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Frostburg mining journal. [volume] (Frostburg, Md.) 1871-1913, April 18, 1913, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025350/1913-04-18/ed-1/seq-7/

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DEVICE TO CARRY INVALIDS
Patient May Be Lifted About From
One Place to Another Without
Trouble or Discomfort.
A device for carrying invalids who
do not object to looking like bundles
has been patented by an Illinois wom
an. A canvas body is made to inclose
the patient from knee to waistline. It
has handles above the knees and at
the waist; The upper half of this body
opens in front and is closed by means
of two strong straps which buckle over
it. When a man or woman is buckled
into this contrivance they are literally
sewed up in a cloth carrier and can be
lifted about from one place to another
with comfort to them and with east to
the person or persons lifting them.
For traveling such a device is particu
larly convenient, as it can be folded
with comfort to them and with ease to
anywhere out of the way when not in
w- • *g^J|
Invalid Carrier.
use, and there is nothing to indicate
the disability of the invalid.
CLOSE GUARD ON INVENTIONS
How Secret Processes of Manufacture
Were Preserved in Olden Days—
Little Faith in Laws.
It would appear that our forefathers
had little faith in patent laws to pro
tect their rights in inventions, remarks
an exchange. What they discovered
or invented they concealed. Workmen
were put upon oath never to reveal
the process used by their employers.
Doors were kept closed, artisans going
out were searched, visitors were rig
orously excluded from admission and
false operations blinded the workmen
themselves. The mysteries of every
craft were hedged in by thick set
fences of empyrical pretensions and
judicial affirmation. The royal manu
fit?feFteirT}f~poFcc7aTn7~ 'for' ~ example-'
were carried on in Europe with a spir
it of jealous exclusiveness.
The king of Saxony was especially
circumspect. Not content with the
oath of secrecy imposed upon his work
people, he would not abate his kingly
suspicion in favor of a brother mon
arch. Nedther king nor king’s dele
gates might enter the tabooed walls of
Meissen. What is erroneously called
the Dresden porcelain was produced
for 200 years by a process so secret
that neither the bribery of princes nor
the garrulity of the operatives re
vealed it.
Other discoveries have been less
successfully guarded, fortunately for
the world. The manufacture of tin
ware in England originated in a stolen
secret. Few persons need to be in
formed that tinware is simply thin
iron plated with tin by being dipped
into the molten metal. In theory it is
an easy matter to clean the surface
of iron, dip it into a bath of boiling
tin, remove it enveloped with a sil
very metal to a place for cooling.
In practice, however, the process is
one of the most difficult in'the indus
trial' arts. It was discovered in Hol
land, and guarded from publicity with
the utmost vigilance for more than
half a century.
England tried in vain to discover
the secret until one James Sherman,
a Cornish miner, insinuated hipiself
into the works, became master of the
secret and brought it home.
To Paint Stack Covers.
Wet the canvas thoroughly with
water, and apply the paint, giving it
two coats. Paint applied in this man
ner, will set to the canvas, and hard
en on the outside without penetrat
' ing the goods, or striking through, and
muslf longer than paint used
in any other way. Cotton goods may
be painted in this manner, such as
tents, wagon covers, etc., etc.
INVENTION
The blood of an average man weighs
twenty pounds.
There are 5,800 licensed airmen in
the United States.
Seven passengers have been carried
by a. new French hydroaeroplane.
More than seventy aeroplanes fig
ured in a recent French army review.
Dr. M. J. Rosenau of Harvard says
infantile paralysis is not contagious.
A Boston scientist, Prof. A. J. Honej,
claims to have discovered a cure for
leprosy.
Dr. G. F. Sammis, Brooklyn, has dis
covered that ether may be successfully
used hypodermically,
George Wentz, Philadelphia, recent
ly broke his back. Surgeons success
fully repaired it with silver wire.
The material excavated from the
Panama canal wouid build a Chinese
wall from San Francisco to New York.
NEW WATCHES QUITE UNIQUE
Recent Adoption of 24-Hour Time in
France Necessitates Time-Piece
With Two Dials.
Because of the recent adoption of
24-hour time in France, the French
timepiece makers are turning out
watches having combination dials and
three hands, says the Popular Me
chanics. The main dial carries only
hour numerals from one to 24. In
front of this dial, and slightly raised
above it, is a smaller dial having just
the 12 hour numerals and minute divis
ions of the ordinary watch. The dials,
of course, have Individual hour hands,
/ S
-
Combination Watch.
but the minute hand of the smaller
dial suffices for both.
