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Frostburg mining journal. [volume] (Frostburg, Md.) 1871-1913, September 23, 1911, Image 4

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MmiKGf^yoURNAL
WEEKLY.
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY BY
The Mining Journal Publishing Company,
INCORPORATED.
Subscription Rates J l JfZui: dn™
Payable in Advance. (3 Months 25 cents
Single Copies, 3 cents—At the Office.
Advertising rates made known on applica
tion.
SARAH JE. I)ANDO, Subscription Clerk.
Address all communications to —
The Mining Journal Publishing Company,
80-82 East Union Street, FROSTBUKG, MD.
FROSTBURG, MD. - SEPT. 23, 1911
Prohibition Convention.
The County Prohibition Convention
at Narrows Park last Saturday after
noon was called to order by Fred. W.
Seaber, of Westernport, and organi
zation followed in the election of Wil
liam H. Kreitzburg, of Frostburg,
chairman, and William Malcolm, of
Moscow, secretary.
The following ticket was submitted
by a committee and nominated by
acclamation:
For Sheriff— William T. Barnes, of
Eonaconing.
Register of Wills —Frank B. Phillips,
of Eonaconing.
Judges of Orphans' Court —Charles
Vanpelt, Westernport; Henry H. Hart
sock, Cumberland; William Plaskett,
Eonaconing.
For County Commissioners —Daniel
W. Robinette, Gilpin; William H.
Kreitzburg, Frostburg; Christopher
W. Greitzner, sr., Westernport.
Road Directors —William W. Myers,
Eckhart; W. Boyd Smith, Martin’s
Mountain.
House of Delegates —William Mal
colm, Moscow; Eatimer Bradley, Fin
ley C. Hendrickson, Edwin T. Dixon,
Cumberland; George Buckle, Eona
coning, and Henry F. Cook, Frostbui'g.
Surveyor —Ephraim Eee, Cumber
land.
Officers of a new county committee
were named as follows:
Chairman —Edwin Elias, of Frost
burg.
Secretary —Frank B. Phillips, of
Eonaconing.
Treasurer John Bannatyne, of Eck
hart.
The usual endorsement of State and
national platforms was made by
resolutions.
The campaign will begin next month,
with Dr. A. S. Watkins, a noted orator,
in the field.
Strong Statement from Good
Authority.
One of the finest articles on “adver
tising” in a long time appears in the
Hardware Reporter, St. Bouis, Mo., j
of the 15th inst. The first paragraph
follows:
“It has been charged, and in some
measure rightfully so, that the aver
age retail hardware dealer does not
use his local newspaper as much as he
should for the promotion of his busi
ness, but is rather inclined to assume
an attitude of indifference towards
newspaper publicity and to endeavor
to get along without making use of
the advertising columns of his paper
to any material extent. It is" not an
unusual thing to pick up a newspaper
in a good live town and not find a
single hardware advertisement in it,
though it may abound in announce
ments of grocery, dry goods, and va
rious other stores, and even be patro
nized by a far-away mail-order house.
It is frequently the case, too, that
when a merchant fails to advertise
his store and business through this
medium his show windows are neg
lected, for these two methods of ad
vertising usually work hand in hand.
If they do not, they should, for it is
the mission of the one to help the
other.”
And so on through five more similar
paragraphs.
The moral is—what is true of hard
ware advertising is true of all other
lines of mercantile advertising.
And, brought directly home, it
should be regarded by all the business
people of Frostburg as a part of their
business duly to advertise in their
home paper!
Political.
Sterling Galt, editor of the Emmits
burg Chronicle —an excellent news
paper, is the democratic nominee for
the State Senate in Frederick county,
and people who know him say he will
make a progressive legislator if
elected. Just “Thirty Years Ago” the
editor of the Journal enjoyed the
same honor, but his party enemies in
Cumberland were too “slick” for him.
In the east end of the county they
persuaded a number of voters to be
lieve the Journal was “a dangerous
laborite,” but on Georges Creek they
measured the editor by the tenets of
the gospel of labor of that day and
denounced him as “a At
least 164 votes were affected by this
contradiction, and the battle was lost.
Poetic Puzzle.
A Federal Hill poet sends the fol
lowing- contribution, hoping the Jour
nal will arrange so it will completely
rhyme:
Mary had a little lamb as a
Present from her papa. But when
Mary went to buy lamb chops she
found
The price was 20 cents a pound.
