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The Wallace miner. [volume] (Wallace, Idaho) 1907-current, February 20, 1919, Image 5

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BUTTE STRIKE FAILURE
ATTEMPT OF I. W. W. TO TIE UP
MINES PROVED UN
SUCCESSFUL,
There was a general movement on
the part of both miners and crafts
men who have been on strike In Butte
for the last ten days to get back to
their jobs on the hill. Finding that
efforts on their part to further pro
long the layoff would meet with fail
ure, the leaders who had endeavored
to bring about a general strike in
Butte such as failed in Seattle had
at which the strike
meetings calls
iwas officially declared at an end, says
the Anaconda Standard of the 18th.
Long before the two miners 'or
ganizations, the 1. W. W. and the
Metal Mine Workers had taken this
action, men were clamoring at the
various mine offices for permission to
go to work. One mine office reported
late in the afternoon that there were
several hundred men in line waiting
their chance to get back on the pay
roll.
•Small shifts started in the morning
and met with no resistance on the
l>art of those who a few days ago
had threatened any man seen going
It took
up the hill witih a bucket,
but a casual glance to show that such
an effort again would meet with dis
approval on the part of those who
have been placed in charge of the
maintenance of law and order. Larger
shifts were put on last night.
No Interference.
Street cars carried the men to the
hill without Interference. Throughout
the mining district there were no
signs to indicate that such a thing as
a strike was in existence. The back
bone of the walkout had been taken
out of the iwhole affair toy the action
of the various crafts' unions, which
refused to strike or give their en
dorsement to a strike at this time.
By early afternoon the lines of men
seeking employment grew longer and
it was then that meetings of the few
faithful ones were called, the hopeless
situation canvassed and the vote to
go back passed in each case,
night the I. W!. W. and Metal Mine
Workers' halts practically were de
serted.
Today it is expected there will be
as full shifts at work as there were
before the walkout. All of the mines
that were operating when the strike
was declared will be running today.
Last
Conditions on the hill are fast re
that existed
Burning the conditions
under the restricted production that
before the strike
was being carried
started.
company is working around 7400 men,
divided Into 4000 for the day shift
and 3450 for the night shift. The day
craftsmen who
At this time the Anaconda
shift includes many
do not work on the night shift, so it
is the largest numerically.
About 50 per cent of the regular
day shift reported for work yesterday
morning, Including practically all the
engineers, electricians, mechanics and
craftsmen, and many
the mine offices making inquiry for
the night shift last night and this
morning. It is estimated that a two
thirds return of the mine workers
iwlll be reached today and by the last
of the week a full quota will be avail
able under the conditions that will be
maintained In the mines for the pres
ent.
men were at
Similar conditions existed at the
North Butte mines, Mr. Braley
porting that several levels were work
ing 'full handed yesterday with many
Inquiries being made as to work on
the night shift last night. He believ
ed that by tomorrow morning there
would be enough applications from
the mine workers to man all the pro
perties to the extent that It ls desir
able to operate them at the present
re
time.
W. C. Sldemfi, manager of the W.
A. Clark properties, reported practic
ally a full crew at all the mines under
his charge, yesterday morning and
contemplated a surplus of applica
tions within the next few days.
Full Crew Reports.
At the Black Rook mine a full crew
reported for work and all the men
wanted were available for the morn
ing shift yesterday morning. All day
there were a great number of rustlers
at the yard gates making inquiry as
to whether they would go to work,
and the manayement reported that
plenty of men had applied for the
night shift last night to fill all re
quirements.
At the Colorado mine of the Davis
Daly company repair work was under
way and the mine was not ready for
underground
morning, but there were plenty of
men on hand ready to go to work on
the morning shift. This property ex
pects to start up again this morning
with a full crew, sufficient applica
tions having already been made to
more than fill the present require
ments.
