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The weekly Shasta courier. [volume] (Shasta, Calif.) 1872-190?, December 27, 1873, Image 2

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WIT A>D HUMOR.
Our paper-maker says that trade is
stationary.
The fall styles made their appearance
last week. The gospel reached a larger
number of people than usual Sunday.
Said Bloggs, the other day, when
applied to for a loan of ten dollars, “ I
have only five lending tens, and they're
all out.”
Why is the road of transgressors so
hard? Because it is so much traveled.
A new style of ear-drop screws into
the lobe of the tortured member, so
that the pearl or diamond rests upon
the ear as if with no support. In fact,
very few are able to support it.
“ I say, don’t you know who that is?”
“Xo.”
“Why, what a fool you are! it's the
celebrated Jones.”
“ What’s he celebrated about, then?”
“ Well, I'm blessed if I know.”
“A basket of champagne!" exclaimed
a country dame. “ Why, I declare,
now! I always thought champagne was
watery stuff, like; 1 neier .knowed you
could carry it in a basket.”
Rowland Hill made a mark
upon hearing the ledfctfi ssed,
whether it were a lettql£i If if!
were not, he said, it woUl ry
serious affair for him, for it .ake i
him “ill" all the days of hi,
A judge, in remanding : u,.al:
called him a scoundrel. The prisoner
replied, “ Sir, 1 am not as big a scoun
drel as your honor”—here the culprit
stopped, but finally added—“takes me
to be.” “ Put your words closer to
gether,” said the judge.
“See here!” exclaimed a returned
Irish soldier to a gaping crowd, as he
exhibited with some pride a hat with a
bullet hole in it. “ Look at that hole,
will you ? You see that if it had been
a low-crowned hat, I should have been
killed outright!”
The Chicago Times has received an
original poem on “The Burnt District
at Midnight.” The 102 d verse reads:
“The derrick stands still 'gainst the
half finished wall. The brick-piles are
quiet; the stones arc at rest. To-mor
row they'll rise, nine or ten stories tall,
in huge, massive structures —the worst
in the West.”
A gentleman did not always agree
with his wife, nor she with him. On
one occasion she summoned a physician,
declaring that her husband had poisoned
her. The husband loudly protested his
innocence, and offered as a clincher this
test. “Doctor, open her right here on
the spot; I'm willing.”
A friend says: Going to Cape May
the other day, I saw a young man lean
ing over the railing of the upper deck,
and with considerable violence giving
to the winds and the sea the contents
of his stomach. Just as this juncture
one of the boat officials, walking brisk
ly by, asked, in a patronizing manner,
“Sick, sir?” “You don't suppose I'm
doing this for fun, do you?” said the
poor fellow', indignantly, as soon as he
could recover his breath.
A soldier was seen in the trenches
holding his hand above the earthwork.
His captain asked, “What are you do
ing that for, Pat?” He replied, with
a grin and a working of his fingers,
“ I’m feelin’ for a furlough, sure! ”
Just then a rifle hall struck his arm be
low the wrist. Slowly drawing it down,
and grasping it with the other hand to
restrain the blood, a queer expression
of pain and humor passed over his face,
as he exclaimed, “ An’ faith it’s a dis
charge ! ”
The Physiology of Tears.— Dr.
Daniel Tuke, says the British Medical
.Journal, who has been investigating
the physiology of tears, thinks we must
confess with Brodie that we can not
answer the simple question why or how
does a certain state of mind augment
the secretion of the gland ? . . . The
quality of the secretion seems to be
altered by powerful emotions; the saline
ingredients being increased, causing “a
strong brine.” Lastly, the secretion
may bo checked. The intensity of the
feeling or the suddenness of sorrow is
the most frequently witnessed cause.
Daily observalion shows that the first
result of distressing intelligence is the
negative one —inability to cry. See, too,
what the want of a handkerchief may
do. “ I went,” says Hunter, “to see
Mrs. Siddons acting. Ihad a full con
viction that I should be very much af
fected ; but, unfortunately I had not put
a handkerchief in my pocket; and the
distress I was in for the want of that
requisite when one is crying, and a kind
of fear I should cry, stopped up every
tear, and 1 was even ashamed I did pot
crv.”
IjtoEjnjiTY of Animals. —One of the
largest of ferocious animals in South
America is the jaguar—a native tiger—
/elis onca. Besides being large, and
immensely strong, it practices extraor
dinary strategic schemes in procuring
food, which indicate some thing above
mere instinct, because circumstances
are constantly requiring some variation
in their foraging expeditions for prey.
Humboldt says when they find a turtle
they adroitly turn it over on its back.
