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Frostburg mining journal. [volume] (Frostburg, Md.) 1871-1913, October 07, 1911, Image 1

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Mining SiffiKf Journal.
J. BENSON ODER, Editor.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR NO. 2
See the New Arrival
FINE FALL SUITS
STERN’S.
_ mi
8 THE H. B. SHAFFERCO. 8
'X > Have greatly improved their
H :B :H STORES p
p in the
JJ “GROWING END OF TOWN” S
P and call especial attention to the X
X New Grocery Department— x
Very much larger and more convenient —
X in which to serve you. X
P A full line of all kinds of Groceries, Flour and Feed—
X fresh ground Meal and Mixed Feed--from the daily X
V/ grind at the chopping mill. p
X the H. B. SHAFFER CO. v
HOUSES AND LOTS FOR SALE!
Five-Room House Mill Street renting for $ 7.00; price $ 800
Six-Room House Hill Street renting for $10.00; price SI2OO
Six-Room House Braddock Street, .renting for $ 8.00; price SIOOO
Six-Room House Oak Street renting for $ 7.00; price $ 750
Five-Room House Green Street renting for $ 7.00; price $ 700
Six-Room House McCulloh Street, .renting for $10.00; price SI2OO
Five-Room House McCulloh Street, .renting for $ 8.00; price $ 800
Five-Room House McCulloh Street, .renting- for $ 8.00; price $ 850
Five-Room House. .Grant Street renting for $ 6.50; price $ 700
Ten-Room Double House. .McCulloh Street. . renting for $14.00; price SIOOO
Among the above are many fine bargains at the prices named.
For further information apply to
UWREIOE' D. WILLISOI \ XECDTOES
CLAYTON PURNELL 1
THE “ROYAL” CHAIR.
The Push - Button Kind " itbhtkßutton-and
i j /E are showing a good range of
\XJ elections in these Handsome,
ltoomy, Modern Morris; Chair. , Chairs
In the “Koyal” Chair all the com- "kind*™*
fort of the Best old-fashioned rod- u,,,.
aud-rack Morris Chair is combined
“Push the Button and Rest”
That is all it takes to adjust the HgMjßj
Chair back exactly as you want it. Ccc —Frfjjfi
Simply a little pressure on the but- lb
ton under the right arm places the -J® jipifcg. '■ ■Tj
back in any comfortable or restful
JAgQH HAFER.
I A !
I CLEAN, I
I STRONG, I
! PROGRESSIVE I
NATIONAL BANK
Is an asset of real worth to any
community, and the opportu
nity to do business with such a
Bank should appeal to every
good citizen.
The Citizens National Bank
Is seeking your business.
Capital - - - - $50,000.00.
Surplus and Profits, $77,014.77. j
j The Citizens National Bank j
of Frostburg.
DIRECTORS.
D. Armstrong, Howard Hitchins,
J. S. Brophy, W. A. Hitchins,
Harry B. Colborn, L. D. Wit.i.ison,
Thomas Humberston, Frank Watts.
■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•
FROSTBURG, MI)., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1911.
I THROUGH OTHER EDITORS’ EYES
ON TOPICS OF THE CAMPAIGN.
MEN LIKE LEE AND GORMAN.
The Westminster Advocate says:
Men like Lee and Gorman are an
honor to the party and to the State.
The courageous way in which Lee met
defeat in the primaries' and then put
forth his best efforts to elect his op
ponent afford an excellent example
for other defeated candidates. And
Gorman demanded a searching inves
tigation as soon as he heard there
was fraud in a single precinct, de
claring that he would not have a
tainted nomination. As some one re
cently remarked: “With men like Gor
man and Lee in the saddle, young,
clean, ambitious and capable, the
Democratic party in Maryland Is safe
from- all assaults from without, and
fully able to ferret out and punish
all irregularities within.”
I Every Maryland voter should re
member the extravagance of the Re
publican party during its administra
tion of State affairs from 1896 to
1900. He should remember the hap
hazard manner in which public offices
were conducted by incompetent Re
publican officials. How Baltimore
city was dotted with negro Republi
can clubs, and how negroes, thinking
they had a political pull, gave vent to
indulgence in crime.
