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Red Wing sentinel. [volume] (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, April 18, 1860, Image 1

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PROSPECTUS.
THE SENTINEL
IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY,
A
E WING, MINNESOTA
•T
LITTLEFIELD A MAGINNIS.
An Independen Democratic Journal
DEVOTED
TO THE INTERESTS AND RIGHTS OP
THE MASSES.
At ft Political Journal it will try all meas
ures and men by the standard of Democratic
principles, and will submit to no test but that
of Democratic truth.
O N E S
ha Stntinel will contain Congressional and
Legislative—Foreign ami Domestic—River
and Commercial Vows—Literary Matter-
Tales-Biographical a Historical
Sketches, dec., fec, &c. &c.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION*.
(Strictly in AdvaM*.)
One Copv, I year $ 2 00
Six Copies, 1 year 8 no
Ton A 15 00
J^"Any person getting up a Club of Ton
*«*l remitting #18 00, will be entitled to one
eory gratis. .»
~J^ Subscriptions to Clubs must all com
mence at the same time, and be strictly in
advance.
A'JENTS.—Postmasters everywhere are au
to ri zed Agen'.s for this paper.
IN ALL ITS VARIOUS BRANCHES,
Executed in ft superior manner, and on the
shortest notice.
•Warranty. Quit-Claim .Special
Deeds, and Township
A N S
Warranty, Mortgage
I'lata constantly on hand and for sale at this
office.
BUSINESS CAKDS.
K. WILDVB. W C. W1LLISTON.
WILDER St WILLISTON,
Attorneys at Law*
RED WIXG, MINNESOTA.
ill attend to the duties of their profession in
any of the Courts of this Slate.
W. WILLIMTOX,
Notary Public and Agent for the fol
lowing reliable
Fire Insurance
MisitaiusTs,
^ITT FlRB,
Co)tipaniea
Hartford, Conn.
Hartford, Conn.
•r i.LIVT I I
AT TOWNBY & COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
GENERAL LAND AGENT,
It KO WIN ft. MINNESOTA
V,yAPJiEN BRISTOL,
•ittorneij at Law
REDWING, MINNESOTA.
51y
A N O
P.
Attorney at Law,
N O A I
And Land and Insurance V^cnt,
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
A N S MATTSON,
Attorney at La
AND JUSTICE OP THE PEACE,
Ril Wing, Minnesota.
Particular attention paid to
and Collecting.
Conveyancing
157-y
lifclSTd?! OCJIISEK.JK. O REYNOLDS
OURSBE & REYNOLDS,
Councilors and Attorneys at Law,
Red Wing, Minn.
ZJ^ Oftiee with Smith. To .me & Co. *1 tiwork.
OHACS WILDER E 1 *ILI.fci4.
II. Si W I T. O E
Bankers & Land Agents
KD W1NO, Minnesota Ter.
oney loaned. Exchange & Land Warranto
•ought and *old. Lund Warranto, or Money
.oaned to pro-emptors, on long or short time,
and on favorable terms.
S^H Landsbonght and sold oneommission&c.
Red Wing, May, 18*7.
O W N E St I E E
DEALERS IN
RBAXi ESTATE.
E WING I N N E S O A
Will attend to locating Land W arrauts. pay
ment of taxes, collection of notes, and to the pur
chase and sale of Real Estate throughout the
Territory. Surveying, Mapping,and Platting
of every kind done t» order by a practical sur
veyor. Copies of township maps furnished.—
Deads drawn and acknowledgements taken.
Z^JT All business intrusted to them, will re
stive prompt attention.
T. O W N E O I E E
W. B. HAWKINS. a. B. BAKKB. A. HAI.L
ACTION S—N O WORDS.
Hawkins & Co.,
VTTOULD take this method of informing
VV their friends and the public generally,
l\\At they are now prepared to do
p&affinraaa
Of allVmds, such as House,sign, Carriage,
curtain and Ornamental Painting. Graining,
glazing, Marbling and Paper Hanging.
jP,t))-"ii Mention paid to all crdorsfro
the country. 52tf
Red Wing, July 17 IS57.
