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Red Wing sentinel. (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, October 17, 1860, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025569/1860-10-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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O S E S
THE SENTINEL
W. W. E S Editor.
PUBLISHED BVEKY WEDNESDAY,
BY
A I N A I N N I S
AT
HED WING, MINNKtiof A,
Aa Independent Democratic Journal.
DEVOTED
TO THE INTERESTS AND RltUlTS 0
THE MASSES:
A* Political Journal it will try all nieas
iir«s and iiton by the standard of Democratic
(hat
rinciple*. and will submit to no test but
of Democratic truth.
C02ff ENTS:
he Stntintl will contain Congressional ami
Leg'alativo—Foreign and Domestic—Kiver
and Commercial News—Literary Mat
ter— Tales -Biographical— Historical.
Sketches, &*., die vie. «&u.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
(Htrietly in Adtanco.)
One Copy, 1 year 9 2 00
Six Conies,1 year 10 00
Ton ... .... 15 00
Itf* Subscriptions to Clubs must all com-good
nience at tho same time, and bo strictly in
ndvance
AGENTS.—Postmasters everywhere aroint
tliorised Agen'.s for this paper.
feMfe fell W* *®1
tN ALL ITS VARIOUS BRANCHE8,
eotcd in a superior manner, and on the
shortest notice.
BLANKS—Warranty, Quit-Claim,Specia
Warranty, Mortgage Deeds, and Township
Plats constantly on hand and for sale at this
BUSINESS CARDS.
B. f. WILDSB. W. C. WILLISTO
W I E W I I S O
•attorneys at Law*
BED WING, MINNESOTA.
Will attend to the duties of their profession in
any of the Courts of this State.
W W I I S O N
Notary Public and Agent fur the fol
lowing reliable
Fire Insurance Companies
Ma»ciiA*T«, Itartfonl, Conn
ClTT Fins, Hartford, Conn.
W I I A O I 1
ATTORNEY A COUN8ELLOB AT LAW
A
GENERAL LAND AGENT,
S I N MINNESOTA.
"BRISTOL & PHELPS
•attorneys
RKDW1NO,
at Law.
MINNESOTA.
Sly
S A N O
Attorney at Law
N O A I
And Land and Insurance Agent,line
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
A N S MATTSON
Attorney at Law,
AND JUSTICE OF THE PEACE,
Red Wing, Minnesota.
Particular Attention paid to Conveyancing
and Collecting. lW-y
Q9 O. E N O S
Red Wing, Minn.
HTO.nce with Smith, Towne & Co
82-
IIORACI W I E I 1 WlLDKll
It. K. W I E
Bankers & Land Agents
ED WING, MinnesotaTer.
onoy loaned. Exchange & Land Warrants
•MtgRt and sold. Land Warrants, or Money
.Oahed to pre-emptors,onlong or short time,
and on favorable terms.
(W Lands bought and *old oncom mission Ac.
Red Wing, May,lSfttv
O W N E I E E
DEALERS tN
REAL ESTATE.
E W I N I N N E S O A
Wil attand to locating land Warrants, pay
taent of taxes, collection of notes, and to tho pur
ehass ami artto df Heal Estate throughout the
Territory:' Surveying, Mapping,and Platting
of e»ery kind done te order by a practical Aur
Ttyor. Copies of township maps lurnished.—
De"» Isdrawn and acknowledgcmer.ts taken.
A business intrusted to them, will re
•SITS prompt attention:
ylf.Town*, j.c.riBnc
A I O N S N O W O S
Hawkins A Go.,
WOULr
take this method of inform!n
thei friends and the public generally
Ihsy are now prepared to do
& 53 If 55 8
"Of all kinds, sack as Hotuio,Sign, Carriage,
artain and Ornamental Painting, Graining,
lasing, Marbling and Paper Hanging.
HTpacial attention paid to all crdcrsfrom
Ih country. *2tf.
Bed Wing, July 17 1957.
I I S I O N I S A E
A A S
fttidle and Hirness Maker,
(Next door to Lawther's Brick Block,)
QlrihBTBBiT, Ren Wise.
Will keep constantly on hand tho very best
JleroesM*. Saddles, ridles, Martingales, Fly
IteM, Whips, Cards, Combs and Brushes, and
everything in the Harness line necessary to rig
not a Horse or Team. All kind of work made
•o order, and
E A I I N
ef all kinds done in a most superior manner]
••d.at the shortest notice.
