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Frostburg mining journal. [volume] (Frostburg, Md.) 1871-1913, May 18, 1912, Image 1

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Mining SSlfe Journal-.
J. BENSON ODER, Editor.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR. NO. 34.
“God, Our Country and Our Order”
WASHINGTON CAMP, No. 41
Patriotic Order Sons of America
MEETS EVERY MONDAY EVENING
IN WITTIG’S HALL
Visiting Members Always Welcome
John W. DeVore Jack S. Crow
President Secretary
“HELLO, BILL!”
Frogtburg LodgE, Ho. 470
B. P. 0. £.
Meets every Tuesday evening- at 8 o’clock
ELEANOR BUILDING
Visiting Brothers Invited Rooms Always Open
H. G. EVANS & CO.
THE) UP-TO-DATE
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
GOOD TE}AMS
Hauling of All Kinds Open Day and Night
Special Attention Given to Funerals and
Weddings. Phone 304
HUNTER & SON
FIRST-CLASS LIVERY
All kinds of FEED for sale
General Hauling a Specialty
Corner Mechanic and Water Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
MILTON W. RACE
Livery and Sales Stables
Horses for sale at all times at all prices and
guaranteed as represented
Mechanic and Maple Streets
C. & P. Telephone FROSTBURG, MD.
RANKIN BROTHERS
TRANSFER
“We Deliver the Goods”
WATER STREET
A. P. HOEY
The Tonsorial Artist
131 E. UNION ST.
FIRST-CLASS WORK GUARANTEED
“THRIS.
About your Hair Cuts, Shaves, Massage, Sham
pooing, Hair Singeing and Tonic Rubs.
He will do them right.
5 Chairs 5 Barbers
PALMER BROTHERS
Tonsorial Parlor
A Specialty of Massage and Hair Cutting
159 East Union Street
B. J. PALMER, Manager
HENRY J. BOETTNER
Fine Groceries
Provisions
Hay and Feed
Phone ioo-i 197 E. Union St.
J. C. WILSON & SON
FANCY ANI) STAPLE GROCERIES
Fruits. Vegetables and Country
Produce
Fresh Fish and Oysters in Season
Fine Cigars and Tobacco
149 E. Union St. Frostbnrg, Md.
EDWARD DAVIS & GO.
DEALERS IN
Staple and Fancy Groceries
Country Produce, Queensware, etc.
Union Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
A. SPITZNAS
Fancy and Staple Groceries
9 BROADWAY
Just a few steps from Union Street,
but it will pay you to come.
GRIFFITH BROTHERS
DEALERS in
Groceries, Provisions, Flour
Feed, Etc.
Corner Union and Water Streets
FROSTBURG, MD.
“GOOD THINGS TO EAT”
C. F. BETZ
GROCER
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
THE CORNER GROCERY
Buy SLEEPY EYE FLOUR
And get a Set of Silver Spoons
Special Grocery offer on cash orders of $5.00 or
more. “See us first.”
nORGAN BROS., 72 Broadway
KIGHT BROTHERS
BROADWAY
GROCERIES PROVISIONS
HAY AND FEED
MINERS’ SUPPLIES
PHONE 2.*±-7-2.
P. F. CARROLL
THE BOWERY GROCER
General Merchandise
Fancy Groceries, Country Produce
Corner Bowery and Loo Streets
FROSTBURG, D.
W. H. ANGWIN
Staple and Fancy Groceries
10 East Loo Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
Phone 139-4
Telephone Orders Promptly Delivered.
MRS. MARY JOHNS
Restaurant and Ice-Cream Parlor
1 68 E. UNION STREET
Ice-Cream sent out in all designs
Meals and Lunches at all hours
Parties, Balls and Lodges furnished
JOE McGRAW
Soft Drinks and Lunches
Cigars, Tobacco and
Confectionery
155 E. Union St. Frostbnrg, Md.
Phone 20-1 Room 1
BERNADETTE RAFFERTY
Leading Public Stenographer
Wittig Building
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
W. G. HILLER
The Reliable Tailor
10 W. UNION ST.
Order your Suit for Summer now and
avoid the rush.
