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Mower County transcript. [volume] (Lansing, Minn.) 1868-1915, September 30, 1869, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025431/1869-09-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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FURl ISnED EVERY THURSDAY AT
Austin, Mower County, Minnesota.
GKO. W. WRIOUT, KM TOR AND
PKOIMUETOR.
TKIIMS, Altcaya
in
rpilASK'S
Aitvaiic.
One Copy, one year
six months
three months
KA TICS OF
I w. 2
suiess
Po.
$2.00
1.00
50
-l /.7»
T1S1SU
1 iu. 2 m. 3 in. 6 in.
1 .V.
-cj'r 073 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 4.00
On ."ij'r 073 1.00 1.30 2.00 2.o0 4.00 6.00
Tw 1.00 1.25 2.00 3.50 4.50 6.00 10.00
Three" 1.50 2.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 S.0013.00
our 2.00 2.50 S.50 0.00 8.00 10.00 16.00
Column 2.5C 4.00 0.00 10.00 12.0016.00 25.00
4.5b 00 10.00 13.00 20.00 25.00 45.00
Oil 6.00 {..HO 15.00 25.00 35.00 45.00 80.00
—Business curds per vcar One Dollar per
line.
—AH religious nnd ehnritaMo notices insert
ed free, also notices of Deaths and Marriages.
—Legal advertisements Seventy five cents
per square for the first insertion, and Tliirty
scven and one half ecnts for each suluwjuent
iu»crtio:i payable before affiduvit is given.
—Transient advertisements payable in ad
tiii-c. Other advertisements according to
oontriu't.
—Advertisement.-' not marked, published till
f-trbid and cliariretl accordin^lv.
Buiutv, si. i).
Phys clan nnd Surgeon.
Special attention given chronic diseases in
all its forms. Office at present South end of
Main street. (Ourney place.)
Austin, Minn. 19tf
A. BARNES, M. D.
PhyNieianjtnd Snrgeon.
Office and residence, corner' Mill and High
Streets, Austin. Minnesota (n2 ly.)
JN.
WHEAT, M. D.
.HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN A SUR
GEON.
Office and Residcndcon the Corner of Mill and
St. Paul St. Austin, Miun. 40t
Jan. 12th, 1S60.
OW.
GIBSON. M. D., PHYSI
cian and Surgeon, Austin, Minn. Office
•nil residence on Wvter street.
Austin, April 30th, 1868. n3-ly
PAOKat
GW.
IO.
& WHEELER. A^TOR-
neys Law and Dealers in Real Estate.
ertified Abstracts of Title to any Lands in
'slower county, given on short notiee. Office
up stairs in Bank Block, Austin, Minn. n2
SIIRRMAK PAGE. E, O. WFLBKI.EB.
BISHOP,
General Agent, Austin, Minnesota.
Lauds bought and sold on Commission, °ftc.
Office on tlie corner, south of tho Court House.
44tf
SWALLOWCOLLECTION
& CLARK, LAW,
LAND aud OFFICE, in
Basford's Brick Block, aorner Main and Bridge
Sts., Austin, Minn.
OF G.T., DEGREE TEMPLE,
Excelsior Lodge No. 8, meets once in two
irei k?, on Tuesday evening at 7:30.
BEST
aounce
O. ALLEJ\ D. T.
J. T.PIC$)D. Sec.
QUALITY OF WOODEN
PUMPS, constantly oa hand, by Q. A.
TRUESDELL, at Austin. 14tf
Austin, July 11th, 1868.
ARCHITECT
AND BUILDER.
GEO. JOHNSON would respectfully an
to the citizens of Austiu and vicinity
that he is now prepared to attend to all orders
in his line. Drafting done and estimates made
on short notice. Will take contracts and erect
buildings of all descriptions. Charges reasona
ble and satisfaction guaranteed. Shop on Bridge
street, Austin, Minnesota. 38 tf
DR.
W.
L. HOLLISTER,
Physi­
cian and Surgeon, Office at his residence,
Lansing, Minn. n6-tl
O. OF Or. T.—TnE LANSING
Lodge No. 150, I. O. G. T., meets every
Friday evening, at Templars llall.
J.
E.
BODIXSOX. W. C. T,
W. I3TTXTX.T, TV~. 3.
LEROY 1H7SIKESS CARDS.
