large number of
stock lenders in the market,
other hand, if the "bear" had made
a seller contract, he is
On the
hlrt sale on
obliged to deposit money with the pur
chaser equal to any advances the stock
might make over his selling price.
Practical Operation.
to where the
cer
Now we are down
"bear" is short 10,000 shares of a
tain stock; or In other words he has
sold 10,000 shares of stock he does not
but which he hopes to buy at a
own,
later date at a lower price. If his ex
pectations come true and the company
does not pay a dividend in accordance
with his forecast, the value of the
stock declines, and he is now In a po
profit by his perspicacity and
the risk he has taken, for he can go
Into the open market and purchase
the 10,000 shares at a lower price than
that at which he sold it.
delivery of the
sition to
As soon as
10,000
•he secures
shares, which he now buys, he takes
it to the lender of the stook and re
the amount
originally deposited, and the
difference between Ills purchase price
selling price is his
celves a check for
money
and his original
profit, less any interest he has paid.
•Local Example.
A good example of the above was
worked on the Hecla stock a short
of brokers
A number
time ago.
New York and locally gave out reports
that the Hecla was going to pay a
and the
cent dividend for Christmas
public bit and forced the stock up
The bear brokers did
around $6.25.
not believe this, but Just the same
they saw that the rumor was spread
far and wide and all the while thei
and selling all
When
were borrowing
stock short they could,
time came for the Hecla to announce
only 15 cents
Its dividend it was
the stock Immediately declined.
the "curb
are advised that even now
Is still short of this stock, but
shorts are hovering fast and are maft
;
ll,at Hecla
naa paid this aO cent dividend and the
stock had advanced instead of declin
ing. In that case the -beers
i.l, 1 e V bears " 0,l " l
i i.tor to cover their short" sales,
They would do this by buying stock in
I the open market as speedily as possi
1 r,K '>' «ould of course have to
! ' ay more for i( thiin the amount for
which they sold It. They would then
bui ' k ; lle ^e original*,he
owners and receive the deposits they
had put up as security, hut they would
have lost the difference between the
rr ." w , "" ™ **
the stock, plus the interest and the
; amol ,nt for which they sold. |
How Values Are Made.
.....„
| ways a considerable short Interest.
There is also at the same time likely
to be a considerable long interest. The
conflict between these two interests. ;
ing a nice profit.
Suppose,
though,
1
together with the influence exerted by
selling or buying by the public, is the '
force W'hich largely fixes the prices j
of stocks. A very active long interest ]
with large buying orders will force
prices up. On the other hand, large ]
short sales make heavy offerings andjent
prices decline. The hammering of j
prices of stocks caused by the con-[face
stant short selling drives the prices
down often to a point where the long
interests see a chance to make an ad
vance. Their efforts are frequently
aided by the public, which, seeing
stocks reflet upward, always send In
large buying orders. Buying from
these two sources immediately ab
sorbs all the stock whioh the shorts
offer. As soon as this upward move
ment begins, in fact sometimes before
the advance comes, the shorts or bears
scramble to cover and force prices Up
on each other, which usually is very j
rapid and if conditions are right the '
very |
tile j
public keeps sending in large buying j
orders and we have what we call a
"bull" market.
Public Hates "Bears.
The public at large is of the opinion |
that the "bears" are an evil to the
stock market and that if it were
for them stocks would never go down.
not
If they are an evil, they are a neces
sary evil. They stabilize the market,
for they are the chief sellers on an
advancing market and are the buyers
on a declining market. Without the
short interests on a declining market,
when buying orders are scarce, stocks
often times would go to unreasonably
low levels vvhlch would cause great
losses to the public and possibly pan
ics. The "shorts" also enable the pub-)ent
lie to buy securities cheaper. For in
stanee, suppose you gave your broker
order to buy a few thousand shares
of a certain stock and'it happened that
on this day no selling orders were in
Without the shorts sell-Ion
a ii
ing to your broker, your stock might
cost you an unreasonable price. So as
it is, when your broker goes into the
market to fill vour order, he can, if
the market.
your order is high enough, get offer
ings from the shorts, which he takes
to fill your order.