At the East Butte, Manager Rohn
said that the smelter and concentra
tor had been down during the strike
and that a full crew were required to
start these so that It would be ne
cessary to wait until all the force had
reported before the plant could he op
erated. Sufficient men were available
for the mine yesterday, but the mill
bins were full and this ore would
have to be gotten out of the way be
fore hoisting of ore from the mine
yesterday
workmen
*
could be started,
hear from the mill and smelter men
in sufficient numbers by the lust of
the week to be aide to announce defi
nitely when the plant would be start
ed up a#ain. In the meantime repair
work in the mine would be carried on
and the property put in shape for
continued operation.
He expected to
DEFECTIVE MINE DRILLS.
Court Decision Fixing Responsibility
for Injury.
Plaintiff, as an employe engaged In
operating a drill in defendant's mine,
did not assume the risk of being in
Jured through breaking of the drill be
cause it hud been welded, if the weld-!
ing was defectively done and he was
not apprised of that fact. This wasj°f
one point decided by the U. S. circuit
court of appeals, Nninth circuit, in
the recent case of Bowden vs. Gold
Hunter Mining and Smelting Co. (252
Federal Reporter, 389).
As a separate defense to liability
for the accident, the defendant com
puny also unsuccessfully relied upon
a claim that the plaintiff had executed
a release covering his injuries. The
court held that, where an injured
worker gives a release at a time when
it is mutually supposed that the in
juries are of minor character, the re
lease will not hold good as against
other and serious injuries afterward
-En
developed from the same cause,
gineering and Mining Journal.
CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH THE
PRIVILEGE MAY BE
OBTAINED.
Although no general extension of
time will be authorized for tiling fed
eral income tax returns due March
15, the commissioner of internal rev
enue has approved a novel feature of
tax collection which will serve for all
practical purposes as a possible ex
tension of 45 days for the filing of
corporation income and excess pro
fits tax returns in cases where cor
porationvs are unable to complete and
file their returns by March 15.
If a corporation finds that, for good
and sufficient reason, it is Impossible
to complete its return by March 15, it
may make a return of the estimated
tax due and make payment thereof
not later than March 15. If meritor
ious reason is shown as to why the
corporation is unable to complete its
return by the specified date, the col
lector will accept the payment of the
estimated tax and agree to accept the
revised and completed tax return
within a period of not more than 45
days.
Make Estimated Payment.
Under the plan adopted for corpor
ation payments and returns, the gov
ernment will be able to collect ap
proximately the amount of tax due
on or before March 15, thus meeting
its urgent needs; and the corporations
actually requiring further .time for
the preparation of their complete re
turns will be granted ample time In
which to do so.
One of the advantages of this plan
is that it relieves the taxpayer of
one-half of one per cent Interest per
month that would attach to the pay
ment of the taxes under an extension
granted at the request of the taxpay
er. The taxpayer will, of course, not
be relieved of interest on
amount as his payment may fall short
of the tax found later to be due on
the basis of his final return.
Should the payment on March 13 of
the estimated tax due be greater than
the tax eventually found to be due on
examination of the completed return,
the excess payment will automatical
lly be credited to the next installment
which will be due on June 15.
Must Give Reasons.
Provision for systematically han
dling this new feature will be made
in the construction of the new return !
blanks for corporations. The new
form will be a combined income and
such j
,
j
excess profits blank, embodied in
which is a detachable letter of remit
Any corporation which finds
tance.
that, for sufficient reasons, it can not
complete its return by March 15, may
detach and fill out the letter of re
mittance and forward same to the
collector on or before March 15, to
gether with a check, money order or
draft for the tax due on that date.
I fthe exact tax Is not known, the es
timated tax due will be paid in this
manner. A statement In writing of
the reasons why it ls impossible for
the corporation to complete the re
turn by the specified date must ac- j
company every such remittance.
Individual Taxpayers, Too.
Individual taxpayers will be given
Similar privileges In cases in which
It is made clear by the taxpayer that
the time available Is not sufficient to
enable him to complete his return by
March 15. No reason exists, accord
ing to the Internal revenue officials,
for delaying the filing of the returns
of individual Incomes, except In un
usually difficult cases.