CASWELL
HOUSE,
». CASWELL, Proprietor.
1 'or. Main it Broadway, LeRoy, Minn.
GOOD STABLING ATTACHED.
v2nl vl.
HOTEL,
J. F, Tit ASK, Proprietor,
LEROY, MINNESOTA.
Refitted, Refurnished and good Livery. Board
by the day or week. v2n2yl
CHeavy
ORBITT & ALLEN—Dealers in
A
Shelf Hardware, Stoves, Tinware,
House Furnishing Goods, &c.
Corner Main Street. fc Eroadway, LeRoy,
Minn, lOtf
"VT"ASON & EDES—Dealers in Up
,1II bolstered and Common Furniture.
Main St,. LeRoy, Minn. lOtf
ALL O. K.
The old 0. K."Barber is now in the town of
Austin and will remain with you. He ia ready
to do ForX in bis line of business.
laic Dressing, Hair Dyeing,
and Ilair Cutting
Shavi
tliat can't help but satisfy all who call on him
fiqtr work. He will be tound at the sign of
"O. K.." en Mill St. E. PAINE.
3Stf
ITY BAKERY.
J, H. MoCLENTIO.
Wi«hes t» inform the public that at his ba
kary on Mill Street may be found everything
that is |isually kept in a fiast class Bakery.
H» manufactures and keeps constantly on hand
ft general assortment of plain candies. Fann
in and others will find this a desirable place
to obtain a lunch as be intends^o pay particular
attention to this branoh of business.
Mill Struct, Austin, Minn.
$100.00 SiOO.OO $100.00!!
For one (ireon Itepps, 1'arli.r Suite, consist
ing ofl 'fete, 1 Easy Chair, Sewing Chair,
Urace Arin Chairs of the very best Eastern
manufactured ware. The above cannot be
bought, in Milwaukee or Chicago at tho very
Jawcat wholesale prKio, for less tbitn $05.00.
MT« venture tho assertion that we are selling
ineso suites at least $20,00 less than similar
styles can bu liou^ht at retiil in eithor of the
latter plau-s.
Miniv -nta.
SKVHX SUITE* SK.HTOUT DUMNG
TIIB I'AST THtiBK UONTiM.
HOPKINS A FE11NALD,
Dealers iu Furniture, Bedding, etc., Austin,
J. HAYES,
WATCH
MAKER,
I IA
JE IVELER,
All work WARRANTED.
On Jlain Slre:t, Austin M'niu.
v2n221y.
cTrlc E'."
MKALKD PROPOSALS} will be ro-
eeived by the Board of Education of Inle
)cndeut District No. 27, (Mower Couuty, Min
nesotii, until the first day of October, A. D.
I.•J0i. lor the furnishing of forty cords of Kea
joncd wood f.r tho puldic schools of Austin,
crjuid wood to lie fiiiuinhcd in such qunntitics
iind at tuuh times as tho Board may direct.
Austin, Sept. 21, 1809
v2u24tf E, C. DORR, Clerk.
AUSTIN, MINN., SEPTEMBER 30, 186#.
Eewlcan StateJTictet
FOR CHIEF JUSTICE SUPREME COURT,
C.O. HIPLEY,
OP RILMONR.
FOR GOVERNOR,
HORACE AUSTIN,
OT SflCOLLET.
FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.
WILLIAM II. YALE,
OP WINONA.
FOR SECRETARY OF STATE.
HANS MATTSON,
OP MEKKER.
FOR AUDITOR OF STATE,
CHARLES MelLRATH,
OF NICOLLET.
FOR TREASURER,
ENIL MUNCH,
OF PINE.
FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL.
F. R. E. CORNELL,
OF 1IE3KKP1X.
FOR CLERK OF SUPREME COURT,
SHERWOOD HOUGH,
Or BAU9BT.
Introductory.
Having made arrangements whereby
we assume the editorial and business
management of the TRANSCRIPT, we
desiro to address a few words to its
friends and patrons, declaratory of our
purposes, principles, and prospects.
First, with regard to our purposes.