EMOVAL—SPORTSMAN'S DEPOT.
Has been removod
to the west side ef
Jordan, Broad street
where may be found
a good assortment of
SHARP'S RIFLES,
Target and Muzzle loading Rifles
doable and single barrel Shot Guns,
CoWs, Allen's, and the celebraed,
Robbins and Lawrence Ptst»tls
Powder, Shot, Lead, Caps, Wads, Flasks, Shot
Belts, Game Bags, Fishing Tackle, &c.,&o.
Cheap for Cash.
Repairin with care and dispatch.
M. .1. OHAMBERL1N.
Red Wing, Sept. 10,1959. T0ui«
A I 8 II O O
The Easter term will commence on Monday,
the Oth of April, to continue 14 weeks, in the
building, on Broadway nearly opposite theSURGEON
Chillson House.
This School being permanently established,
a,o pains will be spared to merit a continuance
of favor.
0
TERMS:
Primary
Higher English, it
5
VOLUM
E 4, NUMBEK 38.
HOTELS.
METROPOLITAN HOTEL.
Lcvee*troet,imme liately opposite the Steam
boat Landing, Red Wing, Minnesota,
A. A. & E. L. TEELE, PROPRIETORS.
THISnow
new, spacious und commodious house
is open for the reception of guests.—
It has been constructed under the immcdintc
super»isionof the proprietors,and nothing has
been omittedtoinsure the comfort and conven
ience of those who may favor them with their
patronage. The numerous rooms are all well
lighted, ventilated and furnished in a superior
manner. In connection with the house is a
good and commodious stable.
Red Wing, March 1,185S. 88tf
E W I N IIOIIMK.
JACOB BENNETT, Propr.etor.
E WING MINNESOTA.
^"Connected with the House is a large and
convenient Stable. Stages leave daily for the
interior. Teams and Carriages on hand to
eonvey Passengers to any part of the country
April 24.185S. 90-tf
I S O N O S E
CORNER OF BROAD AND THIBD STREETS.
A. B. MILLER, Proprietor.
THIoSf
new Hotel is now open for the reception
the traveling public, where they will
find the best of accommodations. There is a
good stabl» attached. Passengers and Bag
gage conveyed to and from the Boats free of
charge. 171-ly
A O S E
MRS. MARY FLING, Proprieties*.
This popular House is now open for the ro
jption of boarders.
Board by the day or week famished on the
most reasonable terms.
January 7,1800. 179—tf.
O O E O S E
L. F. HENDRICKSON, Proprietor.
This new and commodious House is situated
on Plum street, Red Wing. It has becn built
and furnished under the special supervision of
the proprietor, all the rooms are well lighted
ventilated and furnished, and all persons wish
ing to get the worth of their money are res
pectfully invited to give him a call, and no
puins will be spared to make comfortable all
those who may" favor him witb their patronage.
In connection with the House is a good stable,
a ".dwell of water. Ostler always in attendance.
January 2nd, 1850. 179tf.
C. II. CONNELLY. HI. D..
Tenders hisprofessional services to the citi
zens of Red Wing and vicinity.
OrriOE.—Corner of Bush and Plum street
up stairs.
1
E E N E S
Hon.Z.KiDWELL, M. Fairmont, i..
Hon. A W S O N, M. Brownsville,Pa.,
Prot.T. D. MUTTER, Philadelphia, Pa.,'
Dr. J. C. COOFEU,
Rev.Dr. DauMMoKD.Morgantown.Va.,
Drs. MCLASE & BKOCK. Morgantown, Va.,
Dr. A. H. CAMPBELL. Key West, Florida,
Dr. E. S. GAINES. Ivnoxville.Tennessee.
Red Wing,May 23,1857. 4
QQ
Classical, it it ti
Modem Languages, (Extra) 4,00
Mosle, (Miss H. Kellogg. Teacher 15 00
DORSET, tsaeher.