Forms for returns of Individual in
comes up to $5000 will he distributed
by collectors within a few days.
Forms for larger Incomes will he
available about February 24. Cor
porations blanks will be distributed
by March 1. Regulations governing
the administration of the new Income
tax will also be available before
March 1.
El SECRETARY G1ASSIHAT
NOTHING IN SIGHT TO DISTURB
BUSINESS CONFIDENCE—
SURPLUS OF CAPITAL.
(By Carter Glass, Secretary of the
Treasury).
A thing difficult of understanding is
the reactionary spirit wthich, in some
pessimistic
quarters, seems to have seized hold
American business. It manifests
itself in a gloomy and
j view of the future in no way justified
by conditions present or discernible,
jand in a disposition to cavil
further expenditures the government
at the
| is under the necessity of making in
order to liquidate the war.
Instead of days of dark foreboding,
f
these should be days of rejoicing,
o
confidence and of high resolve. Am
erica is least injured of any of tHe
nations which took active part in the
death grapple with autocracy on the
soil of France and
Flanders.
Our
j fields have not been devastated, our
i homes ahd factories have not been
razed, famine does not stalk among
us. In all material things the nation
is richer and stronger than it was be
1 fore we went to war.
Our Condition Compared.
Is the American spirit less courag
eons than is the spirit of the French
or of the Belgians? France, sorrow
ing, but undaunted, has set about to
repair the wreck the ruthless invad
er wrought, and refuses to view
future darkly. Belgium, stripped of
all save honor, looks forward to the
day when a greater nation will arise
on the ruins of the old. Shall Amer
ica, then, bend and groan under the
imaginings of a burden which it
should bear lightly, if felt at all?
Sight never should be lost of the
fact that America's war debt is sub
stantially all owed to the American
people. Money to meet the Interest
charges on it and eventually to pay
off the principal will flow back to the
sources whence it came. A national
debt of this character is not a burden
to cripple future business.
Plenty of Capital.
It should be kept in mind also that
the issues of Liberty bonds were paid
for, or are being paid for, almost en
tirely by the current savings of the
people. There was no impairment of
the capital which had accumulated
from the savings of former years. I
More capital is available today for the
financing of legitimate business than
ever before in the history of the na
tion. Moreover, it must toe remem
bered for at least two years prior to |
the entrance of this country into war
American business enjoyed unprece
{hpil'll
dented prosperity, with enormous pro
fits, untaxed beyond the normal lev- I
i
ies.
prov jj e( j
p . eace pHze money awflrdeel to
In affecting the savings by means
of which they bought Liberty bonds, !
the American people learned the les
sons of thrift, the benefits of which
will be felt by our children and our
children's children. The billion dollar
indemnity which Bismarck levied In
the belief, that it would keep France
prostrate rejuvenated France and en
abled her to become the chief stum
bling block to Germany's dream of
world domination. So America's war
debt, If rightly viewed and rightly
handled, should make for the con
tentment and prosperity of our peo
ple. To see in it an obstacle to busi
ness progress Is to see ghosts and
hobgoblins and other things which
have no existence outside the realms
of fancy.
ROOSEVELT AND RED CROSS.
Leaves Fund to Be Used as Memorial
to His Son.
Colonel Theodore Roosevelt, shortly
before his death, arranged to give
substantial expression of his gratitude
to the people of the little village in
[France near which his son Quentin is
buried. Through the Red Cross he
that $6900 of the Nobel
him
should be used for the benefit of the
simple country people who have kept
Quentin's grave covered with flowers.
Colonel Roosevelt left the decision
of the exact form his gift should take
to the discretion of the Red Cross,
and that organization is now trying
to ascertain the wishes of the villag
ers.
Tliose
Washington
would look less out of place picketing
a bughouse.—Toledo Blade.
suffragettes
j
j
u
BEES
... .
HOLDS ALL RECORDS
All Sizes and Forms carried in stock
Exclusive Agency "Lidgerwood" Hoists, Etc.