It is then helpless, and totally unable
to offer resistance in that condition.
'With the most cruel manifestation of
feline character, the jaguar then leisure
ly gnaws out the quivering flesh from
between the shell and carapace. An
other of the jaguar's reasonable man
euvrings is to quietly follow the margin
of streams. At the sight of a fish near
enough to be approached, with a quick
dash of its paw the game is thrown
high and dry above the bank. Fortun
ately for the country, the jaguar has a
match in the great serpents that infest
tropical America. In the twinkling of: n
eye one of those monsters winds him
self around his body, and crushes out
life and cracks the bones into fragments
at the same moment.
Koakse Shot. —lt iz a grate deal
eazier tew be a philosopher after a man
haz a warm meal than it iz when he
don't kno where he iz going tew get one.
Most men lament their condishlin in
life, but are but phew, after all,
who are superior to it.
Tricing tew define love is like tricing
tew tell how yu kum tew brake thru the
ice; all yu kno about it iz, yu fell in
and got ducked.
A weak man wants az much watching
az a bad one.
A wize man never enjoys himself so
mutch nor a phool so little as when
alone.
Avarice iz az hungry az the grave.
There iz a grate deal ov virtew in
this world that iz like jewelry, more for
ornament than use.
There are menny people who net only
beleave that this world revolves on its
axis, but they beleave that they are the
axis.
Self-made men are most alwus apt to
be a leetle too proud ov the job.
I think there iz az menny old phools
in this w'orld az there iz young ones,
and there iz this difference between
them: The yung ones may outgrow
their pholly, but the old ones never do.
A genuine aphorism iz truth done up
in a small package.
Marrying for buty iz a poor spekula
*hun, for enny man who sees your wife
haz got jest about az much stock in her
az you hav. —Josh Billings.
The smoothness of Mr. Edmund
Yates's diction, and the harmony and
grammatical accuracy of his sentences,
are explained by the fact that lie invari
ably dictates to a stenographer and
talks olf his stories. All'great novelists
have talked better even than they have
composed. Mr. Yatks began novel
writing quite by accident. Being edi
tor of a London magazine, there had
been an announcement of a forthcoming
serial by a popular romancist, who, from
illness, failed to be in time with copy.
Mr. V. vainly importuned his collabor
ateurs to fill the gap, and in sheer de
spair began Broken to Harness, which
is one of his best works, because prob
ably conceived and written under more
ambitious spur than were his other
works.— Harper’s Bazar.
The Rome letter-writers tell us that
Edmonia Lewis is very busy at her stu
dio in Rome. She is engaged upon a
statue of Abraham Lincoln for the Cen
tral Park, John Brown for the Union
League Club, and the poet Longfellow
for Yale College.
We are rejoiced at everything we
hear that tells of the success of -this
modest but gifted little artist. Half
negro and half Indian, she is wholly a
lady, and by slow and steady effort, in
stead of lobbying with Congressmen for
jobs, she is making sure progress in
her art. — Christian Union.
Now don’t live a single hour of yonr life
without doing exactly what is to be done in
it and going straight through it. from begin
ning to end. Work, play, study, whatever
it is take hold at once and finish it up
squarely and cleanly ; and then to the next
thing, without letting any moments drop
out between. It is wonderful to see how
many hours these prompt people contrive to
make of a day; it is as if they picked up
the moments that the dawdlers lost. And
if ever you find yourself where you have so
many things pressing upon you that you
hardly know how to begin, let me tell you a
secret: Take hold of the very first one that
comes to hand and you will find the rest ail
fall into file and follow after like a company
of well drilled soldiers: and though work
may be hard to meet when it charges in a
squad, L is easily vanquished if you can
bring it into line. You may have often
seen the anecdote of the man who was ask
ed how be had accomplished so much in his
life. “My father taught me,’’ was the re
ply, “ when I had anything to do, to go ami
iht it." There is the secret—the magic
word now. — Exchange.
The Kings. — A United States ship sail
\ ed once into the harbor of Naples, and the
king and a glittering party of noblemen
came off to visit her. To the honest Yan
kee sailor eyes, that could see no other sign
of royalty than gold lace, one laced man
was as much of a king as another. And as
one of the royal party upon the deck trip
ped and disappea-ed. a sailor stepped up to
an officer and, touching his hat with a grin,
said briefly, "Please, sir, one of them ’ere
kings has tumbled down the hatchway.”
The new postal card will l>e made from
dies cut in hardened steel for surface
printing, a novel and heretofore consid
ered impossible mode of engraving. The
lines, instead of being sunk, are raised
like those of an ordinary wood cut, so
that the plate may be used in the same
manner as type in any printing-press.
