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Mower County transcript. [volume] (Lansing, Minn.) 1868-1915, August 26, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025431/1891-08-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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J^CINTYRE POST, G. A. R.
Meets on tbe first and tbird Saturday of
each month, at 7:30 p.m. at Grand Army
Hall. B. MAXWELL. Com.
T. F, LEONARD, Adit.
M. MAJORS, Quartermaster.
o.u. w.
Austin Lodge, A. O. U. W., No. 32, meets on
the second and fourth Fridays of every month,
in their hall. Brothers visiting in the city are
cordially invited to attend.
LEoNAltD,
JOHAN WOLD, Reco _tr.
M. W.
J^OYAL ARCH CHAPTER, NO. 14
The Stated convocations of this
rfc
are held in Masonsic HaU, A"0*'
on tbe SECOND and \fioC*c
of each BOD"- -.alottca\
avaVe" -%i- E. H. P.
D. Z. ROBINS*" ^ecre(ary.
J^IDELITY LODGE, NO. 39. A. F. &
The regular communications of this lodge
are held in Masonic Hall, Austin, Minnesota,
on tbe FIRST and THIRD Wednesday evenings
of each montb.
S. A. EMMERSON, W. M.,
C. H. WILBOUR,Secretary.
t.
BERNARD COMMANDERY, K. T.
QT. BEF
O NO. 13
Meets first Monday evening of each montb
at Masonsic Hall.
C. I. JOHNSON. E. C.
C. J. MILLER. Recorder.
O. G. T. LODGE NO. 107
Meets every Monday evening in Conductors
Hall. Strangers belonging to this order are
cordially invited to attend.
FRANK FELCH, C. T.
FX A. COWEN, SECRETARY.
JgNTERPRISE GRANGE. NO. 181.
Meets at Enterprise School House tbe first
and tbird Saturday of each montb.
E. P. 8POONER. W. M.
M. I. PROUTY, SECRETARY.
E,
B. CRANE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Real Estate and Collection Agent. Taxes paid
tor non-residents. Office, second floor of
Dunkelmann's new block. Main street.
J^YMAN D. BAIRD.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Real Estate, Insurance and Collection Agent
Office, front room, second floor, over air
banks & Leonard's store Austin, Minn.
Al. GREENMAN,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Will practice in tbe courts of record and the
United States courts. Office in Schleuder's
Block, Main Street, Austin, Minn.
J£INGSLEY & SHEPHERD,
ATTORNEYS & COUNSELORS
Law, Land, Loan Office, Insurance, Collec
tions, Taxes.
AUSTIN, MINN.
JJR. H. A. AVERY,
DENTIST,
A S I N I N N
Office over Hall & West's.
H. JOHNSON. M. D., C. M.
C.
Graduate of McGillJCollege, Montreal, late
Assistant Surgeon in Montreal General
Hospital. Office in West & Litchfield
Biock, opposite Opera House. Calls at
tended day and night.
I), B. JOHNSON, Jb., S. D. CATHEBWOOD.
County Attorney.
JOHNSON & CATHEBWOOD.
Attorneys and Counselors at Lav,
INSURANCE AND COLLECTIONS.
Dunkelmann's Block. AUSTIN, MINN.
4131.
AUSTIN NATIONAL BA(
AUSTIN, NINN.
Incorporated as a State Bank Feb.l 1887. Re
organized as a National Bank, Oct. 1,1889.)
PAID DP CAPITAL, $50,000.
C. H. DAVIDSON, President.
G. SCHLEUDER. Vice President,
J. L. MITCHELL, Cashier.
COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY.
Interest Allowed on Time Deposits*
W
W. RANNEY,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law. Notary Public.
Particular attention given to Probate Law. Broker
in Real Estate and Loans. Fire Insurance, rep
resenting
The German Insurance Company, of Fre?port,
Illinois^
MilwanJcee
Mechanics, of Milwaukee.