It takes lots of nerve to be on the
Every time
short side of a market,
you make a short sale, you are selling
it to someone who thinks it is going
The purchaser also might
inside information which
higher.
have some
will advance the stock when it is made
Maybe there is a deal on to
public.
manipulate the stock to higher levels.
that the life of the
So you can see
"shorts" is not always a rosy one. But
remember, anybody can buy stocks if
he has the money, but it takes real
nerve to sell them.
CRIPfU CREEK NINES
GREAT DRAINAGE ENTERPRISE
THAT REQUIRED 11 YEARS
TO COMPLETE.
The Roosevelt deep drainage tun
nel in the Cripple Creek gold mining
world's greatest
district, one of the
feats in mining engineering, has been
inpleted and work has ceased.
Credit for this gigantic undertaking,
which took 11 years and cost $812,000,
belongs in Colorado Springs, because
it was the faith of the mining men ot
this city in a greater Cripple
at new low levels, plus the cash ni
engineering brains that made it pos
The tunnel always " ill be
to A. E. Carlton, tow- 1
r,.
stble.
monument
Springs financier, whose perseverance
and ability put it through, says the
Colorado Springs correspondent of the
Denver Mining Record.
of
of this undertaking
adventure, in tha'.
The history
full of romantic
every round of shots fired might re
veal a new ore body and open up new
of fabulous wealth. It wts
the general under
avenues
to lower
built
ground water level of the entire Crip
The total water
in
pie Creek district,
flow at the portal now averages about
2500 gallons per minute. The work
successful that mining
the tunnel level will
has been so
operations above
again be seriously hampered
50|uie\er
water.
The tunnel
1907. and Mr. Carlton was
contract in beginning
The officers of tlie company
: F. G. Peck, president;
started in June,
awarded
was
to
the
the first
work.
that time were
Frank F. Gastello, treasurer; W.
Waterton, secretary: Arnold Nydeg
ger, assistant secretary and Charles
Castello, assistant treasurer.
Countryman Writes History.
A complete resume of all the work
done and what Is accomplished is
in the following statement prepared^
and
the
We
the
.... i t u
1 l ' riss ' b> T R ' <-OUntr> man.
ecginecr in charge:
The Itooeevelt tunnel is the lutes'
and most import ant of the numerous
important or tne numerous
tmmels driven through the surround
ir.g Cripple Creek mining district,
Most of the previous tunnels were
.driven primarily for exploration pur
[poses, but the Roosevelt tunnel has
been intended chiefly for drainage,
The El Paso tunnel driven through
surrounding granite walls Into
the eruptive rock or the Cripple Creek
volcanic crater, would effectually
drain a large nart of the productive
... -»*..
Portal 8033 Feet Above Sea.
"Accordingly after many delays and'R.
several expensive attempts to lower!
s r»pil
Roosevelt tunnel was begun in Juno,
RIOT. The point selected for the por
tal is in Cripple Creek gulch, about
live miles to the southwest of the
town of Cripple Creek. It is at an
elevation of 8033 feet above sea level
and the most favorable point for a
tunnel of the length decided,
was continued with several long
tervals of suspension up to the pres
time. The total length of the
main bore is now 24,255 feet. The
is near the center of the Hawk
eye claim of the Portland Gold Min
ing company on Battle mountain. The
section for nearly the entire distance
is 8 to 10 feet wide and 7 feet high,
The grade is 0.3 per cent or a rise of
feet per 1000 for the entire distance,
The elevation at face is approxim
ately 8110 feet above sea level. A
waterway at one side is provided 4
feet wide by 3 feet deep,
"The total cost»of the main bore up
to August 1, 1918, when work was
suspended amounted to $812,000. This
included the cost of sinking an inter
mediate shaft 700 feet deep and a
Work
in
included ttie cost of sinking an infer
mediate shaft 700 feet deep and a
raise to the bottom of the Elkton
shaft of 160 feet.
This would make
the average cost $33.30 per lineal foot.
The highest cost per foot for any one
month was $106 and the lowest $13.
"The Roosevelt tunnel has lowered
the general underground water level
of the dsitrict some 750 feet. Careful
measurements of the flow at the
ute.
the
portal have been made every month.
