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Frostburg mining journal. [volume] (Frostburg, Md.) 1871-1913, November 11, 1911, Image 1

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Mining &SB£k Journal-.
J. BENSON ODER, Editor.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR NO. 7
Our Fall Stock
IS NOW COMPLETE.
The Offerings Are The
Very Best Obtainable.
STERN’S.
S THE H.B. SHAFFER CO. |
55 117 to 123 East Union Street, X
JK IS THE PLACE TO GET
g Pure Buckwheat Flour, g
5J GROUND FRESH EVERY DAY.
X ALL KINDS OF FEED. K
w K
X Mixed Feed a Specialty. v
X A Full Line of Groceries- Just the Kind You Want. X
XXXXXXXXXXXXXIXX>Z>mXXX}Q<XXX
HOUSES AND LOTS FOR SALE!
Five-Room House Mill Street renting' for f 7.00; price $ 800
Six-Room House Hill Street renting for $10J)O; price SI2OO
Six-Room House Braddock Street, .renting for $ 8.00; price SIOOO
Six-Room House Oak Street renting for $ 7.00; price $ 750
Five-Room House Green Street renting for $ 7.00; price $ 700
Six-Room House McCulloh Street, .renting for $10.00; price SI2OO
Five-Room House McCulloh Street, .renting for $ 8.00; price $ 800
Five-Room House McCulloh Street, .renting for $ 8.00; price $ 850
Five-Room House Grant Street renting for $ 6.50; price $ 700
Ten-Room Double House. .McCulloh Street. . renting for $14.00; price SIOOO
Among the above are many fine bargains at the prices named.
For further information apply to
LAWRENCE D. WILLISONI EXECUTORS
CLAYTON PURNELL f
THE “ROYAL” CHAIR.
The Push - Button Kind " Kish die Button-and Best"
l | /B are showing a good range of
WJ elections in these Handsome,
Roomy, Modern Morris, Chair. „ ChctirS
In the “Royal” Chair all the com
fort of the Best old-fashioned rod
and-rack Morris Chair is combined
“Push the Button and Rest”
That is all it takes to adjust the iS
Chair back exactly as you want it. Mr j|e!- lhr~ .Mf Iff? fy* fp
Simply a little pressure on the but- iTiw'B uj W [__
ton under the right arm places the "f Tit
back. in any comfortable or restful Pusiufff
! A
STRONG
BANKING
CONNECTION
Appeals to a good business man.
We are seeking YOUR business
and are prepared to care for it.
The smallest depositor is entitled
to absolute safety, adequate facil
ities, unvarying courtesy —and gets
them all at the —
| CITIZENS NATIONAL.
Eventually—you will open an ac
count with the Citizens National.
: |
Capital - - - - $50,000.00.
Surplus and Profits, $76,348.69.
OUR SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
Is one of our strong features.
f=%QJ O INTEREST PAID.
| The Citizens National Bank |
of Frostburg.
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FROSTBURG, MD, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1911.
1881 1911 *{
f THIRTY YEARS AGO. f
T The Items Below Were Current During
Week Ending November 19, 1881.
“Annie Laurie,” writing from Eck
hart, furnished the program of ser
vices for re-dedication of the Baptist
Church, at that place. Rev. Mr. Mor
gan, of Connellsville, Pa., was an
nounced to preach, and other ministers
had promised to take part. The
Ladies’ Mite Society were given much
praise for having taken so much in
terest in the improvements of the
edifice.
Much speculation over the result of
the election—one in which “the cor
porations fought on both sides.”
The Arion Band’s entertainment for
November 19th and 21st promised to
be a big one. “An Aggregation of 25
Local Stars of the First Magnitude”
was a big attraction. Among these
were Pete Dailey, Henry Baum, Rip
Hamill, Jack Hart and Billie Wenk,
while Philip Pfeiffer, George Vogt
man, John Merrbach, Peter Pressman,
Adam Krause, John Heintz, Frank
Maurey, Godfreid Merrbach, John
" | '
I. ijf^
Wtn. Wiuterhoff, Earl Simmons, Rose Ainsworth and Sada Simmons iu Scene from the 3d Act in “Barriers Burned Away” at the Frostburg
Opera House Monday, November 13th.
The Great Show.
The series of instructive addresses
arranged for in connection with the
Maryland Week Exposition, December
4 to 9 in Baltimore, will be to the farm- -
ers who attend the meetings like a
school in which the teachers are
among the ver}' highest authorities in :
the several departments of agricul
tural science in the world. ;
Each afternoon an expert packer
from the Hood River Valley, of Ore- -
gon, will give demonstrations in
methods of handling and packing
apples and other fruits. The fruit ex
hibit, as well as corn exhibit, will be
the largest ever shown in Maryland.
