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Frostburg mining journal. [volume] (Frostburg, Md.) 1871-1913, July 06, 1912, Image 1

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Mining Sw Journal.
I J. BENSON ODER, Editor.
FORT'Y-FIKST YEA] i. NO. 4 1
“God. Our Country and Our Order”
WASHINGTON CAMP, No. 41
Patriotic Order Sons of America
MEETS EVERY MONDAY EVENING
IN WITTIG’S HALL
Visiting Members Always Welcotne
John W. DeVore Jack S. Crow
President Secretary
"HELLO, BI Llj !”
Frostburg Lodge, 00. 470
B. P. 0. 5.
Meets every Tuesday evening: at 8 o’clock
ELERNOR BUILDING
Visiting Brothers Invited ltooms Always Open
H. G. EVANS & CO.
THE UP-TO-DATE
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
GOOD TEAMS
Hauling of All Kinds Open Day and Night
Special Attention Given to Funerals and
Weddings. Phone 304
HUNTER & SON
FIRST-CLASS LIVERY
All kinds of FEED for sale
General Hauling a Specialty
Corner Mechanic and Water Street
FKOSTBUKG, MD.
MILTON W. RACE
Livery and Sales Stables
Horses for sale at all times at all prices and
guaranteed as represented
Mechanic and Maple Streets
C. & P. Telephone FROSTBURG, MD.
RANKIN BROTHERS
TRANSFER
“We Deliver the Goods”
WATER STREET
A. P. HOEY
The Tonsorial Artist
13 1 E. UNION ST.
Fra ST-CLASS WORK GUARANTEED
CHRIS.
About your Hair Cuts, Shaves Massage, Sham
pooing, Hair Singeing and Tonic Rubs.
He will do them right.
5 Chairs 5 Barbers
PALMER BROTHERS
Tonsorial Parlor
A Specialty of Massage and Hair Cutting
159 East Union Street
B. J. PALMER. Manager
WILLIAM HARVEY
Civil and Mining Engineer
COUNTY SURVEYOR
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
J. C. WILSON & SON
FANCY ANI) ST'PLE GROCERIES
E'rnits. Vegetables anil Country
J reduce
Fresh Fish and Oysters in Season
Fine Cigars and Tobacco
11!) E. Union St. Frost burg, Md.
EDWARD DAVIS & CO.
DEALERS in
Staple and Fancy Groceries
Country Produce, Queensware, etc.
Union Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
A. SPITZNAS
Fancy and Staple Groceries
i) BROADWAY
Just a few steps from Union Street,
but it will pay you to come.
GRIFFITH BROTHERS
DEALERS in
Groceries, Provisions, Flour
Feed, Etc.
.Corner Union and Water Streets
FROSTBURG, MD.
“GOOD THINGS TO EAT”
C. F. BETZ
GROCER
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
THE CORNER GROCERY
Buy SLEEPY EYE FLOUR
And get a Set of Silver Spoons
.Special Grocery offer on cash orders of $5.00 or
more. “See us first.”
riORGAN BROS., 72 Broadway
KIGHT BROTHERS
-q-5 BRORDWRY
GROCERIES PROVISIONS
BAY AND FEED
MINERS’ SUPPLIES
2^7-2
P. F. CARROLL
the bowery grocer
General Merchandise
Fancy Groceries, Country Produce
Corner Rot eery ami Loo Streets
FROSTBURG, 7WD.
W. H. ANGWIN
Staple and Fancy Groceries
10 East Loo Street
FROSTBURG, MD.
Phone 145-F
Telephone Orders Promptly De ivered.
MRS. MARY JOHNS
Restaurant and Ice-Cream Parlor
l 68 E. UNION STREET
Ice-Cream sent, out in all des'gns
Meals and Lunches at al tours
I’artie-', ’ a 1- . nd Fudges furnished
‘ JOE McGRAW
Soft Drinks and Lunches
Cigirs, Tobacco and
Confectionery
1 155 E. Union St. Frostburg, Md. j
Phone 20-1 Room 1 1
BERNADETTE RAFFERTY
Leading Public Stenographer
Wittig Building
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
W. G. HILLER
The Reliable Tailor
10 AV. UNION ST. .
Order your Suit for Summer now and
avoid the rush.