The completed card is three inches in
size, made from a fine quality of card
board, and is of a light buff color. A
border of scroll-work runs around the
edge, while in the upper right-hand cor
ner is a very handsome stamp, consisting
of a head of liberty encircled with stars,
and surrounded with elliptical scroll
work. The denomination is one cent,
and the color of the work a rich velvet
brown. The inscription issimply‘‘United
States postage card write address only
on this side, the message on the other.’
Below are ruled lines, while the reverse
is blank.
The Empress Josephine was very fond
of perfumes, and above all of musk.
Her dressing-room at Malmaison was
filled with it, notwithstanding Napole
on's frequent remonstrances. Forty
years have elapsed since her death, and
the present owner of Malmaison has had
the wall of that dressing-room rejieatedly
washed and painted : but neither scrub
bing, aquafortis, nor paint has been suf
ficient to remove the smell of the good
Empress’ musk, which continues as
strong as if the l>ottle which contained
it had been but yesterday removed.
Four missionaries to Burmah have
written home to say, they must have
wives.
Fanny Fern's last expressed wish was;
“ Let no stranger g..z ? on me when I am
dead.”
—Set your glass fruit jar in a wet fold
ed towel, and you can pour your fruit
in boiling hot.
FARM AND GARDEN.
Eypekimentisg with Hess.— ln
the Poultry World, Isaac Lynde, of
Ohio, gives the result of an experiment
with different breeds of pullets in lay
ing for six months, and the cost of their
feed. On September Ist he took ten
pullets of each of the breeds mentioned
below, about six months old, gave them
a yard forty feet square, with a com
fortable house, and kept an exact account
of eggs and feed, as follows :
The Dark Brahmas ate 369 1-2 quarts
of corn, oats and wheat screenings, laid
605 eggs, and weighed 70 pounds. The
Buff Cochins ate 406 quarts, laid 591
eggs, and weighed 73 pounds. The
Gray Dorkings ate 309 1-2 quarts, laid
524 eggs, and weighed 59 1-2 pounds.
The Houdans ate 214 1-4 quarts, laid
763 eggs, and weighed 45 1-2 pounds.
The Leghorns ate 231 1-5 quarts, laid
807 eggs, and weighed 36 1-2 pounds.
To make this experiment more com
plete, and to show which lot gave the
most profit, including both eggs and
flesh, we have supposed the fowls to be
dressed and sold at the end of the six
months at 20 cents per pound ; also that
the eggs were worth 24 cents a dozen
(two cents each), and that the cost of
the feed was- 2 1-2 cents per quart, or
80 cents por bushel. The figures would
then be•
( «t of Value Value Total Total
• jeeil eggs. meal. value, profit.
Brahmas...? 92* sl2 10 sl4 00 $26 10 sl6 8»
Cochins.... 10 15 1182 14 00 26 42 16 2u
Dorkings... 772 10 48 11 00 22 !18 14 3t«
Houdans... 535 15 06 910 24 76 19 41
Leghorns... 577 16 14 730 23 44 17 < 7
The greatest profit on the investment
is thus in favor of the Houdans, with
the Leghorns next and the Dorkings
least. It would have been interesting,
however, to know the weight of the eggs
laid by the several varieties, to see what
actual difference there was in the amount
of food furnished by them, and its value
|at a fair estimate by weight. On such
a basis it is quite probable that the
Brahmas would have shown the greatest
profit. And another item to be consid
ered by r investors is, that where the
fowls must be confined a four-foot fence
j will answer for the large breeds, while
: for the light-bodied breeds eight or ten
feet will be necessary, and even then
: their wings will have to be clipped. In
addition, it is the general verdict that
the large breeds bear confinement the
best, and are more easily kept in good
| health and from those vicious habits of
( plucking each other's feathers and eating
| their own eggs. But all breeds will
j give trouble enough in confinement if
| not furnished with plenty of employment,
water and food.— Country Gentleman.
Keep the Catti.e Growing. —The
most successful breeders of horses, cat
tle, sheep or swine know from experi
cnce that, although they - may possess
the best breeding animals, they will not
bo successful in producing superior stock
if a continuous growth of young ani
mals is not kept up. In order to begin
in time at this indispensable preparation
for success, the brood mares, cows, ewes
and sows are most carefully and suitably
fed while with young, and as soon as
the young animals make their appear
ance they are taken the greatest care of,
the dams being suitably fed while suck
ling, and when the young ones are
weaned they are not supposed to want
for food or drink a single hour.