Several hundred boys of Maryland
are entered in a contest to show the
best acre product for a valuable prize.
Students of the State College are
making ornamental stands to hold the
50 or more beautiful silver cups of
fered as premiums, and one of the
cups will stand in the midst of each
competitive exhibit.
There will be 600 feet of tables for
the display of fruit.
The moving pictures and night en
tertainments will be interesting fea
tures.
Important Meeting Next Week.
The Associated Boards of Trade of
Maryland will meet in Frederick next
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
The Governor and other prominent
citizens of the State will take active
part, and on Wednesday evening Hon.
David J. Lewis, Congressman, from
this District, will deliver an address
introducing President Taft, who, in
his turn, will have something of great
public importance to say.
Wednesday afternoon Mayor George
G. Young, of Cumberland, will be one
of the speakers.
Thursday afternoon Clayton Pur
nell, of this place, will deliver an ad
dress upon “The Value of Commercial
Organizations,” and at the evening
session D. Lindley Sloan, of Cumber
land, will speak of “Commission
Government.”
Accounted For.
*A Los Angeles woman wants a di
vorce because she got a beating when
ever the home team lost. Frostburg
papers please copy Cumberland
News.
She must have been the Los Angeles
umpire.
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER.
- Rupp and Peter Lammert would “greet
- their friends at the rise of the curtain
t with songs and funny sayings.”
After nearly a year’s idleness Mid
lothian mine started work Thursday,
’ November 17th.
“The telephone” was “the talk of
the town,” so satisfactory was its
work on evening of election day.
Rev. W. S. Holt, of the Eckhart
- Baptist Church, received and accepted
. a call to a church near Pittsburg, Pa.
Messrs. Henry Williams, William
• Hart and J. Wesley Porter, of this
, place, returned from a visit to Wash
; ington and Baltimore.
Cornelius Lynch, landlord of St.
' Cloud Hotel, reported ill.
>
Rev. E. M. Davies, of this place, re
ported critically ill.
, Much illness among children and
: the deaths of four during the week
i are recorded.
Postal Savings Bonds.
On the Ist day of January, 1912, de
positors in the Postal Savings Sys
tem may exchange the whole or a part
of their deposits on January 1, 1912,
for United States registered or coupon
bonds in denominations of S2O, SIOO,
SSOO, bearing interest at the rate of
2% percent, per annum, payable semi-
and redeemable at the
pleasure of the United States after
one year from the date of issue, both
principal and interest payable 20 years
from that date in United States gold
coin.
Postal savings bonds are exempt
from all taxes or duties of the United
States, as well as from taxation in
any form by or understate, municipal,
or local authority.
Application for conversion of de
posits into bonds on the date named
must be made to the post-master of
depository office before December 15,
1911, the post-master furnishing the
blanks and information.
The application mustindicate wheth
er bonds are desired in registered or
coupon form.
Registered bonds are preferable for
persons intending to hold them for a
considerable period, and are payable
only to those to whom they are issued,
or their assigns.
Coupon bonds are preferable for a
depositor who intends to hold them for
a short time only and who has ample
facilities for their safekeeping. These
bonds are payable to bearer, and the
title will pass by'delivery without in
dorsement. The interest coupons are
detachable and collectible by holder
as they become due.
See the post-master for details.
OvetTieariags.
Some Consolation
Peter Whetstone —lf Frank Spates
wore glasses,could William C. Preston?
Joe H. Hatchet —No; but if Mr. Pink
Whiskers of Pocahontas, in despair,
would go down the mine road, he
would find New Hope.
Journalistic
Then, just as I ran to Bill Warn for
protection—
Peter Whetstone —Do you believe the
Journal is “exclusively great ?”
Joe H. Hatchet —Yes, but I’ve seen
a nutmeg grater.
C. B. Ryan.
Am Appeal to Nero.
The Dawson correspondent of the
Keyser (W. Va.) Tribune introduced
his letter last week with this:
Nero came to my house
And, pounding on the door,
Said—Lucas, you had better wake
And write the news once more.
So I waked up and looked about to see
if I could find
Some good news for the old Tribune
to ease poor Nero’s mind.
I found a few by looking close —
To write them now I’ll try ;
Next week I’ll try to write some more,
1 Please, Nero, do not cry !
A Great Idea.
> “Billy Lowes has a new idea for
making time tables.”
f “So?”
3 “Yep. He’s going to make all time
tables go into effect 20 years after pub-
lication and then have them added to
the public school curriculum .”
“Twenty years” is too long.
One year and 27 days is the latest
l limit for 1 year.
3 ♦
Basket Ball.
