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Alexandria gazette. [volume] (Alexandria, D.C.) 1834-1974, September 11, 1919, Image 2

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PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON
Except Snndny
By the Alexandria Gazette Corporation
S17 King Street, Alexandria, Va.
HOWARD W. SMITn, President and
Treasurer
WILLIAM A. SMOOT ... VR-e-PresIaenf
MICHAEL T. DWl'ER Editor
Entered at the Postofflce at Alexan
dria. Virginia, as second class matter.
BRITAIN'S PROPHECY
Shortly before the British fleet
evacuated Boston, after the; United
States had been declared free and
independent nation, they erected a
pole upon which they placed the
British flag. The pole had been
greased to prevent any one frc-n
climbing1 it, and as the ships passed
out of the haibor the-y fired salutes.
Sailors in .the meantime veiled back
at our forefathers: "Never mind
d n you! We'll get you yet!"
It is interesting to read English
literature about that time. The
mother country assumed that the
first presidential election would
brin-r to an enu the great American
republic. The writers were confident
the country would break up in an
archy.
It is significant to read of occur
rences in Boston at the present day.
This city was the cradle of Liberty,
and one of the first overt acts com
mitted against the British- crown
(throwing tea overboard from ships
in the harbor) was committed there.
Many crimes have been commit
ted in the name of Liberty since the
people of Massachusetts precipitated
the war against Great Britain. But
the Bostonias, who assume that
their city is. the hub of the universe
never dreamed that scenes akin to
those now prevailing would ever be
witnessed in their midst. Shops have
been looted, people have been killed,
laws set at. defiance, and at this
time hundreds of games ??f crap are
beintr played upon Boston Com
mons. Is Britain's forecast of a cen
tury and a third atfo to lie realized?
THE WORLD SEEMS MAD
Nobody yet has been rash enough
to publish a ''Who's Who in Sanity."
Reuben's remark to Rachel that "ev
eryoncs mad but me and thee. and
scmeties I think thoe's a little
queer," gains points every day. It
was a comparatively sane world in
which David declared that all men
were liars. He admitted later that
he said it in a haste, but were he
lure just now he might repeat it
at leisure, only substituting "mad"
for '"liars."
As the Hartford Times says '"san
ity is* at best, it seems, a relative
thing. It is a changing condition.
The sanity <:f the nations had a sad
strain in the years from 1014 to
li? 10. That is over, and the reaction
has begun. It product>, an abnor
mal conditions in the mind of the
world. It is a condition akin to
madness, and many unavoidable cir
cumstances and move undesirable but
seemingly unavoidable persons are
ignorantly or deliberately making it
worse.
Coming down to cases, we have
.evidence of this condition in the un
rest of the world, as displayed in
numerous ways. Practically every
body is uneasy: the philosopher
grows rare. The wealthy at one
end of the scale arc protesting be
cause their increment is broken into
by taxes and demands and appeals
and high expenses generally, lhc
poor at the other are frantic be
cause of the high and growing price
they must pay for the merest sui>
sistance. ignoring the fact that
somehow even their names are less
limited than they used to be. Be
DISTINCTIVE
PRINTING
that attracts attention
and put your station
ery in a class by itself
Quickest Service
Fast Electric Presses
Best Workmanship
HARRY W. WADE
Printing : : Publishing
313 King St. Phone 60
tween the great multitude is com
plaining, some of one thing, some of
| another?all of many things.
All this reacts upon the rest of
us It is catching. Keeping one's
compcsura cn straight, amid the din,
is a rare accomplishment. The pes
simist mutiplies, and the optimist
tends to faintness and timidity. But
the situation is far from hopeless.
As this has been the worst year, so
its aftermath is unprecedented. But
cheer up. Even this shall pass
away."
1
? , 4
NEGRO RESENTMENT
Boftker Washington's successor as
head of the Tuskcgee Institute, R.
"R. itfoton, regards very seriously
the recent race riots in various parts
of the country. ''I have never known
the colored-people to have more in
tense feeling towards the white
oeople than at present," he* remarks,
"and I have never known a time
when there was less reason." And
he goes on to say that the South is
iust as anxious to be "absolutely
'air and just to the negro" as the
Yerth, that it recognizes just as
Nearly his value as an economic
factor, and that it is determined as
never before to put down mob rule.
