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Red Wing sentinel. [volume] (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, July 02, 1859, Image 1

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O S E S
THE SENTINEL
19 PUBLISHED EVEKY SATURDAY,
ME WING, MINNESOTA,
•T
E I E & MAGINNIS.
As laelepeaetoat Deanocratie Jemraal
DEVOTED
TO THE 1NTE1EST8 AND EIGHTS OF
THE MASSES.
At a Political Jonrnal it will try all meas
a and man by tne standard or Democratic
principle*, and will anbmit to no taat but that
of Democratic truth.
CONTENTS:
The SMimt will contain CongraMlonal and
Legislative—Foreign andd
nd Commercial News—Literary
Talaa-Biographical a Historical
ijr an Domestic--River
and Commercia News—Literar Matter-
Sketches, A A Ac. Ac.
TEEMS Or 8UB8CEIPTION:
CtHttMl ta AitsMw.)
One Copy, 1 year $ 8 00
Six Copies, 1 yaar 8 00
Tan 15 00
OT Any person getting? np a Clnb of Ten
nndremitting $10 00, will be entitled to one
«opy vratis.
HPJT Subscriptions to Clubs must all com
mence at the aame time, and be strictly in
advance.
AGENTS.—Postmasters a verywhere are au
thorised Agen.a for this paper.
IN ALL ITS VARIOUS BRANCHES,
Executed in a superior manner, and on thethis
shortest notice.
Bit \XKS.«Warranty, Quit-Claim, Special
Warranty, Mori/are Deod-s and Township
Pints constantly on hand and for aale at this
office.
BUSINESS CARPS.
O I A I O N
ATTORNEYS A COUNSELLORS AT LAW
ND
GENERAL LAND AGENTS
RF.D WINCS, MINNESOTA.
yyAIlREN~BRISTOL,
Attorney at Law
Aid Notary Public,
REDWING, MINNESOTA
51y
S. T. WILD«R. W. C. WILLI8TOX.
WILDER Ac WILLISTON,
Attorney* at Law,
KKD WING, MINNESOTA.
Will attend to the duties of their profession in
any of the Courts of this Scute.
W. WILLI STOW,
Notary Public ami Assent for thefol
lowing reliable
Fire Insurance Companies
MERCHANT*.
A KM wis' UMIAK,
PlKKXIX,
Hartford, Conn.
Alliens, Pa.
Milwaukee, Wis
FRANK IVES.
••. SAKir*u».
S I N O ft I E S
Attorneys a- Lvv 4* Nolnry Public.
E WINIL MINNESOTA,
Agent* for the United States, Franklin,
and Marine,
INSUHAXCK COMPANIES.
Ltsuf)
ei.lXrOM OtJtlMKB.JIt. CO. RKYXOLD9.
OURXK E & REYNOLDS,
Counsellors and Attorneys at Law,
Red Wing, Minn.
Cw~«!Hoe with Smith. To ,/ne A C«. S2-tt
FB.41MK A
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR
A A W
NORTH PEPIN, -WISCONSIN.
Will give apeeial attention to collecting Ac.
74y
BANKING, &C.
OSACt WtLDKR ZLIT. WILOKB.
II. A W I E
Bankers A Land Agents
RED WING, Minnesota Ter.
Money loaned. Exchange A Land Warrants
bought and sold. Land Warrants, or Money
loaned to pre-emptors, on lone or short time,
And on favorable terms.
Bsf Lands boncht and sold on commission Ac.
Red Win*, May, 18*7.
a La-wilier,
A N S
Real B«tate Agrai, a id Dealer
IN
I N WARRANTS.
It«« Wing Minnesota
J^*Money loaned, Land Warrants sold or lo
aned on ciaj. Beat Eetato, and Exchagn
bought and sold. May 39, '57
O W N S I E E
DEALERS IN
REAL ESTATE.
E WING, MINNESOTA
Will attend to locating Land W arrants. pay
ment of taxes,collection of notes, and to the pur
ekase and aale of Real Estate throughout the
Territory. 8nrveying, Mapping,and Platting
of every kind done t« order by a practical snr
v%yor. Copies of township maps furnished.—
Deads drawn and acknowledgements taken.