Red Wuff, Dee. It, 185t. "%_*
Uf
1S50. E WING 1950.
E A A N I N I
A N
SASH, DOOR AN BLIND FACTORY
(One Bloek above Freeborn's Sav Mill.)
E SHALL BE PREPARED TO FUR
nish at ail times, anything in the above
line of business, and shall keep on hnnd all
kinds of planed and matched Lumber. Mould
ings, etc.
Orders promptly attended to, which may al
so be left with Brown & Betcher.
Produce of all kinds taken in exchange for
COGEL & BETCHEK.
Bed Wing, April 19,1859. 142-ly
I N I E Ar S E O N
DEALK1I8 I N
DryGoods,6roceries.Crockery.Hardware Cut
.ery. Nails. Oils, Paints Sash. Window Glass,
Looking Glasses. Farminglmplments.
A.so. Hosiery. Gloves. Cravats.Suspenders,
Shirts .Collars,Brushes, Fancy Goods, &e.
J. MCINTIRE.
Red Wing M. T. T. B. SHELDON.
DUBUQE CITY MARBLE
WORKS.
jU" HERRICK,Dealer in American and For
Ll eign Marble.Sixthstreet, below Mainand
Iowa, Dubuque. IoAia.
Monument*. Tom .v fiend Stones.Ma
tics a A 63m9
O N & E
S I N G,
W A A
E S
DEALERS IN
I REPAIRERS
Watches, locks and Jewelry,
Red Wing, Minnesota.
A WORK WARRANTED...^
Aug. 13,1859. 158-tf
A I A N S
PATEi^T
S A E S
OF ALL KINDS.
FAIRBANKS & GREENLEAF,
35 L«ke street, Chicago.
L. E N I S O N
Rectifiet and Wholesale dealerin
a avtcl ii
WINES & LIQUORS,
RED
Corner Plum and Third Sts., 97tf
WIJNG, MINNESOTA
A Ei I E HI S "KIT A IV
AND MECHANCA
E N I S
Rooms over the Drag store, Main at
Red Ml inc. 70m
O A S J. S I
Fashionable Tailor!
Next door to Smith, Meiga & Go.'s Bank.
BED WING MINNESOTA.
17, 8 178-ly
PUSH BACK THE BOWL.
Push back the bowl! Its charm to-day
Will vanish ere to-morrow
Its potent fumes will die away,
And leave the wretch to sorrow.
Although it lights the frenzied eyes
With pleasure for a minute,
Yet where the frenzied poison lies,
An age of woe is in it.
Push back the bowl! the ruby wine
Is but a treacherous snare
For serpents round the goblet twine,
An'I leave their poison there,
A blaze of rapturous joy ma}' seem
To issue from the cup
Tou bask a moment in the gleam,
Then drink destruction up.
Push back the bowl! its Judas kiss
Soon lays the victim low
Why revel in a moment's bliss,
To find an age of woe
Let Reason's voici lie heard supreme,
Take Temperance for your guide,
Lest, launched on Dissipation's stream,
You're 'whelmed beneath the tide.
Presidential question, and in reply to
Mr. Curry, of Alabama, in the House
There were traits of character de
veloped in Judge Douglas during that
contest—now that the controversy is
forever ended—which give him new
claims on the hearts and aifections of
the people, and which inspire his
friends with a confidence in his hon
esty and integrity greater than all the
acts of the st of his life beside. In
1857, when the Lecompton controver
sy arose, the nomination of Judge
Douglas, at the expiration of Mr. Bu
chanan's term, was :i fact that seemed
to admit of no contest. The Presi
dential mantle was ready to fall upon
upon his shoulders. When that ques
tion arose, he found arrayed on onee
side of it the southern Democracy,
with whom he had done battle in sothe
many years of the past he found an
administration in the zenith of its
power, with all its patronage and inheads
mietice ready to strike him down if
he dared to resist he saw the bright
prize of the Presidency, which before
seemed so near, ready to be forever
withdrawn from him, unless he would
sacrifice his honor and prove recreant
to the high principles of his life, yet
he never hesitated nor faltered for a
moment. He displayed no wavering
nor time-serving. He knew well the
fearful nature ot the contest in which
he was about to engage yet, on the
very day on which the President sent
his message to the Senate, and before
the sounds of the clerk's voice had
died away in the Senate chamber, he
arose and entered his manly, bold and
decided protest agaiust it Throw
aside your political prejudices cease
to remember your Lecompton partner
ship, and behold and admire the sub
limity of moral heroism in the man.