U/TQTFDM MACHINERY AMD
WL 3 I Lit IN e 9 JMIF? JNJT: p P
i
^T7iim sniir..nni r rp , mTTTr.i r ri , r TT T nTTTrnnnTTii n,i. , TTPTTTiiTra'
South 5 Stevens Street, SPOKANE
/
1
SHOWS RED BLOOD
WORK
AN INCIDENT OF RELIEF
WITH ARMERICAN ARMY
IN FRANCE.
(By .Melville Clutter)
The telephone bell rang.
The lted Cross canteen worker
jumped to
"Another
o hours, she throw back the
phrases over her shoulder between tile
breaks in a bad connection.
her feet and answered It.
train—1200 men
troop
due in t
118 *1 "as well along toward midnight
the workers had turned in for a few
led 9000
Tlie canteen had already
troops at the trainside that day and
hours rest,
the entire
But in twenty
minutes
force was again at work
making sandwiches and coffee.
in covered with
The
train
came
American soldiers
with ants.
us an ant hill
They had been in France
ls
on '. v a ,u ' v weeks but on the morrow
they would be thrown into the great
allied offensive; they would taste the
real warfare for the first time. In
rollicking spirits they were singing
** le "Doughboy's Song."
Goodbye, paw, goodbye, maw,
(Goodbye, mule with your old hee-haw,
-* ^ on *• l tnow w hat this war's about
,Dut you bet, by gum, I'll soon find out.
(With long drawn tenderness)
Uoodtoye,
fret;
sweetheart,
don't you
my
come back all right, you bet.
I'll bring you a Turk and the kaiser,
too
(with
And that's about all one feller can do.
modest
restraint)
Quickly they filed past the Red
Cross women distributing "the eats."
"Whoop-la, cigarettes," came from
one observant youth and the rest took
up the cheer. They had run out of
tobacco and the majority of the men
had not had a spioke that day.
"Only one each, boys," warned the
suddenly popular canteen worker;
"they are very scarce just now." A*
each man had his mouth full, the pre
cigarette was tucked securely
back of his ear.
Suddenly a hush
troops. Through the darkness a sec
ond train with a big Red Cross break
ing its drab sides rolled slowly in on
It was a hospital
clous
upon the
isite track.
an opp
train from the front.
The fresh troops pressed close to
the sides of the car carrying their
wounded brothers.
"How is it going up there?"
"We're giving them hell. Where
you fellows headed for?"
you just came from—the
"Where
front.
Live cm more hell and good luck
to you."
And so the fragments of conversa
tion were thrown back and forth.
Meanwhile there had cropped up a
certain bit of information which was
echoed all through the fresh troops.
"What, those fellows got no
smokes? We got the last?"
And in three minutes the Red Cross
workers had their big cigarette bowls
filled again and were making a sec
ond distribution in the hospital car.
A few minutes more and the troop
train was under way. As the boys
aboard hung out of the windows to
give a final cheer to the heroes they
were leaving behind the last sight
they beheld was that flickering patch
of light points in the darkness.
And they turned to their song—
I'll bring you a Turk and the kaiser,
too,
And that's about all one feller can do.
PUNGENT PARAGRAPHS PER
TAINING TO PROHIBITION.
The Commoner's Awful Revenge.
If Bill Bryan had a score to settle
with the people for beating him out
of the presidency, he squared it when
he put them all on the water wagon.
—Washington Post.
Antique Furniture.
iSome day a feller'll look at a pic
ture of a barroom of the present cen
tury and wonder what they did with
all the brass foot rails after the Sa
hara.—Baltimore Sun.
He Laughs No More.
And what's become of the o. f. bar
lizard who thought Carrie Nation
just too funny for anything.—Macon
Telegraph.
It's in the Flavor.
It doesn't look as though any
is going to be able to dodge the rev
one
enue tax this year.
If It doesn't hit
a man on excess profits, it will fetch
lnm a swipe through the soda foun
tain.—Utica Observer.
