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Frostburg mining journal. [volume] (Frostburg, Md.) 1871-1913, June 01, 1912, Image 1

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Mining fStti Journal.
J. BENSON ODER, Editor.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR. NO. 36.
“God, Our Country and Our Order”
WASHINGTON CAMP, No. 41
Patriotic Order Sons of America
MEETS EVERY MONDAY EVENING
IN WITTIG’S HALL
Visiting Members Always Welcome
John W. DeVore Jack S. Crow
President Secretary
“HELLO, BILL!”
Frostburg Lodge, 80. 470
B. F. 0. S.
Meets every Tuesday evening at 8 o’clock
ELEANOR BUILDING
Visiting Brothers Invited Rooms Always Open
H. C. EVANS & CO.
THE UP-TO-DATE
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
GOOD TEAMS
Hauling of All Kinds Open Day and Night
Special Attention Given to Funerals and
Weddings. Phone 304
HUNTER & SON
FIRST-CLASS LIVERY
All kinds of FEED for sale
General Hauling a Specialty
Corner Mechanic and Water Street
EROSTBUKG, MD.
MILTON W. RACE
Livery and Sales Stables
Horses for sale at all times at all prices and
guaranteed as represented
Mechanic and Maple Streets
C. & P. Telephone FROSTBURG, MD.
RANKIN BROTHERS
TRANSFER
“We Deliver the Goods”
WATER STREET
A. P. HOEY
The Tonsorial Artist
131 E. UNION ST.
FIRST-CLASS WORK GUARANTEED

About your Hair Cuts, Shaves, Massage, Sham
pooing, Hair Singeing and Tonic Rubs.
He will do them right.
5 Chairs 5 Barbers
PALMER BROTHERS
Tonsorial Parlor
A Specialty of Massage and Hair Cutting
159 East Union Street
B. J. PALMER, Manager
HENRY J. BOETTNER
Fine Groceries
Provisions
Hay and Feed
Phone ioo-i 197 E. Union St.
J. C. WILSON & SON
FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES
Fruits. Vegetables and Country
Produce
Fresh Fish and Oysters in Season
Fine Cigars and Tobacco
140 E. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
EDWARD DAVIS & CO.
DEALERS in
Staple and Fancy Groceries
Country Produce, Queensware, etc.
Union Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
A. SITTZN AS
Fancy and Staple Groceries
5) BROADWAY
Just a few steps from Union Street,
but it will pay you to come.
GRIFFITH BROTHERS
dealers in
Groceries, Provisions, Flour
Feed, Etc.
Corner Union and Water Streets
FROSTBURG, MD.
“GOOD THINGS TO EAT”
C. F. BETZ
GROCER
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
THE CORNER GROCERY
Buy SLEEPY EYE FLOUR
And get a Set of Silver Spoons
Special Grocery offer on cash orders of $5.00 or
more. “See us first.”
nORGAN BROS., 72 Broadway
RIGHT BROTHERS
-ziS BROADWAY
GROCERIES PROVISIONS
HAY AND FEED
MINERS’ SUPPLIES
PHONE
P. F. CA Ft ROLL.
THE BOWERY GROCER
General Merchandise
Fancy Groceries, Country Produce
Corner Bowery and Loo Streets
FROSTBURG, 7*LD.
W. 11. ANGWIN
Staple and Fancy Groceries
10 East Loo Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
Phone 145-F
Telephone Orders Promptly Delivered.
MRS. MARY JOHNS
Restaurant and Ice-Cream Parlor
68 E. UNION STREET
Ice-Cream sent out in all designs
Meals and Lunches at all hours
Partie o , Balls and Lodges furnished
JOE McGRAW
Soft Drinks and Lunches
Cigars, Tobacco and
Confectionery
155 E. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
Phone 20-1 Room 1
BERNADETTE RAFFERTY
Leading Public Stenographer
Wittig Building
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
W. G. HILLER
The Reliable Tailor
10 W. UNION ST.
Order your Suit for Summer now and
avoid the rush.
