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Mower County transcript. [volume] (Lansing, Minn.) 1868-1915, August 26, 1891, Image 2

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H1ST0BIC BENNINGTON.
THE MONUMENT COMMEMORATIVE
OF A GREAT E/.TTLE DEDICATED.
And at the Same Time the One Hun
dredth Anniversary of Vermont's Birth
day Celebrated President Harrison,
His Cabinet, Governors of States, and
Other Notables Participate.
BENNINGTON, Vt., Aug. 19.—The cere
mony of dedicating the monument
erected to commemorate the battle of
Bennington crowded this little town to
overflowing. The presence of the presi
dent of the United States and members
of his cabinet, as well as the governors
of three or four states, gave the event
a more than local interest. It brought
people from all parts of the United
States, but particularly from the New
England states, to witness and take part
in the interesting ceremony. Every
Sk in?
GEXEKA.L JOHN STARK.
private, as well as every public house in
Bennington was crowded during the
night, and many slept on the lawns,
while hundreds were
Glad to Find Quarters in Tents,
which afforded little protection from the
chill night air. The first of the special
trains was due before 8 o'clock, but the
wagon roads brought a very large acces
sion to the multitude in the town before
that hour, and when the first train ar
rived the gaily decorated streets were
well filled. The principal interest was
in the arrival of the president and his
party, who had spent the night at the
home of General J. Gr. McCullough, at
North Bennington, five miles away.
Governor Page had gone to meet the
president and to act as his escort, and
with him had gone a dozen members of
John A. Logan Post, G. A. B,., of Or
well., Vt., mounted and under command
of H. G. Hibbard. All the way
from North Bennington to Benning
ton the president was greeted with
cheering, to which he responded by tak
ing off his hat and bowing. The start
from North Bennington was made
shortly after 8 o'clock, but it was slow,
and it was after 9 when the little proces
sion reached the Soldjer's home, where
the carriages drew up and the president
left his carriage and entered the gover
nor's parlor. In the parlor the president
Hold a Uriel' Reception
at which the members of the governor's
staff and other distinguished persons
were introduced to him. In the mean
time the militia forces had been assem
bling on the parade ground without.
The parade moved in three divisions
and Was made tip of Sons of the Revolu
tion, Grand Army posts, West Point
cadets, state and municipal officers, chic
societies and citizens. The column as it
moved passed under an evergreeen
arch which stood at the head of North
street. Across the face of the arch in
white immortelles was the inscription:
"Itlollie Stark Was Not Widowed,"
and the dates "1791" and "1777," An
enormous crowd filled the street from
curb to curb, and the advance guard
cleared the way slowly. The houses on
both sides of the street had been decor
ated profusely with flags and bunting,
and stands had been erected on all of the
graceful green lawns, from which the
good people of Bennington and their
friends waved a welcome to the chief
magistrate and his escort. The pres
ident was greeted with prolonged cheer
ing all along the line and he
was kept busy continually bowing to the
right and left.
i"he reviewing stand was on Main
street, about a quarter of a mile beyond
the arch, it was designed for only forty
people, and only the members of the
the president's party were invited to
enter it. The president stood with his
head uncovered for a half hour, while
the procession was passing in review.
When the Odd Fellows had passed and
the head of the column of carriages
came in sight the president left the stand
and resumed his seat in his carnage and
was driven to the monument. Seats for
a thousand had been provided on the
stand which was roofed with canvas. It
took some time to arrange all of the
guests and it was after the noon hour
when Hon. Wheelock G. Veazey, the
president of the day, arose and spoke
briefly. The enormous crowd stood
with heads bared and listened with re
spectful attention to the address. At its
conclusion Mr. Veazey introduced Rev.
Charles Parkhurst, of Boston, the chap
lain of the day, who delivered the invo
cation. Governor Page then arose and
on behalf of the State of Vermont deliv
ered an address of welcome.
Ex-Governor Prescott. of New Hamp
shire, president of the Bennington Battle
Monument association, in a brief speech
then transferred the monument to the
State of Vermont, and Governor Page
responded briefly, accepting it.
President Harrison Talks.
Before the introduction of President
Harrison the choir sang "America."
Governor Page. ex-Senator Edmunds
and ex-Governor Alger joined heartily
in the singing. President Harrison was
introduced at 8:15. He was greeted
with "three cheers and a tiger" and made
a short extemporaneous speech and was
frequently applauded.
KATZER IS HONORED.
The Pallium Conferred on the Kev Arch
bishop of Milwaukee.
MILWAUKEE, Aug. 21.—The conferring
of the pallium on Archbishop F. X.