The maximum discharge observed
was 17,000 gallons per minute, Which
continued for several months during
the early part of 1916. It has now de
clined to some 2500 gallons per tnin
The total discharge divided by
total vertical subsidence (750
feet) indicated that there was pres
in the area drained 40,000,000
150,000,000 gallons of water per verti
(cal foot.
to
"it has been estimated that to low
jer the water level by pumping would
have cost $5000 per vertical foot. Up
that basis the Roosevelt
tunnel
has saved the mine owners of the
district fully $.1,1)00,000 to sa> noth
ing of other benefits and its useful
ness will continue for many years to
*-«. "T. "•
tunnel level will never again be stri
hampered 'by- water. Shafts
come.
ously
sunk below the tunnel will no doubt
encounter considerable water, but
will not have to be raised 2000 feet
fnore to the surface. The tunnel
been connected by raises with
the El
or
The Fuller cross
790 feet
Hill drift
feet and the Portland
has
four of the principal shafts,
Elkton, 'Cresson and the Port
Several important laterals have
Paso,
land.
also been driven,
cut in the El Paso ground
Raven-Beacon
long, the
about 300 feet long, the 'Cresson lat
1700 feet long connecting
eral some
with the Cresson main shaft at
depth of 1920
lateral connecting with the Portland
No. 2 shaft at a depth of 2133 feet
and about 2000 feet long.
Cut Rich Ore Veins.
"Quite a number of veins and dykes
have been cut in the tunnel. Of these
at least three carry good ore where
In the Cresson lateral
encountered,
a large body of good ore was opened
about 400 feet south of the shaft. This
shoot is now being developed with
very encouraging results. A vein
high grade ore was also cut in the
Portland ground not fur from the No.
ore
In the Rose-Nicho] property
2 shaft.
a vein was cut about 60 feet east
the shaft yielding good pay ore. Many
of the other veins opened carry low
grade ore and will undoubtedly be ex
plored at some future time when con
ditions are more favorable.
consl(Jered complete ,
^ a „ (hat
^ fu ji y justified the expenditure
^ constniction
i ^ ^
tunngl at depth 2000 feet or more
should encourage deep mining in the
(jj str | ct j n this connection it is only
fair to state that much credit is due
A. E. Carlton for the energy and per
sistence with which he has supported
thls great enterprise from the begin
"The Roosevelt tunnel may now be
It has accom
expected of
was
The discovery
deposits in the
ore
INTERNATIONAL
'B ul-iTdoo"
.1
^ v«?
HOLDS ALL RECORDS
Sizes and Forms carried in stock
Exclusive Agency "Lidgerwood" Hoists, Etc.
All
... i I lH. llIHliHIlll H -• Hi-HIMU
11/ rCTCDM iMACHINERV and
WtD I LnINI EQUIPMENT CO.
' r - * - 1 ' ' M . --
L7 1 ' T ^T^rT TTT TTTTTITTT^PnT^TT TT !n71iilLIilIIiIIlllUiriilll^L'IlAlIIIinjIL ; Ili l JJUIUr:
South 5 Stevens Street, SPOKANE
'niiiK
8 . ,
(Signed)
"T. u COUNTRYMAN.
Portland Feat Wonderful.
greatest feats
1 vrhaps one or tne greatest teat
accomplished during the constrtn ion
of the tunnel was In the construction
jof the 2000-foot lateral driven from
the main tunnel bore to connect wlt i
the iNo. 2 shaft of the Portland. It
must be remembered that this ground
had to be surveyed at .depth of 2133
f «et. 1 here was much speculat n
among those interested over how near
the lateral would come to connecting
i*» "»■**"■«* %■
deal of skill and accurate figuring R.