The Minneapolis Underwriters, of Minneapolis,
And the State Investment & Insurance Com
pany, of San Francisco, Cal.
OFFICE WEST OF COURT HOUSE, IN THE
a. SCHLEUDER BLOCK,
Austin, WIINN.
A share of business respectfully solicited.
1690.
Tbe FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF AUSTIN, MINN.
Paiiin Capital, $50,000.00
Surplus & Undivided Profits, $50,000.00
OFFICERS*
O. w. SHAW, N. F. BANF1ELD.
President. Cashier.
Interest bearing Certificates of Deposit issued.
Deeds Insurance Policies and other valuable papers
cared for in our safety Deposit Boxes without charge.
General Banking Business in all its branches trans
acted
CORRESPONDENTS-
CHEMICAL NAT. BANK. yew York.
CENTENNIAL NAT. BANK, Philadelphia.
"UNION NAT. BANK. Chicago.
FIRST NAT. BANK, Minneapolis.
FIRST NAT. BANK, MUVMtikee• Tffe.
FIRST NAT. BANK. St- Paul, Minn.
SECURITY BANK OF MINN Minneapolis.
MERCHANTS NAT, BANK, St. Paid.
FRANK A TICKNOR,
Real Estate and Loan Agency,
AUSTIN, MINN.
Ahatrftcts of Title, Tax Collections and Fire
insurance promptly attended to.
Real
Estate Securities bought and sold.
Careful attention paid to Aeal Estate for non
residents.
s,QOf
00O
Available to loan upon first-class Farm and
C'straigbf
Building Loans at the lowest rates
of Interest.
MOWER COUNTY
VOL. XXIV.—No. 24 AUSTIN. MOWER COUNTY. MINN.. WEDNESDAY AUGUST 26, i8gi.
PROMINENT MEN AND WOMEN
OP MOWBR COUNTY.
Miles M. Trowbridge.
Miles M. Trowbridge was born in Do
ver, Racine countv, Wisconsin, May 22d,
1843. He was the oldest child of S. H.
and Diana Trowbridge. His father, S.
H. Trowbridge was descended from
Thomas Trowbridge, who emigrated from
Taunton. England, about 1634 to Dor
Chester, Mass., and when the New Haven
colony was formed removed in 1638 or 9
and became one of the earliest settlers of
that colony.
The Trowbridge family was an ancient
land holding family of Devonshire, Eng
land. The early settler, Thomas, from
whom the Trowbridges of America are
descended, was remembered by his uncle
ah older Thomas, very handsomely, in
bequest of personal property, while the
real estate in accordance with English
custom was left wholly to his oldest son.
In the revolutionary war John Trow
bridge, the great grandfather of the sub
ject of this sketch, was a captain and
stationed at West Point. His son, John,
was capthin of a sailing vessel and cap
tured by the British off the Isle of France,
under their orders in council. He suc
ceeded in recapturing his ship from the
prize crew of twenty-one, put aboard to
take her into Cape Good Hope, but was
captured again by a French frigate un
der the "Berlin and Milan" decrees and
sent to the Isle of France. The French
governor restored his ship and part of
his cargo. He sold his ship and cargo to
avoid confiscation and escaped to Bata
via. After an eventful period of a year
or two there and a most daring enterprise
on the coast of Ne.w Holland, where^bv
the aid of divers, he recovered upwards
of $250,000 in specie from a sunken
wreck, he was again captured by the
British with all his specie and taken as a
prisoner of war first to Java, then to
Calcutta and afterwards to England. He
was released when peace was concluded
and arrived in New York, June 5, 1815,
after an absence of five and a half years.
He went west, accumulated and lost a
fortune at Rochester, N. Y. In 1836 he
removed to Racine, Wis., with his family,
among whom was 8. H. Trowbridge, and
engaged in farminir.
The subject ot this sketch passed the
first 14 years of his life in the immediate
neighborhood of this grandfather and
learned lessons of patriotism from his
lips, and stories of his adventurous life.