“The object of the request,” it is
stated, “is —Mary’s father wants to
keep Mary from selling to instead of
buying from the butcher.”
The Journal has done its best, but
is compelled to turn it over to some
“centennial” poet with this offer — j
make a complete poetic stanza, ratio
of measure 100 to 106, and send to
Journal accompanied by 100 cents—
not 106, for one year’s subscription.
WHEN HER BACK AGHES.
——
A Woman Finds All Her Energy and
Ambition Slipping Away.
Frostburg women know how the
aches and pains that come when the
kidneys fail make life a burden.
Backache, hip pains, headaches, dizzy
spells, distressing urinary troubles, all
tell of sick kidneys and warn you of
the stealthy approach of dropsy or
Bright’s disease. Doan’s Kidney Pills
are for the kidneys only. They at
tack kidney diseases by striking at the
cause. Here’s proof of it in a Frost
burg woman’s worde:
Mrs. Cleaver Richardson, 102 Center
street, Frostburg, Md., says: “I
found Doan’s Kidney Pills to be a very
■ good kidney medicine and I publicly
endorsed them in 1907. All that I then
said in their praise still holds good.
I had various symptoms of kidney
complaint. My head and back ached
and often I felt dizzy and nervous.
Mornings on arising, I was all tired
out and my kidneys were in bad shape.
Hearing about Doan’s Kidney Pills, I
used them and they not only drove
away the pains but toned up my entire
system. One of my children was af
flicted with kidney trouble, and in
this case Doan’s Kidney Pills effected
a complete cure.”
For sale by all dealers. Price 50
: cents. Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo,
New York, sole agents for the United
States.
Remember the name —Doan’s —and
take no other.
Married.
At the home of Mr. and Mrs. John
J. Foster, West Mechanic street, this
place, Monday, September 18, 1811, by
Rev. F. H. Crissman, Miss Marie
Josephine Bosdeck to Mr. Adolph
Goebel, both of McKeesport, Pa. A
small company of friends were present
and bade the happy couple a joyous
journey through life. Mr. Goebel was
not long since one of Frostburg’s
good boys, but is now filling a posi
tion of responsibility in McKeesport,
and there he and his bride will make
their home.
Estray.
“How do you sleep these nights?”
“Much better since I got into the
habit of leaving my dollar watch out
in the hall on the hat-rack.”—Birm
ingham Age-Herald.
This would indicate that Ed. Wil
lisou’s watch had gotten away from
him.
Ia the Insect World.
The Union and Water-street inter
section swarmed Tuesday morning
with what were generally called by
the crowd “moth-millers.”
Where they came from no man —not
even a present-day centennialist could
say.
Ed. Miller said the proper name is
psychodid fly; that he was once over
at Burdockburg and that was what a
high-school principal from Sand Patch
said it was.
Melville Dennison took issue with
this statement, saying he and his base
drum spent several hours at Oldtown
last Sunday, and down there a pupil
said he could prove by a new diction
ary just extant that it is an aleurodid
telegraph-pole bark louse.
Joshua Davis pronounced it a cicada,
because in Welsh that word means
both moth and clabber-fly.
After tasting one Walter Scott Bur
ton spit it out and exclaimed:—“scar
abeid nidus!" —the first Eatin words
Scott ever spoke. Taken to task for
the obscurity of his speech, he denied
that he meant beetle; in fact, he ex
plained that he was trying to avoid the
word, bug.
Just then the post office windows
flew up and the discussion was
adjourned indefinitely.
W. C. T. U.
The County Convention of the
Women’s Christian Temperance Union
was held in First M. E. Church, this
place, Tuesday, 19th inst.
The forenoon and afternoon sessions
were taken up with the business work
of the Union.
One of the leading program num
[ bers of these sessions was an address
by the State President —Mrs. Mary
Haslup, of Baltimore.
The election resulted in the re-elec
tion of the officers who served last
year, as follows:
President —Mrs. Charles C. Willison.
Vice-President —Mrs. R. C. Stotler.
Corresponding Secretary —Mrs. C. J.
McKenzie.
Treasurer —Mrs. Horace G. Evans.
The leading number of the evening
meeting was the contest for the grand
gold medal. Five contestants entered
as follows:
Misses Fannie Crawford, Twila Wil
lison, Grace Stotler and Gladys Burk
hart, all of Cumberland, and Mr. Clif
ton Jeffries, of Frostburg.
Miss Burkhart won, receiving a per
centage of 46 1-6. Her nearest con
testant was Miss Willison, who made
46.