GEO. H. GUNTER
Clothing and Furnishings
For Men and Boys
Hotel Gladstone Building
9W. Union St. Frostbnrg, Md.
A. CHAS. STEWART
“Home of Good Clothing”
Citizens Bank Building
KYLUS & GROSS
MODERN TAILORS
WILL FIT YOU
88/£ East Union Street
ALL MEN’S CLOTHING
MADE TO ORDER
AND
Guaranteed to Fit or No Sale!
Other work in Tailoring done on same satis
factory conditions. Whether you come early
or late in the season we will try to please you.
GEORGE D. HAMILL, Sr.
Phone 20-1 Wittig Building
W. C. NOEL & CO.
Fire, Health and Accident Insurance
Bonds, Business. Brokers
IS E. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
J. S. METZGER & SOIV
General Eire Insurance
19 East Union Street
FROSTBURB, MARYLAND
Reliable Fire
Insurance Companies
REPRESENTED BY
ULYSSES HANNA
General Insurance
Bonding
Fire
Offices—Citizens National Bank and
Opposite Postolfice.
D. A. BENSON, Agent.
HOCKING & HOHING
Fire Insurance Agents
Frostburg, Md.
Before buying Fife Insurance
consult
Arthur T. Johnson
Manager of
The Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.
Room 7 Shea Building
JAS. D. WILLIAMS
THE OLD RELIABLE
Boot and Shoe Maker
East Union Street
Invites a call from all friends
old and new
FIFTY YEKRS IN BUSINESS
HENRY N. SCHNEIDER
Shoe and Hat Emporium
97 East Union Street
M. & W. RODDA
Shoes Rubbers Slippers
REPAIRING NEATLY
DONE
93 Bowery Street
GILBERT STUDIO
79}4 E. Union St.
Moderate-Price F*lnotos
Post Cards Picture Framing
JPiotvire K irvislvirYg
D. J. BETZ
J eweler
and
Scientific Optician
FROSTBURG, MD.
FROSTBURG, MD., SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1912.
HUGH HPEIK
FRESH AND SMOKED
MEATS
13 BROADWAY
HARTIGBROS.
ALL KINDS OF
Fresh and Smoked Meats
ON HAND DAILY
30 Broadway Frostburg, Md.
William Engle James Engle
ENGLE MEAT MARKET
Dealers in
Live and Dressed Meats
Butter and Eggs Poultry in Season
66 E. Union St. 19 W. Union St.
WILLIAM HARVEY
Civil and Mining Engineer
COUNTY SURVEYOR
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
CHAS. G. WATSON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Pearce Building
Frostburg Maryland
CLAYTON PURNELL
Attorney at Law
Shea Building
FROSTBURG, MARYLAND
J. MV. SHEA
THE OLDEST DRUGGIST IN FROSTBURG
Eastman Kodaks Huyler’s Candies
Paints Glass Wall-Paper
WALTER T. LAYMAN
28 W. Union St. Opp. Postoffice
FROSTBURG, MD.
Roofing and Spouting
All kinds of Hand-Made Tinware
Stove Pipe and Elbows
Phone 25-4
Dr. G. Elwood Rrrriacost
Bentigt
C. & P. Phone
17% West Union Street
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
1893 ESTHBLISH6D 1912
Dr. I. L. RITTER,
DENTIST,
19 Broadway, [J7] Frostburg, Md.
Dr. J. M. PORTER,
DENTIST
First National Bank Building
Broadway Entrance Phone 20-3
j.Aiex. DAVIS BROS. Jas S
SMOK6 HOUSe
Domestic and Key West Cigars
Egyptian and Turkish Cigarettes
Meerschaum and Briar Pixies
Post Cards Pure-Food Chocolates
Smokers’ Articles a Specialty
20 W. Union St. End of Street Car Line
J. JOHNSON HON
Contractors and Builders
AGENCY FOR
CAREY ROOFING
WILLISON BROS.
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Sashes Doors Laths Shingles Slate
Rubber Roofing Wall Plaster Etc.
FROSTBURG, MD.
JAMES SRERDOS
Manufacturer of and dealer in
Coiffectionerg and Ice-Creatn
Dealer in
Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Nuts, Etc.
FROSTBURG, MD.