Lloyd Lowndes was a high class
gentleman, and meant to do right, but
his party would not support him in
doing so. Mr. Goldsborough may per
sonally and socially he a fine gentle
man, but his political associations
have been bad. He is not any strong
er mentally or intellectually than Gov.
Lowndes, and giving him credit for
his good promises, he would do no
more than did the last Republican
Governor of Maryland.
1 The people of Maryland are not
going to he fooled again by Republi
can promises.
MARYLAND DEMOCRATS STAND
BY YOUR PARTY.
(The Towson Democrat-Journal.)
Democrats of Maryland should
stand by their party in the present
contest, and elect a Democratic Gov
ernor by such an overwhelming ma
jority that encouragement will he
given to bring about the election of a
Democratic President next year.
Maryland in recent presidential elec
tions has been close, and therefore
the result of the election here in No
vember will be watched throughout
the county with interest.
GORMAN A MAN FULL OF RED
BLOOD.
(The Salisbury Advertiser.)
Mr. Gorman is a man full of red
blood, who believes in standing up for
bis rights and in fighting for what he
wants. His address of acceptance is
remarkable for its outspoken frank
ness on public questions and its note
of insistency when he demands that
his nomination be cleared of any
doubt. His course throughout the
whole trying situation of counting
the ballots in Baltimore has been such
as to win the respect and confidence
of his fellow citizens. He has made
it clear that he will not be a party to
crooked work himself, nor the
beneficiary of the crooked work of
others. Gorman is a young man whose
ambition reaches farther and higher
than the gubernatorial chair, if he so
desired or was so Inclined he could
not afford to go back on his pledges
made To do this would mar forever
his ambitions of the future. He can
he depended upon to keep his record
clean and true —and give to this State
one of the best and cleanest adminis
trations it ever had.
GORMAN’S HONESTY KNOWN BY
REPUBLICANS AND DEM
OCRATS ALIKE.
(Marlboro Gazette.
Senator Gorman owes his nomina
tion directly to the people. While it
is true that a number of prominent
organization men were behind him,
there were many others just as promi
nent in the counsels of the party who
were behind Senator Lee. Every
party organization man was back of
Mr. Goldsborough. Mr. Goldsborough
and his running mates also talk of
the record of Senator Gorman. Sen
ator Gorman’s record as an office
holder consists of four sessions as a
member of the State Senate from
Howard county, and no man has ever
worked harder as a Senator than Mr.
Gorman. While the Legislature was
in session he lived in Annapolis. For
three sessions Mr. Gorman, as a Sen
ator, received $5 a day or $450 a ses
sion. At the last session he was
President of the Senate, and received
$8 a day or $720 for the session. The
pay he received did not nearly pay his
expenses at Annapolis, but he was
more interested in serving his party
and the State than he was making
money for himself, for while the Re
publicans will ch°rge Senator Gor
man with many things during the
campaign, not one of them will dare
to charge him with making money by
corrupt means. They well know that
as far as being financially interested
in any proposition that has ever come
before the Legislature, Senator Gor
man is absolutely free of any sus
picion. His honesty is known by Re
publicans and Democrats alike.
MR. GORMAN DID NOT WAIT FOR
FRAUD TO BE PROVEN.
(Annapolis Advertiser-Republican.)
Sen*tor Gorman and the Democratic
party are both to he congratulated on
the prompt manner in which the Bal
timore City situation was realized,
and the decisive action taken for
placing the Democratic nominee in a
proper position before the people.
Mr. Gorman did not wait for fraud to
be proven, but when it was apparent
that there had been crooked work on
the part of certain election officials,
he promptly demanded that the mat
ter he thoroughly investigated, and all
appearance of fraud removed from his
nomination. It is to he regretted that
the affair cannot be gone into more
expeditiously, but it should he
thorough. The Democratic party will
of course, suffer for the acts of the
election officials, but the Republican
party cannot escape Its responsibility
in the matter as the officials of that
party connived at whatever was done
in the premises. In fact, in certain
sections of the State people Save
come to look on the Republican party
as willr-o- tools for anv corrupt propo
sition v/hiob unserenulous politicians
might w>h to c?rry through.