And Once We Were Free.
People with any kind of vision can
the time approaching when medl
cal experts w ill be engaged In deter
mining the alcoholic contents
plate of bread pudding
Sun.
sec
of a
-Baltimore
Fill 'Em Up Again.
If the bolshevik! are to punish tliel
drunkenness among their leaders with
death we
withdraw our opposition to
temporarily.—(Pittsburg
vodka
zette-Times.
Gu
We'll Still Have Reformers.
It's going to be a lonesome old|
world with nothing left but peace and
prohibition.—'Columbia Record,
Nothing Free But Stomach Ache,
In Ills efforts to pose
ns a pliilan
thropist old John Barleycorn calls
at
tention to the fact that nobody thinks
of serving free lunch at a soda foun
tain.—•Washington Star.
Prohibltion will rid the country of
the old-fashioned fellow who had to
have a few snorts of whisky before
could put tears In his temperance j
lecture.—Toledo Blade
He Has It Stored Away.
lie
The Dry Samaritan.
prohibitionists
The
say that we
may feed the world, but may not give
it drink..
We may give it wine and oil
and bind up its wounds—all but the
wine.—Los Angeles Times.
A Maryland Lament.
soda water everywhere
—and nothin' else to drink!—(Balti
more Sun.
Some One Brave Enough to Try.
Such is the vigor of the human
constitution that it is to he doubted
whether a man who now decides to
Soda water,
drink himself to death will have time
to make good.—'Cleveland Plain Deal-;
or.
Obsolete Literature.
We suppose the time will come be
fore very long now when a copy of
The Bartender's Guide won't he of
any more value hi the world of con
temporary literature than a govern
ment report.—Ohio State Journal.
Mining and Development
Companies of the Coeur d'Alenes
Assessments Levied, Meeting! Called, Delinquent Lilts—Doings of
Companies of Special Interest to All Stockholders.
ASSESSMENTS LFVIED.
Buffalo Mining Co. —Levied Septenf
ber 30, 10 mills, payable November 5
to George Dunham, treasurer, Bruns
wick hotel, Missoula, Mont,
quent sale December 4. Postponed to
April 4.
Dclln
Coeur d'Alene Antimony Mining Co.
—Levied January 24, 3 mills, payable
March 1 to C. M. Powell, secretary,
Pino creek, Kellogg. Delinquent sale
March 22.
Friend Mining Co. —Levied January
18, 3 mills, payable February 19 to
William Schierding,
Empire State building, Spokane,
linquent sale March 15.
treasurer, 310
De
Highland ■ Surprise
Mining Co.—Levied August
cent, payable to Clins. Weigand,
retary, Kellogg,
postponed to March 1.
Consolidated
29, 1
sec
Delinquent sale
Old Veteran Mining Co. —Levied
January 6, 2 mills, payable February
10 to L. L. Brainard, secretary-treas
urer, Wallace. Delinquent sale March
1st.
Daily Quotations of Silver, Lead, Zinc and Copper
Which Are the Actual Basis of Settlement
1 h# accompanying table give* the and are generally determined from re
luotatlons of silver, lead, zinc and
•opper as obtained by the Englneer
ng and Mining Journal and which are
generally specified ae the baste of set
lement In ore contracts wRh the
imelters. The quotations published In
he daily press are usually higher for
the reason that they represent sales
n smah lota, while the figure* her*
given are based on large transaction*
ports made by produce™ and sailing
agencies. Both the New York nod St
Louis prices of lead are given, the dif
ference being due mainly to the differ
ence in freight between the two point*.
The quotations
prime western brands. To arrive at
the New York price add 2t cent* pw
109 pounds to the Bt. Louie price.
for spelter are ter
January
February
Silver
LEAD
N. Y. St. L.
ZING
COPPER
St. L.
