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Frostburg mining journal. [volume] (Frostburg, Md.) 1871-1913, May 25, 1912, Image 1

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Mining &Uat Journal.
J. BENSON ODER, Editor.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR. NO. 35
“God. Our Country and Our Order”
WASHINGTON CAMP, No. 41
Patriotic Order Sons of America
MEETS EVERY MONDAY EVENING
IN WITTIG’S HALL
Visiting Members Always Welcome
John W. DeVore . Jack S. Crow
President Secretary
“HELLO, BILL!”
Frostburg LodgE, 80. 470
B. P. 0. S.
Meets every Tuesday evening at 8 o’clock
ELERNOR BUILDING
Visiting Brothers Invited ltooms Always Open
H.C. EVANS & CO.
THE UP-TO-DATE
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
Good teams
Haulinp of All Kinds Open Day and Night
Special Attention Given to Funerals and
- Weddings. Phone 304
HUNTER & SON
FIRST-CLASS LIVERY
All kinds of FEED for sale
General Hauling a Specialty
Corner Mechanic and Water Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
MILTON W. RACE
Livery and Sales Stables
Horses for sale at all times at all prices and
guaranteed as represented
Mechanic and Maple Streets
C. & P. Telephone FROSTBURG, MD.
RANKIN BROTHERS
TRANSFER
“We Deliver the Goods”
WATER STREET
A. P. HOEY
The Tonsorial Artist
13 1 E. UNION ST.
FIRST-CLASS WORK GUARANTEED
About your Hair. Guts, Shaves, Massage, Sham
pooing, Hair Singeing and Tonic Rubs.
He will do them right.
5 Chairs 5 Barbers
PALMER BROTHERS
Tonsorial Parlor
A Specialty of Massage and Hair Cutting
159 East Union Street
B. J. PALMER, Manager
HENRY J. BOETTNER
Fine Groceries
Provisions
Hay and Feed
Phone ioo-i 197 E. Union St.
J. C. WILSON & SON
FANCY ANI) STAPLE GROCERIES
Fruits. Vegetables and Country
Produce
Fresh Fish and Oysters in Season
Fine Cigars and Tobacco
140 E. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
EDWARD DAVIS & GO.
DEALERS IN
Staple and Fancy Groceries
Country Produce, Queensware, etc.
Union Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
A. SPITZNAS
Fancy and Staple Groceries
9 BROADWAY
Just a few steps from Union Street,
but it will pay you to come.
GRIFFITH BROTHERS
dealers in
Groceries, Provisions, Flour
Feed, Etc.
Corner Union and Water Streets
FROSTBURG, MD.
“GOOD THINGS TO EAT”
C. F. BETZ
GROCER
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
THE CORNER GROCERY
Buy SLEEPY EYE FLOUR
And get a Set of Silver Spoons
Special Grocery offer on cash orders of $5.00 or
more. “See us first.”
HORGAN BROS., 72 Broadway
RIGHT BROTHERS
•245 BROADWAY
GROCERIES PROVISIONS
HAY AND FEED
MINERS’ SUPPLIES
PHONE 2-4:*7-2
P. F. CARROLL
THE BOWERY GROCER
General Merchandise
Fancy Groceries, Country Produce
Corner Bowery and Loo Streets
FROSTBURG, 7VYD.
\V. H. ANGWIN
Staple and Fancy Groceries
10 East Loo Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
Phone 145-F
Telephone Orders Promptly Delivered.
MRS. MARY JOHNS
Restaurant and Ice-Cream Parlor
1 68 F. UNION STREET
Ice-Cream sent out in all designs
Meals and Lunches at all hours
Parties, Balls and Lodges furnished
JOE McGRAW
Soft Drinks and Lunches
Cigars, Tobacco and
Confectionery
1 155 E. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
Phone 20-1 Room 1
BERNADETTE RAFFERTY
Leading Public Stenographer
t Wittig Building
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
W. (i. HILLER
The Reliable TaUor
10 W. UNION ST.
Order your Suit for Summer now and
avoid the rush.