Miles M. worked on his father's farm
summers and attended the common school
winters till the breaking out of the war of
the rebellion in 1861. His father re
strained him from enlisting with the
three month men, but wben Freemont's
proclamation in Missouri disclosed that
it would be a fight to a finish, and re
move the cause of the war, his consent
was given and Miles enlisted in Septem
ber, 1861, in the 1st regiment of Wiscon
sin volunteer infantry for three years and
went as one of the color guards to that
regiment. The first serious battle in
which the regiment engaged, was at Per
ryville, Oct. 8th, 1862, during Buell and
Bragg's foot race from the south line of
Tennessee for the Ohio. During the bat
tie, the regiment iu front lost every field
officer and was thrown into confusion
and obliged to retire. The first Wiscon
sin was advanced to its place and with
the assistance of artillery held the posi
tion till all the artillery horses were killed
or unmanageable. The regiments of the
brigade were ordered to hold the ground
while the guns were withdrawn. About
this time the 1st Wisconsin made a dash
and captured the flag of the 1st Tennes
see. Protected by the fire of other regi
ments the 1st Wisconsin took away from
the field every gun and caisson by hand.
Their flag was riddled by balls and flag
staff severed in two places. All the color
euard but three were killed or wounded.
The regiment received the thanks of the
state of Indiana for rescuing the battery,
which belonged to that state, and a pres
ent of a full complement of colors in
recognition of its bravery.
Miles was reported mortally wounded.
His father went down for his body but
saved his life by careful nursing. He
removed him to the Louisville hospital,
and on the 15th of November he was dis
charged as permanently disabled. Even
then the chances of his reaching home
alive seemed about even, but by easv
stages and laying over a day or two for
rest in different places, his father brought
him through. Tbe ball enteied his left
shoulder, passed through the upper por
tion of his lung and came out close by
the spine. He has never fully recovered
from the effects. He remained at home
and in the fall of 1863 removed with his
father to Lvle, Minn.
Apart of the succeeding year, as his
health became firmer, was spent in com
mencing a higher education, but he was
chiefly indebted for his admirable fund
of information and terse use of the Eng
lish language to his persiitent habit, of
reading, formed in his boyhood and kept
up after the war. He was not satisfied
to study while others were fighting, and
in September, 1864. reeniisted in Co. K.
4th Minnesota. He joined the regiment
in season to take part in the terrific fUht
at Altoona, where Corse "held the fort"
on Sherman's signals, notwithstanding
his great loss of men and the individual
loss of an ear and a cheek bone.
Miles was among the sixty thousand
selected for the march to the sea. This
was a mere picnic. The Indian summer
days lasted till after Christmas in that
latitude. The strategy of the general,
the uncertainty of his objective point,
and the celerity of the forward march
paralyzed th« enemy and rendered fight
ing unnecessary.
After resting at Savannah more than a
month, the still longer march north com
menced in February. This was a far
more arduous task. The spring rains
rendered it necessary tc^cordroy all roads
for tbe passage of baggage and artillery
and frequently rendered the swollen riv
ers impassible, and Joe Johnston, at
least second in ability of confederate
generals commanded the enemy and de
livered a blow at this wing or the other
at every opportunity. Then followed
the surrender of the confederate armies,
the grand review at Washington, and the
mustering out which occurred in July,
1865.
Miles returned to farming in the town
of Lyle. On the 22nd day of February,
1869. he married Rachel Crawford, of
Dover, Wis., the schoolmate and com
panion of his boyhood. They have been
blessed with six children, John, Henry,
Mary, Alfred, Frank and Miles.