As shown in the illustration, this
hands of the 12-hour dial .udicate
that the time is 3:84 o'clock ThiW
hour hand of the 24-b ur dial has pasdß
ed the numeral 15. This, with
-jßtattteJte va
the 24-hour time to bo 15:34 o'clock,
the fact that the hour number is high
er than 12, showing that the time in
dicated is in the afternoon.
AID FOR COMING ASTRONOMY
One Large Observatory to Be Main
tained With Three Stations—
Work Watched Carefully.
The coming astronomy, thinks Prof.
Edward C. Pickering of Harvard, will
find at least one large observatory
with 100 or 200 assistants, and
maintaining three stations. Two of
these will be observing stations,
one in the western part of the
United States, the other probably
in South Africa. * The locations will
be selected wholly from climatic
conditions, moderately high, from 5,-
000 to 10,000 feet, in desert regions.
1 Each observatory will have telescopes
and other instruments of the largest
size, which will be kept at work
I throughout the whole of every clear
night. The observers will do little
i In the day, except perhaps on the sun,
and will not undertake much of the
computation or reductions.
This last work will be carried on at
i a third station, which will be near a
large city, where the cost of- living
and of intellectual labor is low. The
photographs will be measured and
stored at this station, and the results
published.
The work of all three stations will
be carefully organized so as to obtain
the greatest result for a given expen
diture.
USEFUL FOR A STOREKEEPER
Little Apparatus Devised by Wash-
jngton JVlaji .Enables ~Qt
Up Change Quickly.
Who has not scratched and fumbled
at a coin that lay on a smooth surface,
such as the top of a glass case? For
the benefit of these people and all oth
[ I
Change Deliverer.
er people who like their change put
into their hand, a Washington man
has designed the little apparatus
shown here. A pedestal disk mount
ed on the top has a screw stud pro
jecting above it. On one end of the
disk is a short coiled spring the oth
er end of which is attached to the cen
ter of a concave tray which is mount
ed above the pedestal. The ends of
this tray depend and have horizontal
projections. The storekeeper lays the
customer’s change in the tray. The
customer lays the backs of his fin e ers
- sf-tfee-'horisos-tal—projections
aid dips that end of the Cray, where
upon the coins slide down into his
hand.
Wireless Pi'4'jr-e Sending.
A young Italian inventor, Bernochi,
of Turin, has just succeeded in send
ing drawings, handwriting and the
like by a new wireless telegraph de
vice which has thus far been tried
with good success at 100 miles’ dis
tant between the wireless stations of
Turin and Milan, which were placeS
at his disposal by the minister of
war. It can be adapted to any kind
of wireless plant and gives absolutely
secret transmission. A point which
is well worked out is the synchron
ous running of the sending and receiv
ing cylinders, which operate on the
principle of phonograph cylinders by
suitable mechanism. In many cases
the records on the receiver cylinder
were quite clear.
Flame Without' Heat.
The invention of a flame derived
from electric energy that will not give
off heat Is claimed by a French scien
tist who is keeping the details secret.
A substantial prize has been offered
in Paris for the best device to prevent
automobiles splashing mud upon pe
destrians.
SMILES^
UNCONVENTIONALITIES.
“Step lively, you old duffer! You’re
obstructin’ the transportation system
of more’n 2,000,000 people!”
“I’m not the least bit disappointed
In you as a neighbor, Mrs. Nagsworth;
everybody told me I’d find you a regu
lar old virago.”
“Yes, sir, I wrote the story that was
printed about you in the paper this
morning, and if you make any fuss
about it wuTll print one so much worse
that you’ll want to crawl off some
where and die.”
“What are yot, kicking about,
madam? That photograph looks ex
actly like you. If I should give you a
hundred sittings I couldn’t make you
appear handsome.”
“Tommy, when you go home you
can tell your mother I kept you in
after school because you are a bad
boy whose parents don’t seem to know
to train children.”
Tragedies Told in Headlines.
“Forgot to Remove His Chew of To
bacco Before Entering Church. Was
■ Shown to Front Seat.”
on Reading Sporting Page
Haircut; Interested Bar-_
of^fciar.’’
Man Seized With Violent
■ While Calling on
■ His Betrothed; Engagement An
nulled.”
“Estrangement Between Two Soci
’ ety Leaders: One Tells of Finding
■ Cockroach on Garments After Making
Call on the Other.”
