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Red Wing sentinel. (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, May 07, 1859, Image 1

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FBDSPBCTIJS
ME SENTINE
riJSLISHED KVZKY SATURDAY,
AT
WOtB WIJIU, MsMWIBSOTA,
•T
LITTL.EFIELD at MAOINNI0.
An Iaetefenelent Desaecratle Jovrm^l,
.„,. DEVOTED
TO INTERESTS AND BIGHTS OF
THE If ASSES.
At ft Political Jonrnftl it will try
ares and men by the standard or
•11 meaa
DemocraticI
principles, and will submit to no test bnt that
of Democratic truth.
CONTENTS:
Tho SaUinA will contain Congressional and
Legislative—Foreign and Domestic—River
•ad Commercial News-Literary Matter-
Tales-Biographical a Historical
Sketches, A A A A
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION
(JMrkUr ia Aeraate.)
OooCopy,lyear 2 00
Sis Copies, 1 year

Tea
15 00
Hf" Any person getting np a Clnb of Ten
and remitting it 00, will be entitled to one
coryrratis.
H§» Subscriptions to Clubs mutt all com
mence at the asmo time, and be strictly in
advance.
AGENTS.—Postmasters everywhere are an
thorited Agenvs for this paper.
&1-$fe 111
IN ALL ITS VARIOUS SSAMCHCS,
Executed in a superior manner, and on
shortest notice.
BLANKS.—Warranty, Quit-Claim,Special
Warranty, Mortgage Deeds, and Township
l'lats constantly on hand and for sale at this
office.
BUSINESS CARDS.
O I A I O N
AT I'OBNEYS A COUNSELLORS AT LAW
A N
E N E A A N AGENTS
1 I N MINNESOTA.
W A E N I S O
r.ate Murdoch JtriuM,')
Attorney at Law
.luil Notary Public,
RED WltfG, MINNESOTA.
51y
B. T. WII.BX1I. W. O. WILLI8TON
\VIIJ)EK 4c WILLISTOft,
•Ittorneyn at M*aw*
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
Will attcn I to tho duties of their profession
snv of the Courts of this State.
W. C. WILLISTON,
Notary Public and A«»ent for thefol
lowing reliable
/v Insurance Companies
MKIU'JIWTS,
\itMi:UH' UNION,
I'iffKVIX,
Hartford, Conn.
Athens, Pa.
Milwaukee. Wis
r. SA.Mro«»n. FUANK IVES.
Stl)F(»ai
I OUHVEE.JH. O REYNOLDS.
O E E & REYNOLDS,
Counsellors and Attorneys at Law,
Red Wing, M:nn.
tar Office with Smith. Towne & Co. 82-tf
FRANK A
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR
A A W
WORTH PEPIN,
wisco&sm.
Will give special attention to collecting Ac.
74v
BANKING. &C.
HORACE WILDES S I WILDER.
H. W I E
Bankers & Land Agents
RED WING, Minnesota Ter.
Money loaned. Exchange A Land Warrant*
bought and sold. Land Warrant*., or Money
loaned to pre-etnptors, on lonjr or short time,
and on favorable terms.
CeT" Lands bonght and sold on commission Ac.
Red Wing, May, 18*7.
a Lawlher,
a Estate Afloat, a Dealer
LA.ND W A A N S
S«iel Winn, Minnesota.
HTMoney loaued, Land Warrants sold or lo
aned on time. Real Estate, and Ezchagn
bought and sold. May 38, '57.
SMITH, TOWNS St CO..
DEALERS IN
RBA ESTATE.
E W I N MINNESOTA
Will attend to locating W arrauts. pay
ment of taxes, collection of notes, and to the par
chase and sale of Real Estate throughout the
Territory. Snrreying, Mapping, and Platting
of every kind done te order by a practical sur
viyor. Copies of township maps famished.—
Deads drawn and acknowledgements taken.
a A easiness intrusted to them, will re
stive prompt attention.
o. v. SUITS, T. r. TOWNS, «. a. BIBBCB
REAL ESTATE OFFICE,
CENTRAL POINT, MINNESOTA.