We had known and loved him be
fore. But then we saw indeed that he
was one of "nature's noblemen"—a
hero from the hand of God." We
knew that for seventeen years he had
originated the political issues on which
parties divided and Presidents made
we knew that in every contest he had
led our forces to battle, and wou our
proudest victories we had seen his
firmness of soul when he was burned
in effigy in Boston, and when he was
insulted by a mob in Chicago, because
he advocated the passage of the fugi
tive. slave law we. had been, lost in.
THE RED WING SENTINEL.
•Minnesota Forever I
RED WING, GOODHU
E COUNTY, MINN., WEDNESDAY. APRIL 18. I860.
A VOICE FROM PENNSYLVANIA, once seemed to carry him away from
the Presidency, are found, at last, to
[The following is the concluding iea(i
of Representatives, delivered March
28, 1860:]
Is it not strikingly singular that in
this hall we hear almost every day de
nunciations of Judge Douglas by the jeent newspaper attacks on the Cana
Republican*, because, as they say, he Ja fuigtives, was held in a dilapitated
has always betrayed the north for the
Truth," in this, as in most cases,
lies in the golden mean." Judge
Douglas, in his long and honorable
career in Congress, h:is betrayed nei
ther side but has been true to all sec
tions. Like every great, intelligent
patriot and statesman, lie has legisla
ted for the nation, and not for particu
lar sections. He loved Illinois much
but he has loved America more. Let
Alabama read his history, and point
to the time when he ever betrayed her
interest or proved false to his Demo
cratic principles.
V..V «.«. «. ..* ..« .«., .. was found a sketch, cut or engraved
admiration, after the city council of with a sharp pointed instrument, of a
crucifix together with the figure of a
man in the attitude of prayer, standing
near it. Upon the cross was repre
sented a human figure bearing the
head of an ass. Beneath the individ
ual at prayer, was inscribed, "Alexan
der adores God." Satisfactory evi
dence refers the date of this represen
tation to the reign of Septimus Siverus,
at whose court were numerous Chris
tians. It was no doubt intended as a
burlesque on their worship. It was
current belief at that penod, that the
Chicago had passed resolutions de
nouncing him as a recreant and un
faithful representative, and the fugi
tive slave law as unconstitutional and
tyranical, when he boldly demanded a
hearing, and invited his assailants to
meet him in discussion in that infuria
ted city we had never ceased to won
der at the matchless power of reason
ing which enabled Mm to convince,
not only Chicago, but the nation, that
the fugitive slave law was not only
constitutional, but iust and proper*
we knew that when he spoke, thous
and* filled the galleries and crowded
the avenues to the capital, and that
even the ladies, in their eagerness to
hear the winged words" as they tell
from his lips, invaded the Senate cham
ber and drove the gallant Senators
from their seats we knew that when
he spoke all men were silent we knew
that when he arose his enemies trem
bled, for they knew he was covered
all over in impenetrable armor, and
that his battle axe would strike down
the greatest of his foes: we knew that
he was the king of the Senate, and
the greatest living debater we knew
that then, as now, when the Demo
cratic party was assailed, his shield
always was interposed to receive the
blow but we did not know that he
would sacrifice the brightest hopes of
his life, rather than desert a principle
that he would rather be right than
to be President! This was all shown
in the Lecompton controversy and
men love and admire him for it, and
will confide the government of thewas
nation to his hands, because he is in-Compromise
corruptibly honest, as well as capable,
lie is the hero of the people—" the
eyed man of destiny." The
blue eyed man
paths of right and principle, which
White House door, and to
0
portion of the sj.eeeh of Hon. Wm. chambers. And he who was
Montgomery, of Pennsylvania, on the
ea
binet maker's boy will
elf be the maker of cabinets.
uunS
ROLE DISCOMFITED.