GEO. H. GUNTER
i Clothing and Furnishings
For Men and Boys
Hotel Gladstone Building
9W. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
A. CHAS. STEWART
“Home of Good Clothing”
Citizens Bank Building
KYLUS & GROSS
MODERN TAILORS
WILL FIT YOU
88 East Union Street
ALL MEN’S CLOTHING
MADE TO ORDER
AND
Guaranteed to Fit or No Sale!
Other work in Tailoring done on same satis
factory conditions. Whether you come early
or late in the season we will try to please you.
GEORGE D, HAMILL, Sr.
Phone 20-1 Wittig Building
W. C. NOEL & CO.
Fire, Health and Accident Insurance
Bonds, Business Brokers
15 E. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
J. S. METZGER & SON
General Fire Insurance
19 East Union Street
FROSTBURG, MARYLAND
Reliable Fire
Insurance Companies
REPRESENTED BY
ULYSSES HANNA
General Insurance
Bonding
Fire
Offices—Citizens National Bank and
Opposite Postoffice.
D. A. BENSON, Agent.
HOCKING & HOHING
Fire Insurance Agents
Frostburg, Md.
Before bujfing Life Insurance
consult
Arthur T. Johnson
Manager of
The Metropolitan Life Ins. Co,
Room 7 Shea Building
JAS. D. WILLIAMS
THE OLD RELIABLE
Boot and Shoe Maker
East Union Street
Invites a call from all frlends--
old and new
FIFTY YERRS IN BUSINESS
HENRY N. SCHNEIDER
Shoe and Hat Emporium
97 East Union Street
M. 8c W. RODDA
Shoes Rubbers Slippers
REPAIRING NEATLY
DONE
93 Bowery Street
GILBERT STUDIO
79 y 2 E. Union St.
Moderate-Price Photos
Post Cards Picture Framing
Picture Finishing
T eweler
and
Scientific Optician
FROSTBURG, MD.
FROSTBURG, MD., SATURDAY, MAY 25, 1912.
0011 mm
FRESH AND SMOKED
MEATS
13 BROADWAY
HARTIGBROS.
ALL KINDS OF
Fresh and Smoked Meats
ON HAND DAILY
30 Broadway Frostburg, Md.
William Engle James Engle
ENGLE MEAT MARKET
Healers in
Live and Dressed Meats
Butter and Eggs Poultry in Season
66 E. Union St. 19 W. Union St.
WILLIAM HARVEY
Civil and Mining Engineer
COUNTY SURVEYOR
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
CHAS. G. WATSON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Pearce Building
Frostburg Maryland
CLAYTON PURNELL
Attorney at Law
Shea Building
FROSTBURG, MARYLAND
T. W. SHEA
THE OLDEST DRUGGIST IN FROSTBURG
Eastman Kodaks Huyler’s Candies
Paints Glass Wall-Paper
WALTER T. LAYMAN
28 W. Union St. Opp. Postoffice
FROSTBURG, MD.
Roofing and Spouting
All kinds of Hand-Made Tinware
Stove Pipe and Elbows
Phone 25-4
Dr. G. Elwood Anuacost
Dentist
mm
C. & P. Phone
West Union Street
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
1593 ESTKBLISH6D IBIZ
Dr. I. L. RITTER,
DENTIST,
19 Broadway, [J7] Frostburg, Md.
Dr. J. M. PORTER,
DENTIST
First National Bank Building
Broadway Entrance Phone 20-3
J.Alex. M y IS BR QS. Jas " S "
S7VYOKe HOWS©
Domestic and Key West Cigars
Egyptian and Turkish Cigarettes
Meerschaum and Briar Pipes
Post Cards Pure-Food Chocolates
Smokers’ Articles a Specialty
20 W. Union St. End of Street Car Line
J. JOHNSON & SON
Contractors and Builders
AGENCY FOR
CAREY ROOFING
WILLISON BROS.