S All basiaeae intrusted to them, will re
eiive prompt attention.
T. F. Towns, o. PIERCE
REAL ESTATE OFFICE,
E N A O I N MINNESOTA
THcate
E subscriber will buy and sell Lands, lo
Land Warrants, enter Government
Lands, select Claima for Settlera deairing to lo
cate on the Half Breed Reservation, pay Taxes
•nd attend to all business appertaining to hie
profession—negotiate Loans for Capitalists up
nnexcepticaable reel estate security from 20
to per cent. PERRY D. MARTIN.
Central Point, Jan. 1,1658. 77y
W. 9 aUWKUTS. O. 9. BAEBS. A. BULL*
A I O N S N O W O S
Hawkins ft Co.,
WOtheiO
VOLUME 8, NUMBEK 48.
HOTELS.
E O O I A N O E
Levee street, imrae liately opposite the Steam*
boat Landing, Red Nfing, Minneaota,
A. A. & E. L. TEELE, PROPRIETORS.
WIIIS new, spacious and commodious house
I is now open for the reception of guests.—
It has been constructed under the immediate
*upervision of the proprietors, and nothing haa
been omitted to insure the comfort and conven
ience of thoae who may favor them with their
patronage. The numerous rooms are all well
lighted, ventilated and furnished in a superior
manner. In connection with tha house ia a
good and commodious stable.
Red Wing, March 1,185b. 83tf
E N A O I N O S E
1!. R. A F. A. 1IARDT, PnornHTona.
TUIfSLake
House is pleasantly located on the share
PeptP, within a few rods of the
Steamboat Landimr. Persons wishing to spend
a tew days of recreation and leisure, will find
the place to do it. A good and well sup
plied barn is attached to the house, and a com
petent ostler always in attendance.
The proprietor* h*\inst leased the above pop
ular house and having thoroughly- repainted
and furnished in a superior style, would say to
the pnblic that thing that they can do to
make al. calling, comfortably aud pleasantly
situated, will be left undone.
May 48,1SW. 95y_
E W I N O S E
JACOB BENNETT, Proprietor*
E WING, MINNESOTA.
23*~Connected with the House is a large and
convenient Stable. Stages leave daily for the
interior. Teams and Carriages on hand to
convey Passengers to unv part of the country.
April -24.1858. 90-tf
A S O S E
BE N VAN CAMPElf
CANNON FALLS, MINNESOTA.
Travolcrs will find every accommodation on
reasonable terms at the above House. Good
Stablss, Ostlers, Ac. C'ily
A O S E
J. HACK, Proprietor.
ONStreet,M
PLU STREET, a few doors from Main
Red Wing.
This House is entirely new and newly fur
nished and the Proprietor hopes by strict at
tention to customers to receive a share cf pat
ronage.
Red Wing, Sept. 5,1857. 59y
MISCELLANEOUS.
L. IIENDRICKSON
Rectitk-t and Wholesale dealer in
O «exx3.
WINES !r LIQUORS,
Corner Plum and Third St*.. l7tf
MINNESOTA.
RED Wlmtt.
NEW BARBER SHOP.
S I
«fKFl-
E
take this method of informing
trienda and the public generally,
that are now prepared to do
5 & 537 53
Of all kinds, such ae House, Sign, Carriage,
Curtain and Ornamental Painting, Graining,
Gteeing, Marbling and Paper Hanging.
17Specia attention paid to all crdersfrora
•be country. tstf
Bed Wing, July IT 1997.
BLACKSMITHING
BT
OBOKOE W PARKER,
At she ae* Shop on Mafn
atmetWwithin*
Sre»fe*»f«becreA«icfJ^«'toT
SUBSCRIBED
HAS FITTED UP INSweden,
a first rate manner, the room formerly
occupied as the Sentinel Office, on Plim street:
opposite the Hack Honse, and having reduced
the price of shaving to
I E E N S
is prepared to execute, in a superior manm r. all
branches of his profession. Citizens an 1 stran
gers are respectfully invited to call.
J. W. COOK.
Red Wing, May 7, '59. 144-tf
II. CONHELLY. 91. iT.
Tenders his professional services to the citi
zens of Red Wing and vicinity.
OFFICE.—Corner of Bush and Plum street
up stairs.
