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The Wallace miner. [volume] (Wallace, Idaho) 1907-current, January 29, 1920, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85007266/1920-01-29/ed-1/seq-3/

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'
Pine Creek Mines and Prospects As Re
ported By Government Geologists

are not
single zone of
(Continued from last week)
ANTIMONY VEINS.
Salient Features.
The antimony veins have a wide
distribution and apparently
connected with any
mineralization, for they have various
dips and strikes. All are in Prichard
rocks, and their mineral composition is
essentially identical.
The
northern
most vein, the Coeur d'Alene Anti
mony, strikes X. CO degrees E. and
dips 35 to GO degrees
brecht vein strikes X. 10 degrees and
.\\\.; the Al
dips 60 degrees W.; the Pearson vein
strikes X. 40 degrees east and is verti
cal; the Star Antimony
vein strikes
east und dips 25 to GO degrees S, Con
centrates from the Coeur d'Alene An
timony contain as high as $5 to the
ton in gold, and from parts of the Star
Antimony vein assays showing $8 to
the ton in gold were obtained. No
information was to be had as to the
gold and antimony content of the
Pearson and Albrecht veins. Stibnite
and quartz, associated
are the dominant minerals of the
veins. Galena was nowhere observed,
but sphalerite occurs rarely in the
Star Antimony- mine. Stibnite re
places the slate and vein quartz, its
relation to the quartz being shown by
small needles lining vugs in the quartz
and by quartz veinlets ending against
the stibnite.
with pyrite,
Coeur d'Alene Antimony.
The Ooeur d'Alene Antimony Min
two
unpatented
X., R. 2 'E. The property has been
worked intermittently since 1885. Tiie
'last work was begun in the summer of
1915, and to the present time consid
enable ore has been shipped. Ore to
the value of $50,000 has probably been
produced, though the records of the
early operations are very incomplete.
About 1000 tons of stibnite ore is said
to have been roasted, and the sublim
0 a bag
roasting
mg company
olaims in the SET4 of seetion 6. T. 48
owns
ed product was conveyed
house and collected.
t'
This
plant burned down and was
■seded by a concentration mill with a .
capacity of 75 tons a day. The con
centrates were' shipped in 1916 to the
International smelter at
■City, Utah. The vein crops out on the
west side of Pine creek, and in the
early d,ays boulders of stibnite
worked from the creek bed.
occupies a fault or shear zone in black
slates of the Prichard
super
Salt Lake
were
The vein
formation,
which trends N. 60 degrees E. and dips
35 to 60 degrees NW. It is exposed in
surface workings for about. 400 feet.
attained is
and the greatest depth
about 170 feet on the dip of the vein.
The foot wall formation appears to
dip of
part, but the
side are
and contorted and
conform with the strike and
the vein for the most
rocks on the hanging wall
extremely folded
contain seams of black gouge, which
ore. The
In places extend into the
from less than one foot to
consists of
and
ore ranges
five feet in
stibnite in a
unreplaced slate,
the fault fissure
the
and
width
ganigue of quartz
Movement, along
subsequent to the
vein has greatly
1
:
formntion of
crushed the quartz and much of the |
to a sliekensidcd I
stibnite is ground
black fine-grained
The !
aggregate,
iff on the south by
ore shoot is cut
fault containing a vertical quartz
trends X. 15 degrees W.
not
a
vein which
The amount of displacement is
known as the continuation of the an
been found
The ore
timony vein has not
south of the quartz vein.
to the south
shoot is said to rake
west. The ore
mill is roughly sorted by hand,
grade coarse material
The rest of it is crush
as it comes to the
the
being
high
picked out.
ed and passed
jigs whore three
products are made. Tiie first and
grades contain about 49 D° r
cent of antimony: the third product.
reground
to
second
which is of lower gradp, is
Wilflev . tobies
tio of concentration is about 7 tons
produced
Three ears of concentrates a f?-J
According to the smelter
a carload of concen
1916, 47.328
hut
and treated
there is still
the tailings.
on
loss in
a considerable
The company plans to treat the
by fine grinding and flotation.
ore
The
ra
of
Into 1, and an average of 3 tons
was being
concentrates
daily,
gregntlng sn tons
June, 1916.
shipped in
wpre
returns from
trates shipped in April.
pounds of ore yielded 36.36 per cent
of antimony and 0.24 ounce of gold to
The antimony was sold at
f
.the ton.
the rate of $3.53 a unit and the gold
at 75 per cent of the assay value
the ore, at $20 an ounce.
