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Weekly Trinity journal. (Weaverville, Calif.) 1857-1972, March 07, 1868, Image 1

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VOLUME XIII.
®>|e Krittitg Journal
IS ?C BUSHED mu satu»dai, at
W»rtrTlllt, Trinity County! California I
DAVID eTgORDON,
XDITOB AND PBOPBIXTOB.
mPPICM— IIOSLINOER A CO.'S BUILDING, CP STAIRS,
(LATE ARMORY HALL.)
Subscription Rates—ln Advancet
One year, *5 00 1 Six months, $3 00 | Three months, $2 00.
4®- The paper will be mailed semi-monthly to any address
In the Atlantic States or Europe at the above rates, and the
necessary amount for postage (which must be prepaid) added
on all papers going out of the United States.
Rates of ■ddsepftetaf r
One square, of 10 lines or lees, first insertion, - - WOO
Each subsequent insertion, --------- 200
(50 per cent, discount to Yearly advertisers.)
Professional cards. (5 lines or leas)per year ... -20 00
Notices of Benevolent or other societies, per year, - 12 00
WEAVERVILLE
f?'?
m
IMPOSTER AXD DEALER IN-
Drugs, APedicines,
PATENT MEDICINES,
PEEFUMEEY,
TOILET ARTICLES,
[And everything usual
ly found in a well-reg
ulated Drug Store.
PbrilcUni’
Prescriptions
CAREFULLY si,. PROPERLY COMPOUNDED stall horns.
T H E
VEAVEEYILLE BOOK STOEE
—IS WELL SUPPLIED WITH —
Blank Books, Writing Paper, Cutlery,
STATIONERY, GOLD PENS,
PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS
FANCY ARTICLES, MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS,
VIOLIN STRINGS, Etc., will be kept.
ALSO, —
School, Standard and Miscellaneous Books,
Newspapers, Magazines, etc.,
WHOIESALR AND RETAIL.
Weaverville, July 1, 1867. 26;tf.
WIRE ROPE!
'd
d
3
o
P 5
a
cd
d
S
Galvanized and Ungalvanized!
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, FOR ' U_(
Hoisting from Shafts and In- 4
dines. 0
I Winding Eopes, Flat and Bound.
| Guy Eopes for Derricks.
Pall Eopes, of Steel, for Der- p
ricks. I
Power Eopes, for conveying ! P.-
Power to Distance.
Ferry Eopes, for Swing and
Flying Ferries. (JJ
AND lot VARIOUS OTHER PURPOSES, BEING
STEONGEE, LI6HTEE, more $
DUEABLE and OHEAPEE $
THAN ANY OTHER KINO OF ROPE I
WIRE ROPE IS NOT AFFECTED BY AT
mospheric changes ; is spliced in the same
manner as Hemp Rope, and manufactured in any
length of any size.
Suitable Blocks and Shaves for Ferry and
Derrick-Fall Ropes supplief. Steel Rope eavet
materially in freight , being only one-third the weight
of Hemp Rope of equal etrength.
Prices and Scale of Strength, Weight and Size
forwarded free on application to manufacturers.
A. 8. HUH DIE S CO.,
412 Olay street, San Francisco.
We are Sole Agents for R. S. Newall &
well-known Wire Rope makers of Gates
head-on-Tyne, and have-a full assortment of
their Ropes on hand.
San Francisco, October 25, 1867. 426 mi.
PACIFIC BREWERY
(OLD STAND—MAIN STREET—WEAVERVILLE.)
LORENZ & HAGLEMAN,
Late of the bavaria brewery, hav
ing purchased the entire interest of Waller
& Co. in the above establishment, arc prepared
to supply the public with a choice article of
Pure Xjagei* Beer,
nr KEGS OE BOTTLES.
Attention is called to the fact that we are
furnishing a superior article of Beer for NURS
ING PURPOSES—so pronounced by those who
have used it. Orders left at the Brewery will be
promptly filled, and Beer delivered without ad
ditional charge. Also,
SODA and SARSAPARILLA,
manufactured after the most improved processes.
HENRY LORENZ,
JOHN HAGLEMAN.
Weaverville, Oct. 20, 1865. 42.t0.
New Store
COX’S 7 BAR!