E E E N E S
Ilon.Z. KmwELL. M. C., Fairmont, Va..
Hon. J. L. DAWSON, M. C, Brownsville, Pa..
Prot. T. D. MUTTER, Philadelphia. Pa.,
Dr. J. C.COOPER,
Rev. Dr. DauniioNn.Morgantown. Va.,
Drs. MCLANE A BROCK. Morguntown. Va.,
Dr. A. H. CAMPBELL, Key West. Florida,
Dr. E. S. GAINES, Knoxvflle,Tennessee.
Red Wing,May 23,1857. 44tf
C. BLAKLSLEE,
Wholesale and retail dealer in
Drags and Medicines,
CHEMICALS, PAINTS,
OILS,
Dye Stuns, Window Glass, Medicinal
Winesand Liquors. Tobacco. Snuff*. Cigars.
Caraphene. Alc-hol. Burning Fluid, A Main
Street. Red Wing, Minnesota. 99yl
1959. E WING 1999.
S E A A N I N I
—AMR—
SASH, DOOR AND BLIND FACTORY.
(One Bloek above Freeborn's Sax Mill.)
VTTE SHALL BE PRKPARED TO FUR
nish at all times, anything the above
line of business and shall keep on bund all
kinds of planed aud matched Lumber, Mould
ings, etc.
Ore era promptly attended to, which may al
so be left with Brown A Botcher.
Produce of all kinds taken in exchange for
work. COGEL A BETCHER.
Red Wing, April W, 1859. 142-ly
I N I E A S E O N
DEALERS IN
Dry (Joods.Grocerits.Crockery,Hardware Cut
.ery, Nails, Oils, Paints Sash, WindowGlass,
Looking Glasses, Farming lmplments.
A.so, Hosiery, Gloves, Cravats, Snspendera,
ShirtB,Collars,Brnshes,Fancy Goods, Ac.
J. MCIMTIRR.
Red Wing M. T. T. B. SHELDON.
DUBUQE CITY MARBLE
WORKS.
nERRTCK. Dealer in American and For
i. eign Marble.Sixth street, below Mainand
Iowa, Dubuque, Ioita.
Monument*. Tom A (lea Stone*, Man
tles, Tabl A «2m»
A E N S W A I N
SURGEON AM MECHANICAL
DENTIST.
Rooms over the
Reel Wing
Drug store, Main st.
TOm
E E WlNt
E W E S O E
ARD
a W a it
E M. O N
Shop OB the corner of Main A Bush streets.
Wing, Minnesota.
April 88, '99. U-3-ly
A 2 L. HOWARD'S
a
8
KID WING, MINNESOTA. Ttsf
Blacksmith Shop,
eonvaa o» HAIR RROADWAT.
It where yoei can get work done cheaper thaa
at aaar e4ber chop in Red Wing. Particular
ettmSbn aims to BOK6JE SlJof ING.
a 9 1 tfS-tf
O I E I S E A N
ON E VERGE
I.
Tou have chased me off of earth!
Tou have hunted me to death
'Twas your lore that gave me birth,
And I perish by your breath!
Now I wander by this bank
Wander in a mad eclipse
Wander from the draught I drank
At the Lotos of your lips
Oh, the sand is smooth and white
Oh, the wind is calm and low!
Oh, it is a gentle night
Shining where long to go
If.
With your coils of golden hair
Crushed beneath your sleeping head,
With a bosom calm and lair
Heaving on a snowy bed,
Tou repose, my murderess,
iVeaming of your newest slave,
While I pace in mad distress
On the threshold of my grave
Oh, the beach is smooth and white
Oh, the ocean ripples low!
Oh, it is a gentle night
Shining where I wish to go!
in.
When you stroll to-morrow by
This sad spot where now I stand,
You, perhaps, may cast your eye
On some footprints in the sand
But thy will not tell the tale
Of my passion and my death,
Though the air your lips inhalo
Mingles with my la'est breath!
Oh, the beach is smooth and white
Oh, the breakers whisper low
Underneath this gentle night
Let rae curse you ere I go
A STORY ABOUT A KISS.