The judges were —Rev. W. D. Eynn,
of Eonaconing;' A. Taylor Smith, of
Cumberland, and Dr. S. A. Baer, of
this place.
Only winners of gold medals in
previous contests are eligible to en
try in the grand gold-medal contest,
and winners of grand gold-medals are
eligible to entry in* the diamond con
test.
The County Union expects to hold
a diamond contest during next year.
KlLLthe COUGH'
with DR.ICING’S
hew discovery
FORfOUCHf fppict so* &$ i.oo
H TRIALBOTTIEFREE
AND ALL THROAT AND LUMG TROUBLES
'go-a RAHTceo^AnsFAcroßr'
Off MONEY REFUNDED.
Lines
•: ' \
To My Only Son, Joseph Mich.EL, on
[ the First Anniversary of His
Birthday.
, Sweet cherub ! pledge of love and
, truth!
“Fac simile" of thy father’s youth !
T Thy mother’s treasure, thy father’s
i joy,
[, With love o’erflowing greet we our
r Boy!
3 Dear, lovely babe ! how sweet ’twill
be
; When I from worldly cares am free,
. For Mama, in your honest face,
Your Sire's resemblance there to trace,
r And while I am here how proudly
j thee
3 That won my heart in years gone by—
. Your Mother’s charms are jujurs, my
, Thy silken locks, of golden hue;
l Thy honest eyes of Irish.blue—
Inherited from her they are;
; And so to me you’re doubly dear!
- One wish is foremost in my heart—
That I may not from life depart
j Until mine eyes may feast upon
Thy manly form, my Baby Son !
) M. A. Chambers.
, St. Andrew, Fla., Sept. 8, 1911.
1 The Difference.
j Where we are weakest—that is, in
all public works, Europe is the strong
- est.
Where we are the strongest—that is,
i in the comforts of our homes, Europe
5 is the weakest.—Mike Kinney, Team
r ster, and Editor of the Gimlet.
i Just in Time.
l Prof. Clyde E. Reppert made a good
t “catch” Tuesday —a runaway two
-5 horse team. He saved a farmer some
, loss by showing considerable nerve.
On a Long Tramp.
; Michael Pistacheo left Pawtucket,
. R. 1., Tuesday, August 22d, to walk to
Eos Angeles, Cal. He reached this
place Tuesday, September 19, stajmd
all night at Hotel Gladstone, and pro
ceeded toward Wheeling, W. Va.,
J next morning. Mayor Price gave him
. some documentary evidence of his
stop and sta3 7 here.
. A STERLING BANK. ft
; Jfie pideSity of prostburg. |
“THE RELIABLE FIDELITY.” jj
We do a General Banking Business.
! 3 °/o Interest Paid on Savings Accounts. I
Assets $275,000. |
1 li
D. F. McMullen, Pres. G. Dud Hocking, Treas. I
' V J?
! We Solicit Your Business.
; STREETT’S
Mother’s Bread
J VERSIFIED
5 Frostburg’s poet-laureate tasted it during a moment of com
-5 munion with his Muse, and, while, yet reeking with inspiration, he
wrote the following tribute to it for us:
The Whiteness and the Lightness and the pure Rightness of our Bread
; Make it a general favorite wherever folks are fed;
i If you will try a loaf to-day,
3 No more will we insist,
For we know that then we’ll have you
3 On our regular list.,
c For its flavor and its savor will find favor that is 1 sure;
It makes friends every day because it’s strictly fresh and pure.
; ■ J. M. STREET! CO
r
United States Depository.
' TP HIS BANK solicits a share of your business upoti the basis of
Souud and Progressive Banking, Liberal, Accurate and Courteous
Treatment.
Capital $ 50,000.00
Surplus Fund 75,000.00
Total Deposits, over... . 1,000,000.00
Assets, over 1,200,000.00
OFFICERS:
.We Pay 3 per cent. Interest on ROBERDEAU ANNAN.... President
Any Amount from Day OEIN BEAEE Cashier
„ n . DIRECTORS:
ot ueposit. R k. Henderson,. Timothy Griffith,
iiiT Open for business Saturday Duncan Sinclair, Daniel Annan,
' nights from 7 to 10 o’clock. Roberdeau Annan.
: DO NOT BE SATISFIEDwith LESS THAN THEBEST
. FET the benefit of improved facilities and experience by having your—
i CLEANING ai)d pYEINIG
DONE BY
FOOTER’S
P 3=?B, s aijd Dyeii?§ U/orks
Charges Moderate. Service Prompt.