G. DUD HOCKING
Notary Public
OFFICE
Fidelity Savings Bank
Model Lice Spray,
Quart Can, 35 cents.
FOR SACK BY
T. L. POPP,
Dealer in Poultry Supplies,
FROSTBURG, MD.
CAMPBELL’S
FINE MILLINERY
73 East Union Street
A New Line of —
For Ladies, Misses and
Children at
MRS. P. O’ROURKE’S
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER.
1882 1912^
> { THIRTY YEARS AGO. f
J The Items Below Were Current During Y
Sfo Week Ending May 27, 1882. £
J were that —cool April weather will
continue until June; that, owing to the
suspension of work in the mines more
gardening will be done in town and
vicinity than ever before; that Guiteau
will hang; that politics will go on in
spite of mining suspension, and that
provisions, already high, will rise in
price.
- John Gerlach, George Stark and
Andrew Fox reported as improving
their properties.
Walking fever subsiding; baseball
disease superseding.
“Tale of Two Cities”—Eckhart,
with 1,000 people, has 7 policemen to
guard 2 houses; Frostburg, with 4,000,
“ has 1 policeman to watch 800 houses.”
Dr. G. Ellis Porter, county phy
sician, and A. M. E. Bush, president
of the County Commissioners, re
turned from eastern asylums and re
ported Allegany patients doing well.
The Consolidation Coal Company
began the erection of a tool-house in
Eckhart —100 feet long, 25 wide.
J Annual Meeting.
The annual meeting of the Mary
land State Bar Association this year
will be held at Cape May Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday, July 1, 2
and 3.
Hon. A. Hunter Boyd, of Cumber
land, the State’s Chief Judge, is the
nominee for President during next
year, and Hon. Clayton Purnell, of
this place, is one of nine nominees for ‘
y nine vice-presidents.
’ As stated, it will take the lawyers
three days —July Ist, 2d and 3d, to
transact the Association’s business,
and as Cape May is also a headquar
ters for bathing, it is presumed they
will celebrate the 4th by “going in
swimming.”
Threatened Danger. ,
C. B. Ryan, of New York City, sends
the Journal, a circular issued by the ,
Farm Bureau, New York Central and ;
_ Hudson River Railroad Company,
“advising farmers against using for
seed potatoes imported from Europe,” 1
because (1) “they are not adapted to -
our soils and climate, and will not re
turn profitable yields; and (2) they are '■
likely to be diseased with the ‘black- 1
scab’ of England, another ‘scab’ of 1
Ireland, ‘black-leg’ and ‘leaf-curl’ of 1
Germany, all dangerous. Work is not
- only lost in failure of crops, but the J
soil is seriously infected. Don’t use
foreign-grown potatoes for seed under ’
any circumstances.”
Advise the Committees Now.
Those who have not yet responded
j to the call of the Committee on Re- ’
search and Exhibits for the Home
' Coming display should do so at once. ’
’■ Relics of old times, such as—
Furniture Pictures
3 Mining Utensils Mining Lamps \
Household Goods Kitchen Utensils i
Bric-a-brac Spinning Wheels
s Books Blankets
Vases Candle-Sticks
etc., etc., etc., (
Of Indian or Colonial origin, will be (
I gladly accepted for display. <
Certainly no more interesting col- ,
lection can be made than of relics of j
the olden time, and everybody who ,
has one or more should apprise the ]
Committee at once of their willingness ;
to loan, so the articles can be proper
ly classified and provided for.
The names of the Committee are—
George G. Townsend, Chairman \
Patrick O’Rourke S: G. Haverstick
Davisson Armstrong Harry Fuller
Paul E. Hitchins H. V. Hesse
eFred. Wehner L. E. Eammert
Daniel J. Betz
Auxiliary Committee—
Mrs. Beverly S. Randolph, Chairman '
Mesdames— ;
" Daniel J. Betz Harry Fuller
D. A. Benson Grace Williams '
Misses —
Genevieve Engle Mary Evans
Margaret Krause Etfie Shaffer
* Annie Hanson
_ I
Western Maryland Extension.