The Philadelphia Inquirer says
"the natural deduction to be drawn
from this statement-is that the re
sponsibility for these riots rests
more upon the blacks than upon the
whites. Yet perhaps it may be re
-rr.rded as a question of immediate
"ather than ultimate responsibility.
Mo ton's testimony as the attitude of
his own race cannot be litrhtly
crushed aside. His position at Tusk
gee qualifies him peculiarly as a
fair witness. The whole spirit of
hat institution is one of co-opera
'ion between the races. All his life
'Vokcr Washington endeavored to
I'.ay race prejudice.
?'What ?seem~ to have happened is
lint large numbers of negroes have
?een brooding over past wrongs and
vorking themselves into a framc of
n'nri to avenge them, forge ting
'n.-.t they are past or passing, and
hut good relatons can never be es
'ablished between the races unless
ha injured are ready to forgive ai;d
'orget. Probably the main cause cf
he riots is to be .sought in the so
ial conditons which arise when
'slacks and whites live together as
v.i ighbors. There are deep-seated
r.imosities peculiarly difficult to
v.rcome in such circumstances. But
ntil they are overcome there will
e no lasting peace.**
>1.1 >-F ASH IONED (. <>M M U NISTS.
The new Communist Labor Party,
sat body which with perfect lo-ric
V.ew out of its ranks two members
l.o had property of their own. has
? "'lared in its platform that there
?list be no more ''parleying or coni
?">mise." The issue is perfectly
::iip!e. Either capitalists o?r work
:en must have "full power." That
< !di-n middle course which Horace
) ti-vd as safer is absolutely bar
i. The class which includes the
?rt majority of people, which be
?ng> neither to capital nor to labor
i the restricted sense in which the
*er,! is used, like the flowers that
eoiii in the spring, tra, la! has
llmnr to do with the case.
Vet it is a curiously oid-fash'cnol
w. after all, which these refo'Hi
-? rf society take. The parly, we
.* further told, "has as its ultimate
m the overthrow of the present
m of production, in whi *k the
r-vl.ing class is mei'cilossly exploit
an.'I the creation of an industrial
sublic wherein the machinery of
nluction shall be socialized =n ;!
guarantee to the workers th? fi.ll
1 value of their toil " In these- days,
! when wages mount by leaps and
bounds, it is a little difficult to be
lieve that workers do not get the full
| value of their toil. But let thai pa?:-:
Hew would the ''soeinluitior." of
industry males available a larger
fund for paying them?
This merciless exploitation if il'<
workingman may iiave b -en one ? f
the things to be destroyed year.-;;?.to,
before organized labor ? became: abl
to dictate its own terms. For a brand'
row party to have no better phrase
to fallback upon - suggest" that its
ocencmic views ar:: those of an old
er, net a newer day. What the Com
munists apparently <!o not under
stand is that much of what thev de
nounce as capitalism is merely
thrift. After all, the money of this
country is in the hands ;.f the m u y,
nc t the few.? (Philadelphia I"
culver.
FIEND'S VICTIM
Girl Found Unconscious Along a Road
After Being Attacked
W:st Chaster, Pa., Sept.. 11.?=M: ? *
Miir.v Gunfclo". 17 years oi l. da::ght''r
cf WiiHiam W. Gunkle, of Chyrch
Malvern. :? in a serious eon
:Li;from injuries and shock at her
ho:!:?, as the result of an attack upon
he:'. and Norman Robinson, a Mary
land negro, who had been working on
Pc ir.~yhrania Railroad repairs near
M; Ivorn for some time, is in prison,
where he is being held ,on orders cf
Tr: :i'ct Attorney Wade for a further
r.:;.r;ng before Justice of th ? Peace
him following a preliminary exami
nation.
girl went out upon a lonely
? to lcok for a younger brother,
was 'ate in arriving home afte
? v! t to the central portion cf t!1
? :? and was attacked, beaten an 1
k: I. marks cf fingers being up .
