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Frostburg mining journal. [volume] (Frostburg, Md.) 1871-1913, October 14, 1911, Image 1

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Mining fW Journal.
J. BENSON ODER, Editor.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR NO. 3.
See the New Arrival
FINE FALL SUITS
V. AT >
I STERN’S.
S THE H. B. SH AFFERCO. 8
X Have greatly improved their X
<> BSCS!- H
JJ “GROWING END OF TOWN” JJ
X and call especial attention to the X
X New Grocery Department— x
ax Very much larger and more convenient— xx
X in which to serve you.
X A full line of all kinds of Groceries, Flour and Feed—
X fresh ground Meal and Mixed Feed—from the daily V
xx grind at the chopping mill. XX
0 THE H. B. SHAFFER CO. X
HOUSES AND LOTS FOR SALE!
Five-Room House Mill Street renting for $ 7.00; price $ 800
Six-Room House.. .Hill Street renting for $10.00; price SI2OO
Six-Room House Braddock Street, .renting for $ 8.00; price SIOOO
Six-Room House Oak Street renting for $ 7.00; price $ 750
Five-Room House Green Street renting for $ 7.00; price $ 700
Six-Room House McCulloh Street, .renting for $10.00; price SI2OO
Five-Room House . . .McCulloh Street, .renting for $ 8.00; price $ 800
Five-Room House McCulloh Street, .renting for $ 8.00; price $ 850
Five-Room House 1. . . .Grant Street renting for $ 6.50; price $ 700
Ten-Room Double House. .McCulloh Street. . renting for $14.00; price SIOOO
Among the above are many line bargains at the prices named.
For further information appty to —
LAWRENCE D. WILLISOHI EXECUTORS .
CLAYTON PURNELL 1
THE “ROYAL” CHAIR.
The Push - Button Kind " Kish the Button-anil Best"
l i / E are showing a good range of nqyrrgjf
\XJ elections in these Handsome, ffrTELjjKL V>
Roomy, Modern Morris! Chair. _ Chairs
In the “Royal” Chair all the com- THC ° u kind tton
fort of the Best old-fashioned rod
and-rack Morris Chair is combined
“Push the Button and Rest”
That is all it takes to adjust the mBwIK H
Chair back exactly as you want it. & ~|gf fTTi? jp
Simply a little pressure on the but- p
back. in any comfortable or restful
JACOB HAFKR.
! A
CLEAN,
STRONG,
PROGRESSIVE
NATIONAL BANK
Is an asset of real worth to any
community, and the opportu
nity to do business with such a
Bank should appeal to every
good citizen.
The Citizens National Bank
Is seeking your business.
Capital - - - - $50,000.00.
Surplus and Profits, $77,014.77.
[ The Citizens National Bank
of Frostburg.
DIRECTORS.
D. Armstrong, Howard Hitchins,
J. S. Brophy, W. A. Hitchins,
Harry B. Colborn, L. D. Willison,
Thomas Humberston, Frank Watts.
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AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER.
FROSTBURG, MI)., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1911.
I WHAT CAN A DEMOCRAT GAIN BY VOTING THE 3
REPUBLICAN TICKET? ~
THINK THIg OVER. §
a jj
A Good Candidate.
For election to the office of Judge
of the Orphans’ Court the name of
John F. Workman, of District No. 11,
Democratic Nominee, is here pre
sented.
Mr. Workman is one of the com
munity’s best citizens—a straightfor
ward, honest, unobtrusive man. He
is all this by inheritance as well as
instinct and habit.
There were seven Workmans to
whom original grants of land were
t JOHN S'. WORKMAN.
[ made in this section during the 18th
< century—all sturdy farmers and ex
l emplary men. One of them was John
} F’s ancestor and he lives on land that
l once belonged to one of the seven.
t “Now and then,” said one of his
[ friends the other day, “I believe that
i the names of some known here for at
least four generations should go on
the county roster, and I believe that
| now is a good time for the people to
remind themselves of what they owe
I to American names over 100 years
old.”
) Mr. Workman is fitted for the office
) in every way.
) ■■
) |
) I ;
) i
) I
) H Honestly, with 44 years, save 4 (Lowndes) record In our State,
with only one defaulting State Official, is a remarkably good record
I for the Democratic Party. Compare this with States who have been
solidly Republican for even one-fourth the time.
Free of Cost.
There are hundreds of trained scien
tists employed by the National Gov
ernment, whose time is passed in ex
amining into problems, sometimes en
tirely scientific and related only to the
discovery of original facts and the
formulation of basic theories, as is
done largely by the skilled technolo
gists of the Smithsonian Institute, and
partly by the magnificent force com
manded by Dr. Wiley in the Bureau
of Chemistry; and sometimes devoted
more entirely to economic researches
into the facts of chemistry, geology,
etc., laying the groundwork for great
practical industrial development, as
is done by the Bureau of Soils, the
Bureau of Chemistry, the Bureau of
Plant Industry, and the Bureaus of
Mines, of Fisheries, and of Forestry.