LOGICAL.
“You can’t he a successful inventor
without a thorough knowledge of the
laws of physics.”
“You’re wrong there. Necessity
knows no law, and is also the mother
of invention.”
Entomology.
Ofttimes the little bedbug Is
As busy as can be.
I hope in his activities
He won’t alight on me!
Could Sell Anything.
wr-ttiag
poetry.”
“But I sell poetry,” protested the
other.
“And that convinces me that you
can sell anything. Such being the
case, why not take up high class
bonds or steel bridges or something
big?”
Not Particularly.
“Did you notice that woman who
just passed?” inquired he.
“The one,” responded she, “with the
gray hat, the white feather, the red
velvet roses, the mauve jacket, the
black skirt, the mink furs and the lav
ender spats?”
“Yes.”
“Not particularly.”
The Best Thing.
“James got dizzy in the water and
it frightened him.”
“It was the best thing which could
have happened.”
“How do you make that out?”
“If he was . dizzy, wasn’t his head
swimming?”
Persistent.
“Our sins are sure to find us out,”
quoted the Wise Guy.
. “Yes, but they have an unpleasant
habit of calling again,” added the Sim
ple Mug.
The First Step.
“What is the first step you would
take toward filling the position you
desire me to obtain for you?” asked
Senator Sorghum.
“Arranging to have it empty,” re
plied the man who thinks that to the
victors belong the spoils.
Provident.
Her p ater —Young man, what pros
pects have you?
Reggie—W-why, sir, I’ve got almost
enough cigarette coupons saved up to
furnish a flat! —Puck.
A Serious Object.
“Why are you suddenly so anxious
to run for local office?”
“Well,” replied Mr. Chuggins, “I
have decided that a man who- drives
an automobile wants a little prom
inence and authority so that the po
licemen will recognize him and maybe
be a little easy.”
A Satirical Gardener.
“Do you read much fiction?”
“Yes. I take a lot of magazines
that tell men what a fine garden I can
make in my back yeard.”
Latest Invasion.
First Suffragette Hobo —What be
came of Weary Millie Walk-a-way?”
Second Suffragette Hobo—She and
Dustina Rhoades were riding the rods
of a Santa Fe east-bound, when Weary
Millie let loose to put her hat on'
straight.”—Judge.
What’s the Use?
“Why don’t you get in the habit of
going to the dictionary when you want
to know how to spell a word?”
“I do occasionally, but somehow
the dictionary always has it wren*,”
HIS* JOB.
/j, *| J |
fill
“Did you have any thrilling expe
riences in the Alps, Mr. Pumper?”
“Oh, yes, Miss Plumper. On one oc
casion I was: forced to act as the
chauffeur of a snowslide!”
the Blame.
—.—
Is just a blank
Oft has himself
For that to thank. .
Couldn’t Go That High.
"What’s worrying you?” we asked a
casual friend, yesterday.
“Why, I can’t make up my mind
what to give my wife for a birthday
gift,” he answered. “Her birthday is
tomorrow, and I’m at my wit’s end.”
“Why not let her choose her own
present?” we suggested, in a moment
of inspiration.
“Oh, I can’t do that,” he explained.
“I can’t afford to go that high.”
The Spoon Told.
Three little girls each had received
a silver spoon as a Christmas gift.
“Mine has ‘From your papa’ on the
handle,” said Georgia.
“Mine says ‘To my loving daugh
ter.’ ” chimed In Margaret.
“And mine,” said Mabel proudly,
“says ‘Hotel Auditorium.’ ” —Puck.
Doctors’ Work.
Bacon—This paper says that doc
• tors are aiding the anti-noise crusade
in Baltimore.
Egbert—Does that mean they are
trying to kill it?
Just Married.
“Don't you think every man has his
price?” asked the visitor.
“Indeed, I do not,” said 'the bride
of a few weeks. “I know my husband
is a priceless treasure.”
What He Carried.
“Do you carry a rabbit’s foot, Sam?”
“No, sail.”
“Why not, Sam?”
“Oh, just ’cause I’d rather depend
on a razor, sail!”
- 1
Ethel —I suppose Jack was at the
steamer to wish you bon voyage.
Kitty—Ob, better than that; he was
there with a five-pound box of candy
and he wished me a bonbon voyage.
A New One.
“Scrambled eggs in the new mown
hay!” sang the irrepressible guest.