THoate
E subscriber will buy and sell Lands, lo
Land Warranto, enter Government
Lands, select Claims for Settlers desiring to lo
eats on the Half Breed Reservation, pay Taxes
and attend to all business appertaining to bis
profession—negotiate Loans for Capitalists up
on unexceptionable real estate seenrityfromSOChillson
to «0 par cent. PERRT MARTIN.
Central Point, Jan. 1,1858. 77y
W. B. HAWKINS. O. B. BaKKB. A. HALL.
A I O N S N O W O S
Hawkins A Co.,
WOULr
take this method of Informing
thei friends and the public generally,
that they are now prepared to do
I & a SI S S3
Of all kinds, sqeh as Home, Sign, Carriage,
Curtain and Ornamental Painting, Graining,
Glazing, Marbling and Paper Hanging.
JW Special attention paid to alfcrdersfroni
the country. 58tf
Red Wing, July If, 1857.
BLACKSMITHING
BT
OEOHOE W PARKER
At the aew Shop en Main siieet, within
fowrodsoftoereealiifofJordon.
SID WINS,MINNESOTA. »Tt|a
THERED
VOLUME 3, NUMBEK 40.
HOTELS-
E O O I A N O E
Levee street, Immediately opposite the Steam
boat Landing, Red wing, Minnesota,
A. A. A L. TEELE, PROPRIETORS.
THISnowE,.spacious
8 0
new and commodious house
is open for the reception of guests.—
It has been constructed under the immediate
supervision of the proprietors, and nothing has
been omitted to Insure the comfort and conven
ience of thoke who may favor them with their
ftatronage. The numerous rooms arc all well
ighted, ventilated and furnished In a superior
manner. In connection with the house ia a
good and eommodious stable.
Red Wing, March 1,1853. 83tf
E N A O I N O S E
1*. R. A F. A. 1IARDT, PBOFBIBTOBS.
THIfSLake
thea
House is pleasantly located on the shere
Pepm, within a few rods of the
Steamboat Landing. Persons wishing to spend
few days of recreation and leisure, will find
this the place to do it. A good and well sup
plied ban is attached to the house, and a com
petent ostler always In attendance.
The proprietor* h*\ ins leased the above pap
ular house and having thoroughly repainted
and furnished In a superior stylo, would say to
the pnblic that thine that they csn do to
make al. calling, comfortably and pleasantly
situated, will be left undone.
May 23,1853. 95y
E W I N O S E
JACOB BENNETT, Proprietor.
E WINU MINNESOTA.
JlfConnected with the House is a large and
convenient Stable. Stages leave daily for the
interior. Teams and Carriages on hand to
convey Passengers to any part of the country.
April 24.1858. 90-tf
A S O S E
BIT BE N VAN CAM E N
CANNON FALLS, MINNESOTA.
Travelers will Unci every accommodation on
reasonable terms at the above House. Good
Stablus, Ostlers, Ae. 62ly
A O S E
J. HACK Proprietor.
ONStreet.M
PLU STREET, a few doors from Main
Red Wins.
This House is entirely new and newly fur
nished, and the Proprietor hopes by strict at
tention to customers to receive a share cf pat
ronage.
Red Wing,,Sept. 5.1857. .•sv.SSy
MISCELLANEOUS.
1,. HKNUltlCKSON
Rectitiui and Wholesale dealer in
O a
At IVES.
Attorney* a- 4* Notary Public
E W I N MINNESOTA,
Agent* for the United States. Franklin, Fire
and Marine.
INSURANCE COMPANIES.
[121tf)
ASXCS.
WINES 4' LIQUORS,
Corner Plum and Third Sts., vTtf
RED Wl«(i, MINNESOTA.
O E N S
10F.3SA1TT TAILOR,
On Main street, next do to Lnwther'*
Bank office in Wilkinson's Itloek,
RED WING, MINNESOTA
Ticonstantlofon
12 best French and other Cloths, kept
hand, and made up in a su
perior manner by competent workmen. Also.