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Sashes Doors Laths Shingles Slate
Rubber Roofing Wall Plaster Etc.
FROSTBUKG, MD.
JAMES SKEfIDOS
Manufacturer of and dealer in
Confectionery and Ice-Crearn
Dealer in
Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Nuts, Etc.
FROSTBURG, MD.
G. DUD HOCKING
Notary Public
OFFICE
Fidelity Savings Bank
Model Lice Spray,
Quart Can, 35 cents.
FOR SAUE BY
T. L. POPP,
Dealer in Poultry Supplies,
FROSTBURG, MD.
CAMPBELL’S
FINE MILLINERY
73 East Union Street
A New Line of—
HATS
For Ladies, Misses and
Children at
MRS. P. O’ROURKE’S
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER.
1882 1912 “
f THIRTY YEARS AGO. f
J The Items Below Were Current During v
Week Ending June 3, 1882.
Rev. J. Ruhl, pastor of Salem Re
, formed Church, attended the conven
tion of Somerset Classis at Somerset,
Pa.
George Jeffries, of Glidden, lowa, a
former resident, returned on a visit to
his father, George Jeffries, seriously
ill.
Gus. Wm. Zeiler returned from a
visit to Chicago, 111.
Miss Kate Standish returned from
a visit to New York.
The family of Rev. J. P. Wright ar
rived and the congregation had a fine
supper ready for them in the parson
age.
Henry Hawthorne, of Pompey
Smash, left that place for Chicago.
Henry Stevens, an old resident of
Eckhart, died Wednesday, May 31,
1882, aged about 55 years.
Beautiful spring flowers, in full
bloom,
Make the air redolent with perfume.
The marching of the “Vets” on
Decoration Day was highly praised by
the younger citizens.
The Future of the Georges Creek
Coal Region.
The Lonaconing Advocate published
last week an interesting and cheering
article concerning the development of
the region’s “small veins” of coal.
The exhaustion of the “Big Vein,”
once the region’s greatest immediate
asset, is admitted, but the “smaller
veins” afford a prospect for develop
ment, business life and growth, the
end whereof no man can foresee.
“Only within the last six or eight
years,” says the Advocate , “has the de
velopment of the ‘small veins’ re
ceived much attention, for only with
in that period have the labor condi
tions and state of coal market allowed
the operator to mine them at a profit.”
Long accustomed to the compara
tively easy work of mining the “Big
Vein,” it has been difficult “to secure
men to work them at a price that
would offset the freight differential
that the railroad companies have ar
bitrarily placed uppn them for ship
ment to the seaboard.”
Concerning theq:;ality of the “small
vein,” coals the Advocate quotes the
Maryland Geological Survey as fol
lows:
“The coal of some of the small
seams is usually of excellent quality
and if properly operated is but slight
ly, if at all, inferior to the coal of the
Big Vein.”
“For steam purposes,” says the
Advocate, “Tyson compares favorably
Waynesburg Lower Sewickley Tyson Pittsburg
Moisture 83 .94 .80 .74
Volatile 19.20 18.60 15.75 17.46
Ash 9.23 6.80 6.46 7.05
Fixed Carbon 70.74 73.66 76.99 74.75
100.00 100.00 100.00 100.0
Sulphur... 1.05 1.15 .72 .94.
B. T. U.* 13950 14550 14650 14620
Baketown Upper Freeport Kittanning Clarion
Moisture 57 . 72 .84 .78
Volatile 14.02 15.60 13.76 18.75
Ash 8.22 9.82 10.13 8.25
Fixed Carbon 77.19 73.86 75.27 72.22
100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
Sulphur 1.20 1.50 F 32 1.69
B. T. U 14537 14100 14285 14500
with Franklin coal in every respect
except it requires more attention on
the part of the firemen.
“Big Vein coal can be fed into fire
box in large quantities and will burn
without further attention. When
Tyson coal is burnt it must be placed
in the box in small quantities and re
quires more attention. It requires
frequent "stirrings up’ or it will
‘crust.’ But the insignificance of this
handicap is made up by its splendid
quality.”