In consequence of impaired health, in
duced by the enervating influences of
a malarious climate, and unseasonable
hours of labor, it has become neces
sary to change our place of residence,
and as Minnesota enjoys a world-wide
reputation for healthfulness, and a
prospective material advancement sec
ond to no State in the Union, we nat
urally turned our steps in this direc
tion, with the intention of making it
our permanent abode. So that, we
are here TO STAY. That settled, our
purpose is to build up such a business,
and to merit such respect from our fel
low citizens, its shall leave no desire
for a change.
The policy we have adopted in order
to bring about such a result, is that
best of all policy—honesty honesty
in the expression of opinion honesty
in our business relations honesty and
earnestness in the support of sach
measures as will tend to the develop
ment of the various interests of the
county honesty in our words of ap
proval or condemnation of the conduct
of public servants, regardless of par
tisan feeling or influence. The people
have an undoubted right to expect in
dependence of utterance, watchfulness
of their interests, and diligence and
ood judgment in collecting and com
menting upon the news of the day.
The people have also an unquestioned
right, (which some public servants
seem to ignore) to demand honesty
and capacity in the conduct of office
holders. We are firmly convinced that
the newspaper publisher or the office
holder who loses sight of these facts,
makes a fatal mistake, and will discover,
to his cost, that the tendency of public
opinion is toward the requirement of
clean records and faithful attention to
duty on the part of those who would
aspire to hold offices of trust from
the people.
It cannot be denied, we think, that
forgetfulness or disregard of these
plain principles have occasioned the
unhappy contentions which are so rife
in this and other counties of this State,
and others, and have rendered neces
sary, especially in Mower county, the
establishment of an organ which shall
be devoted to the purification of the
Republican party, and of that nest of
unclean birds the existence of which
every good man in the county has so
long deplored. No man, who has the
least historical knowledge of the pro
gress of thought, and of the way in
which reforms, are accomplished, can
doubt the final result. The unfaithful
servant, whether in charge of a press
or an office in the gift of the people,
shall surely meet with his reward in
the stern mandate, away with him/'
of an outraged public.
We will also add that it is our pur
pose to give special attention to the ag
ricultural interests of the county and
State. Having made this subject a
special study for some years, we think
\vc shall be able tcr Tirake suggestion *,
and present such facta and illustrations
as will help the tiller of the soil to de
velop the possibilities of his acres to
advise him with regard to the most
profitable methods of farming to guard
him from imposition and to elucidate
the principles on which depend the
successful growth of animals and of
plants. To this end wc are completing
arrangements in every township in the
county for securing to our columns re
ports'of tho progress of tho couuty in
agricultural improvement the opinions
and practices of the bust far mens ami
a discussion of the various requirements
of rural life, for producing the best
results.
Briefly, as to our prospects. We
think theso arc as good as the certainty
of the final prevalence of truth and jus
tice. Wc think, and ht^ve long
thought, that the closer an individual
or a newspaper conforms his or its con
duct to the great principles on which
the welfare of society and the final .sal
vation of the race depend, tho better
will bo thoir chanocs of success.
And now, if these utterances have
tho true rnttj, and find a response iu
the hearts of the people, come over and
WF
help us give us your moral and mate
rial support words of encouragement
your personal efforts in extending the
circulation of tho TRANSCRIPT, and in
sending us tho news of your respective
neighborhoods and thus, together, we
will labor to induce emigration, build
railroads, attract business, promote so
briety, fill our churchcs and school
houses, placc honest, competent men
iu office and then may we hope to ren
der Mower county the envy of her
sisters, and the North Star State shall
become, even more than now, the goal
to which the people of all climes shall
look with hope and confidcncc.
GEO. W. WRIGHT.
Action.
We would urge the friends of reform
in all parts of the county to organize
their forccs, and prepare for a vigorous
prosecution of the canvass. The enemy
is wily and vigilant, and will steal a
march on their opponents if the latter
be caught napping. All who desire a
change for the better in the administra
tion of county affairs, the need of which
is generally admitted, should try to
impress upon their neighbors the
ncccssity for decisive action, in
order that tho stain which now rests
upon tho character of the county may
be removed. Vigilance is the price of
liberty.
Democratic Ticket.
The Democracy of Minnesota held
their Convention on Thursday and
nominated the following ticket:
For Governor—Qcorge L. Otir, of Ramsey
county,
Lieutenant Governor—J. A. Wisewell, of
Blue Earth.
Secretary of Stato F.Q. FludHtBd,if Fill
more.