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS.
fc*7~ Cutting don* to order. _^»=8
Red Wing, May 23,1857. OSy
ADAMS
Manufacturer and dealer in
SADDLES. HARNESSES &C
^IIOP on Bush St. opposite C. .1. F. SmithV
O store. Red Wing, Minn. Where he has
constantly on hand a large assortment of Sad
dles, Harnesses, Bridles, Trunks, Valises.
Whips, Fly nets, and all other articles usually
kept in a harness shop, and cheaper than can be
bonght this side of Chicago.
Repairing and Job work Anna nn abort notice
and in the best style. l»4tf
JOHN HISLER,
Manufacturer and dealer in
LADIES' GENTS A N CHILDREN'S
Boot* Shoes*
Plum street one door north of the Kelly House
E WING, MINNESOTA. 9«tf
Repairing done to order and with dispatch
«.. O N N E
Tenders hisprofessional services to the citi
zens of Red Wing and vicinity.
Owes.—Corner of Bash and Plum street,
up stairs.
E E E N E S
Hon.Z.KiDwxu., M. Fairmont, Va.,
Uon. J. L. DAWSON, M. Brownsville, Pa.,
Prot. T. D. MCTTBB, Philadelphia, Pa.,
Dr. J. C. COOMB,
Rev. Dr. DRUMMONO, Morgantown, Va.,
Drs. MCLANX A BBOCK. Morgantown, Va.,
Dr. A. H. CAMFBBLI., Key West, Florida,
Dr. E. 8. GAINES, Knoxvjlle, Tennessee.
Red Wing, May W.1857. «4tf
I. S. KELLOGG,
Wholesale and retail dealer in
Drugs a Medicine*,
CHEMICALS, PAINTS,
OILS,
Dye Starts, Window Glass, Medicinal
Winesand Liquors. Tobacco, Snuffs. Cigars.
Camphene, Alc-hol. Burning Fluid, dec. Main
Street, Red Wing. Minnesota. 99y I
WOODBURY A WRIGHT,
Architects and Builders
E are new prepared to take contracts.fur
nish plans and specifications: slso.Sash
md doors on hand, and made to order. Work
and
from the country solicited.
Hoaae.
Shop near the
Red Wing, March S7, 1858. 8«tf
MelNTIRE SHELDON
BBAIBBSIII
Ory Goods.Groceries.Crockery, Hardware Cut
-ery. Nails, Oils, Paints Sash, Window Glass,
Looking Glaaaea, Farming lmplmento.
A
**°U ?.° I' °lOT*»' Cravats, Suspenders
8hirta,Collars,Brushes,Fancy Goods,
E«1»*»BB.
Red Wing M. T. T. B. SHSLDOK.
DUBUQE CITY MARBLE
WORKS.
N•HERRICK,
Dealer in American and For
sign Marble.Sizth street, below Mainand
Iowa, Dubuque, Io«a.
Monument*. Tomb Head Stones,Mnn
T«M« Tops, Ac. m9
ties.
A I E S W A I N
SURGEON AND MECHANICAL
Gm DENTIST.
RoosBsovdr the Dmg store. Mail
Red Wing* 71B
!&&1»tfefellft
From the Atlantic Monthly.
E O O E A
BY OX.ITKB WKIfDBLL O S
Ah, here it is! the eliding nut
That marks the old remembered spot
That gap that struck oar school boy trail,
The crooked path across the lot.
It left the road by school and church,
A penciled shadow, nothing more,
That parted from the silver birch.
And ended at the (arm house door.
No line or compos* traced its phut
With frequent bends to left or right,J
In aimless, wayward curves it ran,
But always kept the door in sight.
The gab'ed porch, with woodbine green.—
The broken mill stone at the sill—
Tho' manj a rood might stretch between,
The truant child could see them still.
No rocks across the pathway lie
No fallen trunk is o'er it thrown—
And yet it winds, we know not why.
And turns, as if for tree or stone.
Perhsps some lover trod the way.
With skakmg knees and leaping heart,
And so it often runs a-tray
With sinsous sweep or sudden start,
Or one, perchance, with clouded brain,
From some unholy banquet reeled—
And since, our devious steps maintain
His track across the trodden field.
Nay, deem not thus—no earth-born will
Could ever trace a faultless line
Our truant steps are human still—
To walk unswerving were divine!