The market for the Tyson is indi
cated as follows:
“At present the larger portion of
Tj-son coal mined in the Georges
Creek Valley finds its way to New
England, where it is used by the mills,
and much goes to Canadian points,
where it is used for smithing purposes.
Before it is used for this purpose,
however, it is given special treatment
byway of washings.”
As indicated previously, “this vein
is receiving the larger portion of cur
rent attention,” and then, geological
ly, “it lies about 100 feet above the
Big Vein or Pittsburg seam. Between
these two is the Redstone seam which
is about 4 feet in thickness.
“The Tyson seam has an average
thickness of 43 inches. Directly be
low it is a layer of lime-stone and
above is dark shale. Of the latter
about 2 Yi feet is removed in mining
the coal in order to get proper work
ing height.”
Now comes a most important chapter
in this discussion. The Advocate
says—
“lt is a sample of this shale which
is now on its way to Dr. Henrich Reis’s
laboratories, at Cornell University, for
examination into its brick-making
qualities. If it proves valuable for fire
brick purposes, that industry will im
mediately assume a position of im
portance with coal-mining and in a
few years equal it.
“All this shale is now thrown over
the hillsides and regarded as so much
dead loss. If it can be made into
bricks it will be mined with the Tyson
coal, the one cost of mining covering
both operations. Instead of miners
then working in 3 to 5 feet veins and
devoting their energies exclusively to
Tyson, they will work in 8 to 10 feet
veins, for the shale will be as valuable
as the coal.”
The new comet not the success an
ticipated.
All fraternal societies in town re
ported in flourishing condition.
Messrs. B. Stern, C. Seifker and T.
A. Miller completed the new assess
ment and found an aggregate of town
property subject to taxation of
$1,027,233, a gain of $83,687.
Thoburn Post, No. 21, G. A. R.,
turned out “60 strong” and decorated
the graves of deceased comrades Tues
day, May 30, 1882. Christian Lehr
was sergeant-major, James Welch en
sign, George Hammond drum-major,
Thomas Hill adjutant and W. H.
Koch commander. Hon. William
Brace delivered the address in Alle
gany cemetery.
James Kane was elected president
of the Frostburg Gaslight Company,
A. E. Hitchins vice-president, C. A.
Greene secretary, Davisson Arm
strong treasurer, Douglas Percy, Nel
son Beall, Lloyd Lowndes, James H.
Ward and Owen Price directors.
W. H. Evans established the Trede
gar Garden in McCulloh’s addition.
The Advocate estimates that the
Tyson vein underlies 16,000 acres of
surface in this region, and quotes “one
prominent operator” as predicting
that the seam “will last 30 years at the
current rate of mining, with 550 miners
getting it out.” The Consolidation
Coal Company alone “has six open
ings, and so far has worked only about
15 per cent, of its holdings.”
“Tyson coal,” continues the Advo
cate, “is easier to work than Big Vein
coal, but entails more expense on the
operators on account of the shale
which must be mined with it and for
which there is at present no market.
It is less dangerous to the men and
they receive the same rate for mining
it. There is no gas. This seam of
coal gets its name from Col. Tyson, a
pioneer coal operator in this region
who first began in a small way to mine
it 40 years ago.”
If Tyson were “all the peaches in
the basket,” 30 years would look like
a short lease to go on, but the coal
veins other than the Big Vein and
Tyson at present being operated are
the Six-foot or Lower Kittanning, the
Upper Freeport, the Four-foot or
Bakerstown, and the Franklin, or
Dirty Nine-foot.
Besides these the Brookville or Blue
baugh and Clarion or Parker seams
lying below the Six-foot vein are
mined at Barrel ville, while the Waynes-
t burg, 100 feet above the Tyson, is
1 operated by the American Coal Com
pany on a small scale just south of
- Lonaconing. As far as the experience
1 of the operators in this region has
i gone, the Six-foot and Tyson seams
1 are found to be subject to more or
- less irregularity of thickness and
5 “draw backs.” The Tyson coal bed
1 is a split seam, the two benches of
s which are split in the middle of the
1 region, by about 18 feet of rock,
mainly limestone.