He held the offices of town clerk, town
treasurer and chairman of the board of
supervisors in the town of Lyle, and in
1877 was elected county commissioner
from the southwest district. He held
this office for three years, and wasjquite,
instrumental in the erection of our beau
tiful court house. The people voted not
to issue bonds for that purpose, and as
the records were unsafe under existing
conditions, he with others wisely disre
garded present unpopularity, and the
outcries of tbe penny wise and pound
foolish, and voted to raise the necessary
amount by taxation, distributed over
three years time. In the fall of 1880 the
court house was so far advanced as to
show it was an excellent bargain for the
money and Miles promoted t® the office
of register of deeds, which he held by
successive elections for six years. He
proved an efficient and acceptable officer.
During this period he became captain of
Co. G. 2d Regiment of Minnesota Na
tional Guards, and brought the company
up in numbers and efficiency. He real
ized the importance of such organizations
for the preservation of order and as a
preparation for defense, and enjoyed tbe
esteem and confidence of the company
In the spring of 1887 he was employed
to get up a set of abstract books at Su
perior, Wis. His experience as register
of deeds fitted him for this work and gave
him the reputation that secured him the
position.
A vear and a half later he went to
Portland, Oregon, in the employ of the
Pacific Coast Abstract Co., where he now
resides.
THE WORLD'S FAIR.
The people of the state are probably
convinced that a proper advertisement of
our resources at the World's Fair, will
bring a ten fold return for the expense
in the improvement of unoccupied land
by immigrants, in increase of capital, for
loans at cheaper rates, and for perma
nent investment, and in increased sale of
products at better prices. If a majority
have not come to that opinion, they no
doubt will after tbe event. The men who
are awake, alive and enterprising, the
thinking men, believe in the good effects
of a thorough display. They are natur
ally leaders of public opinion, and neces
sarilv express themselves in advance of
it, while tbe public thinks differently or
has given the matter no mature consid
eration If we can double the assess
ment roll by moderate expenditure, it
will lessen, not increase, taxation. There
is another class of men who never head
any movement for the advancement of
the state. Their word is, "keep mum
don't let people know about your busi
ness, mining, timber, dairy, wheat, oats,
corn, fiax, or manufactures, for it will
cost you ten cents apiece to do it in good
shape."They seek to be leaders,but it is of
the least enterprising, the fearful, timid,
unbelieving and penurious. They rely
rather on universal avarice than on en
lightened expenditure.
l+BE NEW GERMAN CHURCH
IN TOWN OP DEXTER.
iff
The edifice of the Evangelical Luth
eran Trinity church will be dedicated
next Sunday. The dedication sermon, in
German, will be preached at 10 a. m., by
Wm. Haar. A collation will be
given at noon, free to all attending from
abroad. At 2:30 p. m., services will be
conducted in English by Rev. Mr. Al
brecht, of St. Paul. All are nu.st cor
dially invited to attend. This church
has every reason to rejoice, and all of us
may well rejoice with it. They have
erected a pretty church some three miles
west of Sutton at a cost of $3,000, of
which sura two thirds has been sub
scribed and the subscriptions nearly all
paid. The neighborhood was blank
prairie fourteen years ago. Now the
wilderness blossoms like the rose. Good
roads have been graded throughout the
neighborhood and substantial farm build
ings are everywhere visible. The land is
well tilled and signs of thrift abound.
This has been accomplished during a
period of failure of wheat crops and gen
eral depression in agriculture, and is the
work of men not unmindful of religion
or neglectful of intellectual culture. The
church was organized about 13 years ago.
Rev. C. Bender, of Red Wing, served it
with occasional missionary work from
1878 to 1881. Then Rev. O. Hoyer, of
St. Paul, came down regularly once a
month and held services for about three
JkM$J£®0,be church. was incorporated- in
1884.' From this time the Minnesota
Synod sent ministers or students every
three weeks until the spring of 1888, when
the society built a parsonage and Rev.
Haar was settled as pastor. He was
called to Lake City two years ago, and
accepted the call. Rev. H. Bruss, the
present pastor of the church, succeeded
him. During all this time services were
held at the school house of Dist. 106.
Last spring step were taken to erect a
church, and their efforts are crowned
with success. The church numbers about
40 members.