By this means a continuous and rapid
growth is kept up, and the animals at
tain a large size and heavy - weight at an
early age. When breeding animals are
not properly fed and comfortably shel
tered in winter, the bad effect of such
treatment is not confined to their own
want of condition—it is shared by their
progeny, and can never be remedied.
When your stock are not fed well and
comfortably sheltered in winter, their
growth becomes stunted, and no subse
quent amount of food can repair the
damage. Y oung animals may - suffer for
want of proper provender in summer
and autumn as well as in winter, and
when this happens it stops continuous
growth and prevents ultimate success
in the object of the breeder.— Working
Farmer.
Flies and Disease. —Flies arc un
comfortable visitors in summer, espe
cially in a sick room. It has been found
that they are harmful also, and may be
agents in spreading contagious diseases.
A German professor in Vienna made an
experiment to test the truth of this the
ory. Finding the flies very numerous
on the faces of his small-pox patients,
he put some glycerine in a saucer to
entangle the flies. Many of them were
caught by the glutinous matter, and
soon the glycerine was filled with strange
cells like those on the small-pox patients.
The inference was inevitable that the
flies communicated the infectious matter
to the glycerine, and could carry conta
gion to other houses. It will be a new
argument to keep all sick rooms free
from these insects.
Camellia Culture—Use oe Lime
Water. —Mrs. Geo. YV. Carpenter, in
Gardeners Monthly, says: In regard to
the watering of camellias wfith lime w r ater,
the facts are as follows : The plants are
grown in large pots, and have been in
them undisturbed for several years; a
large reservoir on the place, containing
five hundred gallons of water, receives
annually about three bushels of lime ;
before watering the plants, the lime is
usually well stirred up with the water,
allowing it to settle before use. Lime
water was first used to kill worms in
the soil, which it effectually did. It has
since been continued regularly, the
thriving, healthy appearance of both
roots and branches seeming to warrant
its use.
■ -
It is now said that the dethroned Em
press of Mexico, Charlotte of Belgium,
is not dead as was reported, but in a
condition far more melancholy. She is
a hopeless maniac; spending her time in
childish imitations of regal ceremony,
dressing up chairs in her rich robes,
and affecting to hold royal receptions.
Her health is such as to give promised
long life, but all hope of her recovery
is finally extinguished.
Ornamental Gardening. Xo. 2.
The season for gardening is fast ap
proaching again. A few good rains will
make the ground soft and fit for spading,
and then we can begin to plant seeds,
slips, etc., in good earnest. It is aston
ishing to see how rapidly slips will grow
when they get the full benefit of the
rain. Rose slips, particularly, grow very
fast. We recall a beautiful Giant of Bat
tle rose-bush which was set out a little
slip early last winter, and which grew
and blossomed in the spring in a way
that was marvelous to contemplate. One
need never buy roses, when slips, which
any friend will give one, will jgrow so
easily if set out early. A much larger
number of flowers will grow from mere
cuttings in this way than persons gener
ally suppose, or than those who have
plants for sale will readily admit. The
cases are few' in which, with care, a slip
does not flourish. A friend once called
our attention to her favorite oleander
bush, from which the children had
broken two or three small branches. She
was about to throw them away, when we
begged permission to take them home,
and try- to make them grow. She had
little faith in our success, but assented,
of course, and w T e hope to see flowers on
the once cast-off branches this coming
season.
It is a good idea to plant seeds of the
same flower twice during the rainy sea
son. Then flowers will blossom early' in
the summer, and one may have a second
crop when the neighbors’ flowers are
dead and gone. It is always desirable,
too, in purchasing for a garden, to select
flowers that blossom at different seasons
of the year. Thus the Calla lily', the
daffodil, the bridal wreath, and the rose
blossom early, while later come the
fuchsia, larkspur, salvia, gladiolus, dah
lia, and hosts of others.
The geraniums, in countless varieties,
will blossom the year round if trimmed
occasionally. Who that has read Miss
Milford’s Life and Letters—a charming
book, by the way —will ever forget her
passionate love for geraniums, and the
wonderful and rare varieties she pos
sessed. She could talk and write about
them constantly’ and yet never weary one,
communicating to others in a remarkable
manner the same interest in her pets
which she herself felt. We have always
been glad that in a life of unusual toil,
as was hers, supporting by her pen for
years an indolent, selfish, and extrava
gant father, and nursing both parents
through a long period of sickness, in
connection with her literary labors, that
she had her geraniums and other flowers
to console and cheer her, when the bur
den of life bore heavily upon her frail
shoulders.