AN rXIIEHEISTDEHSTT NEWSPAPER.
POLITICAL NEWS.
Baltimore, October, 3, 1911.
The old adage about the person
who laughs last, laughs longest ia
going to come into play in this cam
paign. If one should take seriously
the big display lines, known by news
paper men as scare heads, in the
Baltimore city papers, he would be
led to believe the fair Monumental
City, the State’s metropolis, is a ver
itable Sodom and Gomorrah, in so
far as politics goes, and the papers
causing the sensations not being able
to dictate to the Democratic party,
charge all the uncleanness of the
recent Primary Election in this city
to that party and have never men
tioned a single time that there has
been just as many Republicans ar
rested for the supposed trickery in
counting the ballots as there are
Democrats. Fortunately, the Crim
inal Courts do not know either
Democrat or Republican when the
traverser- comes to the Bar of Jus
tice. If the irregularities had been
confined to the Twenty-third ward,
then it would be reasonable to con
sider these discrepancies venal and a
matter of collusion —but the wrong
counts in other wards sometimes
favor one candidate and then an
other, and this does not only apply
to the leading candidates, Mr. Gor
man and Mr. Lee, but applies to all
the other candidates as well, which
shows instead of collusion to defeat
any one candidate; these discrep
ancies are the results of carelessness
arising from the fact that as yet the
people—we" mean the election offi
cials, also ao not realize what a legal
primary is. The Republican candi
dates, Goldsborough, Cunningham
and Soper, under the skillful guid
ance of that arch-political manipu
lator, Stone, knew the primary in its
many details, as the law now stands
could hardly be carried through suc
cessfully even by the shrewdness of
the proverbial Philadelphia law
yer, therefore they declined to
let their people, the Republicans,
register a choice at the polls and re
fused to run until canned nominations
could be given them. It must be also
understood that election officials, both
Republicans and Democrats, are not
just anybody picked up at random, or
persons who are susceptible to brib
ery, but said officials of both parties
have to run the gauntlet of a perfectly
honorable Board of Election Super
visors after a recommendation by
their party managers, and police in
vestigation as to honesty and sobriety.
The clouded skies politically will soon
clear, and we have not the slightest
doubt of Democratic ascendency. No
doubt it has been noticed that the In
dependents, so called, or the Reform
League, have not charged the Demo
cratic Party -with either bad faith or
bad acts, and their leaders, William
Cabell Bruce, George Morrison, Wil
liam L. Marbury, and a host of others
stUnd solidly behind Mr. Gorman and
his associates on the State ticket.
While the turmoil has been going on
in the city, just exactly the opposite
is happeninig in the counties, from
which come the most encouraging re
ports. All the sores caused by the
primary fight have been healed. Many
Democratic clubs are being formed,
and the party in the counties in solid
front will he presented to the Republi
cans on election day. The large popu
lar majority received by Mr. Gorman
over the entire state in the primaries
foretells his election in November,
even if quite a few go over to the
enemy in Baltimore city. We do not
believe many will desert the Demo
cratic ranks. Once a Democrat always
a Democrat is an old absolute truism.
What is to be gained by going into
the camp of the enemy? Are the Re
publicans in the States where they
have complete control any more hon
est than the Democrats have been In
Maryland? Not at all, and then again
look at the candidates and their rec
ords, are the Republicans in any way
superior to the Democrats? Not at
all; look closer, compare your per
sonal friends of both political com
plexions and then honestly, do you
believe as a deserter from the politic
al camp of your fathers, that you will
fare better in the camp of your here
tofore political enemies, not much.
Governor Crothers after three days of
consideration and after weighing the
whole matter very carefully, decided
the calling of an extra session of the
Legislature was not necessary to
count the disputed ballots of Balti
more city, hut he didn’t so decide un
til the Grand Jury now probing the
matter promised quick action in
finishing. The count,' the leaders
among the Democrats are perfectly
satisfied with this, and are assured
they will have the last laugh and that
it will he Governor Gorman after
January 2nd, next. The self-satisfied
hog, while in the fattening pen, crack
ing his corn, is always quiet and
tractable, but when the killing time
comes ht squeals from fear, and that
is the position of the Republican, n ;\v
that the killing is in sight.