1 hi oat when she was fuun i u
cersc'cus a short time later.
I'ci'owiT.g news of the asv.'.'t St.itf
:n rs arrested five negroes, b.:t '
?j. v I avbis except Robinson.
!? :tn partly identified by th*? tri:*
:r! unable to explain his where
iI'lu: -. at the time.
m IT? '
1 J,
I 1 ?'? $*. 3 ;'j
Z Ifo is f. burden when the bccTy
ic racked with pain. Everything
?worries and the victim becomes
?'?:s; ondenr. and downhearted.
To Lring fc?.ck tiiS sunshine tako
GyiJS MSMkL
UbHi'
t-1"'
-nlicml remedy cf Hoibr i for ovo
2 -o years; :I is on enemy c: nil rr.tr.3 rc
Euhinff from kid.vy, liver cr.d uric -cui
troubles. A'i druggists, .1. "...
L-oIt isr ins r.snr Cs'd !>'-e.-.i r.n c..-cr~
?:cc risa uccrpi. na
or nveo, after you use RAT-SNAP,
?'s sure rodent killer. Try a Fkg.
an I prove it. Rats killed with r.at
SNAP leave no smell. Cats or do.:
wi.-i'l touch it. Guaranteed,
j 2">c size (1 cake> enough for Pantry
'Kit-hen or Cellar.
:?<?c size (2 cakes' for Chicken
i Hcuse, coops, or small buildings.
?Si.' 0 si/.? (."> cakes) enough for ali
; farm and out-buildings, storage build
? i:; v.. or factory buildings,
i and Guaranteed by R. K.
Knight and Son. Alexandria; Mankin's
S't >re. Fi lls Church.
COAL.LUMBER AND?BUiLDiNG MATTRl4
Invest a Part of Your
Carefully Planned Building and Imp-roving
LUMBER
FLOORING
SIDING
CEILING
MOULDINGS
DOORS
SASH
BLINDS
LATHS
SHINGLES
BUILDING LIME
PORTLAND CEMENT
WALL PLASTER
PREPARED ROOFINGS
./ TERRA COTTA PIPE
AND EVERYTHING FOR BUILDING
BUT THE HARDWARE
W. A. SM OOT ?. CO.. i mo
ALEXANDRIA. VIRGINIA
DROWNED WIFE TO MARRY
William I'ortcr Wroten Tells of Gross
Crime Committed in His Chil
dren's Presence
St. Sept. 11.?Interruptir.g
his gam?, c.f solitaire in a cell of thr
Perry Coariy jail at Pir.ckneyviHe,
-.:sty{ n?I:s' fooiheaat of here Tuesday
^irht^Wi-iliaiH Porter Wort en to! J in
?. natter-cijiact tcr.e, with' not a
d'Mri' ;ri?hN voice, how he had drow*
, , !'1* l* ? ? . e 1- ?
; 1 nis wife in the presence of then
two children, sj that he might marry
Mary Brown. a shctec-n-yaar-cld girl.
?>invy Brown Worten, bride of .'J
ek5, who is :i!jo in prison li:re, sah
\c:! cut her leve for Worten and an
ivounced nor determination to stick by
him.
SLAV OFFICERS
El Ceutro, Cal., Sent. 11.?Mexi
can soldiers at- the garrison :it San
Luis, State of Sono'ra. .M x'c ?, mu
tini; 1 and killed all of the officers,
r.ccrding to informutloh rece.ved
ycsierday by F. N. Croaholm, super
intendent of the Imperial Irrigation
district, whose headquartes ae at
An tirade, near the California-Mexi
c:in boundary.
POISON DRAFT KILLS
: . ? _ ?
Victim of Liquid In Collar Mis
taken for Elderberry
? iVctsville, Pa., Sept. 11.?Adam
j RjvUr, of St. Ciair. diea yesterday
f 1*1*- uie ei f. ct of a:k?': prlscninv..
v.'libh he- took in m'stako for eiiicr
berrv wine.
R:eh':er w?s cleaning o.i his cellar
when he came upon the wine rod
;lva:'.u enough to kill him before he
realized it was poison. Richtor was
.in t.?live business man ai' St Clair
l'jr years.