Some persons object to geraniums on
the ground that they are so common,
and they will spend fifty or a hundred
dollars in buying rare plants for their
gardens, which, when completed, fre
quently look less beautiful than those of
their neighbors who have never paid a
cent for anything they have. The rea
son is, either that they select plants
which flower for a brief period and then
lose their foliage, or else those that have
little color, and consequently present a
sameness that is monotonous. Buy’ the
rare plants by all means, if you can—no
one can have a greater weakness in that
direction than ourselves —but intermix
with them the bright flow ers of the gera
nium and the verbena, and the effect will
be much finer.
Everybody has heard of Vick, the cel
ebrated florist of Rochester, New York.
He suggests a very pretty way to make
“Ribbon Beds,’ 1 and we think all who
try it will be pleased with the result.
The plan is to set plants of the same
height and color in a row, several rows
forming the bed. A circle is a pretty
and simple form, and may contain any
number of inner circles which the size
will allow. Plant, then, in the outer
ring flowers which are uniform in color
and which do not grow very high; in
the next circle, flowers of a different
color and somewhat taller, and so on,
the height gradually increasing toward
the centre, where they are highest. We
think this would be more difficult to
accomplish than the plan of taking dif
ferent colors of the same flower, the por
tulaca or phlox Drummondii, for in
stance. Of course, in this case, the
arrangement of height must be dispensed
with, but this simplifies the object to be
attained so much that it seems as if none
who try it need to fail. No flower is
prettier than the phlox for this purpose,
and the seed in four or five different col
ors can easily be purchased and set out
row within row. It is not necessary to
have so many colors, neither is it neces
sary that a circular bed be used. A
diamond-shaped bed with but three col
ors, would be very pretty and perfectly
simple. This plan of ribbon beds is
very popular in Europe, but seldom seen
in America; and, though we do not be
long to that class who like everything
foreign because it in foreign, we think in
this case, by following European exam
ple, we may add much to our pleasure
and to ornamental gardening.
It is impossible for flowers to grow
successfully where there is too much
shade. People should remember this
when they set out their trees, and not
put them so near together that in a
couidc of years there is room for nothing
else. It looks out of place, too. to see a
small front door-yard crowded full of
trees. One does not expect a forest
grove in a space fifty feet by seventy
live. A few shade trees and a green
lawn, with here and there a rose-bush
hanging over with rich, red roses, or a
mass of geranium all ablaze, seems to us
much more appropriate, while to persons
who prefer, there is the alternative of
variously shaped beds, neat gravel walks,
and flowers of every name. and hue.
If every one could have a hot-house,
then the objection to house plants would
fade away. We saw a few days ago a
beautiful residence with a piazza inclos
ed on both sides with glass, and having
an outside glass door. We thought it
the most desirable thing we had seen,
much better than having a separate con
servatory in some part of the garden.
The flowers looked so bright and pretty
peeping through the windows every
where, that as we rode slowly by, feast
ing our eyes on the scene before us, we
came very near breaking the tenth com
mandment. If the glass were of mod
erate size it does not seem as thongh
this plan for a conservatory need be very
expensive, and, once bnilt, we could go
to work to rival Woodward as soon as
we chose! Incognita.
»»♦ 4 < -
A Michigan man has invented a hunting
boat that weighs only 141. pounds. He can
fold it up and carry it on his back, and if a
storm overtakes him on the water he can
run his boat ashore, take it apart, and use
it as a tent.
A New Parlor Amusement Across the
Continent. A new, beautifully illustrated
and instructive Pallor Amusement, contain
ing nearly fifty highly executed Chromo
Lithographic Pictures, which form a
continuous illustration of all the most
interesting and beautiful scenes along the
trails continental railroad, being the most
entertaining, instinctive and amusing game
for old or young ever invented. Will send
it by Mail or Express, free of charge, on re
ceipt of two dollars. G. Thistleton, Pub
lisher, 9 Post St., and No. 608 Market St.,
San Francisco'.
£pennl
FOR SUPERIOR PHOTOGRAPHS, go to Edouart
* Cobb, MH Kearny Street, San Francisco, as the First
Premium for best general photographic work was
awarded them at the Mechanics’ Institute Fair lor 1871.
All wo k guaranteed.
Dickey's 4’peine de I#|m—For (ieaßtlng
and Preserving the Teeth, Beautifying the Complexion,
and removing Freckles, Eruptions, Sunburn, and Tan
A New Combination, equal to the best French prepara
tions, and free from their poisonous ingredients. In
vented by GEO. S. DICKEY. Chemist.
PICTURES.
THE LAROF4T A\ ■> ( lIE APEST
stock of PICTURES. PICTURE-FRAMES and
MOLDINGS, wholesale and retail.