0
The Detroit Free Press says the ne
gro convention to take action on re.
i,i building, in Sandwich, in Ca., on
benefit of the south? Yet in this the 0th inst. The colored folks of two
same hall we hear southern represen- counties collected and made an
atance
tatives denounce Judge Douglas, be
cause he has done too much for the
north, and not enough for the south.
tempt to proceed to business, but their
proceedings were interrupted by a fight
between two colored clergymen, who
fell into a dispute on some knotty the
ological topic, and came to sturdy
blows The combatants were the
Rev. Mr. Jones, pastor of the Zion So
ciety at Winsor, and the Rev. Mr. Bo
ler, of Philadelphia, a distinguished
colored divine, who had come all the
way from the Quaker City to attend
the Convention. The Rev. Mr. Jones
"sailed in" unexpectedly, and deliver
ed a scientific "one, two" on Rev.
Boler's nose, bringing the claret. The
Rev. Boler retaliated by getting in a
stunner on the Rev. Jones's bread
basket, which the Convention now
deeply interested, pronounced foul.—
Loud cries of "But him Jones, but
him," emanated from the audience,
acting upon which the Rev. Jones
doubled up and planted the top of
hisof
skull in the Rev. Boler's abdomen
with fearful effect. The downfall of
Philadelphia caused a shout of triumph
from the spectators, which was cut
short by an artful dodge on the part
of the Rev. Boler, who shut himself up
like a jack knife, and opened with such
velocity that the collision tripped up
the Rev. Jones and brought him down,
where, with his head "in chancery,'
took a healthy pummelling. They
were finally pulled apart by some of
sisters and turned out, after which
they procured clubs and waged an un
compromising warfare until both their
were seriously damaged. They
were then arested by a police officer
and locked up for trial. The fight
between the reverend gentlemen ex
cited so much debate that the conven
tion was forgotten, and the discussion
turned upon them rits of the combat
ants. The general oppinion was in fav
or of the Rev.Jones, as a home cham
pion, the sentiment being decidedly
averse to allowing Philadelphia dar
kies to come out aud take on airs over
the aborigines. A majority of thein
sisters sided with "de gemman from
Fillimadelfy," on account of his wear
ing a white hat, and being withal,
rather a good looking darkey but they
were indignantly frowned down.—
Some of the knowing ones went so
far as to intimate(that the good clothes
he wore were apart of the proceeds
of some $700 which he had collected
for the Abolition cause and appropria
ted to his own benefit. This may have
been the cause of the fight, which ac
tually occured as descrbed, and which
promises to create no little disturbance
in the church before the matter is set
tled.—Boston Post.
INTERESTING DISCOVERT AT ROME.
—A letter from Lewis Cass, Jr., at
Rome, states in the course of excava
tions on the Palatin, where stood the
House of Gold of the Caesars, a room
was exposed, on the walls of which
Christians worshipped a divinity whose
bead was similar to that of an aw.
We have seen no stronger indica
tion of the change in public senti
ment than in the following from the
New York Times. Western Repub
licans will do well to abandon their
heresies at once, or they will find
themselees outside the Republican
camp:
E E I A N A O
Judge Collamer, of Vermont, made
a very able speech upon the Slavery
question, in the Senate of the United
States, a few days since. It waspapers
marked by historical research, logical
ability and excellent temper. In the
course of it he said that the Republi
can Party propose to restore the Mis
souri Compromise line. What,"
said he, is the proposition of the
Republican Party? Nothing more,
nothing less than to restore that line."