And the waiter brought them In
with shredded wheat. —Williams Pur
ple Cow.
Fortunate.
Uncle —I understand that young
Brown is utterly ruined by specula
tion.
Niece —How lucky that we agreed
to keep our engagement secret.
HARDLY.
“That horse you bought yesterday
Is a vicious looking brute. Is he
kind?” , t|
“I should thmE so. Why, when he
came out of the stable, he stood upon
his hind legs and tried to embrace
me.”
Dining Out,
Mary had a little lamb,
Then gave her head a toss;
"I don’t think much,” she whispered, “of
The chef who made the sauce.”
Prejudiced Choice.
“Won’t you marry me, dear?” plead
ed the actor, after his fourth divorce.
“Why, I kind o’ like you, Billy,”
said the actress; “but I’ve heard so
much about you, I fear—”
“My dear,” hastily Interrupted the
actor, “you must not believe all those
old wives’ tales.” —Judge.
In the Nuttery.
Visitor —What’s wrong with the man
in that cell?
Attendant —He’s a doughnut.
“You mean that is his hallucina
tion?”
“No; he really is. He went erazy
on the subject of money.”—Judg
The Natural Course.
“What Is the first thing a man does
when he gets into trouble with the ;
police?”
“Why, he sends for somebody to i
hall hire* OUJL”
Ora®
S.E.KISEZ3
HELPING HIM
TO BEAR IT
' r
HE.
O maiden, may I still hope on
And may I still be glad?
Ah, tell me not the love is gone
That once you said you had!.
O maiden, turn me not away—
Have pity, maiden fair,
Since candor forces me to say
My pa’s a millionaire!
The sorrows of the rich, you know,
Are broad and deep and high,
For Carnegie has told men so,
And Andy wouldn’t lie!
Ah, maiden, you have poverty
And, therefore, you are blest,
But maiden, do not turn from mo
And rob my soul of rest!
SHE.
I Pity you, O luckless boy!
Your pa’s a millionaire,
And so there can be little joy
In life for you to share—
I pity you! I pity you!
So take me to your heart
And let me bravely help you to
Play out your Sitter part!
How to Lfve a Century.
Don’t try to show people how grace
fully you can jump on or off moving
trains.
Don’t try to save three-quarters of a
second hy running in front of a trolley
car.
Don’t go downstairs in the dark to
hunt burglars.
Don’t stay to find out whether the
other fool’s gun is really loaded or
not.
Don’t try to see how near you can
skate to the edge of the ice before it
will break.
Don’t slap a large person on the
shoulder and yell, “Hello, Bill,” until
you are sure it isn’t a case of mis
taken identity. His vaccination may
be working.
Don’t try to show that you are used
to city ways by leaping out of the ele
vator before it stops.
Don’t tell all the funny things your
children say.
Don’t take everything people recom
mend to you for the grip.
Don’t try to use moral suasion on
bulldogs.
Don’t read original poetry every
time you are invited out to dinner.
Don’t experiment with the things
that are concocted to prolong life.
THE ONLY WORDS FOR HIM.
|— “Here, said the,
city editor, “you
Say mall
art! a//fyti g§m] ' sca ' ecl theheight.
fj§, ££" W That’s a hack
n e y e d phrase
I—— Don’t you think
a you could find
v.fjj'i. \jV- IKB better words in
which to express
the glory of his achievement?”
“No,” replied the old reporter, “I’m
afraid not. You see, he started in life
as a fish peddler.”
Very Sad Case.
“Yis, poor chap,” said Michael, “he
had a hard toime av it. He ought to
be glad he’s dead. He niver had none
av the blessings av the rich. The
only toime he iver rode in a carriage
in his loife was phwin he wint to his
funeral.”
Knew All About It.
“Has he the courage of hi 3 convic
tions, though?”
“Yes,” replied the one who had bet
against him on what he supposed was
a sure thing, “and what’s more, he ha 3
the courage of my convictions in hi 3
pocket right now.”
Fallen.
O, little comets tumble
From out their firmaments;
This morning, with a sense of pain,
I saw “The Story of Mary Mac Lean”
Marked down to twenty cents.
Skeptical.
“My wife,” said Mr. Younglove,
proudly, “can. talk in four different
languages.”
“What!” replied the crusty old
bachelor; “not all at once!”
Always Prepared.
The Common Man —Why is it you
i actors wear heavily furred coats in all
j seasons?
