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The Grange advance. [volume] (Red Wing, Minn.) 1873-1877, October 22, 1873, Image 9

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FAMILY CHICLE.
WHERE THE SUN DOES NOT
SET.
The following graphic passage is
from the description of a scene witness
ed by Mr. Campbell and his party, in
the north of Norway, from a cliff one
thousand feet above the sea: "Thething.
ocean stretched away in silent vastness
at our feet the sound of waves scarce
ly reached our airy lookout away in
the north the huge old sun swung low
along the horizon, like the slow beat of
the pendulum in the tall clock of our
grandfather's parlor corner. We stood
silent, looking at our watches. When
beth hands came together at twelve,
midnight, the fall round orb hung
triumphantly above the wave—a bridge
of gold running due north spanned the
water between us and him. There he
shone in silent majesty, which knew no
setting. We involuntarily took off our
hats no word was said. Combine, if
you can, the most brilliant sunrise and
sunset you ever saw, and its beauties
will pale before the gorgeous coloring
which now lit up ocean, heaven, and
mountain. In half an hour the sun
had swung up perceptibly on his beat,
the colors changed to those of morning,
a fresh breeze rippled over the flood,
one songster after another piped up in
the grove behind us—we had slid into
another day."
VALUE OF BOOKS.
God be thanked for books! They
are the voices of the distant and the
dead, and makes us heirs of the spiritu
al life of the past ages. Books are the
true levelers. They give to all who
will faithfully use them, the society,
the spiritual presence, of the greatest
of our race. No matter how poor I am
—no matter though the prosperous of
my own time will not enter my obscure
dwelling—if the sacred writers will
enter and take up their abode under
my roof—if Milton will cro3s my
threshold to sing to me of paradise,
and Shakspcare to open to me the
world of imagination and the workings
of the human heart, and Franklin to
enrich me with his practical wisdom,
I shall not pine for the want of intel
lectual companionship, and I may be
come a cultivated man,«though excluded
from what is called the best society in
the place where I live.
MOLD POISONOUS.
Mold, however induced—whether
eaten in cheese, or moldy bread, or other
food, or breathed in an infinitesimal spo
ra that are diffused from it in the at
mosphere—sems to be the source of a
very great variety of very serious
diseases. One variety, which is found
in the hold of damp and badly ventila
ted ships, is proved to be the cause of
ship fever, which is often very fatal.
Another variety which is found in
some localities, formed on newly stirred
earth,-is the cause of fever and ague
and at one time in a place in Western
Pennsylvania, every man who worked
in digging the canal was affected with
it, and most of the inhabitants who
lived in the vicinity, on low grounds,
were also affected but above a certain
elevation all escaped, and on examina
tion with a microscope spora from mold
on the recently made banks, toofineto
be seen with the naked eye, were found
floating in the damp evening in every
house where those slept who were taken
with the fever, but none in the houses
on a higher level where there were no
cases of fever.
Other varieties of mold, in cellars
and damp places, are believed to be the
cause of typhoid fever, dysentery, and
many other diseases, whose origin can
not otherwise be accounted for. These
facts should make us afraid of all molds,
and, indeed, of all decomposed and de
composing materials, whether in the
food we eat, or in our dwellings, or even
in our vicinity, where they can impart
to the air a deleterious influence.
DONT' GIVE LIQUOR TO CH1L
DREN.
One of the first literary men in the
United States said to the writer, after
speaking on the subject of intemperance:
There is one thing which, as you visit
different places, I wish you to do every
where that is, to entreat every mother
iHJi»..H .Jfi, iij,i. I, t", W
never to give a drop of strong drink to
a child. I have had to fight as for my
life and all my days to keep from being
a drunkard, because I was fed with
spirits when a child. I acquired a
taste for it. My, brother, poor fellow,
died a drunkard. I would not have a
child of mine take a drop of it for any-
Warn every mother, wherever
you go. never to give a drop to any
child/'
AN OLD LETTER.
BOSTON, DEC. 17, 1873.
DEAR SIR:
The Dye is cast! The People have
passed the River and cut away the
Bridge! last Night Three Cargoes of
Tea were emptied into the Harbour.