ITHBIKK A WI\TER,
Jill Kearny Street, near Sutter.
#lOO A AI OTVTH
Made by Agents who canvass for our Books. For
circulars, address A. L. BANCROFT A CO., S. F.-
Prices Itetlnced.
0. LAWTON & CO.,
Successors to Haynks & Lawton,
Will sell for the next Sixty Days to Reduce Stock,
CROCKERY, CHINA. GLASS,
FINE TABLE CUTLERY, CLOCKS,
BRONZES, SILVER PLATED WARE
AND FANCY GOODS,*
• AT GREATLY REDUCED TRICES.
Market Street, Under Grand Hotel,
SAN FRANCISCO.
Initial Note Papers.
We have the la-gest and finest assortment of
Initial Note Papers of NEW DESIGNS
Ever offered In this mar&et, which we are selling at
Greatly Reduced Prices.
By JOHN G. HODGE & CO.,
Importers, Manufacturers and Wholesale stationers,
Nan mo me Street, Nan Fruneliieo.
FIRST PREMIUM
At Slate Fair. 1872. obtained over ail
Competitors.
BOOTS AMD SHOES
Toil*’ SI'I-I.IVAX, iVorthciist
comer of Battery and Jackson streets,
offers to make to order the best French Call
Leather HOOTS, at from #4 to #9; Calitor
nia Leather Boots, French Calf Oxford
Ties, $3.50: California. $3.
Boys’ and Childrens’ Boots and Shoes
made to order.
GEO. W. CLAI
IMPORTER OF
PAPER HANGINGS
And Manufacturer ef
WINDOW SHADES,
333 Pine Street, San Francisco.
Toys! Toys! Toys!
THURNAUER & ZiNN,
Importer ind Manufacturers of
Willow Ware, Fancy Baskets,
TOYS AND NOTIONS,
French and English Fancy G-oods,
Children’s Carriages, Willow Chairs, Brushes,
Feather Dusters, Twine, Beads, Etc.,
No. I 19 Battery Street,
fNKAK CALIFORNIA.]
SS.7SE'"-} San Francisco.
Written orders promptly attended to.
ALL WORK NbATLY EXECUTED.
JOHN H. CARMAN Y & CO.,
Newspaper, Book, and JoP Printers.
400 Washington Street*
i
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA.
Purchasing Agency.
We are prepared to fill orders from the country for
Pianos, Organs, Sewing Machines.
Books and Stationery, Dry-Goods,
and Holiday Goods, of all kinds.
Any line of Merchandise In San Francisco will he pur
chased at the Lowest Market Itatea and
forwarded by Express or Slow Freight
Without Cliarge
To those who order. Merchants can have their business
attended to without the necess ty of coming to the city,
ggr" Prices Given when Desired. Address
Pacific Coast Newspaper Union,
409 Washington Street. San Francisco.
SEEDS PLANTS
A fine and complete assortment of
VEGETABLE. FIELD AND FLOWER SEED?,
GKAsS SEEDS. A LFALFA, Tl MOIIIA . ETC.
Flne«t Stock of GREEN-HOOK BLASTS, and S DE
SERT STOCK, in the State. “ Send lor Catalogues.”
At the Old Stand. IC. IC. MOOR IC.
4«.» Washington «*., San Fran«-Ne », Cal.
SEED GRAIN, IN LOTS TO SUIT.
The subscriber offers for sale, grown on the Coast and
reC l t ane d ( ; nf>lCE AUSTRALIAN WHEAT,
do. CHILE do.
do. CLUB do.
do. SONORA do.
Also, selected lots of Oregon Oats. Wild Oats. Cheva
lier and Coast Barley. J. W. 11. CAMPBELL,
Cunningham’s Warehouse. Cor. Front and Green Sta.
PRINTERS
AND
We wspaper publishers
Who wifih to bur or sell a newspaper with office can
have their business negotiated by addressing
Pacific Newspaper Publishing Company,
409 Washington St., Francisco.
All communications confidential.^
THE PACIFIC GLUE MANUFACTURING COMPANY.
Manutnctnrera, Importers and Dealers In Olae^
CURLED HAIR
iVIVD NBATS-POOT OIL.
408 Market Street, San Francisco
INCORPORATED April 30, lf%S.
CAPITA 1 * Ml .000,000
LOCATION if WOKKs,
Corner Beale and Howard Streets,
San Pr.'incisco.
MASCFiCTI R KS OF
Steam Engines, Quartz and Flour M U
Machinery, Steam Boilers, all kinds
of Light and Heavy Castings, at
LOWEST PRICES.