The Reading (Pa.) Eagle of recent
date says that “a force of 1,000 men is
working day and night, fastening the
rails, filling in ballast and removing .
possible land-slides, and the like,” j
preparatory to a certain beginning of ,
through traffic July Ist. ,
The longest bridge on the road is at <
Salisbury Junction, where the viaduct ,
is 1,975 feet long over the steel work. •
It crosses a sloping meadow through ,
which the Cassellman River flows and .
J along which extends the Baltimore & (
Ohio, both of which are crossed.
♦ 1
Decline of Illiteracy. '
1
Maryland has kept pace with the
rest of the country in reducing the j
- number of its illiterate inhabitants. ]
In 1900 there were 101,947 illiterates
in the State over 10 years of age.
In 1910 the number had fallen to
73,397 —a decline of 3 per cent.
In 1900 the total of white illiterates 1
was 38,694; negroes 63,033; in 1910 i
whites 30,999; negroes 42,289.
■ (
A 111-Year Term.
For 23 years the figure, “9,” has ap
peared in dates of letters, bills and all .
papers of calendar record, and will so i
continue for 88 years. In 1889 it stood
on the right; the next year it moved a '
step to the left; in 1900 another step, <
and here it will stay until most read- 1
ers hereof will quit dating letters, etc. i
Bailiff D. J. Williams appeared in a
new uniform of “splendid blue.”
The Frostburg Water Company be
gan to lay mains along Steyer, Charles
and Beall streets.
Thomas Jenkins and Janies Cook,
two Frostburg youths, indulged a “4-
hour go-as-you-please walk Wednes
day afternoon, May 24th, near the
brick-yard, Jenkins winning by a mile.
Score—Jenkins 24; Cook 23 miles.
Archbishop Gibbons visited St.
Michael’s Church Sunday, May 21,
1882, and confirmed 177 at the High
Mass. Very many could not enter the
church owing to the crowd. At 2 p.
m. a procession was formed to visit
the new cemetery consecration. John
Kirby, Philip McMahon, Thomas
Morris, John Byrnes, William Grimes,
Patrick Cosgrove and John Keating
were officers in the long line of march.
While here the Archbishop expressed
pleasure at evidences of town growth.
He had been here in 1871 and 1879 and
noted many creditable improvements.
Mrs. Elizabeth Price died at Par
sons Bridge, British Columbia, Mon
day, May 15, 1882, in the 94th year of
her age. She was born in the north
of Ireland; lived at Eonaconing from
1875 to 1878, and removed thence to
live with three sons in British Colum
bia. She was the grandmother of Mrs.
James Tennant, of Borden Shaft.
Mary’s Little Cold.
Mary had a little cold
That started in her head,
And everywhere that Mary went
That cold was sure to spread.
It followed her to school one day —
(There wasn’t any rule ;)
It made the children cough and sneeze
To have that cold in school.
The teacher tried to drive it out; —
She tried hard, but —kerchoo !
It didn’t do a bit of good,
For teacher caught it too !
—Oskaloosa (Miss.) Herald.
A Suggestion Worth Consideration.
The Judge of the Juvenile Court in
Kansas City, Mo., believes that po
licemen should be equipped with pad
dles or slippers to spank members of
“boy gangs.”
A judicious use of these implements,
he believes, would deter very many
boys from mischief-making and
wrong-doing, and thus relieve the
Court of inflicting worse punishments
—to the further disgrace of the boys.
There is something in this, but
parents who are intolerant of corporal
punishment in school will not relish
chastisement by policemen, and so the
boy must go his own way—to the bad.
When the Judge disposes of a case,
however, he hands the boy a printed
list of injunctions, which are as full
of moral and educational value here
and everywhere as in Kansas City:
“Don’t go to Sunday ball games.
“Don’t jump street cars. It is
stealing.
“Don’t lead smaller boys. Associate
with boys of your own age.
“Start a bank account. The boy
who helps his mother is always en
titled to another chance.
“Bad boys should be switched, but
the imprint of the switching should be
made on the mind, not on the body.”
Open For Business.
Henfy J. Boettner, tax-collector for
this district, has opened his office in
the Merrbach builping, East Union
street, and the presumption is—if
every tax payer will do his full duty—
go to the office and pay his taxes like
a manly man , Mr. Boettner will not
have to make his duty unpleasant to
anybody.