Truants from love, we dream of wrath.
Oh, rather let us trust the more!
Through all the wanderings of the path,
We still can see our Father's door.
E PROGRESS O E AGE
LIFB IN 1776.
Man to the plow,
Wife to the cow,
Boys to the barn,
Girls to the yarn,
And all dues settled.
MFE IN
1850.
Man a mere show,
Girls'to the piano,
Boys to Greek and Latin,
Wives in silk and satin,
And all hands gazetted.
LIFE IN 1859.
Men all in debt.
Wives in a terrible pet,
Boys smokers and squirts,
Girls in hoops and patent skirts,
Alld EVERYBODY CHEATED.
True prayer is not the noisy sound
That clamorous lips repeat,
But tho rip«p ftitttftra of a annl
That clasps Jehovah's feet
BOUDOIR,
All work and no play.
Makes Jack a dnll boy."
Why is Pike's pt-ak like a young lady
Because it is a dumsett.
The great billiard match is itaid to have
excited great I'helan, (feelin*).
In a certain town down East, there was
but one birth during the past year. This
may be railed xvlttiry confinement.
Hoops and the Equator—Crinoline
and the Equinoctial Line—God bless 'em
The one encircles die earth, the other the
heavens."
An exchange says that an old sheep
gave birth to a lamb in Cambridge last week,
belonging to a lady with six legs and fine
wool all over her head.
v7e hare all heard of askingforbread
and receiv'ng a stone, bat a gentleman may
be considered as still worse treated, when
be asksfora lady's hand, and receives her
Esther's foot!
Bubby, why don't you go home and
have your mother sew up that hole in your
trowsera Oh, go 'long old woman, oursought,
folks are economising, ana a hole will lasted
longer ban a patch."
The following toast was given by a
printer:—WOMAV—the fairest work of ere
etion—the edition being extensive, let nomanpurpose
be without a copy.
Our only objection to the work is, that
there are too many gilt edged and foncy
bound copies in the market.
My eon, would you suppose that the
Lord's prayer could be engraved on a space
nolarger than the area of half dime
Well. yes. father if a half dime is
large in everybody's eye as it is in yours, I
think there would be no difficulty in pat
ting it on about four times,''
A husband and wife while traveling
through the woods in haste met with a mel
ancholy accident, which is recorded in the
following felicitous attain:
And while retreating through the woods,
And through thetangledtern,
H« tore his mus'n't mention 'ems,
And had to put on hern,I
Mrs. Partington says: I haven't any
desire to live longer than the breath rema iw
in my body, if it isn't mors than eighty
years—I wouldn't wish to be a centurion,
and the idea of surviving one's lactories, al
ways gives me a disagreeable eensorioasness.
Bat whatever is to be, will be, and there is
noknowing a thing win take pises till hex
•/mime*ota Forever!
RED WING, GOODHUE COUNTY, MINN., SATURDAY, MAY 6. 1859.
[COMMUHICATSO.]
CI1APTEKSON E E A N E
BBMBBB OUB.
The present sge is marked with
strong, and auspicious peculiarities.
One of them is, increasing numbers
of people are disposed to inquire, with
regard to every moral principle and
practice "is it right It is less sat
isfactory now than in former times,
that a thing is pleasant, merely that
it is popular, has been practiced along
time, by respectable men, or even by
good men the question is and with
numbers increasing continually, "Is it
right?"
asand
Another auspicious indication of the
present time, is the standard of right
and wrong with increasing numbers is
the bible. This has, by good men,
long been acknowledged, in theory, as
the only perfect moral standard. But
they are now, more than ever before,
applying it to practice. Not only
areapplied
they laboring with more vigor to send
it to all nations and convey a know
ledge of its contents to all hearts
but they are appealing to it, as the cri
terion of thought aud action and
arebe,
endeavoring with new diligence to
bring every soul under its controling
power. It is not decisive as it once
was, that a thing is legal, according
to the human statute or honorable in
human society but the question is,
does it accord with the word of God,
as revealed in the bible? To the
lawhis
and the testimony if they speak not
according to this word, increasing
numbers conclude there is no truth in
them.