Emens, engineer for tlie Portland,
Prepared his figures and other data
z>«"-«* «•—> n a ;: J
study. When the lateral was finally
connected with the shaft they con
nected in an almost perfect line. The
difference In space between where the
lateral drive and the shaft connected
w " as too small to be noticed,
Mr. Em
roundly complimented upon
on s
his work,
was
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Notice is hereby given that at a
meeting of the. board of directors of
the Buffalo Mining company, held in
the Brunswick hotel at Missoula,
Montana, September 30, 1918, an as
sessment of ten (10) mills on each
share of capital stock was levied, pay
able on or before November 5, 1918, to
Geo. Dunham, treasurer of said com
pany, at tlio Brunswick hotel or 321
Pine street, Missoula, Montana.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment is not paid on or before Novem
ber 5, 1918, will be declared delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
tion, and unless payment is made be
fore will be sold on the 4th day oi
December, 1918, to pay the delinquent
assessment together with the cost of
advertising and expenses of sale.
J. W. CONROY,
Secretary of the Buffalo Mining Com
Alder Street, Missoula,
O10-31-4t
puny, 334
Montana.
Notice of Postponement.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der and resolution of the board of di
rectors of the Buffalo Mining company
the time for payment of the above as
sessment lias been postponed from the
5th day of November, 1918, to the 4th
of December, J»18. and the sale
of delinquent stock has been post
polled from the 4th day of December,
1918, to tlie 4th day of January, 1919,
at the same hour and place above de
scribed.
J. W. CONROY,
Secretary of tlie Buffalo Mining Com
pany, 334 Alder Street, Missoula,
Montana.
N7-28-4t
Notice of Postponement.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der and resolution of tlie board of di
rectors of the Buffalo Mining company
^e^n/^s^bien" poMPO^d ^trom
lhg 4til day 0 f December, 1918, to the
4th da y 0 p January, 1919, and the sale
of delinquent stock has been P°stpon
s SMtarw*
j j) le S anie hour and place above de
; scribed.
J. W. CONROY,
Secretary of the Buffalo Mining Corn
Aider Street, Missoula,
D5-J2-5t
pany, 334
Montana.
Notice of Postponement.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der and resolution of the board of di
rectors of the Buffalo Mining com
pany, the time for payment of the
above assessment has been postponed
from the 4th day of January, 1919, to
the 3rd day of February, 1919, and the
sale of delinquent stock has been post
! poned from the 4th day of February,
11919, to the 4th day of March, 1919,
and place above
I at the same hour
described,
J. W. CONROY.
Secretary of the Buffalo Mining Corn
Street, Missoula,
J2-30-5t
pany, 334 Alder
Montana.
Notice of Postponement.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der and resolution of the board of di
rectors of the Buffalo Mining com
pany, the time for payment of the
nbove assessment has been postponed
from the 3rd day of February, 1919, to
the 3rd day of March, 1919, and the
sale of delinquent stock has been post
poned from the 4th day of March,
1919, to the 4th day of April, 1919, at
place above de
the same hour and
scribed.
tion, duly attested
f^r^rShH^ an^ in^rest^of
t)ig saj( j D ega i Tender Mining Com
pa ny, In and to the following describ
J. W. CONROY,
Secretary of the Ruffalo Mining Coin
Aider Street, Missoula,
J30-F27-5t
pany, 334
Montana.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE.
in my
the District
By virtue of an execution
hands, issued out .... . ,
Court of the First Judicial District
of the State of Idaho, in and for tlie
County of Shoshone, in the suit
against Legal
of
James \V. Hutchins
Tender Mining Company, a corpora
the 13th day
led lode mining claims, situated in
E\olutlon Mining Dietrict, Shoshone
County, Idaho, viz.:
"Legal Tender" lode claim, located
Junuary 19th. 1891. notice of location
of which Is recorded In Hook "L" of
Quar[z lj00atlon „ ttt p;l(fe 9!) thereof;
c [ almi located October
10th 1S!t9 notice of location of which
is recorded In Book of Quartz Lo
lode^claim' located October
lst 1S9Si notlce of location of which
( i recorded in Book g" of Quartz
^.on^at ^^er
j g!)9i not ( ce () j» location of which
ls recorded In Book "S" of Quurtz
Locations at page 305 thereof;
ss
js recorde(1 jn Book .. r , of g unrtz
Locations at page 177 thereof; "Her
schel" lode claim, located October
aarwwsit
cfltlons at p . l>fe 240 tliereof; "Prank
n n " lode claim, located April 14th,
1S9S, notice of location of vvhlch Is
caliong a t page* 350 thereof; ''Pacific"
lnde 0 | a ( n , located March 19th, 1900,
notice of location of which Is recorded
in Book "T" of Quartz Locations ut
page 176 thereof; "Hewett" lode
elaim, located April 2nd, 1903, notice
of location of which is recorded in
Book "X" of Quartz Locations at
page 409 thereof: "Revelation" lode
claim, located August 31st, 1903, no
the of locution of which is recorded
In Book "Y" of Quartz Locations at
Iiage 18 thereof; "Thomson" lode
claim, located March 21st, 1903, no
tire of location of which Is recorded
in Book "X" of Quartz Locations at
page 408 thereof; "Loring" lode
claim, located April 14th, 1898, no
tice of location of which is recorded
in Book "Q" of Quartz Locations at
page 351 thereof; "St. Paul" lode
claitn, located April 9th, 1900, notice
of location of which Is recorded In
Book "T" of Quartz Locations at
page 426 thereof; "Admiral Dewey"
lode claim, located May 13th, 1898,
r.otlce of location of which is record
ed in Book "Q" of Quartz Locations
at page 397 thereof;
lode claim, located
and "Bell R."