Elaelro
30
4.95
101 %
4.90
6.50
@5.05
@4.95
31
4.95
101 %
4.80
6.50
@5.05
@4.90
@8.55
1
101 %
4.95
4.80
6.45
@5.05
@4.85
@6.60
18%
3
101 %
4.95
4.80
6.25
18%
@5.05
101 %
4
4.95
4.70
6%
@5.05
@4.75
@ 6 %
18%
5
101 %
4.95
6.10
18
@5.05
4.70
@18%
* Undetermined.
MONTHLY AVERAGE PRICES OF METALS, 1918.
At Determined by the Engineering and Mining Journal.
Zinc
St. L.
7.661
7.639
7.286
6.715
7.114
7.791
8.338
8.635
9.092
8.451
8.141
7.813
Sliver
N. Y.
.87 702
.85.71S
.88.082
.95.346
.99.505
.99.500
.99.625
.100.292
.101.125
.101.125
.101.126
.... 101.125
Lead
N. Y.
6.782
6.973
7.201
6.772
6.818
7.611.
8.033
8.050
8.050
8.060
8.050
Lead
St. L.
6.684
,6.899
7.091
6.701
6.704
.7.511
7.750
7.750
7.750
7.760
7.750
Copper
N. Y.
23.500
23.600
23.800
23.600
28 500
23.600
23.500
26.000
86.000
86.000
20 000
MONTH—
January .
February ....
March .
April .
May .
June .
July .
August ..
September ...
October .
November ..
December .
(a) No market

6.564
6.324
(■)
BIQ BREWER8.
! -
Whit They Ac# Planning to Do With
Their Plante.
(New York Telegraph).
j
! milk.
Now for bock butter and pilsner
i Breweries of the United tSaets will
begin manufacturing dry commodities
j after prohibition grips the land next
according
July '
; made yesterday by representative* of
to announcements
the country's principal beermakers.
The huge Anheuser-Busch plant at
St. Ix>uls, for Instance, will be con
verted lnto a Packing establishment
Birmingham breweries are entering
the Ice manufacturing business.
One big Kansas City brewery will
pass Into the hands of a Cleveland
food products concern.
Many are to be converted Into stor
age houses. Others will make Ice
cream, malted milk and dairy prod
Ucts ' ° nly a fmv wln Produce soft
, drlnks ' ,,s the br6 wers say the profit
ls t0 ° sma11 ' Many establishments
plan to retaln thelr employes in the
new Industrie*.
So much money ls
tied up In the beer business that a
determined effort must be made to
continue to realize on the capital In
vested.
A number of companies are plan
ning to move out of the country. The
South American field Is being looked
over by a Milwaukee firm.
Not Always.
"Mother," asked Tommy, "do fairy
tales always begin with 'Once upon a
time?' "
"No, dear, not always; they sotne
times begin witli 'My love. I have
been detained at the office again to
night.' "
Trus Loglo.
Raslus, what's an alibi?
oat's proving dnt yoh
prnyer meetln' whnr yoh wasn't In or
der to show dat yoh wasn't at de
was at a
crap
game whar yoh was.—The Shield.
Rainbow Mining & Milling Co.
Levied December 19, 2 mills, payable
February 6 to R. P. Woodworth,
retary-treasurer, 745 Peyton building,
Spokane. Delinquent rale March 7.
Success Mining Co—Levied Decem
ber 20, 2 cents, payable January 27 to
Herman J. Rossi, treasurer, Wallace.
Delinquent sale February 28.
sec
•»
Syndicate Mining & Exploration Co.
—Levied Januury 14, 1 mill, payable
February 15 to Louis Stevens, secre
tary, Wardner. Delinquent sale on
March 16,
Tarbox Mining Co.—Levied Decem
ber 20, 10 mills, payable January 24 to
R. E. Seysler, secretary, Wallace. De
linquent sale February 21. Postponed
to March 8.
STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING8.
Tamarack A, Custer Con. Mining Co.
—Annual meeting to be held In tbs
Day building, Wallace, on Wednesday,
February 28, at 2 p. m.—Harry L.
Day, secretary.

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