REPAIRS MADE UPON MACHINERY
Pmmpllv and at Lowest I*rlcei». Alan. Manu
facture Chilled Cur Wheel* of all size*.
W. H. TAYLOR. JOSEPH MOORE,
President. Superintendent.
I.OLTN IC. MEAD, Secretary.
CALIFORNIA
Fnrnitnre MaiMrai Co.
222 to 226 BUSH STREET,
SAN FRANCISCO.
THE ONLY COMPLETE STOCK
—or—
FURNITURE!
EVER OFFERED IN CALIFORNIA.
New Groods.
NEW DESIGNS,
AND AT PRICES TO SUIT.
N. P. COLE, President.
O. W. MRRRIAM. *r*anur*r.
MeAFEE, SPIERS & CO.,
BOILER MAKERS
AND
GE.l'Ett.MX* .IW.tCUM.VtSTS,
Howard Street (bet. Fremont and Beale SU.).
SAN FRANCIS O.
nr The propi k-tors are practical workmen, and
give personal attention to all orders.
Mnacker’s Gold Medal Apai
PIANO-FORTES.
U.
3
Tn Volume.
Purity of Tone, Brilllancv.
Depth and Evenness ot Couch with exquisite Delicacy
and Sweetness, these Superior and
beautifully-finished Instruments
are wholly I'nequaled.
Also, Grovestcen & Fullers Pianos,
AND
French Piccolo or Cottage Pianos,
ALSO
TAYLOR & FARLEYS CELEBRATED PARLOR ORGANS-
Woodworth, Schell »t Co.,
Sole Agents, MASONIC TEMPLE, IS Post Street.
P. S.— Pianos and Organs sold on the Installment Plan.
THE
GOODWIN PUMP
Wh’ch received the Highest Premium at the late State
Fair at Sacramento over all competitors. For Mining.
Irrigation or Domestic purposes it is unsurpa* ed; is
peculiarly adapted to Windmills: a- it has no VALVES
it will pump water containing sand or corn, rendering It
the best Mining and Ship Pump in Hie world. All sizes
manufactured by
GOODV.T.V WEST,
No. 3J13 First Street. San Francisco.
ARMES & DALLAM,
Manafacturcr* of and Wholesale Dealers in *
WOOD AND WILLOW WARE,
Baskets. Brooms. Brushes. Matches, Feather Dusters,
Twine, Paper Bags. etc. Send for Cata oguos.
215 and 217 Sacram-nto St.. S. F.
AVERILL
Chemical Faint.
- 3
-5^
MANUFACTURE') BY THE
CALIFORNIA CHEMICAL PAINT CO.
Purest White, any Shade or Color.
It Is Cheaper, Handsomer. More Durable, and More
Elastic than the bent of any other Paint
it will not Fade or (Tiaik off, and will last twice as
lone as the best While Lead.
These Paints a*e prepared for Immediate application,
requiring no mixing, and sold only by the gallon,
uur rates may be found in " Wholesale Prices Cur-
Kor further information, send for simple card and
price list, or applv to the Manufactory and Office, cor
ner of Fourth and Townsend streets, -*an Francisco.
JESSE HEALT, }
M. C. JEWELL, (
The Overland Monthly
Is the only Literary Magazine
published on the Pacific Coast.
S 4 per annum. Send for It. You
will never regret It.
JOHN H. CARMANV A CO.,
Publishers. San Francisco.
E. BUTTERICK & CO.’S
CELEBRATED PATTERNS FOR LADIES. MISSES
an 1 Children: wi-h them any garm ntcan be cut
and made to fit perfectly, send pos age stamp for illus
l trated catalogue. 11 A. DEM I SO. Agent office ol the
Howe Sewing Machine. 113 Keamy Street.
C. C. HASTINGS & CO.,
CLOTHIERS.
| (Lick House Block,) SAN FRANCISCO.
Have Reduced their Prices.
At
Second St.
LZLAND S
FORD,
Pw^dciif.
EDGAR MILL* Vico President.
JOS. CRACRBt)N, - Secretary.
aTcfi/tclßcV 13
'yrticiat j4yrn(i, [email protected]<>me- @//ice.
Kerby, Byrne & Co.
HAVE JUST RECEIVED
From TV«»w York.
Additions to their Complete Stock
DRY GOODS!
Silks and Dress Goods
Suitable far Fall aid Winter fear.
Plain and Embroidered Linen Sets, Collars
Sleeves and Cuffs.
Initial Handerchiefs, Lace Collars, Sleeves, Set*
and Handkerchiefs.
Ladies’, Misses* and Gents’ Hosiery and Glove*.
Lace Veils, Fichus and Mantles.