THE UNDERSIGNED HAS RE-OPENED HIS
trading-post at Cox’s Bar, (opposite Mansan
ita Flat,) where be intends to keep a complete
assortment of general merchandise, such as
GROCERIES, LIQUORS, DRY-GOODS,
CLOTHING, HATS, BOOTS,
MUIIHO TOOLS, SHELF HARDWARE,
*c., all of which will be sold as cheap as at any
Store on Trinity river. Give me a call.
ALEX. TINSLEY.
Coz'i Bar, November 1, 1867. 43:t0.
Crinitj I annul I.
g familij llftopapu, |iftejmtorat in ||olitits, aito fWwtffo hr girfmntfroisnt of lame |nhr«tl.
W. J. Tinnin, - J. W. Owens.
Tinnin
db
Owens,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN
GROCERIES,
Liquors
PROVISIONS!
CROCKERYWARE, '
HARDWARE,
IRON,
STEEL,
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES, WIN
DOW GLASS, QUICKSILVER,
BAR-ROOM, PARLOR and
Cooking
TIN AND SHEET-IRON WARE,
Clothing
FURNISHINGS,
Rubber Goods,
BOOTS, SHOES, &C.
HIGHEST PRICE PAID
FOR COLD DUST.
tfS, We draw SIGHT DRAFTS
—ON THE—
Bank of California,
SAN FRANCISCO, AT PAR.
AGENTS FOR
Guardian Life Insurance Co.,
OF NEW YORK.
FIRE-PROOF BUILDING,
Main Street.
Weaverville, Sept. 27, 1867. 38:to.
E. L. STRAUSS,
(Successor to Wm. Baehr,)
Practical Watchmaker and Jeweler,
HUH ADJOIHIHQ TILIGHA.H OmCl.
a select stock of
WATCHES!
JEWELRY, SPECTACLES,
Silver Ware, Quartz Jewelry, Etc. Repairing of
all kinds done at short notice and moderate pn
ces. Give me a call. E. L. STRAUSS.
Weaverville, July 15, 1855. 27.t0.
R. THOMPSON,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
No. 583 Kearney at.*
SAN FRANCISCO.
tt" Particular attention given to the subject of BANK*
RI'PTCY In the U. B. DISTRICT COURT, under the
D. S. BANKRUPT LAW of 1897.
Information given by letter, or other.lee, FREE OF
CHARGE. Bciiseta done tor ATTORNEYS on very
reasonable term. l:lS;ly.
WEAYERVILLE, CALIFORNIA, MARCH 7, 1868.
INSURANCE 10MPMY!
OF BAN FRANCISCO.
Hoi. 418 and 418 California Street.
INDIVIDUAL
Cash Capital,
LIABILITY.
- $750,000.
Losses Promptly and Equitably Adjusted,
and paid in GOLD COIN.
•DIRECTORS
J. MORA MOSS,
JAMES OTIS,
WM. E. BARRON,
J. O. KITTLE,
JOS. A. DONOHOK,
M. J. O’CONNOR.
J. FRIEDLANDER,
MOSES HELLER.
LAFAYETTE MAYNARD,
CHAB L. LOW,
JACOB BCHOLLE,
JAMES DOW,
JOSEPH SELLER,
L. H. ALLEN,
WM. HOOPER,
C. TEMPLE EMMET,
JOS. BRANDENSTEIN,
BENJAMIN BREWSTER,
LLOYD TEVIB,
THOS. H. SELBY,
NICHOLAS LUNINQ,
JOHN PARROTT,
J. UNDERHILL,
M. D. SWEENY,
C. N. FELTEN,
JAMES PHELAN,
GUSTAVE TOVCHARD,
MICHAEL CASTLE,
NICHOLAS LARCO,
N. 0. KITTLE,
WM. C. TALBOT,
PATRICK McARAN,
GEO. C. JOHNSON, *
CALEB T. PAY,
B. F HASTINGS, Sacramento.
L. CUNNINGHAM and WM. SMITH, Maryrtllle.
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD President.
CHARLES D. HAVEN Secretary.
2:to. O. E. GORDON, Agent at WaaverTille.
New Clothing
—AND—
FURNISHING GOODS I
FOR WINTER WEAR!
JAS. B. BALCH,
(MAIN STREET, UNDER ODD FELLOWS' HALL,)
HAS JUST RECEIVED A LARGE AND WELL-SELECTED
stock of FALL and WINTER
CLOTHING,
BUSINESS and DRESS
Suits !