The Greatest Current Problem.
What is “the eternal question” for
to-day?
Answer wanted before to-morrow.
Funny Entertainment Coming.
“Mr. Bob,” an extremely humorous
comedy, will be produced in Frostburg
Opera House Monday evening, May
27th, under the auspices of St. John’s
Episcopal Church, directed by Mrs.
Clara P. Ewing.
This play has won great success in
every house where it has appeared.
It is filled with ludicrous situations
from beginning to end; abounds in
clever wit and humor, and is a laugh
from start to finish.
Don’t miss it.
Applicable Here.
Every effort should be made by
parents and teachers to lead children
to see that it is a wrong to the prop
erty owner and to society to mark or
deface a fence, building or sidewalk.
Strangers always get a bad impression
of a town if when walking its streets
they see names, initials and pictures
scratched on the buildings and side
walks with pencil or chalk. —Salisbury
(Pa.) Star.
Teachers could do nothing better
than deliver a brief, pungent lecture
on this and kindred subjects at least
once a week—to supply the neglect of
parents, engrossed in many other
things. It’s like promoting “good
house-keeping” to do this.
“Thirty Years Ago.”
In the Baltimore News record of
happenings May 12, 1882, appears this
note:
“Rev. J. B. Avirett lectured in the
Chapel of Ascension P. E. Church,
(Baltimore,) on “‘Humanity: Its In
firmities and How to Heal Them.’”
The lecturer was Col. John W.
Avirett’s father, who died several
months ago.
The title of the lecture is as much
“up-to-date” now as then, and no
doubt the chaplain told his audience
that it is a condition wherein every
man should be his own physician.
A Continued Story.
C. B. Ryan, of New York City, sends
the Journal, a clip from an article
written by Garrett P. Serviss paying
high tribute to the motor-car as a pro
moter of good-road building.
The Journal will publish it by in
stalments, so that for several weeks
its readers will enjoy as many pun
gent lessons on the value of good
roads.
Mr. Serviss asks—
“ Did you know that we have in this
country 2,199,645 miles of highways—
enough in aggregate length to make
four continuous loops around the earth
and the moon —and that, although this
is more than twice the length of all
the highwa3 T s in crowded Europe, only
. 190,489 miles of these highways are
5 improved—i. e., graded, drained and
surfaced with hard material—while
practically all the European roads are
, thus improved?
“And did you also know that most
-of the improved roads that we do
: possess have been made in con
. sequence of the demands of the users
of motor cars and motor trucks? The
benefit accrues to all —to every user
. of the roads, whether for walking,
, driving for pleasure, or carrying pro
l ducts to market —but the impulse pro
: ducing the improvement comes, al
. most entirely, from the urging of those
t who ride in motor cars. In helping
l themselves they are helping all
3 others.”
, The Jotjrnai, entitles this “a con
i' tiuued story,” because each division
. will be in itself a tribute to the motor
-1 car, which Mr. Serviss affirms, “is do
. ing more for good road construction
1 than all other influences combined,”
. and as a lesson to everybody concern
ing his own duty in the premises as a
- promoter of the greatest of all public
- utilities—good roads.
E—
i Financial.
’ The last grand jury recommended
that the County Treasurer place the
county funds in the bank offering the
most interest upon deposits.
The Fidelity of this place, put in an
offer of 2 per cent, on daily balances,
and 3 per cent, on stated amounts for
half-yearly periods.
The matter, however, remains un
settled, though the Fidelity’s offer
seems very liberal.
Dances.
Messrs. Stanley Eogsdon, Owen E.
: Winter, James A. Brown, W. J. Davis
and Prof. D. A. Boyle constitute a
committee arranging for and directing
a dance last evening in Frostburg
Opera House under auspices of Frost
burg Council, No. 1442, Knights of
Columbus.
The leading class of Beall High
, School indulged a dance last evening
! in the Jr. O. U. A. M. Pavilion. It
was a return tender by the boys to the
girls for the Eeap Year ball sometime
, ago. Carl Ehm, Clifton Jeffries and
Engle Speir are the committee.
Appeal For Titanic Shaft.