Auditor «f State—Lewis A. Evans, of
Stearns.
Attorney General—Seagrage Smith, of Da
cotah.
State Treasurer—Caspar Babritch, of Browa.
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court—Chas.
E. Flandrau, of Uet nepin county.
Clerk of Supreme Court—W. T. Bonniwell,
ofMcLeod.
CALIFORNIA.
A Letter from Rev. A. J. Nelson.
Correspondence of the TRANSCRIPT.
University of the Pacific, Santa Clara,
California, Sept. 12, 1869.
I promised you some account of my
trip to1 the Pacific, and the receipt of
several numbers of your paper reminds
me of the sacreducss of promises.
THE TRIP
was made from Chicago to Sacramento
in precisely 126 hours and 40 minutes,
from the time I stepped upon the train
at the depot, until I stepped aboard
the steamer on the Sacramento.
The ..road all the way is in first rate
condition, whatever Tetter writers may
say to the contrary. I have never
seen a better road. The track is well
laid with the most improved rail the
rolling stock is new and first class no
better cars or more powerful and mag
nificent engines are found on the conti
nent. The baggage men, brakemen,
engineers and conductors are quiet,
genteel, and attend to business. No
loud talk, no profanity, no assumption
of authority this was remarkable
throughout the entire trip. In fact,
the moral atmosphere in some respects
seemed purer than I had been accus
tomed to. I have scarcely heard a
dozen oaths, and have not'seen one drun
ken man since I left Austin.
The weather was fine, except two or
three showers while we weire ascending
the mountains. The sky was clear—
the road was not dusty as I expected,
we rode with open windows exeept while
crossing the alkali desert in the vicin
ity of Salt Lake—here all was made
close to keep from smothering.
This is the most desolate, heaven-de
serted, God-forsaken portion of country
I ever saw—worse than Sahara it is
poison to look at it. It is well adapted
to the moral atmosphere that mixes with
it. If alkali dust and Mormon poly
gamy will form a chemical combination,
and there is grease enough in the hell
ish system to form a soap, there may be
some probability of washing out the
deep, blood-red sins of these most de
praved sons and daughters of Adam.—
The house is now divided against itself,
the Josephites versus the Brighamitcs.
Woemen defending their chastity
against the treachery of men. The case
is in chancery, but chance always favors
the right, anct there ia no doubt that
Mormonism will have a speedy an
haps a violent death another proof
that sin is self-destructive.
The trip as a whole is a pleasure trip
the scenery grand, awful and sublime,
71:: first object of special attention is
1'
Waysatch. or Black Hills as we
hi ^'in to asccnd, mountains appear in
the* distance 00 miles, covered with
aijfw they seem only 4 or 5,—but they
•.,•0 huge, monstrous, sublime and terri
ble to beholds. As we near them their
structure is wonderful, built of coarsc
granite,
built, I
said cjected from be­
low, from a depth as deep and far off as
tl' to which Milton's Satan wandered
froiu the wrat'i of Heaven.
I »:ized at them, I wondered, then
praised, then started back at thought
of such calamity. What wild confusion
infinite contortion! amazing power who
did this why done when I touched
them, there were the scars of ages, curi
ous marks] of forgotten centuries. They
are not pyramids built by past genera
tions as a memorial of their greatness.—
No, these are the monuments of tho In
finite the work of the Omnipotent,
tho people of Him who lived before the
mountains were brought forth! Divine
syllogisms with conclusion stretching
from base to summit. I touched these
gianta and felt a sense of sa^rcdness as
keen as ever thrilled a Jew at Sinai's
base. I said, these marks aro the hand
writing of God. I never had such sub
lime ideas of Jehovah before.—I road
from my Testament, "All things were
made by Him, and without Him was
not anything (made that was made."
said, I am not deceived, Jesus made
these mountains, I can trust Him to do
anything—"All power is given unto
Him in heaven and in earth".
This stop of 20 minutes at Sherman
was the sublimest period of my life.
Sherman is the highest point on the
road, 8266 feet above the level of the
sea, more than 7000 feet higher than
the Transcript Office the attic among
the towns. This is all that makes it
worthy of a name it is a pdor, misera
ble little station, no town at all this is
nearly true of all the places along the
line. They are mostly cities of tents,
and I think that but ^ittle improvement
has been made either in tent or tenant
since the days of Juba!. Most of the
people living along the road would be
a disgrace to their great grandfather.—
They arc the remnants of the Caruiich
ael construction camps, those cloth
towns where iniquity went mad and
killed a half-dozen daily.