We have frequently noticed that the
staitk'St oll maids have- the most liberal
notions of kissing. Frederika Bremer,
with a simplicity and geniality emi
nently Christian, has ever a gentle
I word for the impulsive lover, if his
I heart is honest. We find this little
story in her Inst book:
In the University of Upsala, in
lived a young student—a
lonely youth, wi a great love for
studies, but without means for pursu
ing them, lie was poor without con
nections. Still he studied, living in
great poverty, but keeping a cheerful
heart and trying not to look at thestudiedJ.00
future which looked so grimly at him.
His good humor and good qualities
made him beloved by his young com
rades. Once he was standing with
some of them in the great square of
Upsala, prating away an hour of leis
ure, when the attention of the young
men became arrested by a very young
and elegant lady, who at the side of
an elderly one, walked slowly over the
place* It was the daughter of the
Governor of Upland, living in the city,
and the lady with her was her govern
ess. She was generally known for her
beauty and for her goodness and gen
tleness of character and was looked
upon with great admiration by
thehad
students. As the young men now
stood silently looking, gazing at
her,the
as she passed on like a graceful vision,
one of them exclaimed:—Well, it
would be worth something to have a
kiss from such a mouth!' The poor
young student, the hero of our story,
who was looking intently on that pure
and angelc face, exclaimed, as if
bythe
inspiration, 'Well, I think I could have
it.' 'What!' cried his friends in chorus,
'are you crazy Do you know her
fcc. 'Not at all,1 he answered but I
think she woul 1 kiss me, just now, if I
asked her.* 'What, in this place, be
fore all our eyes 'In this place, be
youreyes.' 'Freely?7 'Freely.' Well,
if she will give you a kiss in that man
ner, I will give you a thousand dollars!'
exclaimed one of the parly. 'And
TH
E RE WIN SENTINEL
•Minnesota Forever!
RED WING, GOODHUE COUNTY, MINN., SATURDAY. JULY 1859.
conversation was so pleased with him,
that he offered him to dine at his table
during his studies at Upsala.
"Our young student now pursued
his studies in a manner which soon
made him regarded as the most prom
ising scholar at the university. Three
years were now passed after the day of
the first kiss, when the young man was
allowed to give a second one to
theclares
lovely daughter of the Governor as to
his .intended bride.
"He became, later, one of the great
est scholars hi Sweden, and much res
pected for his character. His works
will endure forever among ..the works
of science, and from his h~py union
sprung a faintly well known in Sweden
in the present day, and whose wealth
of fortune and high position in society
are regarded as small things, compared
with thewealth of goodness and love."
W O PICTURES
Mrs. Swishelm, of the St. Cloud
Democrat, and J. A. Wheelock, who
writes silly "stuff" to the Pioneer and
Democrat, have been amusing them
selves in drawing pen and ink sketches
of each other. Mrs. Swishelm is thus
sketched by Wheelock, in a letter to
the Pioneer from Saint Cloud:—
"Among other objects of use andwas
ornament, in this city, is the famous
Mrs. Swishelm, whon I did myself the
honor to call and see, and who, by the'
way, proved to be a very agreeable,
chatty person, not at all demoniac or
elfish in her general appearance—a
woman of small stature, with a brow
of really line contour in the wide arch
and Grecian sweep of the perceptive
and ideal organs with large, unsteady,
rebellious eyes too, that look as if they
could flash, whether they could melt
or not and with lips to back the eye's
assertion—a piquant, spicy little body,
done up, for the nonce, in an affecta
tion of Quaker hideousuess of costume,
just such a little woiriar-, for all thehead
world, as it refreshes one's soul to
quarreW with."
Here is what Mrs. S. says, in the last
number of her paper:—
"Mr. Wheelock, our one persevering
enemy, in the editorial corps of Min
nesota is with the party, (Col. Nobles.)
and intends going to Rod lliver. He
is in search of health, laboring with a
bad bronchial disease. He is a gentle
pleasant looking man with remarkably
fine eyes and a head which bespeaks
an undue development of the mental
powers. We should judge he had
hard when a child and
that extreme nervous sensibility cre
ates his tendency to sarcasm."
We shall expect a further description
of "Joe" when Mrs.«Swishelm*s "rebel
lious eyes" light upon the first para
graph.
From the New York Mercury, June 13.