BOOTS. HATS,
—AND A FIX! ASSORTMENT OF
Gentlemen’s Furnishing Goods,
All of which he intends to sell
AS CHEAP AS ANYBODY
IN THIS MARKET.
Those intending to outfit themselves, and
who desire to do so at a LOW FIGURE, are in
vited to call and examine my stock before mak
ing their purchases.
Weaverville, October 1, 1867. 39:tf.
BEST '» ibe WORLD!
DONNOLLT’S
CALIFORNIA
PREMIUM
YEAST
POWDERS !
/ WARRANTED TO 1
1 MAKE SWEET,LIGHT,/
j WHOLESOME and NU
-1 TRITIOUS BREAD I
( BEST ARTICLE
1 TO MAKE GOOD BUCK
(WHEAT AND OTHER \
\ CAKES t /
-}
D. CALLAGHAN, Proprietor.
They are io per cent, cheaper
than the imported article.
DONNELLY’S pure CREAM TARTAR, DON
NELLY’S SODA SALERATUS, put up FRESH
EVERY DAY.
TRY THEMJJRY THEM!
PREMIUMS FROM EVERY EXHIBITION IN THE STATE.
■7of the yeast powders used in ban fban-
CISCO ARE DONNOLLY’S.
—DEPOT, —
191 Front street.
Near California, San Francisco. 42:lyi.
KTew Stock.
COMING!
THE UNDERSIGNED has
it returned from SanFran
ico, where he purchased
a largest aQd best selected
offered on Trinity River,
comprising a general assortment of
GROCERIES AND LIQUORS,
CLOTH mo,
DRY- GOODS,
BOOTS and SHOES,
HATS and CAPS,
MINING TOOLS,
And a full supply of articles required in a moun
tain market, all of which will be sold at
PEIOEB TO SUIT THE TIMES.
Goods delivered without additional charge,
And Sold as Cheap
at Big Flat as
in Weaverville.
A. MARTIN.
Big Flat, June 25, 1867. 25:t0.
Art
stock
U
of Goods ever
Henry Hooker,
DEALER IE
GROCERIES, LIQUORS, PROVISIONS,
NATIVE OALIFOBNIA
ran
1
%
ED E B BUILDING,
WEST SIPS MAIN STREET WEAVER VILLI.
January 1, 1867. 53:t0.
feebly ffluml.
49~ County Vtarw)i and firiMtukl taken el
their ruling nine in payment tor enbeerlptione to tbie
paper. To eoldien in the OoTemment eerriee the Jocuu
will be furnlebed for Oreenbacke at MB.
Weaverville, Saturday, M'ch 7,1868.
Sam Prtnclico Agcne y.—San Francisco mer
chants or business men who may desire advertisements in
serted in the Teikitt Jo van ax, are informed that L. P.
FISHER, 629 Washington street, is our Agent, and that be
alone is authorized to transact business for this paper.
The Biggest Game of Poker ever Known.
The newspapers have a story of Commodore
Vanderbilt “ seeing” a blackleg’s bluff at poker
and going a $30,000 steamboat better, but this is
hardly up to an affair of which we recollect of
reading long since in a Mississippi paper:
In the days when the Hon. George Poindexter
represented the State in the Federal Senate, say
some tbirty-five years ago, before the time of the
railroads, he started from Natchez by an up
river boat, on his way te Washington. The Ag
ricultural Bank, having a heavy deposit to make
in one of the Pittsbugb banks, entrusted the
money to his charge.
Before many hours elapsed, some of the sport
ing fraternity were making up a little game, and
invited the Senator to take a band, to which,
nothing loath, be consented. The game ran
about the usual course of such things, while the
professionals were taking the measure of their
intended victim, and guessing at the size of bis
pile. When those points were settled to their
satisfaction, the business began in earnest.
An overpowering hand was dealt to Mr. Poin
dexter, upon which be made a small bet, the
others passed, with one exception, who “saw
him” and went a thousand dollars better. To
this he responded with another thousand better,
when the gambler replied, “I see your thousand
dollars and go thirty thousand dollars better”—
for perceiving that his customer was pretty flush,
be did not dare risk a few thousand.