The following appeal for funds for
: a national memorial to the heroes of
; the Titanic tragedy was issued yester
day by Mrs. Annie Eeakin Sioussat,
honorary president of the Maryland
• State Federation of Womens Clubs:
“In the youth and the elasticity of
: our nation, impressions made upon us,
even of our sorrows, are not lasting,
and therefore it seems fitting that of
this latest and greatest grief which
has come to our people —the loss of
the Titanic —there should be some
great memorial erected in the capital
of our nation.
1 “It should follow the memorials of
ancient Greece and Rome, which to
-1 day call to mind the uplift of their
heroic deeds throughout the ages;
and it might well bear the oft-quoted
but ever-inspiring refrain of Kipling—
‘Eord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Eest we forget, lest we forget!’
; “And so there has been begun by a
little group of women in Washington,
represented by Mrs. John Hay, honor
ary chairman, and Mrs. John Hays
' Hammond, secretary, a fund for such
i a memorial, which it is hoped will
i extend to every nook and corner of
' this republic.
“The co-operation, therefore, of
' every woman in this State of Mary
: land is asked; and the sum of one
1 dollar from each will make a worthy
remembrance of that splendid group,
from the bellboy and the stoker to the
army officer and the capitalist, who
' faceed death with the intrepidity
which upholds our ideals and gives us
fresh impetus for the life of our
nation.”
All contributions may be sent to the
. chairman for Maryland, Mrs. T.
. Harrison Garrett, Titanic Memorial
. Fnnd,!so6 Continental Trust Building,
. Baltimore Baltimore Sun.
♦' .
Building Growth and Improvements
' John A. Eammert is building a store
house on West Union street.
Frank Conlon is building a residence
i at Wright’s Crossing.
John Monahan has built a store
house on Mt. Pleasant street.
Ex-Judge Perry Weimer has made
an addition of several rooms to his
residence on Orman street.
i
Mayor John J. Price has improved
• his properties, both on the corner of
Frost avenue and Broadway and the
adjacent residence on the avenue.
' Mrs. Mary G. Patterson, of Wood
' land, will shortly begin the erection
) of a residence on Washington-street
lot recently purchased from Joseph
Eindauer.
The Cumberland Brewing Company
: has added a rear building to property
: on Hill street, to be used for cold
■ storage.
The Mayer Brothers’ new ice-plant,
on Uhl street, and “Clarke Hall,” on
First street, are progressing rapidly.
William A. Kreiling is building a
dwelling on Park avenue.
A Growing Organization.
Nearly 20 members have been added
■ to the roll of Frostburg Company, No.
9, Uniformed Rank of Knights of
Pythias, within the last month. This
is probably the finest uniformed body
in town and, lacking only in number,
its officers and members are campaign
ing for recruits to meet big expecta
tions in the Home-Coming parades.
They want to enlarge and drill pre
paratory to the town’s greatest event.
HENRY F. COOK, Manager.
WHOLE NUMBER 2,119
Origiu of Flag Day.
! Responding to a request for some
: account of the origin of “Flag Day,”
■ Dr. S. A. Baer, of the State Normal
■ School Faculty, submits the following
historical sketch:
“When the American Colonies
. separated from Fngland in 1776 for
some time they had no flag.
“In scattered parts of the country
different flags were used at first.
“ ‘The Pine-Tree Flag’ was that of
Massachusetts and consisted of a
plain white field and a green pine-tree
in the centre, with the motto—“An
Appeal to Heaven.”
“This flag was used in the different
scenes around Boston until the autumn
of 1775, and in a distinct way ex
pressed the position of the American
colonies at the time.
“It was also used as the naval flag
for some time.
“ ‘The Rattlesnake Flag’ of Vir
ginia was generally known as ‘The
Culpepper Flag,” from the county
where it was first raised. It consisted
of a white field with a coiling rattle
snake in the centre with the mottoes
—‘Liberty or Death,’ above, and
‘Don’t Tread on Me,’ below the snake.
“The Palmetto flag of South Caro
lina consisted of a blue field with a
silver crescent. Its motto was—
‘Liberty or Death.’ The flag Ser
geant Jasper rescued at the battle of
Fort Moultrie,
“The Grand Union Flag, consisting
of thirteen stripes and the Union Jack,
was raised by Washington at Cam
bridge, January 2, 1776.