GEO. H. G I NTER
i Clothing and Furnishings
For Men and Boys
Hotel Gladstone Building
!) W. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
A. CHAS. STEWART
“Home of Good Clothing”
Citizens Bank Building
KYLUS & GROSS
MODERN TAILORS
WILL FIT YOU
1 East Union Street
ALL MEN’S CLOTHING
MADE TO ORDER
AND
Guaranteed to Fit or No Sale!
Other work in Tailoring d rie on same satis
factory conditions. Whether you come early
or late in the season we will try to please you.
GEORGE D. HAM ILL, Sr.
Phone 20-1 Wittig Building
W. C. NOEL & CO.
Fire, Health and Accid. nt Insurance
Bo’ ds, Business Brokers
15 E. Union St. Frostburg, Md.
J. S. METZGER & SON
.
General Eire Insurance
l!l East Union Street
FROSTBURG, MARYLAND
Re liable Eire
Insurance Companies
RE TR ESENTE /> It Y
ULYSSES HANNA
General Insurance
; Bonding
Fire
Offices—Citizens National Bank and
Opposite Postoffice.
D. A. BENSON, Agent.
HOCKING & HOHING
Fire Insurance Agents
Frostburg, Md.
Before buying Life Insurance
consult
Arthur T. Johnson
Manager of
The Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.
Room 7 Shea Building
JAS. D WILLIAMS
THE OLD RELIABLE
Boot and Shoe Maker
East Union Street
Invites a call from all friends
old and new
FIFTY VEKRS IN BUSINESS
HENRY N. SCHNEIDER
Shoe and Hat Emporium
97 East Union Street
, M. & W. RODDA
Shoes Rubbe s Slippers
> REPAIRING NEATLY
DONE
93 Bowery Street
GILBERT STUDIO
79 >4 E. Union St.
9 Moderate-Price Photos
Post Cards Hiotuire Framing
Phot Aire P'iriisliing
Jeweler*
and
Scientific Optician
FROSTBURG, MD.
FURYriiUUG, MD., SATURDAY, JULY 6, 1912
OFFICE
State and County TuX Collector
7KT
HENRY J. BGETTKER’S STORE
1 .9 7 La si Union Street
FROSTBURG, M.TRYLHND
Jim speir
FRESH AND SMOKED
MEATS
13 LB’ -O AD WAY
HARTIG BROS.
ALL KINDS OF
Fresh and Smoked Meats
ON HAND DAILY
30 Broadway Frostburg, Md.
William Engle James Engle
ENGLE MEAT MARKET
Healers in
Live and Dressed Meats
Butter and Eggs Poultry in Season
66 E. Union St. 10 W. Union St. I
CHAS. G. WATSON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Pearce Building
Frostburg Maryland
CLAYTON PURNELL
Attorney at Law
Shea Building
FROSTBURG, MARYLAND
J. W. SHEA
THE OLDEST DRUGGIST IX FROSTBURG
Eastman Kodaks Huyler’s Candies
Paints Glass Wall-Paper
WALTER T. L LYMAN
28 W. Union St. Opp. Postoffice
FROSTBURG, MD.
Roofing and Spouting
All kinds of Hand-Made Tinware
StoVe Pipe and Elbows
Phone 25-4
Dr. G. Elwood Anjacost
oEntigt
wm
C. & P. Phone
17West Union Street
FROSTBURG MARYLAND
1893 ESTRBLISHSD IQI2
Dr. I. L. RITTER,
DENTIST,
19 Broadway, [J7] Frostburg, Md.
Dr. J. M. PORTER,
DENTIST
Firs* National Rank Building
Broadway Entrance l’lione 20-3
j. .vex. DAVIS BROS. -i“ s -
S7vy iks House
Domestic and Key West Cigars
Egyptian and Turkish Cigarettes
Meerschaum and Briar Pipes
Post Cards Pure Food Chocolates
Smokers’ Articles a Specialty
20 W. Union St. End of Street t ar Line
J. JOHNSON A SON
Contractors and Builders
AGENCY FOR
CAREY ROOFING
WILLISON BROS.
MANUFACTURERS AM) DEALERS IN
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Sashes Doors Laths Shingles Slate
Rubber Roofing Wall Plaster Etc.
FKOSTBUKG, MD.