Auother momentous indication
the present time, aud one which takes
hold, with a mighty grasp on the des
tinies of man, is, the number is increas
ing who feel conscience bound, daily
to listen to the bible, as the voice of
God speaking to them and with fer
vent supplication for the teachings of
his spirit, that they may understand
his will, and who when they dp under
stand it, are not ashamed to, do it.
The number is rapidly increasing,
who, when they learn, that the bible
condemns a practice will renounce it,
and who when they learn that it re
quires an action, will attempt with the
spirit which the bible inculcates, to
perform it, whether other men do
this or not and who will leave the
consequences to the divine disposal,
Man has a deeper and more pervad
ing conviction than ever before of per
sonal responsibility, in all situations,
tor the character and tendency of his
actions to the retributions of eternity,
The consequence is, it is becoming
more and more common, if a man wish
es to have good done, to do it himself
if a man wishes to have a little good
done, to do that, and if he wishes to
have a great good done, to do that, and
to do it novo. There is less disposition
than formerly, to depend on other peo
ple, nnd to nut off present dnty to
fu-oue
ture time. Men are not so much afraid
as they once were or ashamed, if need
ful, to go in the path of duty alone,
and whether others do it or not, athand
tempt to do good, as they have oppor
tunity, to all men. The feeblest and
most obscure do not despair of exert
ing influence that shall be felt by all
people, to all ages. A striking devel
opment of these principles has been
made in the Temperance Reformation.
A vicious practice had long received
the sanction of legislation, and theform
support of the example of nearly the
whole Christian world. But it was
followed, as its natural and necessary
results, by loss of property, character,
life, aud soul to an extent which must
fill every person, who comprehends it,
with amazement. And the question
was started, no doubt, by the Spirit of
God, "Is it right" to continue a prac
tice which produces such results and
which, if continued, will perpetuate
and increase them to all future ages?
&
The bible was examined, and provi
dences observed Divine teaching was
and the conviction was fasten
on the mind, that the practice was
not right, and that to prevent the evils
which it produced, men must cease to
perpetuate the cause. And for the
of making knowu to our coun
trymen especially, the reasons why
they should do this, Temperance So
cieties have been formed, whose ob
ject is, by diffusion of information and
the exertion of kind moral influence,
to attempt with, the divine blearing,
to procure suoh a change of sentiment
practice with regard to intoxicat
ing drinks, that intemperance shall
cease, and temperance with all its at
tendant benefits to the body and the
soul shall universally prevail.
Temperance, in view of thoee who
have formed these eocietie* i$ the mod'
eraie and proper uee of thing* bene
ficial, and ahetirtence from thing*
hurtfuL
Ardent spirits, being in its nature,
as manifested by Ha effects, a poison,
and one of the things hurtful, and in
this country the grand means of in*
toxicatton, their object required them
to abstain from the drinking and from
the furnishing of H, and. to endeavor
by all Mutable means, to induce tho
whole community tb do tho
4
c-'
ff
lU
SSSSSM
atMS"
This object they have steadily pur
sued. And to give to moral influence
the highest and best effect, they have
attempted to embody, in voluntary as
sociations, all, who practice on theto
principle and are willing to unite with
them.
The plan has received the smile of
Heaven. It has been viewed with fa
vor by the good, and has accomplish
ed great results.
More than 4,000 had ceased to make
ardent spirits, and more than 10,000
had ceased to sell it They believed
that the business was wicked, and they
their belief to their practice,
more than 50,000 men, who once were
drunkards, had within five years ceas
ed to use intoxicating drinks, and were
as all men who pursue this course will
sober men. W.