E NE W JERSI' I I E I E S
E I TIME E N E
I!'as
And I!' cried three or four others, for
it so happened that several rich young
men were in the groop, and bets ran
high on so improbable an event, and
the challenge was made and received
in less time than we take to relate it.
"Our hero—my authority tells us
not whether he was handsome or plain
—I haveraypeculiar reacons for be
lieveing that lie was rather plain, but
singularly goodlooking—our hero walk
ed to meet the young lady. He bow
ed to her and said, 'My lady, my for
tune is in your hand.1 She looked at
him in astonishment, but arrested her
steps.
"He proceeded to state his name and
condition, his aspirations, and related
truly and simply what had just passed
between him and his companions.—
The young lady listened atentively,
and when he had ceased to speak, she
said blushing, but with great sweet
ness 'If by so little a thing so much
can be effected, it would be foolish in
me to refuse your request,' and she
kissed the young man publicly in the
open square.
"Next day the young student was
aent for by the Governor. He wanted
to see the young man who dared to
ask a kiss of his daughter in that way
and whom she had consented to kiss
so. He received him with a severe and
senrtiniring Brow, but after an hour's
Yesterday was the utmost limit fixed
by the Second Adventists of this city
for the continuance of all earthly
things. At the meeting of these delu
ded people at Union Hall in the morn
ing, one of the speakers said that it
been announced in the newspa
pers that if this day did not witness
end of the world, they would give
up their belief, and cease to hold their
meetings. This was an error. They
intended nothing of the kind. If the
world did not come to an end now,
and he doubted somewhat that it
would, it would come "sometime," and
meetings would be continued to
the end, that they might all be pre
pared when the long expected event
should take place. He counseled his
hearers to be in no wise cast down,
but to hold up iheir heads, and to look
the world square in the eyes. He
firmly believed that according to thePhysicians
Scriptures, time was up." He had
no prophetic vision, and there might
be some error in the calculation, butYesterday
far as he could see, it was high time
for the consummation of all things in
gener J, and every thing in particular.
The speaker said that probably the
next steamer from Europe will bring
some intelligence favorable to their
views, and enlightened them upon
some points which were heretofore ve
ry dubious.
The speaker compared the present
position of those who were "rooted
and grounded" in the peculiar belief of
the Second Adventists to the condi
tion of the children of Israel, on coin
ing, in their journeyings, to the Red
Sea. There appears to be no avenue
of escape, but God opened a way
forFrank
them, and he would now relieve them
from their present condition of doubt
and uncertainty, through some puch
miraculous agency. Much of this kind
of argument was used, but it appa
rently afforded the leading disciples
present but little satisfaction, and they
appeared as though they would have
much rather experienced the crisis at
this time. Hope deferred mnketh
the heart sick," was literally true in
their case. The majority, 'however,
seemed to find great satisfaction iu the
fact that the "end was not yet,"
andconsecutive
were perfectly willing to "wait a little
longer."
ROSSINI A N E W A QUESTION.
The Paris correspondent of the Na
tional Intelligencer relates the xollow
ing anecdote about Rossini:
Appropos of popular sentiment in
the Romagna, you may not quarrel,
perhaps( with an anecdote about Ros
sini, a native of this part of the Papal
territory. The veteran maestro de
that his fellow countrymen are
unchanged at heart since the gay days
of his youth, when he was happy to
play a good trick upon an Austrian
general. The adventure, related by
himself a few evenings ago at his house
in Paris, is given to you second-hand,
but yon may rest quite assured of there
being no betrayal of confidence. The
conversation had turned upon the war,
and, as usual, many an eld battle was
fought over again. Rossini's achieve
ment was bloodless, but none the less
victorious. The Austrians, soon after
the fatal attempt of Murat, in 1815, oc
cupied Bologna. Rossini had emigra
ted thither from his native village of
Pesaro, in the adjoining legation, and
had been at work in his new abode
upon the "Barber of Seville." Some
time before the arrival of the Austri
ans he had won the people's heart by
a superb national song. The author
wise enough in his generation to
know that, agreeable as he was to hisrative
fellow-countrymen in consequence of
this performance, it was the circum
stance*of all others to render him ob-from
noxious to their "protectors" from the
other side of the Po. He was con
vinced, therefore, of the necessity toplace
leave the country. But to do this was
now impossible without an Austrian
passport, which at the moment, in
Rossini's predicament, could only be
hoped for through some lucky strata
gem. The author of Largo al facto
tum can have felt no great want of
self reliance in such proceedings. He
presented himself, therefore, at
thedischarged
quarters of the Austrian com
mander, and made his request. The
officer looked at him askant "Your
name and calling?" he asked. "My
name," replied Rossini, "is Ioacchino,
aud I ama composer of music not,
however," he added, "like that mad
fellow Rossini, who writes revolution
ary songs. My/orte i9 military music
aud by the way, your excellency, I
have taken the liberty to compose a
march in honor of the new garrison,
which I humbly solicit may be honored
by your excellency's band."