Prof. Louis A. Tuvin, Messrs. Ro
. land Lammert, Israel Sapiro and other
athletes are promoting the organiza
tion of a basket-ball team for com
petition with teams proposed in a
league comprising Meyersdale, Lona
-1 coning, Cumberland, Mt. Savage,
< Piedmont, and perhaps other places.
The prospect of success seems good.
Knocking at the Wrong Crime.
W. C. Montagnani, of Cumberland,
objected to a game of “scrouge” in
Cumberland last Sunday because of
“the great crowd drawn to it, causing
a lot of discorder very unbecoming,
especially on Sunday."
According to the News Mr. Mon
tagnani “personally did not object to
the playing because of any harm in
the sport itself.”
But “the game involved a stiff con
test and the players came away with
costumes bespattered with mud artd
faces begrimed with a mixture of coal
dust and earth, but there were no
bones broken or hurts of a serious
character.”
Mr. Montagnani’s platform raises a
question—
Which is the worse—a game on Wed
nesday in which “bones” may be
“broken, or hurts of a serious char
acter” sustained, or one on Sunday
whose greatest evil is—it draws a big
crowd, which, it is presumed is al
ways “disorderly?”
The Journal believes Mr. Mon
tagnani objects to the wrong end of
the proposition.
To wait until Sunday to object to a
scramble that is dangerous to limb
and life doesn’t seem to be in accord
with the office of the reformer.
He means well, no doubt, but it is
far worse to permit a game that may
kill on Thursday than one of a hurt
less character on Sunday.
Get after the murderous game—the
game that is worse even than the
deadly knock-down-and-out ring fight.
Echo from Kentucky.
A town named “Jenkins”—after the
well-known and popular Frostburg
family, is going up on Elkhorn Creek,
in Kentucky, the site of the closing
scenes depicted in the great story by
John Fox, jr., “The Trail of the Eone
some Pine.”
Out there the Consolidation Coal
Company calls the place “Our Model
City,” and the old log house in which
the heroine of the story was married
to Hale, the engineer, has been torn
down, and in its place now stand the
offices of the coal company.
Soon the whistle of the locomotive
will proclaim civilization to the one
time haunt of “Bad Rufe Toliver,”
Catholic FederatioM CoaveMtioM.
About 150 delegates, representing 30
societies of the Catholic Federation
of this county, met in annual session
in Midland last Sunday.
After church services a sermon by
Rev. F. Mackall, pastor of St. Joseph’s
Church, and a dinner provided and
served by the ladies of the parish, the
following officers were elected for the
ensuing year:
President—P. B. Cain, of Midland.
First Vice-President—Theodore
Thumel, of Cumberland ; Second Vice-
President —Mrs. Anna Bell, of Pied
mont, W. Va.
Secretary—Bernard Byrnes, of Eck
hart.
Treasurer—J. E. Williams, of Frost
burg.
Marshal—Peter Boyle, of Mt.
Savage.
Chaplain—Rev. F. Mackall, of Mid
land.
Trustees —Frank A. Wolfhope, of
Cumberland; Bernard A. Grant, of
Frostburg, and J. E. Rowan, of
Lonaconing.
Accurately Stated.
Just five weeks after it broke and
destroyed a town, engineers have de
cided that the Austin (Pa.) dam was
“faulty.” An opinion on the condi
tion of JEtna in the days of Pompeii
may be forthcoming within a few
years Baltimore Sun.
According to the Frostburg method
of computing centennials that opinion
will be due in September, 1941.
To Become Correct, Begin Now.
A newspaper from “away out back”
says “the name, ‘earth,’ is derived
from an old verb, ‘ear,’ which meant
‘to plow,’ and was in use at the time
the Bible was translated under King
James. ‘Earth’ signifies, accordingly,
‘what can be plowed.’ ”
Yes, and owing to both the careless
ness and cheek of historians, there is
a dispute concerning the number of
the earth’s last centennial.
One authority has it that IS years
ago, or in 1896, was the 59th while an
other contends that the last, year not
named, was the 7,000 th.
All of which goes to accentuate the
public duty of observing centennials
during the year in they fall due, or
not at all.
A Home-Coming Week the people
can hold in any year without an in
fraction of the calendar or a whirling
wedge knock-out of history.
Died.
In Allegany Hospital, Cumberland,
Sunday morning, November 5, 1911,
Mr. William J. Powers, of this place,
in the 41st year of his age. Mr. Pow
ers was a State police officer, on duty
at the House of Correction, Jessups,
near Baltimore. He contracted the
disease in the epidemic in that insti
tution and was at once brought to the
Cumberland hospital, where he grew
steadily worse until death ensued.