Leaving the Advocate's article now
f and making a survey of the Georges
5 Creek coal-field from the Frostburg
7 outlook, the scene shifts from a ques
tion whether the magnitude of its
. wealth in minerals indicates need of
, amelioration of conditions, implied by
*■ the Advocate, after the Big Vein or
, Pittsburg seam is exhausted.
The pre-eminent point for observa
tion and study of this great valley,
' with its landscape of exquisite beauty,
, its naturally fertile surface, capable
under proper cultivation of support
- ing five millions of people, is the town
j of Frostburg.
r With an average elevation of 2,200
f feet above sea-level, yet, geologically,
' it occupies the surface overlying the
upper coal seams of the Dunkard for
? mation, or the top of the last layer of
the carboniferous period.
1 The flow of this great coal basin is
’ formed by the heavy Pottsville con
r glomerate (pudding stone) sandstone,
- which comes to the surface on the
" mountain-sides east of Georges Creek,
[ and, dipping down away under the
surface, forms a deep trough, or basin,
r passing below the centre of town at a
1 depth of nearly 3,000 feet, and, again
J reaching the surface, forms the back
r bone of Great Savage mountain on the
; west —the distance from crest to crest
1 being about 7 miles!
J No coal exists below this heavy
; sand-stone; hence, all the coal-seams
underlying the town of Frostburg are
to be found in the rocks which fill this
trough or basin. The coal is deposited
in parallel layers or beds called “coal
veins,” and are approximately parallel
to the conglomerate sand-stone, or
floor and other sand-stones, fire-clay,
shale and lime-stone that fill the
trough. They extend with persistent
regularity from outcrop to outcrop at
and in the vicinity of Frostburg, but
are eroded by the streams to some ex
tent north-east and south-west from
town. Due to this erosion, many of
the seams are exposed to the surface,
' and erelong will be profitably mined.
It is not generally known that in all
there are thirty coal beds in the Georges
Creek basin, ten of the principal ones
now under operation and producing
, coal!
E A glimpse sidewise at a picture of
the series of thirty seams, within the
, 3,000 feet limit of depth, develops the
1 facts that they vary in thickness from
. 1 foot to 14 feet, and that the total
. thickness of all the workable seams will
average nearly ioo feet, making five
billion tons a fair estimate of its ag
gregate tonnage! This will insure
wages to employees in Allegany coun
ty in a sum not less than six billions of
dollars!
This, plus the enormous wealth to
be derived from fire-clays, lime-stone,
shale, etc., saying nothing of the value
of land products, endows Allegany
county with a total of wealth equal, if
not greater, than the aggregate of all
the counties in this State, Delaware
and the eastern half of Virginia!
In the face of these facts, why
should the hearts of the residents of
the George’s Creek valley grow cold
with apprehension for its business fu
ture when contemplating the exhaus
tion of the Big Vein?
A portion of this article consists of
an analysis of eight veins, and the
reader, remembering that the “Pitts
burg” and the “Big Vein” are the
same, can see that in the vital in
gredients the “Tyson” is by 4.54
points the superior coal!
Good Roads.
In continuation of the story begun
last week—the road story sent by C.
B. Ryan, the next chapter is made up
of two observations, as follows:
“There is nothing that strikes the
visitor from Europe so unpleasantly
as soon as he ventures beyond the
neighborhood of our great cities as the
abominable condition of the majority
of our country roads. Their lack of
everything which he has been taught
to regard as indispensable in a high
way frequently makes him jump to
the conclusion that after all this mar
velous nation is but half civilized.
“Such a conclusion is, of course,
unjustified, and yet one can under
stand how it is reached. The visitor
does not reflect upon the fact that we, ,
even with our vertiginous rapidity of
execution, have not yet had time ,
enough to reform the face of the land.