A I W I A S A
About the latter end of Queen
Anne's wars,. Captain John Beams,
commander of the York Merchant, ar
rived at Barbadoes from England
having disembarked the last part of
loading, which was coals, the
sailors who had been employed in
that dirty work ventured into the
sea to wash themselves there they
had not been long before a person on
°f board (spied a large shark making
towards them, and gave them notice
of their danger, upon which they swam
back, and reached the boat, all butlength
one him the monster overtook almost
within reach of the oars, and griping
him by the small of the back, his de-member
vouring jaws soon cut asunder, and asa
soon swallowed the lower part of bis
body the remaining part was taken
up and carried on board, where'his
comrade was, his friendship with the
deceased had long been distinguished
by a reciprocal discharge of such en
dearing offices, as an union and sym
pathy of souls implied. When he saw
the severed trunk of his friend, it
wasfects
with an horror and emotion top great
for words to paint. During this affect
ing scene, the insatiable shark was
traversing the bloody surface in search
after the remainder of his prey the
rest of the crew thought themselves
happy in being on board, he alone un*
in the most gracious manner. The
rounds of the battle were detailed to
us, with great minuteness, and the only
thing my Portuguese friends seemed
regret was that they were not spec
tators of so exciting a scene." Twen
ty years pass, and Mr. Buckingham is
at Earl Fitzwilliam's house, on the
coming of age of Lord Milton—"There
were, already about 2,000 persons as
sembled in their gayest apparel with
a blaze of diamonds and jewelry, es
pecially on some of the elderly ladies,
whose natural beauty having departed
was sought to be replaced by artificial
attractions, in which rouge, false hair,
and other auxiliaries were used, to
At the last annual meeting, of one
of those societies, there had been
formed in the United States, thirty-one
State Temperance Societies and in
the United States there had been
formed over 1,000 of one particular
order, embracing a membership of harmonize with an openness of neck
over 100,000,' and of other societies a
sufficient membership, to make 1,000.
000, and all connected with this great
reform.
h.ppy that he was not within reach of degeneration and decay in the system.
the destroyer. Fired at the sight, and
vowiug that he wouid make the
de-eric
vourer disgorge, or be swallowed him
self, into the same grave—he plunges
into the deep, armed with a large,
sharp pointed knife. The shark no
sooner saw but he made furiously to
wards him—both equally eager, the
for his prey, the other for revenge.
The moment the shark.opened his ca-laborer!
pacious jaws, his adversary dexterous
ly diving,and grasping him with his left
somewhat below the upner fins,
successfully employs his knife in hie
right hand, giving him repeated stabs
in the belly the enraged shark after
many unavailing efforts finding him
self overmatched in his own element,
endeavors to disengage himself, some
times plunging to the bottom, then
mad with pain, rearing his uncouth
how stained with his own
waves.^Xwd
The crews of the surround
ing vessels saw the unequal..._.
combat,
uncertain from which ot the combat
ants the stream of blood issued till at
length the shark, weakened by loss of
blood made towards the shore, and
with him his conqueror who flushed
with an assurance of victory, pushes
his foe with redoubled ardor, and bynot
the help of an ebbing tide, dragging
him on shore, rips up his bowels, aud
unites and buries the severed carcase of
his friend in one hospitable grave.—
Fraxer'e Magazine.
}!l?^ )l-}
M7f^J^yF\^m
W O I S E
I E O A
FICI1TER.
Mr. Buckingham, in his amusing
gossipping Life, writes:—"A few days
after this, an oppoturnity presented it
self of our seeing the moat popular
prize fighter of the day—young Gully,
who had just beaten the champion of
England, Gregson, in a terribly bloody
encounter, and was to show himself at
his own house to his admirers, as soon
as the cuts and bruises he had receiv
ed in the contest were sufficiently heal
ed. At that period Gully kept a small
public house, under the sign of theof
Plough, in Carey street, LinoolnVinn
fields, and thither we repaired on thetruth
..V
WHOLE NUMBEB 144.
and bosom that was anything but ap
propriate. Among the groups, how
ever, that passed from room, to room
in the general promenade, there was
one that attracted universal attention.