November 10th,
Mining and Development
Companies of the Coeur d'Alenes
-Doings of
Assessments Levied, Meetings Called, Delinquent Lieti
Companies of Special Intaraet to All Stockholders.
ASSESSMENTS LEVIED.
Buffalo Mining Co. —Levied Septem
ber 30, 10 mills, payable November 5
to George Dunham, treasurer, Bruns
wick hotel, Missoula, Mont,
quent sale December 4. Postponed to
March 4.
Delln
East Standard Mining Co.— Levied
August 9, 2 mills, payable January 1
to C. E. Inskip, secretray-treasurer.
Wallace. Delinquent sale January 20.
Postponed to January 31.
Friend Mining Co. —Levied January
18, 3 mills, payable February 19 to
W|illiam Schierding, treasurer, 310
Empire 'State building, Spokane. De
linquent sale March 15.
Guelph Mining & Milling Co. —Lev
ied May 7, 10 mills, payable to A. B.
Corby, secretary, Kellogg. Delin
quent sale postponed to February 14.
Highland - Surprise
Mining Co.— Levied August 29, 1 cent,
payable to Charles Welgand, secretary,
Kellogg. Delinquent sale postponed to
January 30.
Conslolidated
Hamburg-American Mming Co —
Levied October 9, 1(4 mills, payable
November 30 to John Rock, secretary,
vellogg. Delinquent sale De ember
30. Postponed to January 30.
Old Vetsran Mining Co.—Levied
January 6, 2 mills, payable February
10 to L. L. Brainard, secretary-treas
urer, Wallace. Delinquent sale March
lst.
My Quotations of Silver, Lead, Zinc and Copper
Which Are the Actual Basis of Settlement
Th* accompanying table glvaa tha
juotatlone of silver, lead, sine and |
■opper as obtained by the Englneer
ng and Mining Journal and which are
generally specified aa th* basis of eet
lement In ore contract! with th*
imelters. The quotations published In
he dally press are usually higher for
the reason that they represent sales
n smah icta, while the figures her*
given are based on large transactions
COPPER
LEAD
ZINC
January
LLclr,
St. L.
N. Y.
St. L.
7.20
5.60
6.75
101%
9
©5.70
@6.90
7.15
6.50
5.70
101K
10
@5.75
7.16
6 %
5.60
101(4
11
@5.05
@5(4
7.15
5% •
101(4
13
@7.20
@5(4
5(4
6.95
6.30
5.40
101(4
14
@7.06
@5.50
6%
5.30
6.40
101(4
15
@7.00
@5.35
' @6.50
4
!.
MONTHLY AVERAGE PRICE8 OF METAL8, 1918.
Ae Determined by th* Engineering end Mining Journal.
Silver
N. T.
.87.702
.85.718
.88.082
.95.346
.99.505
.99.500
.99.625
.100.292
.101.125
.101.126
.101.126
.... 101.125
8
Copper
N. Y
13.500
33.500
13.500
11.500
33.100
33.500
33.500
30.000
30.000
Zinc
Lead
St L.