Leather and Paddlery Hardware at Whole
ale and retail. Country Shops will be sup
lied at the lowest prices. 192ai6
EMOVAL 1 REMOVAL! REMOVAL
E O A
O W A E E
hsve removed their stock of
3BC4NT
to thslr B.let Store M*tn Street, heretofore
oeenpieil by B* B. Foot,
fled Wing, June 16..
VOLUM
E 5. NUMBEK12.
HOTELS.
E O O I A N O E
LovUb4tr£ct,immediately opposite the Steam
boiitLundiusr.lted Wing,Minnesota,
A. A & E L. E E E PROPRIETORS
THIS
new, spacious and commodious house
is now open for the reception of gitdsts.—
It has hccH constructed under the immediate
supertisionof the proprietors.and nothing has
been omittodtoinsure the oomibrt arut conven
ience of those wliomay favor them with their
patronage. The numerous rooms are all well
lighted, ventilated and furnishedlh asuperior
manner. In connection with the house is a
and commodious stable.
Red Wing,March 1,'1S5S. 83tf
E W O S E
ACOB BENNETT, Proprietor.
E WINtt MINNESOTA
^"Connectcd with the Hon se \t a 1 argc and
convenient Stable. Stapes leave Jaily for the
interior. Teams and Carriages on hand to
convcv Passeneerstoany part of the country
Apfil24.185S. 90-tf
THIoS
O N O S E
CORKER OF BROAD ASBTHIRD STREETS
A. B. MILLER, Proprietor.
new Hotel is now open for the reception
the traveling public, where they will
find the best of accommodations. There is a*
good stabla attached. Passengers and Bag
gage conveyed to and from the Boats free of
charge. 171-ly
A HOUftE.
MRS. MARY FLING, Proprietress.
This popular House is now open for the
January 7. I860. 170—tf.
fiOODHVE O S E
L. F. HENDBICKSON, Proprietor.
This new and commodious House is situated
on Plum street, Red Wing. It has been built
and furnished under the special supervision of
the proprietor, all the rooms are well lighted
ventilated and furnished, and all persons wish
ing to get the worth of their money are res
pectfully invited to give him a call, and no
pains will be spared to make comfortable all
those who may* favor him with tlicir patronage.
In connection with the House is a good stable,
lwcll of water. Ostler always in attendance.
January 2nd, 1850. 179tf.
I I A S H. CONNELLY, M. D.
I85». E WINK 1859.
S E A A N I N I
—AND—
SASH, DOOR AN BLIND FACTORY
(On Bloek above Frccborn'B Saw Mill.)
WEenish
SHALL BE PREPARED TO FUR
at all times, anything in the above
of business, and shall keep on hand all
kinds of planed and matched Lumber, Mould
ings, etc.
On'ers promptly attended to, which may al
so be left with Brown & Betcher.
Produce of all kinds taken in exchange for
work. COGEL & BETCHER.
Red Wing, April 19.1S59. 142-ly
II. BRAND,
•I
Atso
Sir JAMES CLARK'S CELEBRATED FE
MALE PILLS.
All of which will be sold for cash at a,very
small advance from eastern prices. 193mti.
O N & E
S I
W A A
N G,
E S
DEALERS IN
E A I E S
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry,
Red Wing, Minnesota.
A WORK WARRANTED. JS S
Aug. 13,1859. 158-tf
A I A N S
A E N
L. UENDRICKSO*,
Rectifier and Wholesale dealcrin
S^aJtk 3
WZlsES 4* LIQUORS,
RED
Corner Plum and Third Sts., 97tf
W I MINNESOTA
A E N 8 W A I N
SURGEON AN MECHANICAL
DENTIST.
Itoom* over the
Red Wing.
Drag store, Main nt
70m
11 O A 8 S I II
FASHIONABLE TAILOR!
Next door to Smith, Meigs & Co.'s Bank
BKO WING MINNESOTA.
17, 859. 17«-ly
E O W A S
Blacksmith Shop,
COBTfKB OT MAIM BHO.VDWAT.
Is wm«M you e*t. eet war* dona cheaper than
At an* other shop in Red Wine. Particular
attention a-iv«n to HOUSE SHOEING.