Katzer, the successor of the late Arch
bishop Heiss, took place in the St. Johns
cathedral, of this city. Cardinal Gibbons
was the bearer of the vestment, and he
conferred it in person. The occasion was
given unusual in
terest by the pres
ence of no less than
700 prelates and
priests, represent
ing almost every
state in the Union.
Among the high
,7V..,dignitaries present
were the Rt. Rev.
Archbishop W. H.
Elder, Cincinnati
Archbishop John
Ireland, St. Paul
ARCHBISHOP KATZKV. the Rt. Rev. Bish
ops John Vertin, Marquette: W.O'Hara,
Scranton, Pa. W. J. McClosky, Louis
ville, Ky. Thomas Bonacum, Lincoln,
Neb. M. P. Burke, Cheyenne, Wyo.
H. Cosgrove, Davenport, la. J. B. Cot
ter, Winona, Minn. J. L. Foley, Detroit,
Mich. J. J. Hennessy, Wichita, Kan.
J. J. Hogan, Kansas City, Mo. J. Jans
sen, Belleville, Ills. J. Rademacher,
Nashville, Tenn. H. J. Richter, Grand
Rapids, Mich. R. Scannell, Omaha,
Neb. J. Shanley, Jamestown, N. D.: J.
A. Watterson, Columbus, O. Otto Zar
iletti, St. Cloud. Minn. Arch Abbott
Andrew Hintenach, St. Vincent's Abbey,
Pennsylvania.
Gibbons' Advice.
The presentation of the pallium by
Cardinal Gibbons to the archbishop was
followed by an address by the former,
which was delivered from the altar. The
cardinal dwelt upon the blessings of cit
izenship in this country, and the duty
of the clergymen in Americanizing the
different nationalities as rapidly as pos
sible. It was wrong to pursue other ob
jects than the welfare of our country,
upon which he invoked the blessings of
heaven.
The ceremonies were surrounded
by much pomp. Bishop Bonnacum
celebrated a pontifical mass and sermons
were preached by Bishop J. A. Watter
son, of Columbus, O., and Bishop Rich
ter, of Grand Rapids, Mich.
In the afternoon the clergymen par
took of a banquet served in St. Francis,
a suburb and the seat of the theological
seminary of the province. This festivity
included a full programme of toasts, a
portion of wnich were responded to as
follows: "Our Holy Father," by the
Rt. Rev. O. Zardetti, of St. Cloud,
Minn. "Baltimore, the Mother See of
the Catholic Church of the United
States," by the Rev. S. Hodsett, of
Chicago "The Land of Liberty," by the
Rev. J. F. Kinseller, of Shullsburg.
Wis.
A DESPERATE BATTLE.
Bloody Fight Between Opposing Chilian
Forces—3,000 Killed and Wounded.
NEW YORK, Aug. 24.—A special to
The Herald says: Bloody battles are
being fiercely fought by the Chilian
troops. Balmaceda's soldiers vainly op
posed the crossing of the Aconcogua,and
after a desperate fight, in which 3,000
men were killed and wounded, were
forced to fall btock. The land forces are
aided by the w?u- ships. Under cover of
the cruiser's guns the insurgent army
I was able to force a passage of the river
I and then drove the enemy before it fif
teen miles to the south. Balmaceda leads
his men in person. Defeat means ruin to
I either part}', and the full strength of
both is being exerted.
INSURGENTS REPULSED.
All of Balmaceda's Availabe Force to
Concentrate at the Capital.
LIMA, Aug. 24.—The latest telegraph
I advices from Valparaiso state that
Balmaceda's army at Vina Del Mar has
repulsed an insurgent attack. The tele
gram adds thnt Balmaceda has ordered
all the available forces in the province
of Valparaiso to concentrate at the
capital, and the 12,000 troops stationed
at Coquimbo to proceed against Iquique,
THINK HE IS THE MAN.
The Alleged Ohio Bank Bobber and Mur
derer Identified by Cashier Maple.
Toledo, O., Aug. 24.—Ottawa special
to The Bee says: James M. Roberts,
the alleged Columbus Grove murderer,
arrived here at 2 o'clock a. m. in charge
of Marshal Faith, of New Washington,
and Deputy Sherivf Reuve, of Ottawa
Not over a score of people were present
when the train arrived and the prisoner
was quietly taken to jail and locked up.
The Bee correspondent had aninterview
with the prisoner during which the
latter talked in a rambling and incoher
ent manner and seemed to be afraid that
he would be strung up. He raved about
being charged with 250 pounds of elec
tricity and acted as if he had an acute
attack of the snakes. Cashier Maple of
the Columbus Grove bank, was among
those who came over on the noon train
to see the prisoner. He is positive that
Roberts is the man. Mr. Crawford, the
hardward man who sold the alleged
murderer the revolver, is also positive of
his identity.
System of Storm Signals.