JAMES SKEfIDOS
Manufacturer of and dealer in
Corjec tioi\er ]g an- Ice-Creain
Dealer in
Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Nuts, Etc.
FROSTBURG, MD.
G. DUD HOCKING
Notary Public
OFFICE
Fidelity Savings Bank
Model Lice Spray,
Quart Can, 35 cents.
FOR SALE BY
T. L. POPP,
Dealer in Poultry Supplies,
FROSTBURG, MD.
CAMPBELL’S
FINE MILLINERY
73 East Union Street
A New Line of—
For Ladies, Misses and
Children at
MRS. P. O’ROURKE’S
A.JN I ' DEPENDENT NEW^PAF'KR
' tDillnn?
“The true light, which lighteth every man <
that cometh Into the world.” —John i, 9.
■‘What do you thinK that heaven may be?’
The bearer answered witb a smile •
’ A place where folK liKe you and me
May hear sweet music all the while.
Where roses bloom and birds will sing
And silver streams plash in. the shade.
With naught but joy in everything"—-
Of these. I Know, is heaven, made. ’
“What do you thinK that heaven may be 7 ”
The mother answered: “ Tis a land
Where all mine own may be with me
And where, too I may understand
The long'ing's of the little hearts
And find my happiness complete
In soothing' with a mother’s arts . .., “
The weary little hands and feet “ )
“What do you thin.K that heaven may be ? ”
The old man answered with a sig'h ■
“A cot beneath a spreading' tree
That towers ever g'reen and hig'h .
And never weariness nor strife
But just a comfort calm and blest
Such as we may not have in life —
A folding of the hands in rest.”
What do you thinK that heaven may bt?
Why, it would be of little worth /
Were it not given us to see yjj
Some promise of it here on earth, .
If through the moments and the years
We could not bring' its radiant glow
To light our smiles and dry the tears
Of all the weary folK we Know.
(Copyright, 1910. ’ " ’■■’in.Ti. •
Famous Portia of Paris
Mile. Miropowlski, the famous woman lawyer of Paris who has gained
special eminence by pleading in criminal courts, is shown in our illustra
tion addressing one of the regular weekly meetings of the Paris bar. She al
so has lectured in London and has been entertained by the judges there.
Mile. Miropowlski believes women are of especial use at the bar in cases af
fecting children, and would like to see mixed juries, but does not think the
time ripe for the appointment of women judges.
At The Selling End.
“You made a mistake in your pa
per!’’ said the indignant man, enter
ing the editorial sanctum. “I was one
of the competitors at the athletic
match last week, and you called me
‘the well-known light-weight cham
pion !’ ”
“Well, aren’t you ?” asked the editor.
“No, I’m nothing of the kind, and
: t’s confounded awkward—because,
roll see. I’m a coal merchant !”
Big Time.
The Journal has a cop} 7 of the last
forecast of the National Conclave of
Elks at Portland. Oregon, but it
conies too late for appearance here,
as the function practically begins to
morrow (Sunday.)
For the entertainment of visitors the
Portland Lodge contributed 125,000,
to which the people of the city added
SIOO,OOO.
So that a big time is assured.
Moral —A little reflection will evolve
the thought nearly every cent of
those contributions will remain in
Portland!
Hence, if Frostburg lavs out SIO,OOO,
$15,000, or $25,000 for entertainment of
■ visitors—the true thing to do, won’t
: nearly all of the money stay here?
KOW THE ELEPHANT TALKS
Elephants are said to make use ot
a great variety of sounds In communi
cating with each other, and In ex
pressing their wants and feelings.
Some are uttered by the trunk, some
by the throat. The conjunctures In
which either means of expression Is
employed cannot be strictly classified,
as fear, pleasure, want and other
emotions are sometimes Indicated by
the trunk, sometimes by the throatj
An elephant rushing upon an assail
ant trumpets shrilly with fury.
Fear Is similarly expressed In &
shrill, brassy trumpet, or by a roaor
from the lungs. Pleasure by a con
tinued low squeaking through the
trunk or an almost Inaudible purring
sound from the throat. Want —as. a
calf calling Its mother —Is chiefly ex
pressed by the throat. A peculiar
sound Is made use of by elephants to
express dislike or apprehension, and
at the same time to intimidate, as
when the cause of some alarm has not
been clearly ascertained and the ani
mals wish to deter an Intruder. It Is
produced by rapping the end of the
trunk smartly on the ground, a cur
rent of air hitherto retained being
sharply emitted through the trunk, as
from a valve, at the moment of Im
pact. The sound made resembles that
of a large sheet of tin rapidly doubled.