The steepest grade is near Promon
tory we ascended 1440 feet in nine
miles. I never before was impressed
fully with the power of a steam en
gine. There are exhibited the talents,
science, and genius of the age. The
carver of the science of mathematics
seem to have been exhausted in mak
ing this ascent.
At the steepest grade the train is
divided a 40 horse engine is attached
to two cars, all the valves thrown open,
steam up, they rush up at the rate of'
25amiles per hour the machinery trem
bled like an aspen leaf, I never before
saw an. engine do its best, or felt the
value of a good engineer. The road
demands the best machinery and the
best men, and mouey procures them.—
Antelopes,wolves, and black tail deer are
abundant along the road. I countcd one
forenoon 26 antelopes frightened from
their quiet grazing by the rushing train.
Some were so near as to draw the fire
from several revolvers these beautiful
innocent creatures, why should they,
seek the wild solitudes for a home
We passed through four villages of prai
rie dogs. I had read the story of the
rattlesnake, and a prairie dog, when a
boy, how they lived together in har
mony in the same house. I thouhgt it a
END ICO ETORY I grew older aud read
other travels. But when I saw the owl
beside the dog on the same hillock, I
said, I am ready to hclievc the whole
story. I wished the train would stop
that I might see if I could find his
suake-ship. A gentleman, the leading
lawyer in Shyccne told mo that on the
previous Sabbath ho had seen the three
taken from the same hole. The dog
dips his hole, the owl and snake hunt
theirs and so it frequently happens
that they all get together, but there is
no social intercourse. There are none of
them. Mormons each takes care of their
own ffospring, and there is no difficulty
in settling the question of family re
semblance.
But I am letting my pen run at will
and have already written words enough
for a newspaper letter, and have said
nothing of California, the land of fruit
and flowers, of big mountains and trees,
her schools and politics, her men and
mines, rivers and railroads. 'These I
must leave for another letter. The
State is under Democratic rale and will
be until the Republican party learns
wisdom enough to keep together.
The Mower county policy prevails.
The majority of Republicans want
office, and there is not enongh of offices
in a State a thousand miles long to sup
ply the demand, hence the general
scramble and total defeat.
I hope 'my Austin friends will not
forget my old freind O. P. Whiteomb
in the coming canvass, if they are de
termined to devour each other. There
is no better or more competent man in
the State.
The Fifteenth Amendment was the
hinge of the canvass in this State. The
Chinese question was made the hobby
ou which the party rode into power.
The pulpit took part in the discussion.
Dr. Scudder, Presbyterian, and Dr.
Briggs, Methodist, did good service. I
was here in time to lose my vote, but
had an opportunity to put in my plea,
on the ground where a few months
since they burnt a church for us, but
where now stands a more beautiful
structure than adorns the State of Min
nesota. I did not put on my kids on
that special occasion.
A. J. NELSON.
—The Edinburgh Review is to be
edited by Henry Kingsloy, who is to re
ceive five thousand dollars a year for his
services.
—The feet of three great travelers
arc now pressing the soil of the Amer
ican continent. Prince Arthur is wan
dering iu Canada, President Grant in
Pennsylvania, and Vice President Col
fax in. California. They all find what
they are in search of—the fossilifrous
huzzas of the mob at every station.
—The Norfolk Jovvnal trusts that
"the old men of departed days" will re
alize that their power is gone, and that
Virginia intends" now to commit her
destinies into the handy of her young
sons, who are "able to do battle with
the greatest that can be brought
against tliem—aye, and overcome thorn
in the fight."
VOL. 2. AUSTIN, MOWER COUNTY, MINN., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 1869. NO 25.
Yeaehers* Column.
Organ of Die Teata' Association.
PROF. J. H.JOHNSTON,
MUS. MAlttA L)OOLITTLE,
MR S. H. SMITH,
Editorial
Committee.