GEO. H. GUNTER
Clothing and Furnishings
For Men and Boys
Hotel Gladstone Building
5) W. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
A. CHAS. STEWART
“Home of Good Clothing”
Citizens Bank Building
KYLUS & GROSS
MODERN TAILORS
WILL FIT YOU
88X East Union Street
ALL MEN’S CLOTHING
MADE TO ORDER
AND
Guaranteed to Pit or No Sale!
Other work in Tailoring done on same satis
factory conditions. Whether you come early
or late in the season we will try to please you.
GEORGE D. HAMILL, Sr.
Phone 20-1 Wittig Building
W. C. NOEL & CO.
Fire, Health and Accident Insurance
Bonds, Business Brokers
IS E. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
J. S. METZGER & SON
General Fire Insurance
15) East Union Street
FROSTBURG, MARYLAND
Reliable Fire
Insurance Companies
REFRESENTED BY
ULYSSES HANNA
General Insurance
Bonding
Fire
Offices—Citizens National Bank and
Opposite Postoffice.
D. A. BENSON, Agent.
HOCKING & HOMING
Fire Insurance Agents
Frostburg, Md.
Before buying Eife Insurance
consult
Arthur T. Johnson
Manager of
The Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.
Room 7 Shea Building
JAS. D. WILLIAMS
THE OLD RELIABLE
Boot and Shoe Maker
East Union Street
Invites a call from all friends
old and new
PIUTV YERRS IN BUSINESS
HENRYN. SCHNEIDER
Shoe and Hat Emporium
97 East Union Street
, M. & W. RODDA
Shoes Rubbers Slippers
* REPAIRING NEATLY
DONE
93 Bowery Street
GILBERT STUDIO
E. Union St.
* Moderate-Price Photos
Post Cards Picture B'raminj
Picture Finishing
J eweler
and
Scientific Optician
FROSTBURG, MD.
FROSTBURG, MD., SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 1912.
' JFJQfi JPEfi
FRESH AND SMOKED
MEATS
13 BROADWAY
HARTIGBROS.
ALL KINDS OF
Fresh and Smoked Meats
ON HAND DAILY
30 Broadway Frostburg, Md.
William Engle James Engle
ENGLE MEAT MARKET
Dealers in
Live and Dressed Meats
Butter and Eggs Poultry in Season
66 E. Union St. , 19 W. Union St.
WILLIAM HARVEY
Civil and Mining Engineer
COUNTY SURVEYOR
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
CHAS. G. WATSON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Pearce Building
Frostburg Maryland i
■ ...i. ... i .i ■ ■ ■ ■■■■—■
CLAYTON PURNELL
Attorney at Law
Shea Building
FROSTBURG, MARYLAND
J. W. SHEA
THE OLDEST DRUGGIST IN FROSTBURG
Eastman Kodaks Huyler’s Candies
Paints Glass Wall-Paper
WALTER T. LAYMAN
28 W. Uuioa St. Opp. Postoffice
FROSTBURG, MD.
Roofing and Spouting
All kinds of Hand-Made Tinware
Stove Pipe and Elbows
Phone 25-4
Dr. C. Elwood Arrgacost
Benti^t
* OH*
C. & P. Phone
\TYz West Union Street
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
1893 ESTHBLISH6D 1912
Dr. I. L. RITTER,
j DENTIST,
- lb Broadway, [J7] Frostburg, Md.
Dr. J. M. PORTER,
DENTIST
First National Bank Building
L Broadway Entrance Phone 20-3
•T. Alex. DA y IS BROS. JaS S
sconce House
Domestic and TCey West Cigars
Egyptian and Turkish Cigarettes
Meerschaum and Briar Pipes
Post Cards Pure-Food Chocolates
Smokers’ Articles a Specialty
20 W. Union St. End of Street Car Line
J. JOHNSON & SON
Contractors and Builders
AGENCY FOR
CAREY ROOFING
WILLISON BROS.