This is the grandest Event which has
ever yet happened Since the Controver
sy with Britain opened The Sublimi
ty of it, charms me
For my own Part I cannot express
my own Sentiments of it, better than in
the Words of Coll. Doane to me last
Evening—Balch should repeat them—
The worst that can happen, I think,
says he in Consequence of it, will be
that the Province must pay for it.—
Now, I think the Province may pay
for it, if it is drowned as easily as if it is
drank—and I think it is a matter of
indifference whether it is drank or
drowned. The Province must pay for
it in either Case—But there is this dif
ference—I believe it will take them 10
Years Interest of the Money—whereas
if it is drank it must be paid for imme
diately, thus He—However, He agreed
with me that the Province, would nev
er pay for it.—and also in this that the
final Ruin, of our Constitution of Gov
ernment and of all American Liberties,
would be the certain Consequence of
Suffering it to be landed.
Governor Hutchinson and his Family
and Friends will never have done with
their good services to Great Britain &
the Colonies! But for him this tea
might have been saved to the East In
dia Company. Whereas this Loss, if
the rest of the Colonies should follow
our example, will in the opinion of
many persons bankrupt the Company.
However,. 1 dare say, that the Gov
ernors and Consignees and Custom
House officers, ia the other colonies,
will have more Wisdom than ours have
had & take effectual care that their Tea
shall be sent back to England untouched
—if not it will as surely be destroyed
there as it has been here.
Threats, Phantoms, Bugbears, by the
million, will be invented and propaga
ted among the People upon this Occa
sion—Individuals will be threatened
with Suits and Prosecutions, Armies
and Navies will be talked of, military
Executions—Charters annuli'd—Trea
son—Trials in England and all that—
But—these Terrors are all but Imagina
tions—Yet if they should become Reali
ties they had better be suffered, than
the great Principle, or Parliamentary
Taxation given up—
The Town of Boston was never more
still and calm of a Saturday night than
it was last Night. All things were con
ducted with great order, Decency and
perfect submission to Government.—No
Doubt We all thought the Administra
tion in better Hands than it had been.
Please to make Mrs. Adams' most re
spectful Compliments to Mrs. Warren,
and mine.
I am your Friend.
JOHN ADAMS.
A SHARP grocer, when a customer,
who was buying a gallon of molasses,
remarked that a good deal remained in
the measure after it was turned, ex
plained the fact by saying, There was
just about the same quantity in the
measure before I drew your*, sir."
GREAT applause has been bestowed
upon Rubens because, with one stroke
of his brush, he turned a laughing child
to a crying one, in a painting but
many a parent has turned a child's ex
pression from joy to grief by a single
stroke, without ever getting any credit
for it.
MY dear," said a cross-grained
husband to his long-suffering wife, do
you intend to make a fool of me?"
"No, my love nature has saved me
that trouble."
miuuwMi^'ii^iau, ^k1^1
To scratch you a bit of a letter:
'Twill surprise you no doubt when you find I can
write
But you're old enough, all, to know better
Than to think of a cat as a mere ball of fur,
A thing to be petted and squeezed
Toted round by the handle or whirled by the ear.
Kicked, beaten, starved, worried, and teased.
Me-ow!
We cats are more gifted than men are our sight
I've a nice quiet home, with no children about,
I fatten on oysters and milk
My eyes in the dark shine like emerald stars,
1
OTO YOimfi PATROKS.
From Hearth and Home.
PUSSrS VIEWS ON THE CAT QUES
TION.
Dear friends: I've just dipped my paw in the ink
Serves us better than yours does you know
Our hearing is quicker, our smellers more keen,
Our feet so much faster to go.
We have hearts that can love or can hate we Lave
brains
That can plot, and our plots rarely fail
If my patience you doubt, see me watch for a mouse,
Or my tenderness—tread on my tail.
Me-ow!
This will prove we can write, so please scoff no more
At our reason, our wisdom, and wit
Respect us in future, and never again
Grieve the sensitive soul of a kit.
To be sure I have naught to complain of, my life
Thus far has been happily spent
And were all of my race fat and jolly as I,
My warm/eh'ne heart were content.