Poindexter replied that that was more money
than he had, but he would put up his pile,
which entitled him to a sight. This the other
denied to be the law. “Certainly,” said Mr. P.,
“I always understand that a gentleman has a
right to a show for his money.”
“ Not unless it is stipulated before hand ;”
and the gambler appealed to the “ gentlemen”
present, who sustained him.
“Come,” said the ruffian, throwing down a
well-filled pocket-book, and laying his watch on
the table, “ I go thirty thousand dollars better,
and give you five minutes to raise the money."
Poindexter bid him count bis money ; and
there it was, sure enough, in good bills. “ Well,”
said he, rising. “ I will see if I can find any
friends who will furnish the funds,” and be
passed into the ladies’ cabin, in which was his
stateroom. He lingered sometime, and as the
hand was nearing the last minute, returned
quickly, took bis seat, drew a bulky pocket-book
from his breast, and laying it upon the table,
calmly said :
“ Sir, I see your thirty thousand dollars, and
go a hundred and twenty thousand dollars bet
ter, and give you five minutes to raise the
money.”
It was the turn of the astonished gambler to
call for a count, but before Mr. Poindexter got
through with the hundred and fifty thousand,
he threw down his hand —there being too many
spectators to make it safe to raise a row—and,
with his companions, went ashore at the next
woodyard.”
A Drove of “Bulls.”
The following is from Harper'i Magazine twelve
years old, which is well worth republishing :
The following piece of composition may be
backed against anything ever produced. It was
written half a century ago, by Sir Doyle Roche,
a member of the Irish Parliament in the troubl
ous times of 11 ’Ninety-Eight,” when a handful
of men from the county of Wexford, struck ter
ror to the hearts of many a gallant son of Mars,
as well as the worthy writer himself. The letter
was addressed to,a friend in London, and it is
old enough to be new to nine in ten of the read
ers of the “ Drawer
“ Mv Dear Sib :—Having now a little peace
and quietness, I sit down to inform you of the
dreadful bustle and confusion we are all in from
these blood-thirsty rebels, most of whom are—
thank God I—killed and dispersed. We are in a
pretty mess—can get nothing to eat nor any
wine to drink, except whisky ; and when we sit
down to dinner, we are obliged to keep both
hands armed. While I write this I bold a sword
in each band and a pistol in the other.
“ I concluded from the beginning that this
would be the end of it, and 1 see 1 was right for
it is not half over yet. At present there are such
goings-on, that! everything is at a stand-still. I
should have answered your letter a fortnight
ago, bnt I did not receive it till this morning.
Indeed, scarcely a mail arrives sate without be
ing robbed. No longer ago than yesterday the
coach with the mails from Dublin was robbed
near this town. The bags had been judiciously
left behind fur fear of accident, and by good
luck there was nobody in except some outside
passengers, who bad nothing for the thieves to
take. Last Thursday notice was given that a
gang of rebels was advancing under the French
standard, but they had no drums except bag
pipes.
“ Immediately every man in the place, includ
ing women and children, ran out to meet them.
We soon found our force much too little; but we
were too near to think of retreating. Death was
in every face, but to it we went, and by the time
half of our little party were killed, we began to
be all alive again. Fortunately, the rebels had
no guns except pistols and pikes, and as we bad
plenty of muskets and ammunition, we put them
all to the sword. Not a soul of them escaped,
except some that were drowned in an adjacent
bog, and in a very short time nothing was heard
but silence. Their uniforms were all of differ
ent colors, but mostly green. After the action
we to rumage a sort of which they had
left behind them. All we found was a few pikes
without beads, a parcel of empty bottles full of
water, and a bundle of French commissions fill
ed with Irish names. Troops are now stationed
all round the country, which exactly squares
with my ideas. I have only time to add that I
am in great haste.
“ p. S.—lf you do not receive this, it must
have miscarried, therefore you must write to let
me know.”
Tot late campaign in Kansas in favor of wo
man's rights has not been without tangible re
sults. Miss Emma Hunt was elected enrolling
clerk of the Lower House of the Legislature of
that Slate. This is the first case of the kind on
record.
What is a symphony ? Flirting with the so
prano singer behind the organ.
THE CONVINCED.
“ Inasmuch at yt have done it unto ONI of these,
ye have done it unto me.”
BY MBS. U. L. GARDINER.
Ob 1 tell me where be got tbote toft, mild eyee.