“ ‘The Star Spangled Banner’ was
adopted by the Americans at Phila
delphia June 14, 1777. The language
of the resolution is as follows:
“ ‘Resolved, That the Flag of the
Thirteen United States be thirteen
stripes—alternate red and white; that
the union be thirteen stars—white in
a blue field, representing a new con
stellation!
“Over a year before this action the
Congress had appointed Col. George
Ross, Robert Morris and Gen. Wash
ington a committee to agree on the
design and form of the new flag. In
June, 1776, this committee met Mrs.
John Ross, familiarly known as ‘Betsy
Ross,” at her home, No. 239 Arch
street, Philadelphia, to request her to
make a flag according to the design
they had agreed upon. She suggested
some changes in regard to the form of
the stars, which were allowed.
“Mrs. Ross made the first flag
and was afterward employed by the
Congress to make the regular supply
for the army.
“Patriotic societies, without dis
tinction, observe, therefore, June 14th
as ‘Flag Day,’ and in many States the
teachers of the public schools are re
quested to observe it with suitable
exercises.”
Tittle and History
This country, discovered nearly 420
years ago, remained unsettled 115
years.
Last Monday, May 13th, 305 years
ago, therefore, the first settlers landed
at Jamestown, Va., and then for near
ly 200 years it was strife for and
against “government.”
Considering how long it seems since
1776, the previous periods seem in
credible.
Time may have flown, aeroplane
like, but American history seems to
have walked.
“Missed the Mark.”
If the Great Paper had read the
Times of April 30 carefully it would
not have fallen into the error of credit
ing our editorial on “Mother’s Day” to
the Oakland Republican.—Cumber
land Times.
The Times' presumption is correct.
The Journal first read the article
in the Republican and aimed to “give
credit where credit is due.”
A Model Appointment.
The Governor appointed Robert Mc-
Donald Judge of the Juvenile Court,
Cumberland, Monday, and Mr. Mc-
Donald accepted.
The Governor might have searched
the city over without finding a man
better endowed with just the qualities
for a position at once so delicately
judicial and usefully humane.
The Journal, therefore, offers full
endorsement of the News' testimonial
accompanying its announcement of
the appointment:
“Captain McDonald is not only a
member of the bar, but is well suited
to the position and will be able to give
the work laid out ample time. He has
a good heart, is kind and genial, and,
while dealing out justice to the little
ones and their offending parents or
guardians, he is just the kind of a man
who will temper justice with mercy—
a trait so much needed in a judge who
has the care of the little ones in his
keeping.”
Incidentally, the Journal com
mends to Judge McDonald’s attention
“A Suggestion Worth Consideration,”
elsewhere printed.
An Attractive Announcement.
Mrs. Ewing will present a recital by
her private pupils in State Normal
School Assembly Hall to-day (Satur
day, May 18th,) at 2 p. m. The fol
lowing programme will be rendered :
Music Beall’s Orchestra
Reading— “Kentucky Philosophy ’’ —
Miss Verna Hill
Reading—“ Lady Maud’s Oath”—
Miss Hazel Davis
Reading—“ Der Oak und Der Vine” —
Miss Irene Lapp
Reading—“ Backward, Turn Back
ward”— Miss Martha Weisenborn
Confessions 3 Miss Ida Eichorn
confessions | Clifton Jeffries
Reading—“ Music on the Rappahan
nock” — Miss Annie Elias
Reading—“Selected”— Arthur Bond
Music Beall’s Orchestra
Reading—“ The Sioux Chief’s Daugh
ter”— Miss Inez Devore
Reading—“A Test in Arithmetic” —
Miss Elinor Smith
Reading—“ Making Him Feel at
Home”— Miss Margaret McAteer
Reading—“Calls’ ’ —
Miss Angela Brady
Reading Miss Cora Martin
Scene from “Mary Stuart” —
Edith Madore Inez Devore
Annie Elias
Clifton Jeffries Arthur Bond
Reading—“TheGlove and the Lion” —
Miss Emogene Caudill
Music Beall’s Orchestra
Admission 20 Cents
Dancing will be indulged at close of
programme.

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