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALEKS IN
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Sashes Doors Laths Shingles Slate
Rubber Roofing 1 all Plaster Etc.
EROSTBUKG, MD.
JAMES SKEfIDOS
Manufacturer of and dealer in
Confectionery and Ice-Cream
Dealer in
Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Nuts, Etc.
FROSTBURG, MD.
G. DUD HOCKING
Notary Public
1 OFFICE
Fidelity Savings Bank
Model Lice Spray,
S Quart Can, 35 cents.
FOR SAKE BY
T. L. POPP,
Dealer in Poultry Supplies,
FROSTBURG, MD.
CAMPBELL’S
FINE MILLINERY
g 73 East Union Street
A New Line of—
For Ladies, Misses and
a Children at
MRS. P. O’ROURKE’S
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER.
ALL INVITED TO COME HOME.
The following list comprises another installment of the names
and addresses of former residents of Frostburg, now living outside
this county, registered by friends here for use of the Centennial
and Home-Coming Committee.
It is proposed by the latter body to supplement the general
invitation, already extended, by one special to each Frostburger, so
that as individuals they may be assured of a home desire to see
them at home; of a warm welcome when they come, and the tender
of generous hospitality while they stay.
The names, arranged alphabetically, will appear in succeeding
issues of the Journal until all are orinted.
Meanwhile, should anyone observe that a name has been over
looked, or an address given incorrectly, an immediate report to the
Journal is solicited, as the Committee is anxious to specially
invite all without exception:
Apple, Miss Trine, Everett, Pa.
Bittner, Mrs. Elmer, Keyser, W. Va.
Byrnes and family, Lawrence, 329 High Street, Fairmont, W. Va.
Brown, Frank A., care of S. & S. C. & C. Co., Bear Creek, Mont.
Byrne, F. P., 24 Pallister Avenue, Detroit, Mich.
Barnard, Mrs. Thomas, Rowlesburg, W. Va.
Blackwell, Mrs. T. H., Hazelton, Pa.
Bigelow, Sr., John, Hazelton, Pa.
Beane, R. 8., Bakewell Building, Pittsburg, Pa.
Butler, Clayton, care of Engineers’ Office, W. Md. R. R., Hagerstown, Md.
Brown, Miss Bess, Brunswick Hotel, Huntingdon, Pa.
Brown, Fee P., Hendricks, W. Va.
Brown, James P., R. F. D. 2, Clarksburg, W. Va.
Cole and family, William, W. Highland Street, Birmingham, Ala.
Corkran, Miss F- Beatrice, St. Michaels, Md.
Carson, Mrs. Nan 8., Brunswick Hotel, Huntingdon, Pa.
Coe, S. Travis, care of Consolidation Coal Co., 1 Broadway, New York, N. Y.
Davis, Miss Amelia, Martinsburg, W. Va.
Davey, Mrs. John, 530 Highland Avenue, Atlanta, Ga.
Davis, David, Byesville, Guernsey County, Ohio.
Doyle and family, William, Tyler, Tex.
Duggan, P. F., care of C. & O. Shops, 17th Street, Richmond, Va.
Evers, Charles F., 740 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, Md.
Engleby, Misses Anna and Elizabeth, 338 Campbell Avenue, Roanoke, Va.
Fogle, Noah A., 1734 Ashburton Street, Walbrook, Baltimore, Md.
Foley and family, John, 331 High Street, Fairmont, W. Va.
Goldsworthy, Vance, Keyser, W. Va.
Goldsworthy, James, Keyser, W. Va.
Henninghausen, Harry F., Asst. Supt. Md. Color Printing Co., Baltimore, Md.
Hartung, J. W., Monroe, Va.
Hall, Edward, Millersville, Ann Arundel County, Md.
Harrison, Charles H., 7241 Sarah Avenue, Maplewood, Mo.
Harrison, Edward C., 7561 Ellis Avenue, Maplewood, Mo.
Howard, Miss Beatrice, Everett, Pa.
Heymond, Mrs. Arthur, Annapolis, Md.