So much like those in whom my young heart lived,
My sister’s beaming eye, blue like yon heaven;
Whether awake or closed I known not now.
“ I would not have my husband an Odd Fel
low for all the world,” said Mrs. Ashton, and she
left the lodge-room with a party of ladies, among
whom were wives of gentlemen, members of the
society.
“ Why not?" inquired Mrs. Belmont.
“ For very many reasons.”
“ Please name them.”
“ In the first place, I could not bear the idea
of having a secret withheld from me by my hus
band ; to feel, when folded to bis bosom, there
was something within it I must not know, per
haps dearer than myself. I am naturally jeal
ous ; a rival I could not bear, and I know bis
heart is wholly and entirely mine.”
“ Very well; this is your first objection ; pray,
what is your second?”
“All those mysterious characters around the
room : the chairai benches, thrones or desks,
the platforms in the centre of the room, with
trap-doors, for aught I know, to let the disor
derly members down through into some subter
ranean cavern ; then, the closed doors, locked
and barred, I presume.y I shuddered as I viewed
them, fancying they were full of spectres, and
hobgoblins, and goats, and the mercy knows
what. This is my second objection.”
“ Very well—what next?”
“ Why, Mr. H. himself—he who Is always so
cheerful, so full of repartee, so quick with a re
mark on every occasion,—was so demure, so
solemn, while we were in the room ; and when
I told him I wanted to peep into those three lit
tle rooms, be looked as sober and as nervous as
a priest; I could not make him laugh— no, not
even smile. He seemed as if be really believed
the ‘all-seeing eye,’ painted on the canvass above
him took cognizance of all his actions. I am
confident there is something dreadful about the
whole of it, and I would not have Fred become
an Odd Fellow for the world; I should never
want him near me, after being in those mysteri
ous rooms.”
“And these are your objections to the Order,
Mrs. Ashton, are they?” inquired Mrs. Belmont,
seriously.
“ Yes.”
“ Then the good originating from them has no
influence whatever upon your mind. If you will
go home with me, I will show you some period
icals containing excellent addresses on different
occasions, and beautiful Annuals. You will
find much in them to admire ; one oration, in
particular, on the ‘Supremacy of Principle,’ by
the Rev. E. H. Chapin, a favorite writer of mine,
and in whose words you can see his soul, and
feel your own thrill, as you read his addresses.
I will also show you a statistical account of the
immense sums distributed by the various socie
ties in our country ; showing how many widows
and orphans they have relieved ; how many chil
dren have been raised from want and degrada
tion ; how many strangers have found an asylum
from a cold, unpilying world ; how many sick
have been comforted ; how many dying, parched
lips, have been moistened by the kind
charity ; how many eyes closed ; and how many
decently buried, honored and mourned by the
members of these societies.”
11 How long since your husband became united
with them ?’'
“ Six years.”
“ Is he as kind and attentive to you as he was
before he became connected with this baud 1”
“More so; he loves me better —I love him
more ; he is so consistent, so correct, so prompt
to do bis duty when called upon to administer
to the necessities of a brother; and how he loves
the little boy we have adopted.”
“Ay, I recollect hearing something of that
foundling. Where did your husband pick up the
friendless thing ?”
“ In Havana, when he was consul there.”
“ Pray tell me the particulars.”
“ As we are near my home, and fatigued, you
shall go in with me ; we will have a cup of tea,
and in the evening I will tell you a simple story.
Mr. Belmont has gone to Washington. I am
lonesome, and shall be glad of your company for
a few days. It is a long time since you have
been in the city, and I have much to say.”
Mrs. Ashton concluded to accompany her,
partly promising to spend the night. As they
entered the parlor, a sweet, rosy-faced boy came
jumping id, and ran directly to Mrs. Belmont,
who, stooping down, kissed him again and again
ere she removed her veil ; and parting the rich
curls that shaded bis beautiful brow, and turn
ing his cherub face toward Mrs. Ashton, she ex
claimed : “ This is our pet 1”
Mrs. Ashton gazed upon the little fellow with
evident surprise ; taking bis hand, she drew him
nearer, and, sinking upon the sofa, cried: “Mer
ciful God 1 how like some one I have seen 1 Pray
tell me where you got those soft, blue eyes ?”
“Come here, Julius,” said Mrs. Belmont, much
surprised at Mrs. Ashton’s emotions; “cometell
me what you have been doing in my absence.”