It has been erroneously ascribed by
some writers to the animals beating
their sides with their trunks.
HEAD DRESS OF TEHUANAS
The head dress of the Tehuana In
dian women whose home is upon the
Isthmus of Tehuantepec In Mexico Is
of remarkable design and not lacking
In attractiveness. It Is called a hul
pll and Is an elaborate lace affair re
sembling In some respects an Eliza
bethan ruff. It Is worn on special oc
casions and In different shapes. Some
times It Is not flared out from the
head, but Is worn hanging down the
back. The Tehuana women perform
the business functions of the tribe,
many of them being small merchants
In town upon the Isthmus. The men
live n Idleness. In this respect they
are -Ike Burmese women and there
Is a striking resemblance between the
Burmese and the Tehuanas. The dally
costumes of the Tehuana women very
much resemble that of the Burmese
women. They are truly oriental In
their fondness for brilliant colors.
HOUSE OF DIAMONDS
About 20 years ago the diamond
merchants of Amsterdam held their
market as best they could. The mer
chants would meet In a cafe, or some
times In the street, where, drawing
their gems from their pockets, they
would compare them, chaffer, and con
clude their contracts. Those days
may be termed the patriarchal age.
In time the merchants saw that their
precious goods were worthy of a more
dignified procedure. They rented
premises, which they named "Beurs
voor den Diamanten.” Business pros
pering, Amsterdam absorbed about
two-thirds of the world’s commerce in
the precious stones, and the syndicate
determined to build their own hall or
exchange, and this the minister of the
interior has recently opened on the
Weesperplein.
SLICE OF LARGEST TREE
What is believed to be the largest
tree in the world grew in Southern
California and stood over 300 feet
high, measuring 90 feet at the base.
The section here illustrated weighs
50 tons and is 56 feet in circumfer
ence. The concentric rings Indicate
that the tree began growing in the
year 550.
FIRST STOCKING FRAME
The first stocking frames are said
.to have been made by William Bee,
curate of Culverton, In 1586, and were
at first worked by him with the as
sistance of his sweetheart or wife.
Like most other inventors, he
failed to receive a suitable reward
for his labor and is said to have died
at Paris in 1610, starving and broken
hearted.
The stocking weavers' company, es
tablished in 1663, for the next 90
years had almost a monopoly of the
business, but Great Britain today
makes nearly one half of the stock
ings made in the world. Germany is
a close second, being famous for the
cheapness and excellence of her hose
BRIGHT MONEY IN STREAKS
A man who gives to his wife all
the bright dimes and quarters and
halves he gets says that bright money
seems to run In streaks. Sometimes
he gets a lot of bright coins for days
and weeks in succession and then he
may go a month and get not one.
HENRY F. COOK, Manager.
WHOLE NUMBER 2,126
c = — =- e
1882-1912
THIRTY YEARS AGO
—+-
The items below were current
during the week ending
July 15, 1882
=— - O
“Annie Laurie,” writing from Eck
hart, reported “a large number of
summer visitors.”.
James Briscoe, freight conductor on
C. and P. R., fell off a Lonaconing
bridge and was painfully hurt.
J. S. Metzger reported quite ill.
H. S. Howson, Frank McNamee, A.
Hoofnagle and Thomas Clifford named
as leading- industrial factors in the
success of the Mt. Savage Fire-Brick
Works.
A new residence was erected near
that of Joseph B. Thomas, at Eckhart,
for occupancy by Dr. B. M. Cromwell.
The Eckhart Base-Ball Team de
feated Borden Shaft by a score of 18
to 13.
Mr. Thomrs W. Neff, aged 48 years,
died at his residence, near Eckhart,
Thursday, July 13, 1882, leaving wife
and several cl ildren. He was a son
of the late John Neff, long time prom
inent citizen of Frostburg.
In Eckhart Wednesday, July 12,
1882, Mrs. Mary Stewart, relict of the
late John Stewart,’died, aged 80 years.
“Frostburg crowded with summer
sojourners.” Several States repre
sented.