It was formed of three persons—the
central one, a fine, manly, athletic,
yet well formed aud graceful figure,
and resting on either arm, two of thewine
loveliest women of all the assembled
multitude, about eighteen and twenty
years of age, dressed in plain, green
velvet, without a single ornament or
jewel of any kind, but such exquisite
figures, beautiful features, blooming
complexions, bright eyes, and rich and
abundant hair, as might make either
of them a worthy representative of the
Venus of Cnidns,of Medici? or Cano
va. They were so little known that
the question was perpetually be
being whispered around, 'But who are
they?—who can they be?' They re
received much attention from Earl
Fitzwilliam, and many of the distin
guished guests, and this only height
ened the curiosity to know from whence
they came, as they were evidently, un
known to the country gentry.'* At
it was discovered that they were
Mr. Gully, the ci-devant prize fighter,
and his two daughters! He was then
for Pontefract, had acquired
large fortune, and most honorably
it was believed, on the turf, being an
an excellent judge of horses—had pur
chased a large estate, and was living
in a style of great elegance, at Hare
park, near Pontefract, respected by
all his neighbors."
MENTAL LABOR.—The injurious ef
of mental labor are in a great
measure owing to the extensive forcing
in early youth to sudden or misdirected
study to the co-operation of depressing
emotions or passions to the neglect of
the ordinary rules of hygiene to the
neglect of the hints of the body or to
^.the presence of the seeds of disease,
The man of healthy phlegmatic or ehol
temperment is less likely to be in-and
joured by application than one of san
guine or melancholic type yet these
latter, with allowance for the original
constitution may be capable of vast ef
forts. The extended and deep culture
of the mind exerts a directly conserva
tive influence upon (tie body. Fellow
one word to you. Fear not to
do manfully the work for which your
gifts qualify you, but do it as one whohis
must give an account of both soul and
body. Work, and work hard while it
day the night cometh soon enough,
do not hasten it, Use your faculties
use them to the utmost, but do notwaiting
abuse them make not the mortal to do
the work of the immortal. The body
has its claims—it is a good servant
treat it well and it will do yonr work,
it knows its own business do not at
to tes4oh force
iWairtg
RATES OF
attendtoits
reqnireroents, listen kindly
and patiently to all its hints, and occa
sionally forstall its necessities by a little
indulgence, and your consideration
will be paid with innerest. But taste
it, and pine it, and suffocate it—make
it a slave instead of a servant it may
complain, much, but like the weary
camel in the desert, it wiU lie down
and die.—Journal of Physiology.
NAVAX RKSOCBCKS OF ENGLAND.—
The Paris I?Elate has the following
remarks upen the debate in the English
House of Commons on the navy esti
mates:
first day of his exhibition. In him we
saw a tall, handsome young man, of he laughs at the public when he pre
ahout twenty one yean, of age, his
head fearfully battered, many cuts in
his face, andboth eyes recovering from
an intense blackness, but full of gaiety
and spirit* at his late triumph he wore
a little white apron before him after
the manner of landlords, and served
his visitors with whatever drink they
required while his young wife, an
4.
The great fact to be remarked is the
immensity of means commanded by the
English navy. To add in a single year
26 large vessels, of which 15 are line
of battle ships, is an extraordinary
ex-]of
ertion, Which England is alone capable
of making, and which could not be ex
ecuted by the dock yards of all the
other powers ofthe old and new world,
were they eventocombine their efforts.
The French steam fleet comprises
splendid vessels, that can bear advan
tageously any comparison with those
England, and the First Lord of the
admirality spoke perhaps with greater
than he suspected when he ad-in
mitted that fact in full Parliament but
tends that the number of these vessels
causes him any alarm. He istoowell
aware thatin this respect Eugland still
possesses no rival."
Miss Tulip, speaking of old baohe
lore, says, they are frozen out old gar
deners in the in the flower bed of love.
,,A8 they are useless as weeds, they
exceedingly pretty woman, though of a in the same manner
the fit Gile»s style of beauty, assisted _Ma*«nl
a .: I dSStud iiatul ,ii .-r
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the first, and 10 cents fot each subsequent in
sertion.
^B~ There are now Boston ship
owners, engaged in the barbarous
Coolie trade, as there used to be Bos
ton ship owners engaged in the Afri
can slave trade. The Boston Courier
mentions that recent letters from Chi
na state that some Boston ships are
doing a fine Chinese Coolie passenger
business." One with a cargo of nine
hundred Celestials had. cleared from
Fao-chanfbr Havana another with
eleven hundred, purchased at from $&
to $20 a bead and New York clip
pers were anticipating a fine bnsines?.