Do not he misled by
those claiming to do ML Oi?
w F k nnTFß°s” Dye Works,
rOUI LK O CUMBERLAND, MD.
work has no equal.
T. S. COOPER, SOLE AGENT, 5 BROADWAY, FROSTBURG, MD.
See Our Town First.
1 In this “Seeing America First” ,
’ campaign every little town is putting
in a word for its own beauties.—Mil
waukee News.
The leading “beauty” in the new
dictionary of the national language of
Frostburg just now is “centennial”—
106th anniversary.
Does Baltimore Deserve It?
There will be two amendments on
the ballot, this year, providing for in
creased representation for Baltimore
in the legislature, and about these the
• voters of Carroll ought to be thinking.
The effect of these amendments, if
they had been in force this year, would
have been to increase Senator Gor
- man’s vote to 78 instead of 65. The
r change, therefore, would not only af
fect the vote of conventions, but all
matters coming before the legislature
in which both city and counties are
interested, as well as all general legis
lation.
On the basis of representation ac
cording to population, Baltimore seems
entitled to the increase, but for all
other reasons it is not. The counties
have not a single interest to be served,
that we are aware of, to justify their
giving to Baltimore this increased hold
on the political and business future of
, the State. The city shows a grasping,
domineering spirit along all lines,
and appears to consider that the State
exists merely to feed it, politically
„ and otherwise.
It may be the fault of the repre
sentatives from the counties in. the
legislature, who lend themselves to
the superior ability and wiles of the
; city’s representatives, that the city al
ready has too much power in shaping
a legislation, and especially politics.
That is the fact, at least. The city
organization, and city interests, have
first call on all things worth having,
, and the city papers are continually re
} minding the counties' that the city
s pays more than its share of the State
1 taxes, for the upkeep of public roads
- and improvements.
, Baltimore will have to change its
1 tune toward the counties before it can
i expect them to fall in and grant it
more political and legislative power,
and we predict that they will line up
! solidly against the present amend
. ! ments Taneytown (Md.) Record.
WASKING !
: My wife, Jennie Livengood, having left my bed
and board without just cause or provocation, I
hereby give notice that I will not be responsible
for any debts she may contradl.
SCOTT LIVENGOOD, Elk Lick, Pa.
FARM FQRSALE.
. Contains 201 acres, 175 acres cleared.
275 peach trees, 3 years old; also apple
' orchard. 75,000 feet of saw timber. 9-
room frame dwelling-house with cellar;
1 barn, outbuildings, etc., all in good re
. pair. Well and springs. Convenient to
, church, school, store, postoffice, etc.
On county road, 3 miles from main line
of B. &O.R. R. 2 miles from Alaska,
l W. Va. Price S3OOO. Oiie third cash and
; balance in one and two years. Address
; DR. PERCIVAD EANTZ,
Alaska, W. Va.
IP IT WERE POSSIBLE FOR
ALL MINERS
OF THE
: GEORGE’S CREEK,
i Pocahontas, Pittsburg,
E AND OTHER
; Coal Fields
! TO QUIT WORK
MINERS’ ASTHMA would soon be a
thing of the past.
> But it is not.
, Great relief, however, can be secured by
; using Dr. M. M. Townsend’s
Remedy for Hay Fever,
Asthma and Catarrh.
’ In successful use over 30 years.
• Prescribed by Physicians.
r 7ld”At. Druggists, or direct from Factory,
: 37 Frost Avenue, Frostburg, Md.
, Circulars free. “Don't wait to grow worse.”
Justice of tlie Peace.
AND Collector of Claims of All Kinds,
Union St., fJy4] Frost-burg, Md.
,3 yearsold
iFI |MEST\ PUREST
All EYE.
FOR SALE BY
AUL UP -TO -13 ATE DEALERS.
THE BIG BLUE BELLI
(f THE BEST HOUSEKEEPERS I
I AFTER THOROUGH TESTS RECOMMEND
I ‘mSlr VICTOR
1 I|IE2|JIJ STOVES AND RANGES
i For economy of fuel, cleanliness in operation and |
excellent qualities in baking and roasting. They |
have improvements and advantages not found in I
other stoves and ranges. Sold under a guarantee
STOOD THF TFST to do good work —and also to last. You run no |
i_ stuuu me test risk —money back if not satisfied.
PROVED THE BEST Would be pleased to have you examine them.
FRANK C. BEALI-J

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