1881 1911^1
f THIRTY YEARS AGO. f
1 The Items Below Were Current During T
Week Ending October 15, 1881.
James Layton visited Westernport.
He claimed to have been born April
14, 1768, and was, therefore, 113 years
old. He came to Allegany county in
1797, and was by trade a broom-maker.
Henry W. Wegman and Mrs. Paul
Goldsworthy reported very ill.
Mr. A. E. Frey died Sunday, Octo
ber 9, 1881, aged 39 years.
In Troy, Ohio, Friday, September
30, 1881, Mr. Elisha Combs* died in
his 87th year. He was born in this
county and resided near Frostburg
until 1853, when he removed to Mor
gantown, West Va., where he lived
until 1871. He had been a member of
the Methodist church 64 years. A
number of relatives resided in this
county, notably the families of Hon.
John S. Combs, of Lonaconing, and
Mrs. A. M. Devecmon, of this place.
A. C. Gross, of Cumberland, an
nounced himself an independent can
didate for Sheriff.
J. W. Shuck, of Cumberland, was
nominated by the County Republican
Committee for Sheriff—to fill vacancy
occasioned by retirement of Otto
Hohing.
Michtel McGann died in Pompey
Say and Do.
Two brothers once lived down this
way,
And one was Do and one was Say.
If streets were dirty, taxes high,
Or schools too crowded, Say would
cry—
“ Lord, what a town !” But brother
Do
Would get to work to make things
new.
And while Do worked Say still would
cry—
“He does it wrong ! I know that I
Could do it right!” So all the day
Was heard the clack of brother Say.
But this one fact from none was hid :
Say always talked—Do always did !
—Kent (Md.) News.
At the Reception.
She sat on the steps at a party,
Enwrapped in an absent air;
Came her lover with greetings hearty,
—She gave him a vacant stair.
—The Chib-Fellow.
And as he sat on the step beside her,
His heart became suddenly gay,
For he saw the twilight come stealing,
Clad in the close of a summer-day.
— Gen. Kear Hosken.
Soaiethiag ia a Name.
Journai, —Is it true that Ed. Miller
wouldn’t go with that missionary to
the heathen, fearing he would be
come the victim of cannibals?
The Eckhart Philosopher —Bay yem
iny, Aye tank so.
Journai, —Well, that’s sad. By the
way, of what name is “Ed.,” in his
case, an abbreviation—Edward, Ed
win, or Edgar?
The E. P. —Bay yeminy, Aye tank
et bane understood for somtengs gute
te eat, bot faller vat know mae who
haf new booktionary hae say et stand
for Edible.
Hagerstown Fair, the Best.
The program arranged by the di
rectors of the Hagerstown fair on Oc
tober 10, 11, 12 and 13, will be the best
yet, and patrons of this big and al
ways interesting fair will surely get
more pleasure than the money they
spend.
Besides the big harness races, there
will be numerous free attractions, con
sisting of the latest acrobats, flying
bars, trapeze, trained animals, balloon
ascensions, etc. The famous Wal
lace’s Orchestra will enliven the oc
casion with its classic and catchy
music.
More Big Fruit.
William A: Murphy, living miles
south of Johnsons, in Garrett county,
brought to town last Saturday 11 enor
mously big red apples, and placed
them on exhibition in one of Frank C.
Beall’s hardware windows. They at
tracted much attention. Asked what
variety they are, Mr. Murphy said
“Wolf River.”
Question.
The Journai. overlooked reference
last week to the report that “President
Taft was the central figure in the
fiftieth anniversary of Kansas as a
State on September 26, 1911. Gov.
Stubbs and Senator Bristow were
present and politics was laid aside.
The President paid a glowing tribute
to the Sunflower State and was en
thusiastically applauded.”