An Element in Successful Teach
ing*
An excellent teacher knows what
to impart aud how to impart it, so that
his pupils shall be interested in his
uarrative. This faculty is akin to that
possessed by the orator. There are
many teachers whose minds are full
enough of instruction, but the manner
in which they impart it is so devoid of
interest, that their pupils suffer more
than the pupils of men of less learning,
but gifted with tact and energy.
A dull teacher is never blessed with
good pupils. The occupation of teach
ing is one full of interest, anT if there
be one who has learned to make it a
mere routine, let him leave the field to
abetter man.
No one, whose soul is not easily and
always enkindled by reading the
thoughts of the great, or by some magic
touch of the pen or pencil of genius,
can expect to hold in sympathy the
teeming mind of childhood. To suc
ceed here, one must love the employ
ment. If it is not too great for hint,
he will love it. No mechanical teaeh
iig will succeed. The teacher must be
in| just the condition lie is striving to
bring his pupil into—full of interest.
He should seize the subject with a
perfect enthusiasm conyey his truths
all in flame and they will leave an
impression that will endure. But he
need not be boisterous, and talk in a
loud tone of voice. A noisy teacher is
rarely—I might say never—an inter
esting one. To teach well, one must
of course sacrifice himself but he will
not deem it a useless sacrifice, if he ean
thus buoy up his young immortals. He
who would communicate a proper fer
vor to other minds, must be full of get
uine fervor himself like leaven, it wi 1
communicate itself to the whole. A
teacher must come to his work full of a
disinterested desire to improve his pu
is. He must be pure-hearted.
There must he an earnest spiiit with
in the man, that carries conviction to
each one's heart, that he is just what
he seems. A teachcr should have
good thoughts. He should be a stu
dent himself, and bring some of his
treasures to the sight of his pupils. He
should show them that he is in search
of just such wealth as they seek.
Let him not fear to select for them a
hoautifulJ^uthj
Jrp.ni.any science. They.
should thus be constantly taught that
their teacher has many bright gems if
thought in his mind—that they are. his
choicest treasures. His language
should be simple, yet vigorous, convey
ing in a few terms just what is inten
ded. A teacher should never have less
love for a subject, because he has taught
it long. He should be interested in his
pupils, and the subject will be new.—
When the mind springs out to help a
scholar trying to escape from the dark
ness by which he is encompassed, the
sympathies are aroused, aud efforts arc
made to simplify a subject the teacher
thought he perfectly understood. It is
just this state of mind that has produced
so many excellent school books.
A teacher,in passing over his ground,
often finds means to reduce the number
of principles, and teaches these better
every time-
True teaching educates the heart as
well as the intellect. Never allow one
to be developed at the expense of the.
other. If the feelings of children are
not kept alive in the school-room, their
interest in their studies will die also.
The manner of the instructor will be
such as to indicate the presence of deep
feeling be must be always in earnest,
and never frivolous.
The scholar who suspects that his
teacher is not what he should be, will
have no confidence in mankind. A
teacher should be above mistrust.
The pupil who believes that, out of
the sehool-room, his teacher will take a
course his conduct within it condemns,
will not improve in either mind or
heart. The confidence existing between
a son and his father, is not more sacred
than that which should and may exist
between the pupil aud his teacher.
To succeed in teaching, one must
be perfectly at home in his subject', and
plead earnestly and fluently as a model
advocate for his client's life. Above
all things, do it with a consciousness
that you are working on impressible
material and if with a right spirit
you will have succcss. If you are sue
cessful, you will ouly^bo so when you
have found a short and certain road to
your pupil's attention and affection.
DANIEL WEBSTER once said "If
I had as many sons as old Priam,
would send them to the Public Schools.
JOHNSON & Buo. are selling
their stock ol Boots, Shoes and
lleady-made Clothing at First
Cost to make room for other
departments of their trade.
May 18th, 18G9.
That grocery department of SOULIS'S i.i now
stuffed and crammed with everything pertain
ing to it dr.- class groc.M-y stock, l'ancy gro
ceries of nil kinds, catsups, pickles, fratdi mtis
terds, canned and dried fruits, piques mid
jollies of every description, in fact, any and
everything tempting to an cpicurinn appetite,
end we propose to give more of paid stock tor a
dollar than can bo obtained elsewhere in Mow
c- bounty this is tho religious truth,, and no
aamtovg*
ILWAUKEE ST. PAUL
A PEA
AND
MINNEAPOLIS RAILWAY.