James, Peter, Hazelton, Pa.
Jarrett, Orlando, Nickerson, Kan.
Johnson, Mrs. Ada S., Parksley, W. Va.
Jones, Mrs. Ida, Fairmont, W. Va.
Kloster, Mrs. Adel, 818 Russell Avenue, St. Fouis, Mo.
Fewis, William J. and Mrs. Annie, 2013 Colwell Street, Pittsburg, Pa.
Fayman, George, Newell, lowa.
Fewis, George W., 118 Mill Street, New Castle, Pa.
Fayman, Ernest, Box 2, Van Fear, Ky.
Fee, Miss Jennie M., Mt. Fake Park, Md.
Fill, Charles, 6076 Fafaj-ette Street, Chicago, 111.
McQuillan, Rev. Jerome F-, Fock Haven, Pa.
McGann, Mrs, Minnie, 908 Anna Street, Elizabeth, N. J.
Moore, Cleon, care of Pendennis Club, Fouisville, Ky.
Myers, Peny, 14724 St. Clair Avenue, Collinwood Station, Cleveland, Ohio.
Mason, Patrick, 2310 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Md.
Niff, Thomas, Traction Co., Fairmont, W. Va.
Roberts, T. J., Weatherly, Pa.
Rowe, Mrs. James, Hazelton, Pa.
Ridler, Joseph, U. S. Naval Training Station, Newport, R. I.
Rutzell, Charles, 323 Valentine Street, Tyler, Tex.
Robinson, Reynolds, Piney Creek, Bedford County, Pa.
Ryan, John T., Bureau of Mines, 40th and Butler Streets, Pittsburg, Pa.
Rutlege, J. J., Bureau of Mines, 40th and Butler Streets, Pittsburg, Pa.
Stanton, Mrs. J. W., 1618 Bell Plain Avenue, Chicago, 111.
Suesze, Mrs. Maggie, Anthony, Harper County, Kan.
Stinley, Mrs. Ervin, Finzel, Md.
Smith and family, Mrs. Mary, New Creek, W. Va.
Trevaskis, John H., Freland, Pa.
Timmons, Mrs. Samuel, Hazelton, Pa.
Trevaskis, Dr. A. F-, Turtle Creek, Pa.
Trevaskis, Mrs. John T., Weatherly, Pa.
Thrasher, Mrs. Fizzie, 427 N. Walnut Street, Youngstown, Ohio.
Tiddy, Frank, 5 Broadway, Baltimore, Md.
Tschudi, Harold, 3609 Fairview Avenue, Baltimore, Md.
Tall, Mrs. Rachel, Graden, Kan.
Ulrich, Mrs. Mary F. Shields, 726 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, Md.
Walters, Thomas, 246 West Side, Wilmerding, Pa.
Wright, J. Purdum, care of Thomas & Wright, Attorneys, Baltimore, Md.
Workman, John 8., Cuyafioga Falls, R. F. D. 8, Stop 119, Akron, Ohio.
Wagner, Henry 8., 104 19th Street, South Side, Pittsburg, Pa.
Young, Miss Fouise, 323 Braddock Avenue, Braddock, Pa.
Young, Celestia, Aquasco, Prince George County, Md.
Zimmerman, Miss Marion, 1521 McCulloh Street, Baltimore, Md.
Zeller, George W. and Charles H., 4138 Cottage Grove Avenue, Chicago, 111.
Zeller, Daniel and Frederick, 6076 Fafayette Avenue, Chicago, 111.
Political.
At the State Republican Convention
of Washington, held at Aberdeen, that
State, May 15th, Alex. D. Sloan, of
North Yakima, was elected one of
eight delegates-at-large to the National
' Convention in Chicago this month.
There was a division of sentiment in
convention between Taft and Roose
velt, but apparenty none in the dele
. gation, which stands for the President.
Mr. Sloan is a native of Fonaconing,
where a big community of relatives
and friends are glad to note his promi
nence in his State.
Mix-Up.