When the President conies here
next year and finds that he is filling a
place that belonged to Theodore
Roosevelt in 1906, what sort of “glow
ing tribute” is he going to pay the
custodians of Frostburg history?
Smash Wednesday, September 12,
1881, aged 68 years.
Wild geese going south.
At the bride’s home, Marlboro, Va.,
Tuesday, October 11, 1881, Miss Ger
trude Mountz was married to Mr.
Thomas Parker, of Eckhart.
John Creamer, of Pompey Smash,
was hurt in a mine at that place Tues
day, October 11, 1881. His left leg
and right arm were broken, and sev
eral ribs fractured.
A two-fold coincidence was recorded
in the facts that both Mr. Frederick
Lutz, who died October 4th, and Mr.
A. E. Frey, who died October 9th,
were born in Esslingen, Wurtemburg,
Germany. Moreover, the first inter
ment in the German Lutheran ceme
tery was that of Mr. Lutz, and the
first in St. Michael’s cemetery was
that of Mr. Frey.
Bailiff Baker resigned his office, but
Council would not accept.
Wednesday, October 12, 1881, Miss
Amanda M. Dennison was married to
Mr. Joseph H. Whetstone by Rev. J.
P. Wilson, ail of this place.
New gas lamps on Bowery street
were lit first time Monday night,
October 10, 1881.
Too Severe.
A cynic who haunts the Broadway
corners slipped this into the Journal's
hand last Saturday evening :
Life is but a fleeting show,
For men’s illusion given ;
To draw their pay on Saturday
Seems all they know of Heaven.
Circuit Court.
The October term began Monday,
Judge R. R. Henderson, presiding.
Roberdeau Annan, of this place,
was appointed foreman of the grand
jury.
This section is further represented
on that body by William Lammert,
Christopher Roberts, Philip Rephan,
Owen Price, Conrad C. Brode, Thomas
G. Dillon and Andrew McMannis.
On the petit jury in part are Messrs.
Clarence p. Ort, Michaff Rooney, J.
Alex. Davis, W. J. O’Rourke, William
McLuckie, Benjamin Jenkins, Henry
Barth and William A. Shaffer.
In his charge to the grand jury
Judge Henderson said there are a good
many in jail, but none accused of great
crime. The building of a great rail
road through the community had fur
nished opportunity for disorders which
were not seriously criminal.
Business Movements.
“Another car-load of horses” is the
result of a recent call upon the farm
ers of Centre county, Pa., by M. W.
Race, liveryman.
The Mountain City Produce Com
pany, E. N. Michael, manager, opened
in the spacious room —16 Broadway,
last Monday, and business began to
boom from the start. As stated last
week, only wholesale business will be
done.
Financial Report.
The picnic preliminary to Home-
Coming Week next year, Saturday,
September 16th, realized in receipts
$642.60; in expenses $462.08; net re
ceipts $180.52.
This statement was confided to the
Journai, late last week, but in the
rush hours overlooked.
A Moral from Hank.
“Is marriage a failure?” I asked of
a man, who, seeking a surgeon, into
me ran. He paused, re-adjusted the
beef to his eye, and replied with a
moan and a shuddering sigh—
“Go up to the house, where my wife
sits alone, since she batted my eye
with a fist like a stone, and hear her
describe me—and if you’re not deaf,
you’ll say that it is—with a capital F.”
“Is marriage a failure?” I asked
Mr. Hank, who drove around town
with a high-stepping spank. “My wife
has a fortune; I haven’t a red, and
since you know this, what more can
be said?”
Moral —ls marriage a failure?
Have faith in us when—we answer
you No—with a capital N!
Reported Wedding.
Report, well authenticated, came to
the Journai, Wednesday that Miss
Nell Broadwater, of Grantsville, was
married to Mr. Gus. W. M. Zeller, of
this place, at New Castle, Pa., Satur
day, September 30, 1911. A card from
him to his father, Gus. Wm. Zeller,
received Wednesday, indicated that
the happy pair were then in Cleveland,
Ohio. A Grantsville correspondent
who knows whereof she writes de
clares that “the bride is an accom
plished house-keeper, a talented mu
sician, and one of this town’s most
popular young ladies. Mr. Zeller
should be warmly congratulated. ’ ’
HENRY F. COOK, Manager.