So saying, he took a manuscript
from his pocket, and opening it at a
piano which stood by, played an in
spiring martial air, not, however, from "Py™""^ before this tribunal on
thn m«».,c/»..
T».e«commander
the manuscript. Th wasI
enchanted. He summoned the band
master, and handing him the music,
ordered the march for the next day's
review: The composer had been dis
missed, meanwhile, with passport and
remuneration. The supposed new
march was to be performed the fol
lowing evening upon the public square.
Certain well known and spirit-stirring
notes seemed to electrify the people.
A mighty chorus resounded as with
one accord throughout the city, and to
the inexpressible confusion of the com
mander, his own garrison band was
upholding a thousand revolutionary
voices in the Bolognee of Rossini.—
"Luckily for my shoulders added the
veteran composer, with a sly grimace,
"I was by that time half way to
Genoa."
A FEOG IX THE STOMACH THRICE
YEARS.~A son of Mr. Charles Davis,
residing in Gould's Court,leading from
Montgomery, near Light street, has
caused the family great uneasiness for
three years past in consequence of his
being subject at times, for hours to
gether, to spasms and terrible fits.—
were consulted, but all
their investigations failed to reveal the
causes that produced the malady.
afternoon, about 3 o'clock,
when entering the house, the lad was
seized with symptoms of his malady,
and, in a fit of wretching, threw up
upon the floor alive frog, about two
inches in length. The frog hopped
gaily about the floor, until secured by
tlie family. Instant relief was experi
enced by the lad. His name is Wm.
Davis, and he is about ten years of
age. He has no recollection of
theelection
time the frog was taken into his stom
ach, but his father thinks it was swal
lowed with his drink about three years
ago, when he was first afflicted with
fits.—Baltimore Sun, \0th.
2 The Janesville Times says
Parker, formerly of Milwaukee,
whose friends lately published a chal
lenge to any person in the State, made
a run" of five thousand one hundred
and seventy points on Saturday, June
5th, on the Hyatt House tables. It
was made while playing an ordinary
full game, and the' first twenty-one
points were made round the table,"
after which the two red balls and the
cue ball being about eighteen inches
from the cushion, he played them so
skillfully and carefully as to make one
thousand seven hundred and sixteen
caroms,raaking in all 5,170
points! This is said to be the largest
run which has ever been accomplished
by iiuy player. A gentleman New
According to the articles of war—it| Orleans once mad* 4*144, and ^MPtf}*!*
is death to stop a cannon ball. jn some portion of Illinois, near 3,JHM),
WHOLE NUMBER 152.
GARIBALDI' S W I E
Some of the most interesting passa
ges in Garibaldi's life relate to his wife.
He married a lady of extraordinary
qualities, a native of one of the States
of South America. She was trained to
horsemanship and the most athletic
habits prevail among the females of
those countries. Though like him, no
ble-hearted, affectionate and disinte
rested, she also possesses a similar de
gree of personal courage and fortitude
which have seldom been displayed,
and still more rarely depicted by anydo
authentic pen. After her marriage she
accompanied him in his battles by sea
and land and although usually un
armed and keeping at his side only as
his companion, she sometimes aided in
his most desperate conflicts, by deal
ing out powder, loading guns, and even
firing them at the enemy. The suffer
ings which she endured among the
mountains in times of adversity and
seasons of tempests, were severe and
almost incredible. The short account
of her escape from a Brazilian guard
after capture in an 'engagement, and
her journey of several days and nights
on horseback, and alone through wild
forests, swimming swollen torrents by
holding to the mane or the tail other
horse, is exceeded only by the sad nar
of her death "in 1849 on theindividual
banks of the Po, when, after resolutely
accompanying Garibaldi on his retreat
Rome, she landed with him in
one of the boats in which he was seek
ing to reach Venice, then the only
in Italy which held out against
the enemy.—N. V. Courier and En-promises
quirer.