There is a big dispute going in Gar
rett county about the legislative atti
tude of a State Senator and of a mem
’ Mining Journal Subscription Blank
9 12 -
’ MINING JOURNAL, Frostburg, Md,
Send me the Journal for
for which find enclosed $
Name
No. and Street
Town or City
State
SUBSCRIPTION RATES—I Year, SI; 6 Months, 50 ceifts; 3 Months, 25 cents.
Fill in the blanks, cut out the slip, enclose proper amount and mail to Journal, Frostburg, Md,
ber of the House of Delegates toward
local-option bills.
The Senator affirms that he never
voted against a local option bill in his
life, but the Delegate contends that
but for the Senator there would be at
least a fraction—if not a unit of local
option over there.
Meanwhile, J. J. Robinson, forget
ting that he is not in Fonaconing any
more, assures all concerned that,
“truth, crushed to earth, shall rise
again!”
Memorial Address.
Rev. Dr. D. H. Martin, of this place,
was announced to deliver the annual
memorial address for Good Friends
Fodge, No. 34, I. O. O. F., in Cumber
land, at 8 o'clock last (Friday) even
ing, May 31st.
Q== = O
1882-1912
THIRTY YEARS AGO
A
The items below were current
during the week ending
June 10, 1882
O =o
A staff artist of Frank Feslie’s Il
lustrated Newspaper drew and printed
four sketches of Eckhart. “The first
resembled a mine opening in general,
no Eckhart opening in particular; the
second a fair hillside view, with houses
scattered here and there and a church
turned round toward a scrap of the
Chesapeake and Ohio canal, and so
on.
The Jackson Club of Fonaconing
defeated the Borden Shaft team in a
game of base-ball by 21 to 13.
Bailiff D. J. Williams gave notice
that no fire-works would be permitted
on the Fourth. Penalty—slo for each
offence.
An Eckhart gentleman told the
Journai, that the Frank Feslie view
of Eckhart must have been taken
from the top of the Washington monu
ment, which would very naturally
show the canal in the foreground.
The Piedmont Observer reported
that “the quire of the M. F. Church
at Keyser had gone to Grafton to as
sist some evangelists.” The Journae
asked —“do they count 20 to a ream?”
but got no reply.
John N. Benson was re-elected col
lector for the Frostburg Gaslight
Company.
Young shad, 256,000, were placed in
the Potomac above Piedmont.
Thursday, June 8, 1882, Miss Annie
M. Brode was married to Mr. George
Crump, both of Borden Shaft, by Rev.
J. Ruhl.
Thursday, June 8, 1882, Miss C.
Elizabeth Futz, of this place, was
married to Mr. Peter Fammert, of
Eckhart, by Rev. A. Homrighaus.
Thursday, June 8, 1882, Miss Fa
vinia Whittington, of Charlestown,
West Va., was married to Mr. Charles
H. Wade, of this place, by Rev. P. F.
Harrison.
Dr. A. B. Price, this place, was elect
ed President of the Allegany Medical
Society.
Thomas Blackley and Thomas Mun
sie, two of Midlothian’s young men,
reported as working in the mines near
Carbon, in Wyoming.
James Waddington, 76 years old,
arrived in Frostburg from Hodelstone,
England, to make his home with his
daughter—Mrs. Howell Powell.
Gabriel Jeffries, of Nebraska, came
to visit his father—George Jeffries, the
latter seriously ill.
DeWarren H. Reynolds was elected
City Attorney of Cumberland, and
Alexander King City Collector.
Town Council issued an order pro
hibiting employment of hands on
streets under 18 years old and of
proxies for those directly engaged.
Hon. William Brace, of Cumber
land, was elected Town Attorney.
The sum of $2,785 was taken off the
assessment upon appeal.
New buildings on Grant street re
ported as erected by F. J. Coleman
and A. J. Willison.
T. H. Paul & Son built and shipped
two locomotives to Oregon.
Dr. J. J. Jones was complimented
very highly for a skillful surgical
operation.