The Star Antimony group consists
of nine" unpatented claims that 00
cunv a ridge between Stewart creek
ana the east fork of Pine creek. The
ore body was discovered in 1914. but
no ore 'shipments were made until
1916 when three carloads of ore were
shirmed About 1506 feet of develop
done in three
between
of which is
tunne! drifts
Star Antimony.
been
ment work has
the vertical range
tunnels.
the upper and the lower
150 feet. In the lower
have been run on the vein for
feet, hut the ore so far produced has
work
400
been derived from the
The face of the lower tunnel is
tipper
ings.
sttl! 170-feet west of the westernmost
the ore shoot In
pnrt of the drift un
strikes
Tt
in bluish
mo ferial In
genemllv
the dominant
hut <r the lower
„ X
The vein
the upper tunnel.
st and dins 25 to 60 degrees R
'p contained In a fault zone
the Prlehard
fnrm nti^n
slates of
'Tbor*' N much 'roug'e
ii nrt 7 .
flffffiiro nnd tbo
'bneLpl'ittpfl
of the oro
tunnel, as far as the vein
stibnite l«
wa#
occurs only rarely as nests ot needle
crystals in vugs. Pyrite is rather
abundant in the lower tunnel, with
an occasional crystal of sphalerite,
fo u t sphalerite
plored at the time of examination, it
was not noted in tiie
ore shoot of tile upper workings.
sample across a 4-foot quartz lens in
the lower tunnel is reported to have
yielded $8 to the ton in gold.
In both
the middle and upper tunnels the ore ■,
has been stuped for about Go feet on
t he strike of the vein,
* * le ore ' "hich ,
has an average width of 3 feet, is con- i
mined in a fault zone whose walls are
Stibnite re
slate and the vein
quartz: a rich streak of crystalline
■though sheared stibnite. from 1 inch
to 28 inches wide, occupies the center
o' the ore, and the poorer grade ore
if disseminated stibnite in
The high grade shipping
assays 55 per cent of antimony.
lower grade material
was concentrated by hand jigging to
f rom 4 to S feet
places both the
consists
the slate,
ore
Some of the
a shipping product, but there is said
jo be 200 tons of ore containing 20
per cent of antimony on the dumps.
Pearson.
The Pearson prospect is in section
24, T. 48 X., R. 1 E„ in a small gulch
tributary to Ross fork. The property
was not being worked at the time °f | t
examination. About 50 tons of anti
mony ore s said to have been shipped
in 1916. I he openings consist of a
short crosscut tunnel and drifts on |
length of 150 |
f],o
vein
attaining
a
1
feet and a maximum depth of 50 feet.
in a well de- |
fined shear zone several feet wide, j 1
which trends X 40 degrees E. and is j^
vertical. Thin bedded blue and green I
slates are the country rocks,
vein has been stoped to the surface I
through a distance of 100 feet on the j
strike. The ore appears to be large-j
iy a result of the replacement of the j
sheared slates by stibnite. Quartz j
was not observed but caieite crystals ]
oeeur in vugs in the ore.
-ni P vein is contained
The ]
i
Hannibal.
uas ltK , ate j j n 4944,
The development work
Th e Hanibal group of three claims
It is about 1800
feet south of the Pearson prospect.
comprises a
crosscut of 100 feet and a drift on the
vein of 150 feet. The vein trends N.
10 degrees E. and pdis 60 degrees W.
It occupies a shear zone with walls
three feet apart in slates and a shear
ed greenish rock that is evidently an
altered dike rock on the belt which
Ross fork and the
Tiberius prospect. Stibnite occurs in
tiie shear zone in bunches and lenses
PX -t ends between
in places 6 inches thick, but no ore
p C4 jy G f commercial size has been de
Several tons of high grade
veloped.
ore is in the bins, butt no shipments
|
have been made from the property.
A few hundred feet west of the an
timony vein an inclined shaft has j
been sunk 60 feet in a shear zone 5 |
feet wide that trends X. 45 degrees
SW.
mineralized ;
The
W. and dips 60 degrees
s j, eare( j roc 4 f j s sparsely
jwith galena and sphalerite.