We doubt very much whether upon
this point he spoke the general senti
ment of the Republican Party. It
unquestionably the repeal of that
which called the Repub
lican Party into existence they re
sisted the effort to blot it out, but itMassachusetts
does not fellow that they would favor
its restoration.
It is not easy to see what the North
has to gain by restoring a line which
excluded them from a very large por
tion of the Territory of the Union,
and admitted them only to a section
which they have succeeded in occu
pying in spite of its repeal. The Mis
sousi Compromise excluded slavery
from all the region north of the par
allel 36 deg. 30 min., and admitted it,
by implication at least, into all the re
gion south of that line. It was re
pealed in order to permit slavery to
enter the northern section but that
object was foiled by the resolute resist
of the people themselves. Kan
sas has been secured to freedom and
slavery can never be carried into the
region lying west and north ol it, sim
ply because it cannot traverse a Free
State. The Free States, therefore,
stand just as well now as they could
have done under the Missouri Com
promise, with the added advantage of
being allowed to contest possession of
the region south of the Compromise
line. It is scarcely probable that, un
der these circumstances, the Republi
cans will insist, upon its restoration.
Undoubtedly the main object of the
Republican Party will continue to be
to prevent the extension of Slavery
into a new Territory but they will
not be restricted in this endeavor here
after, as they have been hitherto, to
that portion of it north of the old
Compromise line. They will carry
the controversy into every Territory
the United States,—and in nearly
all of them with reasonable prospects
of success. Whether they will insist
that Congress shall pass a law prohib
iting Slavery in the Territories may be
doubtful. The great mass of the par
ty hold to the abstract right of Con
gress to enact such a prohibition, in
spite of the opinions of members of
tne Supreme Court and there are
many in its ranks who seem disposed
to insist upon its exercise. But the*
general conviction seems to be that no
such action of Congress will be neces
sary and the most eminent and influ
ential of the Republican leaders are
inclined neither to ask nor permit any
further legislation upon this subject.
They rest with full confidence upon
the spirit and sentiment of the setlers,
feeling quite certain that in any Terri
tory which may be settled by emigra
tion, the interest of the inhabitants
will decide the question in favor of
freedom. While they will resist,
therefore, any attempt of the South to
pass laws for the protection of Slavery
the Territories, they will ask none
for its prohibition.
Whatever party may be in the as
cendant, therefore, it seems altogether
probable that the principle—or at allagain.'
events the practice—of popular sov
ereignty, will practically settle the
question of Slavery in the Territories.
The refinements of constitutional law
will have but little influence on the
subject. Whatever lawyers may ar
gue, or courts decide, it will after all
remain for the people of the Territo
ries to say for themselves whether
Slavery shall, or shall not, find afoot
hold upon their soil.
A GOOD ONE.
The following is said to have occur
ed at New Orleans,during the invasion
of the British. After the battle of the
23 December, 1814, in which both
armies received nearly the same injury,
a subaltern British officer was sent to
the American line with a flag of truce.
Being detained a little, he began to
converse with a corporal in our service,
respecting the probable events there.
He stated it was folly for the Ameri
can to resist any longer, as they must
eventually be beaten—that the troops
opposed to them were the flower of
tne British army, who had vanquished
the best veterans on the continent of
Europe, and were commanded by Lord
Packenham, Lord Picton, Lord Coch
ran, Lord Kean, and many others of
the ablest Generals in Europe." To
this the corporal replied indignantly,
"on our side we have the Lord God
Almighty, the Lord Jesus Christ, and
the hero*Andrew Jackson, and I'll be
if we ean't whip youv"
WHOLE NUMBER 194.
"A E I
We have often heard, says the North
Iowa Times, persons crying out
against the great sin of slavery, the
enormity of the crimes attendtan upon
it, and the want of feeling of theassociations,
slaveholder. We hardly ever pay
much attention to such remarks, be
cause we know from the tenor of them
that persons making them know no
thing of the real condition of the slave
only as they read it in the Opposition
of the North. There are nu
merous instances which we are person
ally cognized of, where people raised
in the North, taught to look upon
slavery as greatest of all sins, and the
negro as ao equal who was held un
der the most tyrannical laws, have
gone South, and after a few months
residence have turned to be the most
zealous supporters of the 'peculiar in
stitution if we mistake not, some of
the present prominent Southern states
men are Northern bom.