“ I have been ’iding my ’illle horse, mamma.”
“ What do you call him?”
“ Jimmy Grey ; here is my 'iltle whip to make
him go fast.”
“ Which do you love best, your hobby-horse
or your mamma?”
“ I love my horse best, and my mamma
best I” and jumping into Mrs. Belmont's lap, be
wound his chubby arms around her neck, and
kissed her forehead, cheeks and lips, as she
pressed him closely to her bosom.
Mrs. Ashton sat confounded ; a strange sensa
tion took possession of her breast. Was it pos
sible Mrs. Belmont could love a child so well?
He was a dear little fellow, truly—quite an un
common child. She had no children of her own,
and had often said she did not wish any ; they
were troublesome comforts, pulling and hauling
curls, ruffles, etc., nothing could be kept in place
where they were. Still, a more lovely picture
she never beheld than the one before her. Mrs.
Belmont was a handsome woman ; the glow up
on her countenance was heightened by exercise,
her eyes beamed with delight, her cap was un
tied, and her curls fell in beautiful disorder over
the the rosy face of her little protege, as he re
turned her endearing caresses.
Tea was brought in, the statistics were read,
the books looked over, and the little boy carried
to bed, after saying bis prayers, as he knelt, like
a young cherub, at the feetjof Mrs. Belmont —the
true personification of love bending over its idol.
“ Sow for the story of that lovely child,”
said Mrs. Ashton, as she drew her feet upon the
sofa, and placed the pillows behind her.
Mrs. Belmont quietly seating herself in her
large, eacy rocking-chair, began: “ When my
husband was consul in Havana, in 18—, Mr. H.,
a physician, coming in one morning, remarked
that be daily visited a very interesting family,
who bad drawn deeply upon bis sympathies for
many reasons ; and first, that, like themselves,
be was an Odd Fellow. He had been on the
island a year, prosperously engaged in the mer
cantile business, and for the last six weeks bad
been much indisposed, owing to a bemorrage of
NUMBER 9.
the lungs, and was gradually sinking. His wife,
an amiable and accomplished woman, perfectly
idolized her husband and little bo; of some six
months of age, who was bright and beautiful as
the morning, and in whom their warmest affec
tions centered. In consequence of her devotion
to her husband and child, she bad grown pale
and languid ; had a cold, and at times her
cheeks assumed a hue he trembled to bebold.
“ My husband’s kind heart enlisted immedi
ately in the feelings of the physician, and to
gether they sought the sufferers. Again and
again they went, and, like true Odd Fellows,
watched over him ; attended to all his wants,
closed bis affairs, saw him die, and decently
buried him ; then turned their attention to his
heart-broken wife, who, it was evident, would
soon follow him. I cannot,” said Mrs. 8., wip
ing the tears from her eyes, “ describe the scene,
although my husband has oftentimes dwelt upon
it; but a more touching one cannot be con
ceived. Like a summer flower the young mother
faded away; gratitude to her friends gleamed in
her every look. She gave her little boy to my
husband. As her dissolution approached, she
yielded up all, in the sweet hope of a glorious
immortality; and the consoling thoughts of
meeting once more her beloved husband, took
from death its sting and robbed the grave of its
victory.
, “ * Bing my child 1’ she one day exclaimed, as
the cold dew gathered upon her marble brow.
Long and closely she held him to her bosom,
and, although gasping for breath, still retained
him, kiss bis dimpled mouth, gazed wishfully
into bis deep blue eyes, until she fainted. My
husband took the child, while the physician ad
ministered the restoratives. She opened her
eyes, fixed them once more upon her darling boy,
and looking to Mr. 8., she said, in trembling ac
cents : ‘ He is yours,’ and expired.”
Mrs. Belmont covered her face ; a convulsive
sob swelled her affectionate breast. After a
moment, she continued : “ The property left, af
ter all the debts were paid, was five hundred
dollars. The bills were enormous, but could not
be disputed. I was sitting by the center-table,
reading, on the evening Mr. Belmont came home.
He entered the room with a child in his arms,
followed by a colored woman, who was bis
nurse.
Mrs. Belmont stopped, while Mrs. Ashton, who
had not moved from the commencement of the
story, lay gazing intently into Mrs. Belmont’s
face, as if awaiting a further development of the
little boy’s history.