SIDERITE VEINS.
Veins composed principally of sid- !
erite occur in the southern part of
the drainage basin of the West Fork
of Pine creek. They are contained in
fault fissures in Burke, Revett, and
St. Regis rocks, but there is no great
displacement of the strata.
Palisade.
The Palisade Mining company owns
in sections 8, 9, 16 and 17,
16 claims
T. 47 N., R. 1 E., on the southeasterly
slope of Twin Crags,
invork was begun here in 1910, and is
represented principally by a tunnel
600 feet long on a course X. 65 de
Development
(Trees \y„ driven to intersect several
veins that crop out on the slope
flbove {he tunne i \ barometric read
^ a{ thg tunne , ^ aVe a i utlK i e of
4440 feet. Green shales and quartzite
j nter j, edded w ith brown and purple
|
quartzites of the St. Regis formation
are cut by the tunnel.
55 to 70 degrees E. and dip uniformly
125 degrees S. The quartzitic beds
contain abundantly disseminated sid
Several dark dikes from 1 to
jq f ee t vvirle iwhich strike about X.
30 degrees W. adst n vanteird cnnfwyp
3Q de g rPPS \y. and stand vertical were
note( 4 j n the tunnel seetion.
jdikes are described on page 8. Noije
i 0 j the veins have been intersected in
j^ e tunnel, but several crop out in
i
They strike X.

erite.
These
f,. a g,, nen ts
j (Q the sumTn i t 0 f Twin Crags.
vping are 5 f ee t wide in places,
of them can be traced for any
great distance, owing to the surface
trend north
places on the hillside and abundant
from them are found nearly
The
but
none
These veins
mantle.
westward, but leading into them are
narrow, discontinuous stringers of
i ron oxides and quartz, most of then,
less than 1 foot thick which trend
west. The iron oxides are in the form
of botryoldal limonite and magnetite,
land they were probably formed by
the reduction of vein siderite, but un
oxidized vein matter has nowhere
been disclosed. Mr. Smith, manager
of the property, states that assays of
the vein matter show traces of lead, a
little silver and considerable man
gitnese.
The Black Diamond group of
claims is in section 23, T. 47 X, R. 1
southeast of the
The claims were lo
Black Diamond.
several miles
E„
Palisade group.
Tiie development work
cated in 1913.
I consists of open cuts and short tnn
|nels directed on a gnsson stained with
iron and mnnganesp. which strikes X.
thoj70 degrees W. and dips steeply north,
In places the outcrop is 40 feet wide,
,The vein can be traced by means of
fragments of gossan and an occaslon
al outcrop toward the Palisade group,
V tuurittt ItiU luiitk
explores
>oit tin*. n*-.t
m itli .1 crosscut ol 3i left
this vein, but it uttaiuk uo great
depth ami tile vein exposed is largely
txidiaed. The country rocK is massive
white quartzite which strikes north
east and dips do to 3J degrees SIS. The
vein mailer is spongy limonUe and
crusts ol small manganese oxide cry
of unaltered
stals that inclose cores
siderite or fragments of the quartzite
vvall rocks. Mr. Brooks, one of the
|owners of the group.
sample across the vein assayed Id per
Cluileoipyrite occurs
sparsely in tlte \ ein, hut no lead or
slated that a
,. tnt manganese,
zinc minerals were observed. Several
veins with iron stained cap
other
pings are on the group, but these have
, li0t been explored. The value of these
the !
veins will probably depend on
utilization of their manganese and
iron content as a flux or as an ore of |

I
manganese.
Equltabl«.
The Equitable group of seven un
patented claims lies principally In the
SWVA of section 13, T. 47 X., It. 1 E.
The group is developed by a tunnel
335 feet long driven on a lissure in
hard white quartzite of the Itevett
formation. The fissure strikes S. 65
degrees E, and dips 75 degrees S. It i
is occupied toy a vein about 2 feet
wide composed mainly of coarse sid
erite, but containing also a little dis
seminated pyrite and ehalcopyrlte. A
dike of dark line grained olivine
oomptonite, 3 feet wide, disclosed
about 200 feet from the portal, lies on
, I
!
t ( le hanging iwall side of the lissure.
iiphe development is directed toward a
underneuth a large
crop on the hillside, probably 100 feot
iron out
from the present face.
Colusa.