Maye-1/SL". HG-ft
LAST CHARGE OF THE OLD GUARD.
Napoleon's Old Guard gained by
their ninny desperate instances ot
bravery an immortality in history, but
their grand, crowning act was their
desperate charge at Waterloo, which
has few parallels in ancient or modern
warfare. They fought for their adored
Emperor, to retrieve the evil fortune
of the day. They felt that to do so
would be to secure to themselves im
mortal glory in this world and eternal
bliss in the land of spirits. The most
graphic account of the struggle that
we have seen is from a recently pub
lished French work. It reads like
war itself. This is it
During the day the artillery of theup
Guard, under Drouct maintained its
old renown, and the Guard itself had
frequently bei'ii Used to feslore the
battle in various parts of the field,
and always with success. The En
glish were fast becoming exhausted,
and in an hour more would doubtless
have suffered a disastrous defeat, but
for the timely arrival of Blucher. But
when they saw him, with thirty thous
and Prussians, approaching their
courage revived while Napoleon was
filled with amazement. A beaten ene
my about to form a junction with the
while Grouchy who had been
to keep them in check was no
where to be seen. Alas what great
plans a single inefficient commander
can overthrow. In a moment Napo
leon saw that he could not sustain the
attack of so many fresh troops if once
allowed to form a junction with the al
lies, and he determined to stake his
fate on one bold cast, and endeavored
to pierce the allied center with a
grand charge of the Old Guard, and
thus throw himself between the two
armies. For this purpose the impe
rial guard was called up and divided
into two immense columns which were
to meet in the British center. That
under Reile no sooner entered the fire
than it disappeared like mist. The oth
was placed under Ney the bravest of
the brave, and the order to advance
given. Napoleon acccompanied them
part of the way down the slope and
halting for a few moments in the hol
low he addressed them a few words.
He told them that the battle restod
with them, and that he relied on their
valor, tried in so many fields.
re-allies,
cption of boarders.
Board by the day or week famished on thesent
most reasonable terms.
S I I A N & S E O N
RED WIXG, MINXKSOTA.
Office on Main street, over Brown & Belch
er's Hardware Store. 20S tf
is a a is
Main Street, Red Wing, Minnesota
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Drugs, Medicines, Paints, Oils, Oluss.Extra
(ruins, Barks, Roots, Herbs, Patent Medicines,
Perfumes, Brushes. Dyes, Varnishes, Oam
phene. Fluid, Brandies, Wines, Tobacco, Snuff
and Cigars.
"ViverEmperenr!" answered him
with a shout that was heard above
the thunder of the artillery.
The whole continental struggle ex
hibited no sublimer spectacle than
that last great effort of Napoleon's ge
nius to save his sinking empire. The
greatest military skill and energy the
world possessed had been taxed to
the utmost during the day. Thrones
were tottering on the turbulent fields
and the shadows of fugitive kings flit
ted through the smoke of the battle.
Bonaparte's star trembled in the zenith
now blazing out in its ancient splen
dor, now paling before his anxious
eye.
The intense anxiety with which he
watched the advance of that column,
and terrible suspense he endured when
the smoke of batttle wrapped it from
his sight and the utter despair of hisend
great heart when the curtain lifted
over a fugitive army and the despair
ing shriek rung out, the Guard re
coils! the Guard recoils!" makes us
for a moment forget all the carnage
in sympathy with his distress.
The Old Guard felt the pressure of
the immense responsibility, and resolv
ed not to prove uuwoithy of the the
great trust committed to it. Nothing
could be more imposing than its move
ments to tho assault. It had never
been known to rccoile before a human
foe, nnd the allied forces beheld with
awe its firm and steady advance to
tho final charge. For a moment the
batteries stopped playing, and the fir-so
ing ceased along the British lines as
the field. Their tre-a
E' S
OF ALL K1KDS.
A I A N S E E N E A
35 Lake street, Chicago.
0
9
fled thunder, K„ilo aaosKnjj hel
mets of the ouirasseurs flashed long
lines of ',ight upon the dark and ter
vie mass that swept in one strong
wave along. The stern Drouct "was
then amid his guns, and on every brow
was written the unalterable resolution
to conquer or to die.