WHOLE NUMBER 2,087.
OFFICE SUPPLIES
The Algonquin File, . . . 25 Cents
WILL HOLD HUNDREDS of PAPERS.
U3F”AII kinds of Legal Covers, Clips,
Daters, Rubber-Stamps, Staple Machines,
Pins, etc.
JOHN A. FULTON 8r CO.
Books and Stationery,
Baltimore and Liberty Streets,
Peb 11 Cumberland, Md.
BALTIMORE & OHIO
EXCURSION TO
McKeesport
AND
PITTSBURG
AND’RETURN
Sunday, October 8
ROUND PROM
TRIP CUMBERLAND
Special Train Leaves at 7 a. m.
Save Your Money
BY BUYING YOUR
RAILROAD TICKETS
J. H. HUTCHINS.
A LLinformation concerning rates, routes,
XJL- change of cars and time of trains cheer
fully furnished. TMarch 29
■ CUMBERLAND k PENNSYLVANIA R. 11.
PASSENGER TIME TABLE NO. 8
In effect 2:00 a. m. Sunday, July 30,1911.
All Passenger Trains Daily.
127 125 123 STATIONS 122 124 1261
11 00 330 830 Cumberland 740 1155 750
' 11 23 353 853 Mt. Savage 715 1130 725
, 11 45 415 915 FItOSTBURG 655 11 10 705
11 56 426 926 C. Junction 645 11 00 655
12 02 432 932 Midland 640 10 55 650
12 12 442 942 Lonaeoning 030 10 45 040
12 20 450 950 Barton 621 10 36 631
12 30 500 10 00 Piedmont J6lO 10 25 620
■ a.m. p.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. p.m.
Accommodation Train leaves Piedmont daily
at 1:30 p. m., arriving at Frostburg at 2:15 p. m,
: Returning leaves Frostburg at 3:00 p. m., ar
riving at Piedmont at 3:45 p. m.
J. T. ROBERTSON,
General Manager.
Baltimore I Ohio R.R.
LOW RATE-ONE WAY
COLONIST FARES
T MANY POINTS IN
California, Colorado,
Alberta, Arizona, Idaho,
British Columbia,
Mexico, Montana,
New Mexico,
Wyoming, Nevada,
Oregon, Texas, Utah and
Wahington.
! Tickets on sale daily from September
• 14tli to October 14th, 1911, inclusive.
For full information call on or
address —
.
M. C. CLARKE, Ticket Agent,
Cumberland, Md.
| U No Us |
:: “Tell It To The Neighbors” |
33 THAT X
■<; C.E. BeE AFTER f
;; rrvAKES a SPECIALTY of |
<; / 1 Weaving Carpets, |
<► And will Pay Freight on All X
3 3 Goods One Way. x
;; MEYERSDALE, PA. |
Eet Us Dry-Steam
Clean and Press Your
Coat, Pants and
Vest!
We do not drive the dirt into the lining of
> the goods, but force it from the inside out.
. This process is strictly sanitary. It removes
all dirt, raises the nap, renders the garment
sterilized like new and not shrink a thread.
Eddies’ Coats, Jackets, Skirts, Etc., re
ceive special attention .
. Shall we call for your next package?
FROSTBURG STEAM LAUNDRY,
A. S. BURTON, Proprietor.
ipCK LOANS!
| From $5.00 Up! j
! \ Anywhere in Allegany County, Md., |
l Mineral County, W. Ya., and t
t Bedford County, Pa,, J
I To owners of Furniture and other I
1 * Chattels and to Salaried Em- |
: f ployees, without security. ♦
, I Can be repaid in weekly or T
! * monthly payments to suit your X
t income. f
| Prompt, Courteous and Confl- i
t dential Treatment. t
j People’s Loan Co., j
t Room 31, Third Floor, ♦
I Third National Bank Buiding, I
: I CUMBERLAND, MD. :
I CALL, PHONE or WRITE! I

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