NORLY SAID
In the case cf the convicted and
sentenced Oberlin slave rescuers,
whom the Abolitionists hoped to have
from imprisonment, by thethe
Supreme Court of Ohio, on habeas cor
pus, Judge Swan thus nobly concludes
the opinion of the Court:
As a citizen I would not deliberate
ly violate the constitution or law bysubject
interference with fugitives from jus
tice. But if a weary, frightened slave
would appeal to me to protect him from
his pursuers, it is possible I might mo
mentarily forget my allegiance to thethe
law and constitution and give him a
covert from those who were on hisviving
track—there are, no doubl, many
slaveholders who would thus follow
the instincts of sympathy. And if I
did it, and was prosecuted, condemn
ed and imprisoned, and brought by
1.. ~~A' habeas corpus, and was then permittedterations,
to pronounce judgment in my ownwill
case, I trust I should have the moral
courage to say before God and the
country, as I am now compelled to say,
under the solemn duties of a judge,OF
bound by official oath to sustain the
supremacy of the constitution and the
law: The prisoners must be remand
ed."
Judge Swan was elected by the Re
publican party, and a few days after he
delivered the above sentiments his
party met in State convention to nom
inate a Judge of theSupreme Court,
and selected another man to take his
place.
SI l»
£3F* TJF° Scotch gentlemen went to
Ireland to make a tour and to see the
natives. One of them one drizzly day
bet the other the price of their dinner
and a bottle of wine that the first Pat
they found would be too ranch for
thern.^ A diminutive fellow, with an
old frieze coat, and a piece of a hat,merchant
was trying to plough with a pony un
der the shelter of a row of trees."
"Pat," said our friend.
"Yes, yer honor," he replied.
"If the devil were to come just now.
which one of us would he take
"Sure he'd take me, yer honor!"
"But why, Pat?"
"Cause he'd be sure of yer honor at
any time."
DEATHS FROM JOY.—The English
papers report the death of Mrs. Young,
a lady of high social position, who died
under the excitement produced by re
ceiving the joyful intelligence of thethe
of her nephew to the Honse ot
Commons.
The wife of a sea-captain in Eng
land lately died from Joy, in conse
quence of the return of her husband
after an absence of-seven vears.
A RARE SHOT.—On the 6th nit., Dr.
Irwin, United States' army, of Fort
Buchanan, killed two antelopes at a
single shot with a Colt's carbine, the
distance being over three hundred
yards. The ball passed throngh the
heart of one animal and the liver of
the other. A case of this sort is very
rare in the annals of sporting.
I a I
PLIUIXXINA.—Lai'.y—"Resign your
situation! Why, what's wrung HUW,
Thomas? Have they been, wanting
you to eat salt butter again
Genteel Footman—"Oh no,'thank
yon, ma'am—biff the fact is, ma'am—
that I have heard th^t, master were
seep fa«t, week on the top of a horam
bns, and couldn't after that rerpain,
any longer in the family 1"
A E S O ADVERTISING
Buttineae Cards of five lines, 1 year, 96,ort
do tenlinea do 10.00
One column per year, 70,00
do six montbe 40,00
Half column per year 40,00
do aixmontna 26,00
Fourth column per year 25,00
do aixmontna 15,00
Each square (10 lines,or lesa)first insertion 75
Koch subsequent insertion ,25
Legal Notices, per sq., (first insertion) 45
each subsequent 20
All advortioamentacontiftuodnntJlorderedout
AdyertisemeuUsetindoublccelumn,Hprice
additional.
^"Advertisements will be changed as Often
ma desired, by paying 25 estate square for
composition.
Business Notices appearing in the Local
Column, will be charged 15 cents per lite for
the first, and 10 cents for each subsequent in
sertion.