The Sick.
Miss Margaret Steinly has gone to
Baltimore to take treatment in the
University hospital. Her mother —
Mrs. Elmer Steinly, accompanied her.
Another Tour of the Pike.
Henry G. Shirley, Chief Engineer
of the Maryland Roads Commission,
began at Oakland Monday morning a
careful inspection of the road from
that place to the National Pike;
thence through Frostburg, Hancock,
etc.
Accompanying Mr. Shirley were
Frank H. Zouck, assistant Chairman
of the Commission, and Andrew Ram
say, of Mt. Savage, lately appointed
a member of the Commission by the
Governor.
In a letter from O. F. Weller, Chair
man, the Journal is informed that
the object of this tour was “to ex
= amine the roads from an engineering
j and business standpoint, with a view
of determining just what work should
be done on this section, and how to
have it best done as quickly as pos
? sible.”
f. The gentlemen named were- then
, to report at a meeting of the State
Roads Commission in Baltimore Wed
nesday, “where,” Mr. Weller wrote,
~ “the matter will be thoroughly gone
I into, and plans outlined for pushing
"’ this work as rapidly as possible.”
e It is admitted that very little work
has been done by the State in this
section, and alleged that the little has
been costly. Under the new policy
'! “the rock foundation of the old Pike,
L laid by the Federal Government a
, s hundred years ago, will not be torn up
and re-laid by another.”
l " “It is intended by the new Commis
sion to use the old foundation, which
- is said to be fully equal to any that
may be laid now. This will be evened
and then surfaced. The plan will ex
pedite the construction greatly, and
will reduce, it is said, the figures run
ning above SIO,OOO a Aiile to something
between SI,OOO and $2,500.
“Friends of the new policy point to
the work done by the new engineer,
Mr. Shirley, on the old York road pike
as evidence of what may be done in
rebuilding these old roads where solid
foundations were laid in the first in
stance.
“Upon that work Mr. Shirley is re
ported to have expended upon an
... average of about SI,BOO a mile, afford
ing Baltimore county a road that has
given perfect satisfaction.”
One of the costly features of the
“college plan” of re-building roads
was the prevalence of highly-paid
student bosses who sat or stood around
to see that picks were used scientifi
cally, and that dirt were handled, a la
shovel, in skillful restraint, if not
artistic abandonment.
HENRY F. COOK, Manager.
WHOLE HUMBER 2,121
Annual Meeting.
The Thirty-Ninth Annual Conven
tion of the Grand Castle Knights of
the Golden Eagle of Maryland was
held in Fischers’ Hall Monday, May
27th.
Grand Chief Daniel F. Billmeyer, of
Baltimore, presided, assisted by Grand
Vice-Chief Jesse C. Mullan, of West
ernport.
All portions of the State were repre
sented, more than 75 delegates at
tending.
The official reports indicated that
the Order in this State is in a healthy,
prosperous condition, its financial
status being particularly satisfactory.
At the morning session the roll-call
developed the presence of nearly all
officers and committees; the official re
port of proceedings of last session was
adopted, and 75 delegates and Past
Chiefs admitted to the deliberations
of the Grand Castle.
At 2 p. m. the election of officers for
the current year was held, resulting
as follows:
Grand Chief —Jesse C. Mullan, of
Westernport.
Grand Vice-Chief—Geo. C. Tracey,
of Towson.
Grand High Priest—Elmer S. Kight,
of Frostburg.
Grand Master of Records—Charles
S. Cockran, of Govanstown.
Grand Keeper of Exchequer—Harry
T. Brown, of Baltimore.
Sir Herald—Thomas Youngblood, of
Cumberland.
Grand First Guardsman—E. C.
Jackson, of Princess Anne.
Grand Second Guardsman—J. W.
Berlin, of Port Deposit.
Grand Trustees—W. E. Ryan, of
Rising Sun, for three years, and Clif
ton E. Fuller, of Cumberland, for one
year.
Representative to Supreme Castle—
John Rompf, of Cumberland.