Me-ow'.
My coat's soft and glossy as silk.
I'm so handsome and smart, my mistress declares
She never will part with her cat
Should 1 eat up her bird, she'd perhaps change her
mind,
So I don't think it best to do that.
Weil, I hate it as bad as you do,
Reub," said his 'sister Lucy. "The
fact is, we never go nowhere nor see
any body, and no wonder we feel so
awkward when we happen to stir out."
The remarks of this brother and
sister were but echoes of the sentiment
of many other farmers' boys and girls
when invited out to spend asocial even
ing. But poor Lucy had not hit the
true cause of the difficulty. It was not
because they so seldom went to any
place, but because there was such a
wide difference between their homes
and company manners. The true
way to feei at ease in any garb is to
wear it often. If the pleasing garb of
good manners is put on upon rare oc
casions, it will never fit and never seem
comfortable.
Learn to behave properly at home
—to cultivate yourselves. Do not sit,
or stand, or lounge about in un ainly
attitudes, but acquire a manly, erect,
and graceful bearing. I have never
seen such vigorous, hearty manhood in
any class as among cultivated farmers'
sons. Let table, manners be especial
ly looked after. Note carefully how
well-bred people behave, and do your
best to imitate them. It is noble to be
an imitator of that which is just and
beautiful. Above all, if you wish to
be at home in society
with ideas. Set your
Wake it out of the
would naturally sink into. Take the
newspaper, and read it thoroughly.
-1'-..^^- .! ..^ '"wwifft^-^'ik1"1^ 'WW1111
Me-ow!
Bat lying sometimes on the soft velvet rug,
In front of the bright, glowing fire,
With my delicate nose on my dainty white paws,
Purring, dozing, with naught to desire,
I think of the wandering nobody's cats
Creeping, shivering out in the snow,
With their thin shabby coats and their big huugry
eyes,
And who mournfully cry as they go,
Me-ow!
You see I'm a cat of superior sense,
And I'm proud of the cats as a race.
Of their wonderful deeds I could tell you all day,
Of their canning, their beauty, and grace.
Puss in Boots" is my hero if genius you seek,
There was Scarlatti's cat who could play
On the harp with the tip of her tail, and composed
Katzenfugue" for piano one day.
Me-ow!
So I speak for my race, if my words can but reach
Your generous hearts, and obtain
For my suffering brethren your pity and care,
I shall feel I have lived not in vain.
And the love of the whole feline race shall be yours
Young kittens shall frisk in your way
Their mewsic shall lull you to slumber at night,
And so I'm yours,
PCBSIK. Good day Me-ow!
*The Cat's Fugue. See Polko's Musical Sketches.
AT EASE IN SOCIETY.
I'd rather thrash wheat all day in
the barn," said Ruben Riley to his
sister, as he adjusted an uncomfortable
collar about his sunburnt neck, than
go to this pesky party. I never know
what to do with myself, stuck up there
in the parlor all the evening. If the
fellows would pull their coats off and
go out and chop on a match, there'd be
some sense in it."
piANOS AND ORGANS
brain
work.
sluggishness it
Knowledge is power in more senses
than one. If you go into society with
something in your mind worthy of ex
planation, you will not tail to find list
eners who will treat you with respect,
and where you are well received you
will not fail very soon to find yourself
at ease.— Country Gentleman.
A LITTLE girl,fouryears old,was on her
way home from church with her father,
when they passed, a boy splitting wood,
and the father-remarked, Mary, do
you see that boy breaking the Sabbath
The child made no reply, but walked
home very thoughtfully, and meeting
her mother, exclaimed, Oh, mother, I
saw a boy breaking the Sabbath with a
big axe!"
VARIETY OF STYLES
OF THE BEST QUALITY, AND
ON VERY LIBERAL TERMS.
Call and see before purchasing.
Music Rooms adjoining Dental Rooms.