PIERRE, S. D., Aug. 21.—Stockmen in
this city are perfecting arrangements for
the establishment of a system of sun
flash or heliographic signals, to be run
in connection with the signal station
here, to protect stock on the ceded lands.
The signals can he sent a distance of 125
miles and will send out reports of all ap
proaching storms, so that cattle can be
driven to shelter. Over $1,000,000 worth
of cattle cover the territory within the
reach of the signals.
Forseea a Storm.
BERLIN Aug. 24 —The Kreuz Zeitmng
promises a series of articles on the
Russo-French entente and the feverish
excitement prevailing in France, and
declares that it sees the coming of a
storm which, however, Germany is pre
pared to meet.
STILL HERE I
J. J. GILBERTSON,
The reliable Agent for Binders and Threshers,
makes his annual salute to the people. He is
Agent for the Celebrated
Minneapolis Threshing
Machine Company,
MANUFACTURERS OF
Minneapolis Engines, Victor
Separators, Stackers, Buggies.
ALSO THE
Aultman, Taylor Gomp'y,
OF MANSFIELD, OHIO, AND
Aultman, Miller & Co.,
MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED
Buckeye Binders and Mowers.
Office and Warehouse, AUSTIN, MINN.
CLEAR THE TRACK1
WeTakeNoBaekSeat
We are able to show the farmers of this vicinity
one of the best lines of Farm Machinery to be
found anywhere.
CHAMPION MACHINERY:
hampion Harvesters,
hampion Reapers,
hampion Mowers.
OTHER MACHINERY:
Norwegian Plows,
Dubuque Plows,
Hollmgsworth Hay Bakes.
All Kinds of Twine at Lowest Prices.
GIVE US A CALL.
GEO. W. HUNT,
WALTHAM, MINNESOTA.
rihe
'~v
4
WlivM
for Infants and Children.
astoria is so well adapted to children that
I recommend it
as superior to any prescription
known to me." H. A. Aurmra, M. D.,
Ill So. Oxford St., Brooklyn, N. Y.
The use of' Castoria' is so universal and
its merits so weH known that it seems a work
of supererogation to endorse it. Few are the
intelligent families who do not keep Castoria
within easy reach."
CARLOS MARTYN, D.D.,
New York City.
Late Pastor Bloomingdale Reformed Church.
Do not fail to use my superb
thoroughbred French Draft Stallion,
"GRAY EAGLE," five years old,
imported by S. B. Woughftal, Ma
son City.
Also my fine thoroughbred
Percheron Norman Stallion, "SU
PERIOR," No. 1259. Pedigrees
perfect.
At my barn on Mill street,
Austin, just east of Duffy's, every
day during the season. Call and
see them.
TERMS: 810 to insure foal
812.50 for live colt.
9-11
H. S. Hammond.
AGENTS WANTED.
LONG'S SOLID MUSCILA&E PENCIL
"Outsells." "oncp&tches," "onttafits" 81 worth
"Liquid." "No Evaporation," *'no spilling," "n
OO YOU WANT A BlJThe Croat
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i'rj7^h£ftcm^h*ze
Castoria cures Colic, Constipation,
Sour Stomach, Diarrhoea. Eructation,
Kills Worms, gives sleep, and promotes di
gestion.
Without injurious medication.
For several years
I
And look over one of the best assorted stocks of Mu
sical Instruments ever kept in one store in Minnesota.
ATTENTION
Horse Breeders
elebrated Bush & Gert's Piano, W. W. Kimball, Chickering and others.
W. W. Kimball, Chicago Cottage, Estey, Newman Bros., and Lake Side Organs,
White, Domestic, Favorite, Household, Standard Sewing Machines.
We guarantee prices ten to twenty per cent, lower than
you can buy the same goods at any large city. This statement
we mean to stay by and guarantee as correct and true.
M. J. KEENAN,
Main Street. AUSTiN, MINNESOTA.
PMMKvtamuuuaiii*
ENTISTRY
have recommended
your4 Castoria,1 and shall always continue to
do so as it has invariably produced beneficial
results."
EDWIN F. PARDEH, H.
"The Winthrop,"
125th Street and 7th Ave.,
New York City.
Tat CENTAUR COMPANY, 77 MURRAY STREET, NEW YORE.
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE YOUR
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1
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to $8 per day. Send twenty-five cents for sample*
and terms.Exclusive territory given. Address, W.
M. BRIGHT. No. 815 Fourth Ave., North, Minne
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3HfMentlon this paper.
P. B. PECK
AUSTIN. MINNESOTA.
C. MICHAEL,
Veterinary Surgeon.
Treats all
Diseases
of Horses
I Cattle.
Office at Stimson & Friedrich's Livery
Barn. AUSTIN, MINN.
DO YOU WANT
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