He was an excellent officer as he was
a citizen, enjoying the esteem of all.
He was twice married. His first wife
—Mrs. Clara B. Powers, nee Parker,
died several years ago, leaving three
daughters and a son—Misses Marie,
Margaret, Veronica, and John. The
widow is Mrs. Bizzie Powers, nee Mor
gan, who is left with two daughters
and a son—Misses Helen and Kathar
ine, and William. His mother, Mrs.
Rachel Powers, several sisters and
brothers are also bereaved. The fun
eral at St. Michael’s Catholic Church
Tuesday morning was largely
attended.
There and. Here.
Doctors, undertakers and coroners
are making preparations for the open
ing of the deer-hunting season.—
Milwaukee Sentinel.
Here the three professions are on
the qui vive for foot-ball results.
HENRY F. COOK, Manager.
WHOLE NUMBER 2,092.
OFFICE SUPPLIES
The Algonquin File, ... 25 Cents
~K\[ ILL hold HUNDREDS of PAPERS.
VV All kinds of Legal Covers, Clips,
Daters, Rubber-Stamps, Staple Machines,
Pins, etc.
JOHN A. FULTON Sr CO.
Books and. Stationery,
Baltimore and Liberty Streets,
Peb 11 Cumberland, Md.
Plans and Specifications. Blue Prints. ■
ARCHITECT
George F. Salisbury,
Rooms 9-10, Citizens Bank Building,
CUMBERLAND, MD.
Send 25 cents for our
Book of Designs. ■
t Patent Office Drawings. Tracings. ■
Save Your Money
BY BUYING YOUR
RAILROAD TICKETS
J. H. HITCHINS.
ALL information concerning rates, routes,
change of cars and time of trains cheer
fully furnished. fMarch 29
CUMBERLAND & PENNSYLVANIA B. R.
PASSENGER TIME TABLE NO. 8
In effect 2:00 a. m. Sunday, July 30,1911.
All Passenger Trains Dally.
127 126 123 STATIONS 122 124 126
1100 330 830 Cumberland 740 1165 760
1123 363 853 Mt. Savage 715 1130 725
11 45 415 915 FROSTBURG 655 1110 705
11 56 426 926 C. Junction 645 1100 655
12 02 432 932 Midland 640 10 65 650
12 12 442 942 Lonaconing 630 10 45 640
12 20 450 950 Barton 621 10 36 631
12 30 600 10 00 Piedmont '6 10 10 25 620
a.m. p.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. p.m.
Accommodation Train leaves Piedmont daily
at 1:30 p. m., arriving at Frostburg at 2:15 p. m,
Returning leaves Frostburg at 3:00 p. m., ar
riving at Piedmont at 3:45 p. m.
J. T. ROBERTSON,
General Manager.
Baltimore & Ohio R.R.
LOW RATE-ONE WAY
COLONIST FARES
TO MANY POINTS IN
California, Colorado,
Alberta, Arizona, Idaho,
British Columbia,
Mexico, Montana,
New Mexico,
Wyoming, Nevada,
Oregon, Texas, Utah and
Wahington.
Tickets on sale daily from September
14th to October 14th, 1911, inclusive.
For full information call on or
address—
M. C. CLARKE, Ticket Agent,
Cumberland, Md.
ri) No Us j
i: “Tell It To The Neighbors" i!
O THAT o
;; C. L. DeLAUTER
;; rr\ AKES a SPECIALTY of
i: ' ' Weaving Carpets,
o And will Pay Freight on All < ►
3 [ Goods One Way. J |
X MEYERSDALE, PA. $
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
L,et Us Dry-Steam
Clean and Press Your
Coat, Pants and
Vest!
We do not drive the dirt into the lining of
the goods, but force it from the inside out.
This process is strictly sanitary. It removes
all dirt, raises the nap, renders the garment
sterilized like new and not shrink a thread.
Ladies’ Coats, Jackets, Skirts, Etc,, re
ceive special attention.
Shall we call for your next package?
FROSTBURG STEAM LAUNDRY,
A. S. BURTON, Proprietor.
ipCKLOANSj
[ From $5.00 Up!
I Anywhere in Allegany County, Md., J
t Mineral County, W. Ya., and t
j Bedford County, Pa., |
T To owners of Furniture and other i
4 Chattels and to Salaried Em- I
4 ployees, without security. 4
I Can be repaid in weekly or I
4 monthly payments to suit your 4
4 income. 4
% Prompt, Courteous and Confi- |
t dential Treatment. t
| People’s Loan Co., j
t Room 31, Third Floor, 4
♦ Third National Bank Bniding, 1
l CUMBERLAND, MD. t
4 CALL, PHONE or WRITE! I

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