TWO DAILY TRAINS EACH WAY.
VIA
MCGREGOR AND MILWAUKEE.
BAGGAGE IS CHECKER THROUGH
MiMee, Chicago, New York. Boston
and all Eastern Points. Passengers changt
cars only at terminal points, thus securing
seats in clean coaches and
FULL NIGHTS REST
on night trains.
IS E WARD'S
CptfCHfgRE
A Safe siid Speady Cure for Coughs,Cold*,
Asthma Bronchitis, Hoarseness. Croup]
Influenza, Whooping Cough, Incipient,
Consumption, and all Diseases of the
Throat and Lungs. Dont neglect a
aev*re Cough, or throw away monev on a
worthless medicine.
PRICK FIFTY CENTS PER BOTTLK
Restores gray and faded Hair to its
ORIGINAL COLOR, removes Dandruff,
CUKES ILL D1SEASE8 OF THE SCALP,
Prevents BALDNESS, and makes the hah
grow Soft, Glossy and Luxuriant.
tlM ii Sl.se par httk bA Bottle is list hpr fa,
Prepared by SEWARD, BENTLET
4CHENEY, Druggists, Bafhlo, N.T. Sold
by all Druggists.
rECT
CURE
For Dyspepsia, Fever and Ague, Aci
dity of the Stomach, Loss of Appetite,
Nausea, Heart-burn, Jaundice, and all
diseases arising from a disordered state
of the Stomach, Liver or Intestinea.
Prepared by SEWARD, BENTLET
& CHENEY. Dniggista, Buffldo, N.T. Sold
by all Druggists.
Jy/JARTZ'S
F0RNITUKE WARER00MS
LEROY, MINN.,
Having completed my new building I am
now in receipt of, and will keep on band a full
stock of selected Furniture. 1 buy from the
most reliable manufacturers and from first
hands for CASH, and will sell ebeapcr (ban
ever offered before in this section. The public
are requested to oall and examine my stock
whether tbey intend purchasing or not.
In connection with my Cabinet Ware 1 offer
for sale
PURE WHITE LEAD,
ALL KINDS OP VARNISH,
ALL KINDS OF PAINTS,
GLASS,
CHILDREN'S CABS, Ac.
A full assortment of TRUNKS. Repairing
in all breaches neatly executed. Cane seated
Chairs Reseated.
7tf JESSIE MARTZ
A
USTIN PUMP MANUFAC
TORY!
A NEW IMPROVED PUMP!
A Great Improvement over the
Waupun or any other Man
factured in the West.
This pump is Warranted to bring the water
to the spout, from below freezing point, at
ONE STROKE,
which it takes any other from three to seven,
and which saves 1 t'O per cent, on tho wear of
the Pump. It is tnado of tho best hjtrd maple
and Warranted the top is also warranted not
to burst by frost in winter.
MATERIAL AND WORKMAN
SHIP OF THE BEST!
We arc also manufacturing a superior FORCE
PUMP, suitablo to any emergency in
extinguishing tiro. This pump will throw wa
ter to the top of any building in the city.
Call and exmmno them for yourselves and
leave your orders.
^afirAll orders by mail promptly attended
TFT
E.
ISAAC WESTOVER
North-east Corner of Publio Square, Austin
Minn. *2n2tf
P. VAN VALKENBURGH,
Will pay
A S I N I E S
WHEAT OATS
Ao., At the
NORTH WAREHOUSE
IN LANSING.
HALLO, MR,!
HAVE YOU'HEARD THE NEWS
J. C. ACKLEY has sold his
BOOT AND SHOE STORE to
B. Revord,
J.
AND
DOWN
GOES
D. C. SIlEPARD, Sup't.
S. S. MERRILL, General Manager.
A. V. If. CARPJSXTEK Gon'l Pass. Agent.
8 5 4
BOOTS
AND
SHOES,
AT fOif.
A large assortment of
BOOTS,
SHOES,
LEATHER&
FINDINGS
Constantly on hand.
REPAIRING done on short notice and
on the most reasonable terms.
The goods will be kept at the 'old stand of
J. C. Ackley, on west side Main street, now
occupied by
2-12yl J. B. REVORD.
»ETER ZELLER,
MERCHANT TAILOR.