A lodge of Good Templars was in
stituted at Cresaptown by a delega
tion from Lonaconing.
Robert Saurbaugh, of this place,
killed a rattle-snake on the fire-clay
tramroad, 3>£ feet long, 10 rattles.
John Davis was elected Worship
ful Master of Mountain Lodge, No. 99,
A., F. and A. M.; G. W. Zeller Senior
Warden; J. N. Benson Junior Warden;
Josiah Ford Secretary, and B. J.
Thomas treasurer.
Charles Gerlach, splitting an oak
log, found a piece of wood, coal-black,
in the centre. It was believed to be a
wedge that had been driven into the
tree years before by a surveyor.
Around it, however, the tree had
grown until it became entirely em
bedded.
John J. Price, N. G.; John B. Rees,
V.-G.; Thomas Bath, R. S.; Reuben
Reed, F. S.; Gershon Anthony, T.; J.
M. Zimmerly, W.; T. A. Fvans, C.;
John Watson, I. G., and Samuel Logs
don, O. G., of Savage Mountain Lodge,
No. 128, I. O. O. F., were installed
officers.
Philip Wenk, N. G.; George Krause,
V.-G.; Fred. Mitchell, R. S.; John
Pfeiffer, T., and Andrew Lapp, C.,
were installed officers of Heine Lodge,
No. 127, I. O. O. F.
A rose-bush covering a space of 13
by 10 feet was a splendid ornament of
N. S. Frost’s yard. It was called
“The Baltimore Belle,” and bore at
least 1,000 full-grown snow-white
roses. It had been planted about 10
years before.
In Cumberland Tuesday, July 4,
1882, Miss Bertie Neff, of Eckhart,
was married to Mr. Walter Greenfield,
of the former place, by Rev. A. A.
Harryman.
N. H. Carson left to make his future
home in Austin, Texas.
One of the jokes of the day was a
reported sermon by Rev. Henry Ward
Beecher on “The Law of Love in
Business.”
Two Printers.
Monday forenoon D. R. Powell, job
printer, of Detroit, Michigan, dropped
in on the editorial side, and while
talking, Bert. Musick, of East Pitts
burg, came into the mechanical side.
Each was a stranger to the other, so
that after introducing themselves they
finally and reciprocally got acquainted
through self-made friends.
Mr. Powell came to town last week
to attend the funeral of his father,
David R. Powell, who died Wednesday,
26th ult.
Like the others of the congregation
of printers, however, Mr. Powell was
much interested in Mr. Musick’s
funny report of his experiences in and
around the National Democratic Con
vention in Baltimore.
Mr. Musick is the editor of the West
inghouse News, East Pittsburg, Pa., a
democratic paper, and he is, there
fore, professionally and scientifically
qualified to talk of both democratic
tragedy and progressive coined}'.
In consequence, he kept his hearers,
both sympathetic and unsympathetic,
either enchained by suspense or un
chained by humor.
Mr. Musick was a guest of Mr. and
Mrs. Patrick Kinney, of Mt, Pleasant,
street.
His and Mr, Powell’s meeting, urn
der Jouknai. auspices, was pleasing
alike to each and all of a most con
genial party.
JSo Exceptions.
“Hen Fruit” pays better than some
other kinds of fruit, but all fruit pays.
—Farm and Orchard, Keyser, W. Va.
A Model Factory.
The Portsmouth (Va.) Star of June
26th contains a lengthy sketch of
“The Parker Hosiery Mill,” in that
city, characterizing it as in every way
a model plant. It is sanitary and
healthful in every respect—a condi
tion constantly promoted by the mana
ger—H. A. V. Parker.
The enterprise was instituted about
11 years ago and the business has
steadily increased until it now re
quires 150 operatives, and would em
ploy more if they could be obtained.
In the knitting and looping depart
ments an advance of 10 per cent, in
wages was recently made by Mr.
Parker, owing to the steady effort of
the workers to keep up with mill
orders.
In view of all these facts, especial
ly of the management’s consideration
for the health and material welfare of
the employees, Portsmouth is mani
j festly proud of the Parker plant.
Mr. Parker is known by many in
Frostburg. His wife is a daughter of
the late Mr. and Mrs. John L. Porter,
j and in her girlhood was a popular
j member of a large circle.

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