“ Why are you so silent?” inquired Mrs. B.
“ I do not know,” replied Mrs. Ashton : “ but
I feel like one in a state of mesmerism. That
child's looks have paralyzed my very I
have seen him ever since. Pray tell me his
name ; I long to know, for he so much resembles
one dear to me.”
“His father’s name was Henry Benton; bis —”
seeing Mrs. Ashton turn deadly pale, she in
quired tb»>oause.
“ Proceed,” said the excited woman: “tell
me bis mother’s name, if you know, before her
marriage.”
“ Julia Crawford.”
“Merciful God! my sister,” exclaimed Mrs.
Ashton ; and clasping her hands, she wept bit
terly.
Mrs. Belmont tenderly inquired into the cause
of her agitation, and sweetly soothed her. After
Mrs. Ashton became calm, she informed Mrs.
Belmont: “My elder and only sister married
contrary to her father's wishes, and thereby in
curred his displeasure. She loved her husband
with all the strength of her young heart, nor
was be in any respect unworthy of her affec
tions. My father is a proud, high-spirited man,
aristocratic in his views, and fixed as the north
pole in his politics, and every one opposed to
him wrong. Mr. Benton was a firm Democrat,
and as fixed in his principles as my father, and
as unyielding. During the contested election of
18—, in conversation one evening, they became
very warm ; many words passed between them,
and my father, being highly excited, in an un
guarded moment grossly insulted him. Mr. Bea
ton could not brook the offence ; be had borne
much for my sister's sake, but this was a point
‘ beyond which forbearance ceased to be a vir
tue.’ He thought a separation of all parlies, for
a few years, would allay the bitterness ot my
father’s hateful, vindictive temper, when he
would again return with ray beloved sister, and
all would be well. They embarked on board a
packet ship for Europe, and arrived safe. He
had a handsome capital, which he invested in
goods, and entered the mercantile business in
Liverpool ; where they were when I last beard
from them. I wrote her often, and, oh ! bow I
have longed to see her! Although my father
has never mentioned Mr. Bentou’s name, I know
he is sorry, and would give all the world, did he
possess it, to see Julia. When I entered your
house and beheld your child, his expression was
like a flash of lightning across my soul. I see
him still—my sister’s own image.”
Mrs. Ashton covered her face with her hands,
and wept. She begged Mr. Belmont to lead her
to the child. Kneeling by his bedside, she gazed
upon his sweet face, as he lay unconscious of all
evil, kissed his forehead, cheeks and lips with
all of a mother's tenderness, raised his little
hands to her lips, pressed them to her heart,
nor could Mrs. Belmont prevail upon her to leave
him. She slept with him ; and when Mrs. Bel
mont arose, she walked softly to the bed, and
found the little boy sleeping upon the bosom of
his aunt, her arms closely encircling him. Her
face was pale with weeping, and her long, loose
curls were wet with the tears of sisterly love.
Mrs. Belmont bent over them until they awoke ;
her first words were :
• • What think you now of Odd Fellows ? ’
“Oh I I will go directly home and tell my
husband to become one immediately ; for where
would this sweet child have been but for this
blessed institution? Vou will surely permit me
to share with you in the pleasure of bringing
him up ; we will together instil into bis opening
mind the principles of ‘ Friendship, Love, and
Truth ;' and we will make his regalia, when old
enough to be initiated into the society of Odd
Fellows.”
Thackibt says:—When a man is in love with
any woman in a family it is astjnisbing bow
food he becomes of every person connected with
it. He ingratiates himself with the maids ; he
interests himself with the footman ; be runs ou
errands for the daughter; be gives and lends
money to the young son at college ; he pats little
dogs that he would otherwise kick ; he smiles at
old stories that would make him break out into
yawns from any one but papa ; he bears with
the old maiden aunt; he beats time when the
darling little Fanny performs her piece on the
piano, and smiles when wicked, lively little Bob
by upsets the coffee over his shirt.
Miohtv Particular. —“ I say, landlord, that
is a dirty towel for a man to wipe on.”
The landlord, with a look of astonishment, re
plied :
“ Well, you are mighty particular. Fifty or
sixty of my boarders have already wiped on that
towel this morning, and you are the first to find
fault.”
A oirl should hang up her fiddle when she has
lost her beau.

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