6.684
6.899
7.091
6.701
6.704
.7.511
7.750
7.750
7.750
7.760
7.750
6.324
Lead
N. Y.
6.782
6.973
7.201
St. L.
7.661
7.629
7.286
6.715
7.114
7.791
MONTH—
January .
February .
March .
April .
May .
June .
July ..
August .
September .
October .
November .. ..
December.
(a) No market.
6.771
6.818
7.611.
8.033
8.050
8.060
8.050
8.050
6.564
8.338
1.635
9.093
36.666
8.461
36.600
8.141
7.813
<*>
1890. notice of location of which !•
, recorded in Book "K" of Quart! Lo
Icationa at page 567 thereof; all rec
lords of ShOBhone County, Idaho, to*
gether with all building*, milla,
! flumes, machinery and mining equip*
ment of whatsoever kind or charac
ter now situated upon said lode min
[ing claims.
Notice Is herobJ p"
1919, at 10:00 o'clock a. m. of said
day at the Bank Street entrance to
the County Court house. In the City
^ni^l -I th^SSS
title and interest of the said Legal
Tender Mining Company, of, in and
to the said above described property
M'waifi.SiMSri'S;
United States, to satisfy said execu
tlon and all costs,
Given under my hand, this 29th
" £*••«»».
Sheriff,
To Whom It May Concern:
Notice is hereby given that the un
dersigned has lost or misplaced the
following certificates:
Certificate No. 14290 for 300 shares
of Caledonia Mining Company stock,
dated August 16. 1918.
Certificate No. 17226 for 200 shares
°f Success Mining Company, Ltd.,
dated June 1. 1916.
'Certificate No. 179-9 for 100 shares
of Success Mining Company, Ltd.,
(luted July 6, 1916.
All persons are warned against ne
gotiating or attempting to negotiate
the above mentioned cert Ideates, and
unless the same are recovered within
thirty days from date hereof, applica
tlon will be made to the secretaries of
said companies for the Issue of cer
titlcates of like numbers and amounts
In their stead.
Dated this 30th day of January,
1919.
By JOHN DOLAN,
Deputy Sheriff.
J30-F27-Gt
NOTICE OF LOST CERTIFICATES.
WILLIAM GORMAN,
133S Missouri Ave., Butte, Montana.
J30-F20-4t
Rainbow Mining A Milling Co.
Levied December 19, 2 mills, payable
February 8 to R. P. Woodworth, sec
retary-treasurer, 746 Peyton building,
Spokane. Delinquent e»le March 7.
Succett Mining Co.—^Levied Decem
ber 20, 2 cents, payable January *7 to
Herman J. Rossi, treasurer, Wallace.
Delinquent sale February 28.
Syndicate Mining A Exploration Co.
—Levied January 14, 1 mill, payable
February 16 to Louis Stevens, secre
tary, Wardner. Delinquent sale on
March 15,
Tarbox Mining Co.—Levied Decem
ber 20, 10 mills, payable January 34 to
It. E. Seysler, secretary, Wlallace. De
linquent sale February 31.
Weetern Union Mining Co.—sLevlod
September 3, 6 mills, payable Ootober
15, to Ben L. Collins, 1210 Old Nation
al bank building, Spokane,
quent sale at court house, Wallaoa
November 16. Po itponed to February
D«Un
15.
STOCKHOLDERS' MEETINGS.
Tamarack A Cutter Con. Mining Co.
—Annual meeting to be held In the
Day building, Wallace, on Wednesday,
February 26, at 2 p. m.— Harry L.
Day, secretary.
Mountain Rote Mining Co. —Annu
al meeting to be held at office of D.
W. Price, Kellogg, on Saturday, Feb
ruary 8, at 8 p. m. — H. Ttelgan, secre
tary.
and ara generally determined from re*
porta made by produoan
agencies. Both the New York and Ut
Louis prices of lead are given, the dif
ference being due mainly to the differ
ence in freight between the two points.
The quotation* for spelter are
prime western brands. To arrive at
the New York price add 36 cente per
109 pounds to th* BL Louie price.

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