ETERTBOFI GOES TO THE SOUTHERN
MINNESOTA FAIR AT ROCHESTER.
They will go Tuesday, Sept. 1, to take
the children to see the pony race for
boys, blind fold race and the dog race.
They will go themselves to see the 2-yr.
old stake race for trotters, 13 entries,
purses $425 3-yr. old stake race for trot
ters, 9 entries, purse $325 2.28 class trot
ters, purse $700.
Wednesday, Sept. 2, they will go to
see the 2nd Minn. Regt. unveiling of the
monument erected to the memory of Col.
James George, and to bear the great
Fort Sneiling band. To listen to the
speeches of Gen. Bishop and Judge C. M.
Start to see the 3 year old pacers the
2.45 class trotters and the 2.24 pacers to
tal purses, $1500.
Thursday, S^pt, 3, they will be present
because it is Governor's Day a great
racing day the 2.21 trot the 2.35 pace
and the 2.35 trot. Total purses, $2000.
Friday they cannot afford to stay at
home, because they would i^iss seeing
tbe 4 year old trot the 2.18 pace and the
2.24 trot. This will be the day in which
we expect to see all the previous records
broken on the Rochester track. Total
purses, $1950. There will also be a good
foot race on this day. Purse $150.
Will be Given Away.
Our enterprising druggists Geo. Mull
& Co. who carry the finest stock of
drugs, perfumeries, toilet articles,
brushes, sponges, etc., are giving away a
large number of trial bottles of Dr. Miles'
celebrated Restorative Nervine. They
guarantee it to cure headache, dizziness,
nervous prostration, sleeplessness, the ill
effects ot spirits, tobacco, coffee, etc.
Druggists say it is the greatest seller they
ever knew, and is universally satisfactory.
They also guarantee Dr. Miles' New Heart
Cure in all cases of nervous or organic
heart disease, palpitation, pain in side,
smothering, etc. Fine book on Ner
vous and Heart Diseases" free. 4
NOTICE LOST!
A certain note dated June 17.1891. given by
Geo. Pew to A. Bush, for $1G6.80 with inter
est at or 8 per cent, and due Nov. 1.189L
Said note was given for seed prain and oats,
and at tbis date remains unpaid. The public
Is hereby cautioned not to buy, sell or negro
tiate said note as tbe payment has been
stopped. A. L. BUSH.
Grand Meadow, Minn., Aug. 18,1891.
ANDREW D. WHITE.
A Proposed Republican Nominee
for Governor of New York.
Prof. Andrew D. White will accept the
nomination for Governor of New York
should it be offered him by the Republi
cans. He thinks the Republicaps can
win this fall. Andrew D. White was
born in Homer, N. Y., November 7.1832.
His ancestors were New Englanders and
noted for their sturdy "traits ot character
and practical common sense. He entered
Yale College and was graduated in 1853.
Afterwards he spent two years in Europe
prosecuting historical studies. He speaks
the German and French language fluent
ly. Then he was appointed attache of
the American Legation in Petersburg,
Russia. He returned io America in 1856,
and soon after received the appointment
of Professor of history aud English lit
erature in the University of Michigan.
He resigned in 1862 and subsequently
was twice elected to the State Senate.
He was largely instrumental in organiz
iug Cornell University and was practi
cally its founder. His works include
•'The Warfare of Science," "Syllabus of
Lectures in Modern History," "The New
Germany," "A History of the Doctrines
of Comets," "Studies in General His
tory." Prof. White is a man of wealth
much of which he has devoted to the en
dowment of Cornell University. He
thoroughly believes in the influence of
newspapers and brought bis influence to
bear to have lectures delivered on jour
nalism in the universifty. The lectures
have been largely attended-by-the-stu
dents and have already proven the wis
dom of the originator. Prof. White lives
in Ithaca. N. Y. He is a very popular
man.
COL. L. L. POLK.
President of the National Farners'
and Industral Union.