Great Actor—Tha tact is, mo dear
fellow, my profession is the only one
liable to frosts in all seasons!—Syd
ney Bulletin.
Hard to Say.
“What horse power is Smith’s new
machine?”
; “Don’t know, but last time I saw
I him with it, it wa3 in tow of a
| mule.”
IT’S A PLEASURE
WHEN COOKING ON OUR
GAS RANGES
G. M. MAYER & CO.
FRGSTSURG, MO.
PHOTOGRAPHER
! r u?ii _ . .1.
On Broadway, FROSTBITRG, MO.
Let Us Dry-Steam
Clean and Press Yojir
Coat, Pants and i
Vest!
We do not drive the dirt into the lining of
the goods, but force it from the inside out.
This process is strictly sanitary. It removes
all dirt, raises the nap, renders the garment
sterilized like new and not shrink a thread.
laddies' Coats, Jackets, Skirts, Etc,, •-
seive special attention.
Shall we call for your next package?
FROSTBURG STEAM LAUNDRY,
A. 8. BURTON, Proprietor.
HAVE YOU A HOUSE
That is Not Insured P
If So, You Should Place a Policy
On It To-Day,
Or To-Morrow Before You Dine.
YOU should place the risk, too, with \
Representing D. P. MILLER & CO.,
Mining Journal Office, 82 East Union St.,
March 25] FROSTBURG, MD.
DEPENDABLE NURSERY STOCK
Varieties True to Name Extra Care Used ia Pockiiijj"
With Privilege of Examining Stock Before Paying For It
These are FOUR vitally smportant features to be considered before
placing- your order for Stock. We offer for Spring Planters—
-100,000 Peach and 75,000 Apple Trees
Embracing all the leading Commercial Varieties. We also offer a
full and complete assortment of Std. and Dwf. Pears, Cherries, Plums,
Quinces, Apricots, Grape Vines, Small Fruits, Asparagus, Rhubarb,
etc. Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Vines, Rose Bushes. California
Privet Is a specialty with us. Submit a list of your wants and
save money.
Mountain View Nursery Co., Williamsport, Md.
SALESMEN WANTED to Travel or Act as our Local Representa
■ tives. Write for terms and territory. We pay liberal commissions.
♦ ———
VOUR soiled Evening Dress, Gown, Wrap,
*■ Fur, Slippers, Gloves, or any other article
of apparel thoroughly cleansed and re-finished like
new by our SUPERIOR METHODS not only brings
SATISFACTION to the wearer, but adds hygienic
Comfort as well.
FOOTER’S DYE WORKS
Anrcrics’s Greatest and Best Gleaners and Dyers
CUMBERLAND, MD.
T. S. COOPER, Agent, 5 Broadway, Rrostburg, Md.
fe— *1
xsnir. jar -nonoaoc —-ani^
j| “My Bank” ...... Jl
to its safety, the best advertisement a J
bank can have is the treatment it affords its /
customers. To see that every patron of this Bank
is served with thoughtfulness and courtesy is the \
aim of our officers. We want you to feel whe-:
11 you come in that this is “my bank.”
nil -"inmnmni- ■ :’..iirri—■ sa I^
a The /"'
IPirst N ational Bank
Q OF FROSTBURG, MARYLAND
-iiv— -j r-ri innnrmr —'-Jh_t t-i r -■ ' en
Capital $50,000 Surplus Fund $75,0j00
Assets Over One Million Dollars 1
Depository of the United States Depository of State of Maryland
WE INVITE YOU TO BECOME A DEPOSITOR 'j
Officers—Robkrdeau Annan, President; Or, in Bsax,L, Cashier
Directors—Robert R. Henderson, Duncan Sinclair, Timothy Griffith,
Daniel Annan, Roberdeau Annan \
- " ""j—ii-t ■ ' ■!"' ' " irrL
Justice of the Peace
And Collector of Claims
of All Kinds
UNION ST. FROSTBURG, HID.
PHONES AT BOTH
OFFICE AND RESIDENCE
a a
‘ppnp
jIS This Spafj&Jyjjj
Is for -Sale ||
il at very rea- JJ|f
lljlS sonable rates |||j
Hill not nse lip
ill|| r itto advertise Xr ||||
i Hill " your war e® " jjlj
mmam

to One \ l|
| Man '
But an advertisement in
this paper talks to the
whole community.
Catch the Idea ?
™ in " l ——a—i ——————— —— r

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