The next moment the artillery opened
and the head of that gallant column
seemed to sink in the earth. Rank
after rank went down, yet they neith
er stopped nor faltered. Dissolving
squadrons and whole battallions dis
appearing one after another iu the de
structive fire, affected not their cour
age. The ranks closed up as before
and each treading over his fallen
comrade passed on unflinching.
The horse which Ne rode sank
under him, and scarcely had he mount
ed another before that also sank to
the earth,, and so another until five
in succession had been shot under him.
Then with his drawn sarcr he march
ed sternly at the head of his column.
In vain did the artillery hurl its storm
of iron on that living mass. tobrought
the very muzzle they pressed, and
driving the artillerymen from their
places pushed on through the English
line*. But jtist as the victory seemed
Wn, a file of soldiers who lav flat on
TH
E RE WIN EENI1NEE
Minnesota Forever!
RED WING, GOODHU
E COUNTY, MINN., WEDNESDAY. OCTOBE It, I860.
the gro,tuul, behind a ridge of earth,
suddenly poured a Volley in their very
face. Another and another followed,
till one broad sheet of flame rolled on
their bosoms, and in such fierce and
and unexpected flow that they
staggered before it. Before the
Guard had time to rally again and
ad-leader
vance, a heavy column of infantry fell
on its left flank in close nnd deadly
volleys, causing it in its unsettled «tat-j
state, to swerve to the right. A that
instant the whole brigade of cavalry
thundered on the right flank, and pene
trated where cavalry had never gone
before.
The intrepid guard could have borne
against the unexpected fire from
soldiers they did not see, and would
have rolled back the infantry that so
boldly charged its right flank, but the
cavalry finished the disorder into which
they had been thrown, and broke the
shaken ranks before they had time to
reform, and the eagles of that hitherto
invincible Guard were pushed back
wards down the slope. It was then
the army seized with despair, shrieked
out—"the Guard recoils!" and turn
ed and fled in dismay. see the
Guard in confusion was a sight that
they had never seen before, and it
froze every heart with terror.
For along time they stood and let
the cannon balls pass through their
ranks disdaining to turn their backs
on the foe. Michel at the head of his
battallions fought like a lion.
every demand of the enemy to surren
der, he replied, "The Guard dies but
never surrenders." And as with his
last breath he bequeathed this motto
to the Guard he fell a glorious witness
to its truth. Death traversed those
eight battallions with such rapid foot
steps that they soon dwindled and died
away to two,"which turned in hopeless
daring on the overwhelming number
that pressed their retiring footsteps.
Last of all but a single battalion,
the debris of the column of granite at
Marengo was left. Into this Napoleon
flung himself. "Carabrome its brave
commander saw with terror the Em-good
peror in its frail keeping. lie was not
struggling for victory, he was intent
on snowing how the guard dio. Ap
proaching the elttperor, he cried out,
"Retire you see that death has
no need of you and closing mourn
fully yet sternly round the expiring
eagles, those brave hearts bade Na
poleon an eternal adieu, and flinging
themselves on the enemy were piled
with the dead at their feet.
Many of the officers were seen to
destroy themselves rather than suffer
defeat. Thus greater even in its own
defeat than any other corps of men invessels,
gaining a victory, the Old Guard
passed from the stage and the curtain
dropped upon its strange career. It
had fought its last battle.
E A E A N EXECUTION
O W A E
Translated from Diario do la Maries, Sept.
2*th.
By the steamer Osceola, which ar
rived yesterday at Batabona from
Truxillo, we have received letters that
gives us an account of the tragical
of the great fillibustcr. W in
sert them below and it is highly sat
isfactory to note the Christian death
of the celebrated fillibustcr. It is a
great pity that a man capable of such
sentiments should have led a life du
ring which he caused so many disas
ters to humanity.
It is not less satisfactory to us to
see how mercifully disposed the Audown
thorities of Honduras were to
theap-e
gratuitous disturbers of the peace of
the country. The gift of life con^d-
ed to the second in command \$
elequent demonstration Oi t'
without the beating of a drum or «t „.
.i O daily insult these countries—for
bugle note to cheer° their sturdy covt
age, they moved in dead £:.lcn'"e
a
0
ble
spirit which prevailed t^ere" as is al
the humane r^d generous treat
ment shown ho officers and sol
a he expedition. The writers
which they cannot find epithets suffi
ciently hard-may here learn all that
there is respectable and honorable in
the sentiments of which tho authori
ties of Honduras have just given
proof
Here aro the Fetters:
TRUXILLO, Sept 18, l860.^-The
who with two hundred men pursued
them in connection with the steamer
Icarus. I ant about to narrate to
you, Circumstantially, the: particulars
of the entrance and execution of their
chieftain.