1 '
j^
The Colusa prospect is on the east
fork of Pine
the line between sections
A cross
,
Ut tunnel of 100 leet from 1 le creek
level intersects the vein, and a drift i
on it extends for 550 feet on a course
S. 65 degrees W. The vein occupies a
flssure in massive hard quartzite and
dips 60 degrees X. At the face of the
drift it is but one foot wide and no
drlft it is but one foot wide, amt no
Where, apparently, does it exceed 4
feet. The walls are poorly defined. In
places quartzite fragments are ce
mented by the vein filling of siderite
and quartz. Chaloopyrlte is reported
to occur sparingly in the vein. At 40
feet from the portal there is a well
defined fault with gouge 3 feet thick
Iwhich strikes N. 45 degrees W. and
dips 60 degrees SW„ but apparently
it has nut greatly displaced the form
ation which it cuts.
'The West Oolusa prospect, 800 feet
downstream from the Colusa, Is de
veloped by a tunnel about 150 feet
long. The vein lies in a fissure which
trends X. 60 degrees W. and dips 65
•rn branch of tiie west
ct eek near
118 and 19, T. 47 N., R. 2 E.
I
l
I
Possibilities of i
The vein is narrow and
siderite
degrees N.
consists of manganiferous
'hlch cements breeeiated quartzite of
w
Xo copper or
the Revett formation.
| lead minerals were noted in the vein.
j
|
MARKET FOR U. S. ZINC.
;
Issue Reiport on the
European Market.
Tiie American Zinc Institute has is
sued as a confidential communication
ito its members the report of an inves
tigation personally made for them by
George C. Stone in respect to the pos
sibilities of Europe as a market for
!
conditions and a world-wide ac
quaintanceship among the men in tne
Industry in which
y* ars P la y 6d a conspicuous part,
Stone was able to obtain within a
time a balanced
A merican zinc.
intimate knowledge of
With an
he has for many
Mr.
comparatively short
perspective of the opportunities which
the old world holds for the new , in
He was
the matter of zinc exports,
in personal contact
zinc producers and with
metallurgists, 'bankers, merchants and
members of government boards
England and western continental Eu
Stone has
with the large
engineers,
in
In his report Mr.
rope.
particularly taken into
economic and sociologic factors
reference to national and internation
al industrial conditions, and his sur
the
account
with
vey is a valuable contribution to a
subject which largely occupies the
minds of every zinc man in the United
States.
England and France offer Cilia coun
try little opportunity for zinc ore
ports, but Belgium affords an oppor
tunity for such exixirts through Ant
werp: Holland is also a possible mar
ket for American ore through Rotter
dam or possibly Antwerp; Germany
will probably need to import high
ex
grade ore.
For several years at least the Unit
ed States seems to be the only coun
try in a position to supply the Euro
demand for slab zinc, unless the
pean
price goes too high or present ex
change rates are radically chan f ed
[The reasons why this is so. including
,an instructive survey of various tor
I eign smelting plants, are illumlnating
ly set forth In the report.
, Mr. Stone's comments on the unl
J fi.rmity, quality and appearance of
slab zinc for export should be read
by every American smelter man.
In exact foreign sizes and properly
packed and marked, American sheet
zinc should be In good demand in Eu
Present conditions
; rcpean countries.
three,even favor the introduction there of
American finished roofing plates.
has recently been shown that Ameri
can machinery for this purpose
be much more economically operated
here than that now in use on the con
tinent).
The largest use for sheet zinc in
Europe Is, of course, in building con
struction. and, strange as.lt may be,
this field seems to be capable of
worth while expansion by way of thp
United States. The American Zinc
(It
can
Ui« LUdi'ivditti tl
Uifuujftu
teudeU iv Mr. btuae gillie abruuU.
which ikt\e miulc
U
*o geiicml tile use el
strut lion purposes tliere.
adopting method*
sun. tor tou
FAMOUS SAYINGS OF THE WAR.
Following are some ol' the sayings
'made famous in the war:
They sdiall uot pass.—Marshal l'e
tain.
The hour has come to advance at
to die where you stand
to give way.—-Marshal
all costs;
rather than
Joltre.
My right is crushed,
retreat
ter.—'Marshal Koch.
My left is in {
1 am attacking with my cen- j
here.—General
Lafayetee, we are
Pershing.
The American flag has been com- j
This is unendurable.