Col. L. L. Polk, the President of the
Farmers' Alliance, is a Southerner. He is
the owner and editor of tbe Progressive
Farmer, of Raleigh. N. which place
is also supposed to be his come. His
duties, however, do not give »him much
opportunity to write for it, so constant
and pressing are the demands upon his
time. Col. Polk was born thirty six years
ago and since early manhood has been
aggressive and progressive. How
popular he is in his order may be seen
from the fact that out of the vast number
of the members of the Farmers' Alliance
he was chosen President. He now makes
his headquartes at Washington, D.
and the amount of business he disposed
of in a short time is immense.
Col. Polk believes that the Farmers'
Alliance movement will become an or
ganized political party. His latest utter
ance on the subject were in Richmond,
Va., where he was attending the meeting
of the State Alliance. He said that the
National Alliance has over 3,000,000
members and is growing rapidly. It is
strongest in the Southern and Northwest
ern States, and is increasing at a rapid
rate in California, Oregon. Washington
and other extreme Western States. Pres
ident Polk is a powerful speaker, and is
a man who, by bis direct manner, would
attract attention anvwhere. His
appearance suggest the possession of the
quality of indomitable perseryerance.
He,is traveling a great deal for campaign
pq£$oses. Every day of bis time until
the end of October he will be employed
in meeting official engagements
TERMS: $ 1.50 Per
WILL BUY.
SOCIETY*
Ml
Annum, in Advance
Wonders
Are wrought by the use of Ayer's Hair
Vigor in restoring gray hair to its original
color, promoting a new growth, prevent*
ing the hair from falling, keeping it soft,
silky, and abundant, and the .scalp cool,
healthy, and free from dandruff or humors.
The universal testimony is that this prep
aration has no equal as a dressing, and
is, therefore, indispensable to every well
furnished toilet.
"I have used Ayer's Hair Vigor for some
time and it has worked wonders for me. I
was troubled with dandruff and was rapidly
becoming bald but since using the Vigor my
head is perfectly clear of dandruff, the hair
has ceased coming out, and I now have a
good growth, ot the same color as when I
was a young woman. I can heartily recom
mend any one suffering from dandruff or
loss of hair to use Ayer's Hair Vigor as a
dressing." Mrs. Lydia O. Moody, East
Pittston Me.
"Some time ago my wife's hair began to
eome out quite freely.
Ayer's
Hair Vigor
not only prevented my wife from becoming
bald, but it also caused an entirely new
growth of hair. I am ready to certify to this
statement store a justice of the peace."—
H. Huisebua, Lewisburgb, la.
"Some years ago, after a severe attack of
brain fever, my hair all came out. 1 used
such preparations for restoring it as my phy
sicians ordered, but failed to produce a
growth of hair. 1 then tried, successively,
several articles recommended by druggists,
and all alike tell short of accomplishing the
desired result. The last remedy I applied
was Ayer's Hair Vigor, which brought a
growth of hair in a few weeks. I think I
used eight bottles in two years more than
was necessary as a restorative, but I likedit
as a dressing, and I have continued to use it
for that purpose. I believe Ayer's Hair
Vigor possesses virtues tar above those of
any similarpreparation now on the market."
—Vincent Jones, Richmond, Ind.
Ayer's Hair Vigor
PRSPAKKD BT
DR. J. C. AYER & CO., Lowell, Mast.
Sold by Druggist* and Verfumer*.
lent Mercantile Co.
WHY PAY
FOR WHAT
75 CTS.
CALL AT THE
Merrill Mercantile Co.'s Store
And they will show you
how to buy $1.00 worth
for
75
cents.
DRY GOODS,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
GROCERIES.
Bring in your butter and eggs.
HOW DO
YOU KNOW
That you are getting
Bottom
Priccs!
On Lumber without
going to the
John Paul
Lumber Co.
For them. Try and
you will buy.
Yarn east side of tract, near C. St. F.
JK. C. Depot.
0. L. GIBBONS,
AGENT.

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