Ladies’ and Misses’ Merino Undergarments.
Embroidered Flannel.
Linen and Linen Goods; Napkins and Table
cloths; all the brands in Cotton ; Towel* ami
Toweling.
Shawls, Flannels, Blankets and Quilt*.
Lace Curtains and Curtain Lace by the yard.
Fiano and Table Covers.
ffj* All our poods are new and of good quality,
at prices within the reach of all classes of cus
tomers.
KERBY, BYRNE & CO.,
No. 1 Montgomery Street, S. F.
LARGE AND WELL ASSORTED
Comprising
OF THE LATEST STYLES
SAVE S4O!
Why l*ay #SOf The lin Ilmue
M.utile Newii» it MiKhlne. f. lee. »«<>•
mms HAH NO MTPKUI R Ft R KAMI LY
I use. It niM a •battle, Mnig t mm d two
threads, and makes the lock stitch. It is simple,
easy to understand, and light to run. Cali and Bee
it, or send for a circular. A (rents wa- led.
E. W. A vent,
IT New V«*«nt|fo;j>ery Mreet,Grand Hotel Huildtng.
fIEOPENING
Or the Hygienic un i l*hren«>l«*gleul Insti
tute, «:«.* uni «:J7 < ullio* hI • hi., N. F.
I>W. HARLOW ,T. SMITH announces that the recent
extensive ail itiona and improvements to hi* • n gieno
Home Wa ensure and I’hreiiologlea Institute a r e ■ <>m
pleied. To hi* original premise* hnve liven adde ‘ mu
entirely new and elegant 3-riorv h i k st ucture. a new
and commodious lecture hall, a Io«tv and spacious tim
ing room, and cosy, comfortable hath rooms In g eate t
variety, and all the most modern, scientitlc and com
plete appliani es for admin' tering everv conceivable
description of medical l>aths: among whieii iimv ho
mentioned the eiectro-thermal, tlie e ( ectro-s *r, f e elec
tro-vapor. the electro-Russian the eleefo-’l urkish. sul
phur, mercurial, iodine, and other medieated bath*, etc.
Also an entirely new hath Invented hv HOl'lnß
SMITH. It ianamed the ** American Hath.” his In
vention combines all (he advantages of the Russian and
'I urkish, together with Hie electric spray a d other ap
pliance* peculiar to itself, making it superior •*» any
other hvrtropathic application in u«e. The spacious
parlors ai.d other mult plieu appliances tor promoting
the health and condor: o- path nts, combine to con-tt
tute I»K. SMITH'S HYGIENE HOME WA ER ITKR
by lar the most complete hygienic e ahliriimenf on tho
l aclflc, and affords to the rick and *uffe ingofii tli sea s
the su eat, speediest and cheapest means of cure to o
found anywhere west oi the Rocky Mountains Per
sons d* siring Hvgienic hoard, w ith-uit treatment, can
he plensai tlv arc inun dated. )-xanimations ai d ad
vice free drily from ma. M to 4 I*. M. *• ree lectures
on i hrcnologv and I'hyahdogv, to gentlemen, every
Kridav evening Reside* the Water i are. we empl y
the l»let C ure Electro-.Magnet!-: « lire, i ifting and Mo
toroathic i Hre. and the Venta and l*» > s|<; r u eric * u e
- all combined, a e embraced in Hvgienic Medication.
Our prices are from fcli.Mi to per week, Hoard.
Room and treatment. "ingle Haths, from 60 cents 1 1
*1 • a h lend for* Inmlam
MUSICAL ALBIUS,
MISKVI, WORK KIIXKH. \!\l» Hl’-
SIC BOXES from «’£..»«> t« g‘4on. AMER
ICAN WATCHES ami t ALIKO«M A-.MADE JEW
ELRY. The best selection to be found is at
MAI EIU* niZAAIt
Corner of Montgomery and Pine Streets,
SAN F'ANTHCO
HAIR JEWELRY.
nA. CALLEXHEK, Manufacturer. No.
• Second Mreet. San Francisco. AMERICAN
WATCH IS. CALIFORNIA JfcWfcUY. EST* orders
hv mall promptly attended to
FLAX SEED
-AND-
Castor Beans
Pacific Oil and Lead Work?,
SAN FRANCISCO, Are prepared to
FURNISH SEED and CONTRACT for
Next year’s Cron nf Flax <eed and Castor Hesns
at rates that, w Ith proper cultivation on suitsMe
land, will make them aniong the most profit
able Crops grown. For further particulars, address
PACIFIC OIL AND LEAD WORKS,
3 and 5 FRONT STREET,
SAN FRANCISCO.

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