Polled to retire.
We are going
General Dinar Bundy.
to counter-attack.—
We made
over.—
We can start at once,
our preparations on the iway
Admiral Sims.
Every position must be held to the
last man. There 'must be no retire -
With our backs to the wall
in the justice of our
cause every one of us must tight to
in
of
hi
merit,
land believing
the end.—Field Marshall Haig.
Heart diseases caused more deaths
in '1917 than any other ailment (115,
publio
Right living would
materially reduce this. Don't wait for
tiie disease to develop before you sec
your physician.
337), says the United Suites
health service
NOTICE OF LOST CERTIFICATES.
To Whom It May- Concern:
Notice is hereby given that the un
dersigned has Tost or misplaced
Certificate Xu.
Certificate Xo.
the
following eortilicates:
203 for 1352 shares,
204 for 2000 shares, certificate No. 205
for 2000 shares of the capital stock of
the Burke Mining Company, Limited,
standing on the books of the company
i n the name of John Nichols,
All persons are hereby
„ P gI d hUe ^^le'^bove mentioned oerti
fi,. a t c , 3 and unless the same is recover
ed within sixty days from date hereof
application will be made to the secre
^ gf ^ Burk<j MlninK company,
Umlted f or the Issuance of new cer
creates of like amounts in their
stead.
Wallace, Tdrth<J ' M A™E HARI>IN
pj8-F19-10t Carthage, Missouri,
011
2,
warned
to
SUMMONS.
No. 4912.
In the District Court of the First Ju
dicial District of the State of Idaho,
in and for Shoshone County.
Martin Devich, plaintiff, vs. Kata De
vieh, defendant.
The State of Idaho Sends Greeting to
Kata Devich, the above named de
fendant:
You are hereby notified that a com
plaint has been filed against you in
the District Court of the First Judi
cial District of the State of Idaho, in
and for tiie County of Shoshone, by
the above named plaintiff, wherein tiie
plaintiff alleging a statutory residence
in tiie County of Shoshone, State of
Idaho, the marriage of plaintiff ami
defendant at tiie town of Gosplc, Aus
tria, in October, 1901, and that ever
I since said date they have been hus
band and wife, charges that the de
i fendant has been guilty of adultery.
Wherefore plaintiff prays that tiie
bonds of matrimony now and hereto
fore existing between the plaintiff and
defendant be dissolved.
And you are hereby directed to ap
and answer the said complilnt
pear
within twenty days of the service 01
this summons if served within said
judicial district, and within forty days
if served elsewhere; and you are fur
ther notified that unless you so ap
and answer said complaint witli
pear
in the time herein specified, the plain
tiff will take judgment against you as
prayed in said complaint.
Witness my hand and the seal of
said District Court this 3rd day of
January, A. D. 1920.
HARRY A. ROGERS,
Clerk.
(Seal)
By L. L. BRAINARD,
Deputy Clerk.
James A. Wayne,
Attorney for Plaintiff,
Residence and P. O. Address,
J8-F12-6t
Wallace, Idaho.
SUMMONS.
In the District Court of the First Ju
dicial District of the State of Idaho,
in and for Shoshone County.
Joseph A. Kernagtian, plaintiff,
Letitia Kernaghan, defendant.
The State of Idaho Sends Greeting to
Letitia Kernaghan, tiie above named
Defendant:
You are hereby notified that a com
plaint has been filed against you in
the District Court of the First Judicial
District of the State of Idaho, in
and for the County of Shoshone, by
the above named plaintiff, wherein
the plaintiff alleging a statutory resi
dence in the county of Shoshone, state
of Idaho, and the marriage of plaintiff
and defendant at Great Falls, Mon
tana, on April 7, 1911, charges that the
defendant during the month of Xo
vemlber, 1914, committed adultery
without his consent and without his
knowledge.
Plaintiff prays that the bonds of
matrimony now and heretofore exist
ing between plaintiff and defendant
be dissolved and for all other relief.
And you are hereby directed to ap
and answer the said complaint
vs.
pear
within twenty days of the service of
within said
this summons if served
judicial district, and within forty days
if served elsewhere; and you are fur
ther notified that unless you so ap
and answer said complaint with
pear
in the time herein specified, the plain
tiff will take Judgment against you as
prayed in said complaint.
Witness my hand and the seal of
said District Court this 29th day of
December, A. D. 1919.