A DisAfPoiNTBD DARKEY.—An old
darkey Whom Captain Jim Francis
knows very Well} Went out one day td
catch cat-fish. After taking two or
three small fry, he hooked a fine pike.
Some gentlemen who were fishing
near him, were about to offer their
congratulations at his success. Before
they could do so, however, the darkey
had detached the quivering beauty
from his hook, and flung hfifl again"
into the water.
Why,'what under the situ did yoU
that for?" he was asked.
Why, marser," was the reply,
come a cattin', an' when I goea a cat
tin', I wants catfish and not pike."
A VTRONG POSITION.
The Lynchburg Republican, on: of
the ablest and the most influential ot
the Virginia Democratic journals, an
nounces its position as follows:
We are gratified to observe that our
position in favor of non-intervention
with slavery in the Territories is likely
to be sustained by the unanimous dem
ocratic sentiment of the country. In*
tervention has but few advocates, and
they cannot long hold out against the
almost unbroken opinions of the Na
tional Democracy. A few extreme
men in the South, tenacious of their
opinions, may continue to
cling to their peculiar and extreme
views upon this subject, but the whole
question will receive a quietus in the
Charleston convention. The National
Democracy will again plant itself upon
the Cincinnati platform and the com
of our country, without the
emasculation or addition of any plank.
The Richmond Enquirer, which is
supposed to represent the views of
Senator Hunter, is equally emphatic
with its Lynchbuagh contemporary in
defining its position:
Were we to insist upon forcing upon
Democratic party the doctrines of
the duty and power of intervention by
Congress for protection of slave prop'
crty in the Territories, we should
abandon the old practice of our party,
ourselves to the mortification
of defeat in the democratic convention,
and, if successful, drive off the masses
of the North, paralyze our party in the
free states, ana yield the Presidency to
black republicans and all this we
would encounter for the purpose of re
an issue which has been prac
tically adjudicated, and which has
ceased to be a living and practical
question.
All signs indicate tfiat the Charles
ton convention will reaffirm the Cin
cinnati platform without essential al
and that the Democracy
go into the Presidential contest
still pledged to "NON-INTRRFKRBJTCB
BY CONGRESS WITH SLAVERY IN STATE
AND TERRITORY OR IN THE DISTRICT
COLUMBIA."
TONNAGE OF THE WORLD.—An
English paper says:
At present it may interest our read
ers to know the extent of the merchant
marine, from which may be estimated
the real maritime power. The ton
nage of the world is about fifteen mil
lions, the United States being first,
United Kingdom second, France third
and British colonies fourth but if we
take Great Britain and her colonies
together they amount to a trifle over
that of the Great Republic. This is a
sad change from that of 1813, when all
the European ports were blockaded by
us, not an enemy's ship appearing on
the ocean, except those of our cousins,
with whom, as well as the great Na
poleon, we were then at war. Our
marine far exceeded the rest
of the world. Now we only stand as
one to three! When Parliamcat meets
British shipping should in all respects
be placed on an equality with foreign
by reciprocity. Since the change of
the Navigation laws, without it foreign
has increased in our carrying trade as
four to one. Let us then have justice
done to this great national interest,
the nursery or our fleet.
VW There is no dispositipn more
agreeable to the person himself, or
more agreeable to others, than good
hunior.^ It is to the mind what good
health is to the body, putting a man in
capacity of enjoying everything
that is agreeable to life, and using ev
ery faculty without clog or impedi
ment. It disposes to contentment with
our lot, to benevolence to all men, to
sympathy with the distressed. It pre
scntsevery object in the most favora
ble light, and disposes us to avoid
giving or taking offense. There is a
disposition opposite to good humor,
which we calf bad humor, of which the
tendency is directly contrary, and
therefore its influence is as, malignant
as that of the other is salutary. Bad
humor alone is sufficient to make a
man unhappy it tinges every object
witlwts own dismal color, and like a
part thai is hurt by everything that
touches it. It takes offense where
none was meant, and leads to envy,
and* in general wr n»dN HHCHWW.—•rweenr
on the Mind.
The very last curiosity we have
seen spoken of in the papers, ia wheel
that came off a dog's tail when it was
a uwffoin, The man who sent in,
has retired from public 1Mbtolire on
\yhathc owes.

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