It is the truth, there is a very great
difference, in the slavery heard of in
and the slavery seen in
Virginia—the negro you hear of as
being held in bondage and the negro
youflnd HO. R. H. dana. of Boston,
an out-and-out Abolitionist, has been
South, and he describes his en
slaved colored brethern in the follow
ing beautifully descriptive and very
truthful language:
The negro among negroes is a
course, grinning, flat-footed, thick-skull
ed creature, ugly as a Calioan, lazy as
the laziest of brutes chiefly ambitious
to be of no use to any one in the world.
View him as you will, his stock in trade
is small, has but the tangible instinct
of all creatures—love of life, of ease
and of offspring. For all else he must
go to school to the white race and his
discipline must be long and laborious.
Nassua, and all that we saw of it, sug
gested to us the unwelcome question,
whether compulsory labor be not bet
ter than none.
HEARING WITH THE TEETH —Lay a
watch upon a table, glass side down
ward, then stand so far from it that
you cannot in any ordinary way hear
the ticking. Now place one end of a
small stick, say about six feet long,
upon the back of the watch, and grip
the teeth to the other, and with the
finger close each ear to exclude all
external noise the beat of the watch
will then be as audible as if placed
against the car. All other sounds can
be conveyed in the same manner, no
matter how long the stick be for in
stance, if one end be put upon a piano
forte in a sitting-room fronting a gar
den, and the stick be thirty feet long,
extending outside the window on to
a lawn, if the instrument be ever so
lightly played, the tune will be instant
ly distinguished by any person apply
ing the teeth to the opposite end of
the stick. Again, if a light bar of
iron, or any other metal, be suspended
by a thick string held between the
teeth, and then struck with any hard
substance, the sound will aqpear fresh
er than by hearing with the ears.—
Presbyterian.
11 11 1
HABITS OF OBSERVATION.—" My
mother taught me at an early age,"
said Miss Hunt, dryly, "to observe
everything. So that now I never go
into a church or room, or pantry, with
out seeing everything at a glance—and
remembering it too. It is a faculty
that may be acquired and therefore,
should be. This was the way in which
Robert Houdin taught his son to ex
hibit what passed for second sight.—
He used to take his child up to a shop
window—the next minute take him
away. Now, Robert, what do you
see Two work-baskets, ten pen
wipers, six whirligigs.' No, you did
n't.' «Yes I did.' *Then go back
The boy, by cultivating this
faculty had become quicker than his
father. He took in at a glance, the
whole contents of the shop, and appli
ed his habits so dexterously before a
crowded audience, that things which
they did not believe he saw, or had
seen, he described accurately. The
consequence was that his father realiz
ed immense profits."
ANTIQUATED LOVERS.—The duke ot
Marlborough, after he had counted up
the octogenarian calender, had not
forgotten that there was a countess of
Ormond Richlieu, at the age ot 67some
though Bulwer says the profligate car
dinal died at eighty-and-nfty—had his
Althea de Melino and Ninon de
L'Enclos, after she had passed the age
of ninety, seduced and conquered the
young Marquis of Languedoc, who had
not counted off two-and-twenty sum
mers!
B3^"The English *fancy' are betting
as high as seven to one on bayers
against Heenan, in the great fight for
the champion of the world, to come off
in England on the 16th of Abril
Heenan is said to be getting admira
bly compact under his training at
last accounts he had been reduced to
182 pounds, with the promise of hisces
his assistant that he shall come down
seven pounds more before the fight.
It is understood that the English au
thorities will not put themselves to
any trouble to prevent the fight
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sertion.