HARRY A. ROGERS,
Clerk.
(Seal)
Jl-F5-6t
By L. L. BRAINARD,
Deputy Clerk.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
Ike Gilder
their
To Charles Gildersleeve,
sleeve and Lee Gildersleeve,
heirs and assigns:
You are hereby notified that in ac
cordance with the provisions of Sec
tion 2324 of the Revised Statutes of
the United States and the acts amen
datory thereof and supplemental
thereto, requiring annual labor on mi
ring claims, I. your co-owner, have
expended in labor and improvements
on Gold Bar Placer, consisting of 100,
acres or five placer mining claims
situated on Neversweat creek, a trlb
THE-UNITED'STORES-CO.
♦ GROCERIES*#
WALLACE
MULLAN
BURKE
PECIAL ATTENTION
is given to Miners' and
Prospectors' patronage.
s
We Know We Can Save
You Money—Give U» a Trial
Silo
utary of the St. Joe river, in
shone, county, Idaho, the sum of live
hundred ($500) dollars for each of the
years 1916, 1917 and 1918, the total
expenditure being one thousand live
hundred ($1500) dollars; and if with
in ninety (90) days after the expira
tiun of this notice by publication you
fail or refuse to pay your proportion
of said expenditure, namely:
Gtldersleeve, one-flfth,
($300) dollars; Ike Glldt rsleeve,
fifth, three hundred ($300)
and I,ee Olldersleeve, one-tifth, three
hi und red ($300) dollars, together with
the cost of publishing this notice, your
interest in said Gold Bar Placer will
become the property
signed, your co-owner, as provided by
law.
Charles
three hundred
one
dollars;
of the under
PRANK A. HTOURER
Xov20,'19-P12,
!0
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
To Laury M. Dustan, Her Heirs and
Assigns:
You are hereby notilled that in uo
oordiuice with the provisions of Sec
tion 2324 ot the Revised Statutes of
the United States and the acts amcn
supploineiilal
datory thereof and
thereto requiring annual labor 011 mi
ning claims, I, your co-owner, have
expended in labor and Improvements
011 the Bull Frog No. 1, Bull Frog No.
2, Bull Frog No. 3 und Buddy No. 1
lode 'mining claims, situated In Hunter
mining district, Shoshone county, Ida
ho, for the years 1913 and 1915, the
sum of Four Hundred ($400) dollars,
fur each year, the total expenditure
aggregating Eight Hundred ($800)
dollars; and If within ninety (90) days
after the expiration of this notice by
publication you fail or refuse to pay
your proportion of such expenditure,
numbly, seven-twenty-fourths (7-24)
and amounting to two hundred thirty
three and thirty-three and one-third
($233.33 -73) dollars, together with tiie
costs of publishing tills notice, your
interest in said mining claims will be
come the property of the undersigned,
your co-owner, ns provided by law.
H. B. GREEN,
Burke. Idaho.
.•>1G-Jan23-I5t
CARBON lilt
Placed in your stove, furnace or boiler will keep them free of »oot.
Saves tearing down pipes and the consequent mess to clean up,
cures more heat and saves fuel.
Se
A. L. HONEKER
The Pioneer Tinsmith and Sheetmetal Worker, ha» the exclusive
sale of Carbonite for Shoshone County.
When you buy
• ••
Sunset Bod
Your money stays
at home
The product is
second to none
SB*
HOWES & KING
GROCERS
The Store That Ha* Stood the TEST OF TIME.
Established in 1886.
'
j
,
!
I
Fresh Stock Full Weight Prompt Delivery
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable* in Season.
*
606 Bank St.
Phone: 194
John h. Nordquist
MINING ENGINEER
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IDAHO
CITY TRANSFER ft STOHABE
Mine Contract Hauling
Solicited
PHONES 241
Wallace
623 Cedar St.
METHODIST
Episcopal Church
CORNER OF FOURTH AND PINE
1
,
1
ifihoshone Bldg.
Sunday School at 10:00 a. m.
Epwortli League at 6:30 p. m.
Public Worship at 11:00 a. m.
and at 7:30 p. m.
RAYMOND F. HAWK, Pastor
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
Accounting
Specializing Mines and Prosoects.
Assessments collected, etc.
John F. Ferguson
Phone 88
Wallace, Idaho

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