Installation followed, Past Grand
Chiefs Jacob H. Anil, Dr. H. E. Mar
tin and Adrian Hughes, of Baltimore;
John Rompf, of Cumberland; George
H. Wittig and Peter Eammert, of
Frostburg, taking part in the impres
sive ceremony.
Not the least of the many pleasant
incidents of the convention was the
presentation to Past Grand Chiefs
Clifton E. Fuller, of Cumberland, and
D. F. Billmyer, of Baltimore, of splen
did gold jewels, that of the latter
studded with diamonds. The recipi
ents were not only delighted with the
distinction so generously accorded
them, but all were manifestly pleased
that an occasion of so much fraternal
import had made the convention one
that will be notable in the annals of
the Order.
In this connection, it has been credi
bly stated that this annual meeting
was one of the most harmonious in the
history of the Grand Castle, nothing
whatever arising to disturb the sereni
ty of good fellowship which normally
prevails when aud wherever Knights
of the Golden Eagle meet.
The next convention will be held in
Baltimore.
Acres and Dollars Lost.
The last and final decision of the
United States Supreme Court in the
Maryland-West Virgania boundary
dispute was rendered Monday, Mary
land losing several thousand acres of
land and $8,577.
It is believed by some that the case
was not well handled on the Maryland
side.
Problem Solved.
How many apples were eaten by
Adam and Eve?
We know that Eve 81, and that
Adam 812; total 893.
But Adam 8142 please his wife, and
Eve 81242 please Adam; total 90,277.
Then again Eve 814240fy herself,
and Adam 281240fy himself; total
I,
Gold and Black.
The prevailing notion that “orange
and black” are the Maryland colors
appears to be erroneous, as stated by
Prof. William Hand Browne, a credible
• authority on Maryland history.
A portion of his statement to the
Baltimore Sun is given below in a
i quotation by Prof. Browne from Sir
; Richard St. George, Norroy King of
Arms, in 1642:
“Cecilius Calvert being granted by
; his charter royal powers over his
i province (though subject to allegiance
. to the crown of Great Britain) the
| color of the sovereign, gold and black,
> were the colors of the province and
borne on its standard.
“No doubt the first colonists brought
t over with them a Maryland flag or
- standard and set it up when they took
r possession of the soil, with solemn
j ceremonies, on March 25, 1634.
1 “No doubt, also, Maryland’s flag was
3 displayed at the naval engagement
. in the Pocomoke in 1635.
“When Gov. Eeonard Calvertmarch
i ed to reduce Kent Island in 1638 it
; was, as he writes to his brother, the
- proprietary, ‘with your colors dis
( played.’
; “William Nugent was appointed
r standard-bearer of the province and
bore the Maryland colors at the battle
c on the Severn in 1655, where he was
3 killed.
3 “Whether Maryland colors were
■f borne by the Maryland contingent
j that took part in Braddock’s expedition
i we connot say, but probably they
3 were not, as the Marylanders were
incorporated with the Virginians and
- other provincials, but we know that
1 in the same year, 1755, the Maryland
t council ordered a large ‘black and
1 yellow flag’ from England, and no
- doubt the Maryland colors floated
1 over Forts Cumberland and Frederick.
“That the Maryland militia not in
r the Continental Army, and before the
accession to the Union, mustered
o under the Maryland colors, there can
•, be no reasonable doubt, though I can
e not at the moment lay my hand on
a any documentary proof. They had a
i flag of their own, which had been in
i- use for 142 years, and had the conven
tion prescribed a new one there would
be some record of the fact,
n “The colors of Maryland, therefore,
- are and for 278 years have been, gold
s and black. How the strange notion
ever got abroad that they were orange
e and black it is hard to imagine,
s Possibly some ignorant persons
d supposed that the word, “or,” (gold)
d was a contraction of ‘orange.’ Such
i- a notion was not only erroneous but
a absurd, as orange is not one of the
if heraldic colors, and could not have
been used in any coat of arms.”

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