CONFESSES KILLING HAlll'H
Maud Moore Discusses Details of M;il
ter Freely With Visitors to Her
Cell
Knoxvil'le, Tenn., Sept. II.?Maud
Moo.ro, who shot and killed Leroy D.
Ilarth. prominent real estate man and
president of a motor ear company, on.
the Kingston pike near Bear Den
late Monday night, was located in :
cave about two miles from the end of
fcheSevier River Pike car Line at G.3f
o'clock Tuesday evening: and placer
under arrest by city detectives. Sh.
confessed to the killing as socn as
she was arrested.
When interviewed in her cell in the
city jail last night, .Miss Mcore dis
cussed the details of the killing free
ly and did not hesitate in saying that
:,!u' had fired the shot which taused
the death of Mr. Ilarih, but stated
that he had attempted to attack hsr
and it was either his life or her honor.
WILSON PRESENTS ISSUE
Peace Can be .Maintained Only by
Concert of League of Nations
Bismarck, X. 1)., Sept. 11.?
President Wilson told a Bismarck
audience yesterday that the issue
involved in his speech making tour
for the treaty was "a question of
war or peace."
There was only one way in which
peace could be maintained, he said,
and that was by such a concert of
nations as was proposed in the
League of Nations.
Completing the first week of his
tour, the President spoke in the
Bismarck auditorium. It was the
smallest hall in which he had yet
spoken, seating about 1500. It was
filled.
NO REST?NO PEACE
There's no peace and little rest for
the-one who suffers from a bad back,
and distressing urinary disorders.
Alexandria people recommend Doan's
? Kidney Tills. Be guided by their Ex
perience.
Mrs. Ghas. Cook, 110 Queen St..
Alexandria, says: "After an attack of
the '*flu" my kidneys were left in bad
shape. My back pained me so I was
in misery all the time. It seemed as
though a dagger were being thrus;
into my kidneys. I could get no rest
at night. Mormings I would be so
tired and worn out I would feel like
giving up. A friend saw what con
dition I was in and told me what a
wonderful remedy Doan's Kidney
Pll's are. I sent to Greighton's Drug
Store for some. Doan's fixed me up
all right in a short time. The pains,
all left me and before long I was en
tirely cured. It was Dean's Kidney
Pils and nothing else that did it."
Price <>0e, at all dealers. Don't
simply ask for a kidney remedy?get
Doan's Kidney Pills?the same that
Mrs. Cook had. Foster-M'iburn Co.,
Mfrs.. Buffalo. X. Y.
v/illiiu ijoiv *;i <<: di rno mcotirg Aousa ana* c/A -
clic-r^cd tz iicuning meow through on open win
aov.'. 2V:e ~?rsLt$ sentry wna placed in the
stcckz /cr J huuro 2.11.1 linvd jj pounds of
tobacco*"
?From tccJry ?>y i3. A. Biu<~e.
J?
?5>
goltei Virginia-Car
C*
<3r
ouna
C3*\ J?
every r
Sun-ripened, mellow Virginia-Carolina to
bacco? that's what gives mat full flavor .0
Piedmont t tas.
When yo.i smoke a cigarette made of
Virginia-CaroKna mixed with other tobaccos,
you are missing some o< Virginia- Carolina 3
fragrance and flavor,
But when you srrx - fed ? icdmcnts, you ars
getting aZ? of it with ?vcry ou.ff because
Piedmonts ars made entirely cf Virginia
Carolina tobacco,
y _.w. ?/ ^
f /
,<=*>?
.?50TE?In England, where Virginia-Carolina tobac
. ?x> has the preference, a smoker pays as much for it
43 for the best Turkish tobacco. Because over th'_?fc
?joth kinds of tobacco pty the same Import 5'ity.
3ut in thii country Virgcfia-Carolina tobacco.costs
?"suless than Turkish tob&cco becausc itis&rown m
country. ?nd, unukc fordgn-srowa- tobaccos,
; I > k : c4 Import duty. f. T
10 for 9c
20 for I. -Be

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