I keep constantly on hand the beat
CLOTHS
CASSIMERE&
VESTINGS.&C.
I employ none but the
BEST OF WORKMEN.
CUTTING DONE IN THE LA7BSV
STYLE.
PETER ZELLER,
South Side of Publie Square.
Auatin, Feb. 23rd, 1869. Myl
OANDSEE
Johnson & Bro,
Tbey are daily receiving
HEW sfbhtg aid summer goods
of «11 descriptions, which fay
for sale at
LOW PRICES.
They will eell all
WOOLEN GOODS AT
Reduced Rates
The Eastern Market bein6 lower than
for soma years back.
Having bought at the
DECLINE IN GOODS
can afford to sell at
LOW FIGURES, AND
WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
They hare a lot of
CUSTOM MADE
SUMMER CLOTHING,
on the way, made for their trade whieh
they can Warrant in all respects, and
will be
SOtP CHEAP.
A Choice lot of
OIL CURTAINS
on hand.
Also WALL PAPER and
26yl
figured Curt aim Paper
STALEY & WILLIAMS,
Main Street, next door to
Clemmer's Drug store, have ib
stock and are constantly receiv
ing choice and well selected
Dry Goods, Yankee Notion^
Hats, Caps, Boots & Shoes,
Groceries, Tobacco & Ci£ars»
Crockery, &c., which they are
offering to the public at prices
that defy competition. W. T.
Ellis' Celebrated Baltimore Oys-
ters constantly on hand and for
sale Wholesale and Retail away
below the market. Choice Ha­
vana and Domestic Cigars for
sale to the trade at very low
figures. CASH buyers should
not fail to call on
STALEY & WILLIAMS.
DUNKLEMAN,
MERCHANT TAILOR
AND DKALKRI*
E A A E
CLOTHING!
Cloths,
Cassismeres,
Doeskins,
Vesting,
and all kinds of
TAILORS TRIMMINGS, HAT S
CAPS, and
GEMS FURNISHING GOODS
52s4tf Mill Street, Austin, Minn.
S
AVE YOUR GREENBACKS
by goingto
ALDERSON'S
CHEAP CASH STORE
for
Groceries,
Provisions,
it
XATSOirS OLD STAID
Cor. Mill and Chatham Streets,
AUSTJOt, MIMN.
I an just receiving directly from the eilt
rocerifp, Crockery, Notion
prepared to sell Cheap for
fresh
Ac.
eiving uirecuy irom wv
supply of UroccrieF, Crockery, Notion#
oil ain now
cash.
All kinds of Farm Produce taken
Exchange for Goods.
Call and examine goods and priocg.
n4tf GEO. ALDERSON.
Browasdale
Nursery.
CHASE & BACON, Proprietors.
ITaving become satisfied that Fruit can b»
raised in this country wo aro prepared to
furnish the people of Southern Minnesota with
tho hardiest Tarictics of Standard and Crab
Applo trcos. Also Shade,
SUBSCRIBE
VOBTHB
THE
LARGEST
AHB OVLY TRUE
REPUBLICAN
IN THE COUNTY,
Job Printing!
In this Department we are prepared
with New Job Type and Power PreoMi
to do the
VORTHB
AND WITH THX OKXATI8T
All Kuril if
OrnaJicntal
PLAIN AND
PRINTING,
POSTERS,
HAND!
BLJfci
B1
DEEDS
BONDS,
CARDS,
WEDDING CARDS,
CIRCULARS,
BILL HEADS,
PROGRAMMES,
ENVELOPES,
ORDERS,.
NOTES,
CHECKS,
PRESCRIPTION BLANKS,
BALL TICKETS,
INVITATIONS,
CERTIFICATES,
LABELS,
CHARTS,
&c., &c., &
AD VER TISE IN THE
Advertise,
and
Evergreen trees, together with all kinds of
Small Fruit and Shrubbery.
Particular attention is called to our Soft
Maple, Black Walnut and Chestnut trees—of
the former we have about Two llundrcd Thou
sand, which we will sell cheap.
As wo arc permanently located here,_we hope
receive a liberal patronage. Satisfaction
guaranteed.
Brownsdale, Mower County,
Mini.
•ddverlisf,
Advertise
IN
13tf
THE
TBAKSCBIFX.

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