Time was, and not so long ago, when
people smiled at these governmental
■ activities, but we are beginning to
learn that while the scientist may be
amusing, he is really doing things,
not merely dabbling.
Recently attention has been directed
to the great Smithsonian Institute, a
wonderfxil repository for historic curios
from the public view, but in fact far
more important than a mere museum
—a starting-point for independent
scientific research, out of which is
coming much of practical value for
the industrial development and im
provement of our country. Even the
purely scientific studies —the looking
after truths regardless of their appar
ent economic value, is really of the
first importance. All of the useful
discoveries are based on the truths
primarily established by scientific
thought and study.
The student, especially in botany,
zoology, biology, physics, meteorology
and scientific geology, will find not
only interesting specimens in the
Smithsonian, but many booklets and
full-grown books are published by the
I Institute, which are of the greatest
instructive value. Any student who
is interested in these subjects, and
wishes to have these publications to
! assist him, either in reading or study,
may secure them by writing to Con
gressman David J. Lewis, at Wash
ington, stating the general subjects
in which he is interested, and the
Congressman will gladly secure such
publications for him without cost.
To Mollie
On the Twelfth Anniversary of Our
Wedding—September 27, 1911.
Not often in life’s journey, dear,
Three events important fall
So closely in the calendar
That, as one observed, are all.
To-day, my love, that treasure blest
We will celebrate with joy—
My own birth-day, our nuptial feast,
And the birth-day of Our Boy.
Impressed am I—and thankful, too,
For blessings great and rare —
For thy confidence, my wife so true,
And children fond and fair.
’Tis not always so, alas, with men
Who, in the sphere of life,
Choose, foolishly, of woman’s kind
A frivolous maid for wife.
Not so the lot that came to me
In you, my Mollie fair;
Nor one moment gave you cause to
rue,
Nor ever caused despair.
And so I pledge my love anew—
As you will, I’m sure, to me;
Each year, please God, we’ll both
review
Love’s true fidelity.
And that though, some say, I “flirt
with fate,”
And ignore old Father Time;
For you are in your prime estate,
And I’m well past manhood’s prime.
M. A. Chambers.
St. Andrew, Florida.
The Newer New Style.
Last Sunday the children of a Balti
more Sunday school sang a hymn
which, according to a programme
found among the church records, was
sung just 91 years before in same
church. According to the Frostburg
centennial calendar, 91 years is incor
rect. Should be 96 years, 5 months
and 16 days.
Resigns Management.
Nelson B. Winter, general manager
of the Frostburg Illuminating and
Manufacturing Company, has resigned
that office in order to take up a more
lucrative position in Chicago.
Mr. Winter will enter business for
himself, having become identified with
The General Sales and Stone Con
tracting Company, Chicago, dealing
in building and decorative stone,
granite and marble, and will act as
manager of the business.
During Mr. Winter’s term as mana
ger of the electric light company’s
business he has “made good.” Many
improvements in the business have
been conceived and installed and he
leaves the company better equipped
than ever to meet its demands.
He will be succeeded by Charles H.
Leatham, of this place, a young man
well versed in the electrical business.
Mr. Winter is now making Mr.
Leatham familiar with the details of
the business, and will remain with the
company until his successor is ready
to take hold.
Meanwhile, he has completed ar
rangements to enter his new business
in Chicago, and will leave for the
west as soon as he is able to wind up
his affairs here. His many friends
regret to see him leave Frostburg, but
wish him the best of fortune in his
new undertaking. He is a young gen
tleman of high character and, owning
fine attainments in both commercial
and social prestige, he has before him
a bright future.
Am Appreciated Endorsement.
The Frostburg Journal was forty
years old last week, and its veteran
editor, J. Benson Oder, says it “will
continue its effort to exemplify the
Golden Rule—to do for the community
all that it would have the community
do for the Journal.” We hope the
expectations of the Journal will be
realized as to the community. We
know the Journal will do its part. —
Piedmont (W. Va.) Herald.
Brevities.
A town over in West Virginia con
templates setting a noble example to
the rest of the country by sending its
only Chinese laundryman back to his
own country as a missionary.
| ATHLETIC CANDIDATES j
Fop State Comp- Fop Attorney Gen-
J Fop Governor troller. eral. \
r GORMAN—The HARRINGTON— POE—Oneofthe #
r Baseball Player. The leader In gen- famous "Pigskin”
f eral sports at St. Poe Brothers, who (P
p John’s College. added ’ustre to
p Princeton Unlver- A
a sity in Its football ' £
J matches. \
| All finished manly products of enthusiastic, athletic boys.