The United States has had to begin ,
at the beginning. We never had a
line of imperial Caesars at work for
a thousand years, or a Napoleon lead
ing conquering armies to give us a ,
great framework of solid highways to
start with. We have had to lay all the
foundations ourselves.”
It required many years to build
“The Appian Way,” the road begun
by Appius Claudius Caecus 312 years :
before Christ, but when its 350 miles
of paved surface was finished, it was
a long stretch for those days, but for
centuries it was the model for all .
Europe.
If the motor-car had been in vogue j
then, what a splendid ride that 350-
mile run from Rome to Brindisi would ]
have been! ,
Such runs will be practicable here
when Allegany-county enterprise !
makes the small-vein shales available
for road surfacing.
-• <
Grantsville Gleanings.
Grantsville is rather sorry that the
automobile for mail transportation has
not proven the success which the en
terprise of the contractor merits. (
Aside from all other of its many ad- ,
vantages, it meant the arrival of “The 1
Great Paper” on Saturdays a few
hours earlier. However, the people
accept the return of the old method
very philosophically, for while not ,
promising so many thrilling adven
tures, it is safer and surer, for Mr. j
Race’s driver and horses have never
failed them yet.
Misses Mary and Rebekah Gerson, S
of Frostburg, are here visiting their <
father—Myer Gerson.
Miss Mary Charles, of Cumberland, 1
returned home Monday from a week’s
visit to her aunt—Miss Maggie Brown, .
of this place. j
Dr. E. A. Smith spent the week !
here, taking the place of his colleague
—Dr. I. E. Ritter, and the people of
Grantsville, pleased with his genial
appearance and manner, hope he will
come again. ;
Wetit to Jail.
Judge Thomas Gatehouse heard the
testimony in the charge of felonious :
assault against Harry Atkinson Mon- i
day evening and held the latter for !
the grand jury in the sum of SSOO bail.
Under advice of counsel, however, !
Atkinson went to jail next morning,
with the view, it is said, of getting >
out under a habeas corpus proceeding. :
States Attorney Frank A. Perdew, !
of Cumberland, was present as pros- :
ecutor, and Charles G. Watson, of
this place, for defense. :
Fred’s Dissent.
The last time Fred. Durr was in
town he told about a man over in
Pennsylvania who had died from a
gorge of old veal, young bacon and
hard cider.
“All this was his own doin’s,” al
leged Fred., “but he belonged to ;
seven lodges, andeveryone of them said i
—‘whereas, in the wisdom of Divine
Providence our beloved brother has
been removed,’ and so on. And that’s
all the news I’ve got this time, Jour
nal, and you can make the most of it! ”
HENRY P. COOK, Manager.
WHOLE NUMBER 2,120
Can’t Keep Him From Going.
“O, ma, look here—git on your duds—
We haven’t much time—my land !
There’s goin’ to be a rumpus
’Way up there in Maryland !”
“You crazy chile ! what’s wrong with
you ?
You are acting like a clown !”
“But listen, ma, just one minute—.
It’s ’bout our dear old home town :
“They’re having a centennial—
The stores all look bright and gay;
I’m goin’ back to that dear place
If it’s only for a day !
“Just wait till pa comes home from
work
And starts to swear—‘eternal’—
I’ll grab him by the neck and show
To him a Mining Journal !
“I’ve read the poems ’bout a month,
And, believe me, they are fine !
Some were writ by G. K. Hosken,
And some by C. B. Ryan.
“No use to try to stop me now —
No use, I say—l’m goin’
To see the town and shake the hand
Of little John H. Mowbn.”
State Normal School.
Next Friday, 31st inst., the general
examination will begin and continue
four days.
“Miss Fearless & C 0.,” a three
act play, will be given Friday
evening, June 7th, in Frostburg Opera
House. Pupils of both the junior and
senior classes will constitute the cast,
and Mrs. Clara Pyle Ewing will di
rect the program.