We will venture that every one of the
Boston men engaged in this unhallow
ed business are Abolitionists and
Republicans.
53TRev. James 6 Putnam, in a
recent letter, gives the following:
When in the Island of Madeira, I saw
a few cases of intoxication among the
poorer people, and I had, from a nine
years resident clergyman, this expla
nation: That before the failure of the
crop in Madeira, formerly the
annual yield was about 15,000 pipes of
wine, now five or six hundred there
was scarcely any drunkenness on the
Island, but the failure had placed wine
beyond the reach of the poor, they now
cultivated the sugar cane, from which
was manufactured a strong spirit now
in common use, and the result was
drunkenness had appeared as the wine
disappeared.
FUNERAL OF AN INDIAN CBTEF.^-
On Sunday the remains of Pa-ser-ich
kwa, one of the braves of the Winne
bago delegation from Minnesota, who
have just concluded a treaty with the
United States, were borne to the Con
gressional cemetery, and committed to
the earth with a simple ceremonial.
Among those present at the ceremo
nial were Senator Rice, Commissioner
Mix of the Indian Bureau, nearly all
the clerks employed in that bureau,
the superintendent, agents, and inter
preters now in this city, and a number
of distinguished gentlemen connected
with the general Government Pa-ser
ich-kwa was probably about 55 years
of age, and was a brave and active
warrior. He was with the war party
of Winnebagoes who, under Wa-con
de-co-rah, took part with the whites in
the Black Hawk war, and took that
chief prisoner. His title of Prophet"
was given him by the whites. He
died at the Juniata House,on Saturday,
of pneumonia.—[Wash. Constitution,
SINGULAR FREAK OF INSANITY.—
Last evening an unknown man enter
ed a barbers shop, up town, and at
tracted the attention of those present
by walking about in an excited manner,
sighing deeply, while awaiting
his turn to be shaved. At last one of
the persons in the room asked him if
he was in trouble, but he made no re
ply. When his turn came, he sat down
in the chair, and the barber lathered
his face, and was strapping his razor
hi* nnVnown euatuiuer uuddeiilv
cried out, am notfitto live!" and
drawing a single barrelled pistol from
pocket fired at his image in the
mirror, shattering the glass to a thous
and fragments. Before the barber re
covered from his astonishment, his
unprofitable patron ran off without
to wash his face.—y. Y. FbsK
THE CULTIVATION OF THE IMAGINA-
TION.—His Lordship, the Bishop ot
Montreal, in a lecture recently deliver
ed before the Church of England As
sociation for Young Men, in that city,,
says: "I believe that in the education
of youth, it is of immense importance
not to^ omit the cultivation of the im
agination. I am inclined to agree in
opinion that all romantic fiction,wheth
er in prose or poetry, whioh does not
actually and purposely paint and praise
vice and vicious characters, and seeks
to make them attractive and imitated
acts advantageously on the mind, and
especially on the well educated spirit,
and most certainly adds to the hap
piness of life. Luther once said: I
would not for any quantity of gold
Eart
with the wonderful tales, which I
ave retained from my earliest youth,,
or have met With in my progress thro'
life.' And Dr. Johnson grand idea,,
is universally true, 'whatever can make
the,past or the future,predominate over
the present, advances us in the dignity
thinking beings.'*
FORTIFICATIONS OF NE W YORK.—at
will require over 16,000 artillerists to
fully man and defend the castles and
other harbor fortifications of New
York. The Courier dee Etate Unie
suggests that they should be transfer
red to the militia, in order that the lat
ter marlearn artillery drill and practice
to enable themtoproperly defend them
time of war. It is estimated that it.
would require 05,000 artillerists to man
all the fortifioations of the Union, our
coast being declared, by competent
jes, to be the best defended in the
world. The works of defence have
gone on so slowly and quietly, that our
people will be wholly taken by surprise
at this assertion.
iji fi
I3P• Tho Govornor has appointed
Luther S Dixon, of Portage city,
Chief Jnetioe of the Supreme Court of
Wisconsin, in place of Hon. E. V.
Whitou deceased.

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