1881 1911 1
| THIRTY YEARS AGO. f
j The Items Below Were Current During %
Week Ending October 22, 1881.
L. P. Wolfe announced the opening
of a night school for teaching tele
graphy.
Daniel Davis died at Borden Shaft
Sunday, October 16, 1881, in the 69th
year of his age. He was a native of
Wales, but had been here about 30
years. Left six children.
Under the pastorate of Rev. Frank
G. Porter a new Methodist Church at
Rawlings had been completed.
Some trouble over principalship of
the Frostburg Public School. Mean
while, Thomas Hill, vice-principal, was
in charge.
Much satisfaction was expressed
over the assured fact that Frostburg,
Pompey Smash, Louaconing and
Cumberland would soon be united un
der one telephone system.
Owing to a sudden and painful ill
ness, Hon. George A. Pearre was un
able to open the October term of the
Circuit Court.
William Broderick announced him
self an independent candidate for the
the State Senate.
A. C. Gross, independent candidate
for Sheriff, withdrew in favor of J.
W. Shuck, republican-committee nomi
nee.
Dr. C. C. Jacobs, Arnettsville, West
Va., located in Frostburg for the prac-
'T S I fi! ■U F: i
Don’t it make you laugh to hear the Republicans talk about the |
Wilson Ballot Law, when they will run Bob Tail Tickets in very many |
of the Counties, with the hope of saving their State Candidates —Golds- |
borough, Cunningham and Soper? But they are doomed to defeat.
Story Founded on Fact.
There was a row among Frostburg
musicians several evenings ago, start
ing with the mellifluous word, “cen
tennial.”
Reserving names and suppressing
the emotional, one dared another to at
tempt a definition of the word.
“All right, I know well enough,” re
sponded the dared; “in fact, I know
better than you know what a quartette
is.”
“A quartette is!” angrily explained
No. 1; “you should say a quartette
are!”
“Well, then, what is a quartette
are?” asked No. 2.
“A quartette are three and a tenor!”
explained No. 1 in a manner so con
clusive that nothing more could be
said. But No. 2 “came back” —
“O, I’ve got you now!”
“How have you got me now?”
asked No. 1.
“Why a three and a ten-er are 13—
you old centennial you!”
And No. 2 had to run for his life.
Contributions.
The hymn, entitled “Witnesses,”
elsewhere printed, was recently com
posed by Miss Esser Marshall Hoff
man, of Binden, Va., for the Women’s
Home Mission Society, Baltimore Con
ference, M. E. Church, South, and a
copy is in the hands of a Windsor (N.
C.) musician for setting to special
music. Miss Hoffman writes of it as
“an auxiliary hymn,” no doubt to
class it with others of similar import
which have not had the opportunity to
pass the ordeal for admission to a page
of the church hymnal. Meanwhile,
the Journal believes it enjoys the
privilege of furnishing the first typo
graphic presentation of the hymn.
X j tice of medicine.
The Davitt Branch of the Irish Land
League passed some stirring resolu
t tions of indignation over the arrest of
l Charles Stewart Parnell by British
f authorities at a meeting in Paul’s
1 Opera House. The paper was signed
by John O. Winter, John McCaughan,
c jr., Michael Murphy, Michael Duffy
l and W. E. Dillon, committee.
Harry Robinson bought the fresh
f meat store belonging to Lewis Bepler.
Miss Naamah Shearer, of Midland,
5 was married in that place Wednesday,
October 19, 1881, to Mr. John Beach,
1 of New York.
> The Knights of Honor--Frostburg
1 Lodge, No. S9O, passed resolutions of
' respect in memorial of Charles Low
ensteiu, who died in Grantsville Tues
- day, September 27, 1881.
Ezekiel Kennedy, wagon-driver for
; Thomas Humberston, was stricken
with paralysis while driving about 4
- miles west of town Tuesday, October
; 18, 1881. Speech and mind lost from
shock and condition regarded as
. critical.
J. M. Porter, of Eckhart, had re
- covered from a short illness.
Mrs. William Wonn and daughter—
t Miss Helen, returned from a visit to
- relatives in Milwaukee, Wis.
Apples.
The very neat, novel and extended
display of apples in one of the big
windows of Shea’s drug store has oc
casioned very much comment upon
the adaptability of this section to
apple culture. Those on display were
grown on the farm of Dr. G. L. Lining
er, in Pennsylvania, not far from
Frostburg. There are twelve varie
ties, each fitting one of the months of
the year for consecutive use—an inter
esting correlation. The trees .upon
which these fine apples were grown
have never been sprayed nor received
any special attention.