Next day the Graduate’s Study Club
will meet for the last time this year
and enjoy a banquet given by Prof.
R. H. Ridgely, principal.
The Senior Class day is fixed for
Monday, June 10th, in Assembly Hall
of the School.
This Class has about completed its
work—this after doing well in both
recitation and practice. The mem
bers have also written and submitted
essays, two of which will be read at
the Commencement afterthe Principal
has determined which are the best.
Topics and names follow:
“Normal Graduates and the State
of Maryland”—Miss Anna Barncord.
“Poetry as a Factor in Education”—
Miss Olive Cathcart.
“Fenelton”—Miss Rosella Eynch.
“Dickens as a Humorist”—Miss
Dora Malcolm.
“Democracy in Education” —Miss
Kathleen McDermott.
“The Primary Teacher” —Miss Jane
Morton.
“The Idyls of the King”—Miss May
Mays.
“English in the Primary Grades”—
Miss Nellie Powell.
“The Power of Fiction”—Miss
Nellie Ryan.
“The Enthusiastic Teacher”—Miss
Kathleen WolfA
“The Training of the Teacher”—
Miss Marie Morgan.
“The Moral Training of Children”
—Miss Estella Williams.
“The Evolution of the Text-Book”
—Walker Chapman.
The Commencement will be held
Wednesday evening,.. June 12th,
in the Frostburg Opera House. Four
teen students will graduate, Hon.
Clayton Purnell, of this place, mem
ber of the State Board of Education,
conferring the diplomas.
The year has been one of great
success.
Later —Since the foregoing report
was placed in type the Journal learns
that Prof. Ridgeley has made selection
of the two essays as follows:
“Poetry as a Factor in Education”
—by Miss Olive Cathcart. Reader-
Miss May Mays.
“The Enthusiastic Teacher”—by
Miss Kathleen Wolfe. Reader—Miss
Kathleen McDermitt.
The Calendar.
generally unobserved, are worth quot-
Several facts about the calendar,
ing:
The month of January always
begins the same day of the week as
the month of October.
The same is true of April and July,
September and December.
Again, February, March and No
vember also begin with the same day
of the week.
These beginnings, however, are
true only in normal years of 365 days.
A century can never begin on Wed
nesday, Friday or Saturday.
Furthermore, the ordinary year
ends on the same day of the week as
it begins.
Fire Department Wanted.
The Cumberland Valley (Pa.) Vol
unteer Firemen evidently want the
Frostburg Fire Department to come to
their 11th annual convention at
Waynesboro, Pa., June4th, sth and6th,
as they ask the Journal to state that
$2,000 in prizes will be distributed for
excelencies in various competitive
ways—hook and ladder contests,
hose-races, etc.
The State Firemen’s meet at Hagers
town follows during the next week,
and the Frostburgers attending the
latter could enjoy two weeks of recrea
tion by going to Waynesboro also.
The New Pension Law.
The new Pension Act provides for
an increase of $35,000,000 during the
first year of its operation, or for an
average of SB3 a year to 450,965 veter
ans.
Every veteran who served 90 days or
more in the naval or military service
during the Civil War, who has been
honorably discharged and is over 62
years old, is provided for by the new
law.
For veterans 62 years old and over
the rate provided for 90 days’ service
is sl3 a month and ranges to
sl6 a month up to 3 years of service;
for 66 years and over the rate is sls
a month f0r.90 days, and ranges up to
sl9 for 3 years; for 70 years old and
over the rate for 90 days is $lB a month
and ranges up to $25 for 3 years; .
at. 75 years old and over the rate
for 90 days’ service is s2l, and ranges
up to S3O for 3 years.
Circumstances Alter Cases.
Titus A. Brick —Never hit a man
after you have him down. It is
cowardly.
The Eckhart Philosopher —An,’ bay
yeminy, Aye tank et bane not gute
teng to hit hem ef hae haf yo down.
Det bane, bay yeminy, vat Yudge
Yohn. Chambers call enyudicious.

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