LEAVING HOME
I conceive no picture more interest'
ing than one which might be drawn
from a young man leavitfg the home of
his childhood, the scene of his early
to try his fortune in a dis
tant country, setting out aloneforthe
forest." A father on the decline, the
down-hill of life, gives his parting
blessing, invoking the best gifts of
heaven to rest on his beloved offspring,
and to crown all his efforts with com
plete success tears gush from his eyes
and words are forbid utterance. A
kind, and affectionatel mother, calling'
after him, as he is departing from the
parental abode, and with all the dan
gers to which he is about to be ex
posed rushing into and pressing upon
her mind she says—" Go, my son—re
member that there is a right and a
wrong way." Her advice is brief.-
Language is inadequate to the expres
sion of the feelirtgs that there crowd
on the mind of a virtuous child. Ev
ery reader has a case of this kind, and
many have been the subject of one in
some respects similar. Here may
found eloquence more touching to him
to whom it is delivered, than even tha
orations of Cicero or Demosthenes.
HYMEN.—Hymen was a a beautiful
youth of Athens, who for the love of a
young uirgin, disguised himself and
assisted at the Elusinian rites, and at
this time, he, together with his beloved
and divers other young ladies of that
city, was surprised and carried off by
pirates who supposed him 10 be what
he appeared, lodged him with his mis
tress. In the dead of night, wheh'
the robbers were all asleep, he arose
and cut their throats. Thence making
hasty way back to Athens, he bar
gained with the parents that he would
restore to them their daughter and a!!
her companions, if they would con
sent to their marriage: which proving
very happy, it became the custom to
invoke the name of Hymen at all nup^
tials.
ESf^The King of Denmark, having
solaced himself with the company of rt
pretty milliner whom he has married
morganatically, which means over the
left, all the highborn ladies, who ap
pear low bred, cut the said ex-milli
ner. They are not shocked at the ir
regularity of the connection, but by the
circumstance that the lady is not of
noble birth. She has invaded their
privileges. They think there is some
thing rotten in the State of Denmark,
Their opinion is much like that of
the English lady, who, hearing another
lady censured for insonstaney, incon
tinetly exclaimed, "I do assure you
she never committed herself with any
body out of the peerage
OCTThe following story gives a live
ly idea of how the Russians govern
Poland. A Jew meta Cossack in the
forest, and the latter robbed him of
his horse. On returning to the town',
he lodged a complaint with the major
in command, who was (with what truth
we shall see) reported to be a most
rigorous disciplinarian. The Cossacks
were paraded, the robber was pointed
out, when, with the utmost effrontery,
he remarked that he had found the
horse.
"How replied the Jew. «*I was
upon his track
"Yes," retorted the Cossack, "I
found you, too but having no use
for a Jew, I did not keep you."
The excuse was admitted, and the
poor Israelite was dismissed minus
his steed.
OCT A little girl, not six years of aire
screamed out to her little brother, who
was playing in the mud, "Bob yon
good-fbr-nothng little scamp, come
right into the house this minute, or I
will whip you till the skin comes off."
"Why Angelina Angelina, dear, what
do you mean where did you learn
such talk exclaimed the mortified
mother' who stood talking with a
friend. Angelina's childish reply was
a good commentary upon this manner
of speaking to children Why, moth
er you see we are playing, and he's
my little boy, and I am scolding him
just as you did me this morning that
is all."
S3T*The European papers make
ot the mfost amusing blunders in
reference to* American affairs. The
Paris Journal Debates in giving an ac
count of the- attempts to organize the
American Congress, makes the follow
ing amusing blunder: "Monsieur
Gilsner received 30 votes, and Mon
sieur Scattering 9. On the next vote,
Monsieur Gilsner retired, but Monsieur
Scattering's nine friends continued to
stand by him.
SSfl a recent sermon upon the
training of children, Henry Ward
Beecher gave the following stern ad
vice to parents: "Never strike a child
upon the head. Providanae has sup
plied other and more appropriate pla
for punishment."
OtTA young lady down in Indiana
is charged with putting on airs be
cause she refused to go to a ball bare
tooted.

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