F. A. WILLIAMSON, Agent.
KEMPE & CO.,
Dealers in
Dry Goods, Millinery Goods,
GROCERIES,
CROCKERY, HATS, CAPS, NOTIONS, &c,
WINES AND LIQUORS,
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
"Clauson'sold stand, corner of Plumb and Third sts
J^ELSON & WINCHESrER,
DIALERS IN
Foreign and Domestic Dry Ctoods
NOTIONS,
CLOTHING,
SLEDS, tt-c., t&c.,
Third, Between Plnmb and Bnsh Sts.
Horse Shoeing and Repairing done to order.
pASH BUYERS
OK
SEWING MACHINES,
Are invited to call and see the
WEED AND
MACHINES.
For nale by
jonrss &
COLE,
DEALERS IN
Drugs, Medicines, Books, Stationery
and Fancy Goods.
Agents for Prince db Co.'s Organs,
A large Assortment of VIOLINS, ACCORDEONS
and small Musical Merchandise constantly on hand.
E. HAWKINS & CO.,
BUSH STREET,
Exclusive Dealers in
PAINTS,
OILS,
GLASS,
PUTTY,
WALL PAPER,
WINDOW SHADES,
ARTISTS' MATERIALS,
Jr., £c.
..Bouse, Sign, Carriage and
Ornamental Fainting in
all its Branches.
T? P. LOWATER,
DIALER 12
BOOKS
fill your
mind to
AND
STATIONERY,
TOYS, FANCY GOODS,
dec, dec.
riAiros, OMAJTS,
and mil the smaller
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
CLOCKS,
WATCHES
SILVER
AND
JEWELRY,
AND
SILVER-
PLATED
rTHE ORIGINAL
HATS, CAPS,
AND RENTS' FURNISHING GOODS
Corner of Main and Bush Streets,
Red Wing, Minnesota.
glXBY'S CITY BAKERY
AND
Farmers' Restaurant,
The Only first-Class Bakery,
And the only
Respectable Eating House
IN THE CITY.
Main Street, opposite Baker's Popular Hardware
Store.
A E & MATTHEWS,
L^LC K8MIT S,
AND MANUFACTURERS OF
WAGONS, PLATFORM WAGONS, SLEIGHS
O W E SEWING MACHINE.
The BEST in the World.
For sale at E. P. Lowater's.
CARPETING,
WARE.
Corner of Main and Bush streets,
1 Red Wing. Minnesota.
4
SEE Tilt NEW IMPROVED.
JAS. C. HAWES, Agent.
QHARLES WITNEY,
MANUFACTURER OF AXD DEALER IK
Breech and Muzzle Loading Gans,
CARTRIDGES,
SPORTING APPARATUS, #«.
Revolvers, Winchester Repeating
Rifles, Ac.
JJROWN & McINTIRE,
STORAGE, FORWARDING,
and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
and Dealers in
FLOUR, GRAIN. AND WOOL,
E WING MINNESOTA.
T?DWARD L. BAKER,
DEALER IN
HEAVY AND SHELF
A W A E
74 MAIN STREET,
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
T.
B. & B. F. SHELDON
DEALERS IN
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
HATS AND CAPS,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
CROCKERY, CHINA
AND GLASS WARE.
A GOOD ASSORTMENT
ALWAYS ON'HAND
AND SOLD AT THE
O W E S I E S
MUSIC HALL BLOCK, RED WING, MINN.
B. DORMAN'S
EXCELSIOR STORE
BUSH STREET,
SECOND DOOR FROM MAIN STREET
DEALER IX
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
BOOTS,
SHOES
AND
GROCERIES, &c.
W E E TO FIND THE
GREATEST BARGAINS!!
W. EISENBRAND Co.
Will and do sell all of their Goods consisting of
CLdTHING.
BUFFALO ROBES,
BUFFALO COATS,
SHIRTS and SHIRTINGS,
PIECE GOODS,
TRUNKS and SATCHELS,
WOOLEN YARN,
HAT8 and CAPS,
READY MADE BOYS' SUITS
and
SUITS CUT AMD MADE TO ORDRR,
at
GRANGE PRICES FOR CASH:
Aire as a eall and yon will find what we saywe mean.
W EUSEJfBKAMD CO.,
Sign of the Green Front, Main Street,
Red Wtog, liiii/'

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