About a dozen big red apples in one
of the Pearce drug store windows,
grown in Garrett county, are also
beautiful specimens.
Uriah Loar, a Dan’s Mountain far
mer, here Wednesday, reported hav
ing 13 apples, weighing 1% . pounds
each, that filled a bushel measure!
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Shea drove to
Grantsville last Sunday and saw hun
dreds of bushels of apples on trees
which showed very few signs of at
tention.
All of which confirms the conviction
that this would be a wonderfully pro
lific fruit-garden—if the people would
get busy as fruit-gardeners.
The Sick.
John Kreiling, of Green street, is
laid up with injured feet —hurt in the
mine some time ago. *
Daniel Labor, of Washington street,
ill for sometime, continues indisposed.
A number of typhoid-fever cases in
town. Cannot be accounted for by
the doctors.
HENRY F. COOK, Manager.
WHOLE NUMBER 2,088.
OFFICE SUPPLIES
The Algonquin File, . . . 25 Cents
-\X7TLI, hold HUNDREDS of PAPERS.
VV pfAll -kinda of Legal Covers, Clips,
Daters, Rubber-Stamps, Staple Machines,
Pins, etc.
JOHN A. FULTON &■ CO.
Books anfl Stationery.
Baltimore and Liberty Streets,
Feb 11 Cumberland, Md.
BALTIMORE & OHIO
EXCURSION
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15th
Round $2.00 Trip to
WASHINGTON.
Round $2.50 Trip to
BALTIMORE.
Special Train leaves Cumber
land at 7:00 a. m.
Bum
Save Your Money
BY BUYING YOUR
RAILROAD TICKET'S
J. H. HETCHINS.
A LLinformationconcernmgrates, routes,
J_A_ change of cars and time of trains cheer
fully furnished. ["March 29
CUMBERLAND & PENNSYLVANIA R. 11
PASSENGER TIME TABLE NO. 8
Til effect 2:00 a. m. Sunday, July 30,1911.
All Passenger Trains Daily.
121 125 123 STATIONS 122 124 1261
11 00 330 830 Cumberland 140 1155 150
11 23 353 853 Mt. Savage 115 1130 125
11 45 415 915 FROSTBURG 655 11 10 105
11 56 426 926 C. Junction 645 11 00 655
12 02 432 932 Midland 640 10 55 650
12 12 442 942 Lonaconing 630 10 45 640
12 20 460 950 Barton 621 10 36 631
12 30 500 10 00 Piedmont 610 10 25 620
a.m. p.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. p.m.
Accommodation Train leaves Piedmont daily
at 1:30 p. m., arriving at Frostburg at 2:15 p. m,
Returning leaves Frostburg at 3:00 p. m., ar
riving at Piedmont at 3:45 p. m.
J. T. ROBERTSON,
General Manager.
Baltimore & Ohio R.R.
LOW RATE-ONE WAY
COLONIST FARES
T MANY POINTS IN
California, Colorado,
Alberta, Arizona, Idaho,
British Columbia,
Mexico, Montana,
New Mexico,
Wyoming, Nevada,
Oregon, Texas, Utah and
Wahington.
Tickets on sale daily from September
14th to October 14th, 1911, inclusive.
For full information call on or
address—
M. €. CLARKE, Ticket Agent,
Cumberland, Md.
U No Us I
I “Tell it To The Neighbors” 1
I THAT X
I C. I. DeLAUTER f
If YN AKES a SPECIALTY of I
I \ Weaving Carpets, |
And will Pay Freight on All ♦
Goods One Way. 1 z
„ MEYERSRALE, PA. $
Get Us Dry-Steam
Clean and Press Your
Coat, Pants and
Vest!
We do not drive the dirt into the lining of
the goods, but force it from the inside out.
This process is strictly sanitary. It removes
all dirt, raises the nap, renders the garment
sterilized like new and not shrink a thread.
Eddies’ Coats, Jachels, Shirts, Etc., re
ceive special attention.
Shall we call for your next package?
FROSTBURG STEAM LAUNDRY,
A. S. BURTON, Proprietor.
[QUfCKLOANS!
| From $5.00 Up! |
♦ Anywhere inAllegany County,ld., t
X Mineral County, W. Va., and ♦
t ' Bedford County, Pa.,
T To owners of Furniture and other T
I Chattels and to Salaried Em- |
t ployees, without security. f
X Can be repaid in weekly or T
♦ monthly payments to suit your |
X income. ♦
X Prompt, Courteous and Conti- $
Idential Treatment. ♦
People’s Loan Co., j
t Room 31, Third Floor,
I Third National Bank Buiding, I
J. CUMBERLAND, MD. t
I CAI.Tj, PHONE or WRITE! I

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