On the 5th inst,. aj thd moment
that General Gody with the auxiliary
troops of Guatemala, set sail with'two
vessels to join Gen. Alvarez, the
schooner Correo came to anchor in
the fort, bringing back the expedition
of Gen. Alvarez himself. The Icarus
remained behind from-motives ot con
venience, but she also came to anchor
during the night.
The next day, at four orciock in
after noon, three great launches (the
very, ones useel by the invaders,) Werje.
alongside of the steamer to
receive the prisoners, who came ashore
under guard of the marines ot the Ica
«fit- ."..V- .,
Upon disembarking, the marines
maixihcd first, the Hondiman troops
I '.
came next, marching in hollow square
with the prisoners in the centre.
With the exceptions of a fillibusters,
all the party looked like corpses, and
some ot them were apparently in the
last agonies. With their sad and lan
guid looks, they appeared to curse the
who had brought them to such
dire extremities.
The march at the entrance was slow
and solemn. Walker, at the head of
his people marched at the tap of therespond
drum, and was the observed of all ob
servers.
As soon as Walker entered the
prison he was heavily ironed, and ask
ed if he wanted anything. only
asked for water. then sent for
the Chaplain of this port, and protest
ing his faith as a Roman Catholic, he
was seen thereafter almost constantly
kneeling at the feet of the priest in
front or a small altar, on which, by the
dim light of the tapers, the image of
Jesus was distinguished. Among
other things he once said to the Capt.,
"I am resigned to die my political ca
reer is concluded."
On the 11th inst., at 1 o'clock p. M.
Walker was notified of his sentence of
death and to this startling message
the only reply he made was' to a6k at
what hour it would bo excuted, and
whether he had time to write.
On the 12th, at 8 o'clock, A. M.,the
culprit marched to the place of execu
tion. walked with the crucifix in
his hand, upon which he bent all hisin
regards, loolciug neither to the right
While on board the Icarus, I had a
conversation with Walker, who hand
me the original correspondence
which had passed between himself
and the British commander, which he
said he would like to have published
He also requested mo to write out.
hillOii4.
his dictation, a brief protest *rrai'
lCer
1
dc- oza
nor to the left, but listening piously toitlon on the Mississippi river.
the psalms which the priest recited in
his ear. He entered the hollow square
formed by the soldiery in the place of
execution, and there full ef resignation,
he pronounced the following words:
I am a Roman Catholic. The war
which I make upon Honduras, in ac
cordance with the sugestions of some
Ruatanocs, was unjust. Those who
accompanied mo are not to blame. I
alone am guilty. I ask pardon of the
people. I receive death with resigna
tion—weuld that it may be for the
of society.
Walker died with remarkable forti
tude. His remains were received in
to a tomb, and rest in peace for a per
petual example.
One day after the execution of
Walker, the American schooner John
E. Taylor with reinforcements and
arms for tho fillibusters anchored in
the port but she soon afterwards dis
appeared, having recognized the for
ces of the republican power. The im
mediate arrival of an American mail'
of-war steamer is announced, and it is
considered very probable that other
with reinforcements for the
unhappy expedition, will arrive, as the will include the records of our o-rcat
promoters thereof in the United States
are ignorant of the fate of Walker.
WALKER'S LAST 1IOUR-II1 S O
TEST
A correspondent of the Ne York
Herald, writing from Truxillo, gives
some details of an interview with
Walker after his capture. Ho says:
tst
his surrender to Honduras fi'n^,oritifes
His dictation was calm HV^ ac'iit,crate
giving me ample op- ortunity to write
every Wq-.aoefbre pronouncing
th next I was thus engaged,
ofl
approached and informed
'.ue that I could receive no communi
cation for publication from the prison*
ers. This seemed to trouble Walker*
who then asked me to look over the
papers and note them well: The offi
ce thereupon reported to the captain,
who promptly came rip and teld mc toThat
take whatever papers I pleased from
the prisoner, fo publication or other
wise. I accordingly acrid1 yon the
rf
Tho following is tho protest refer
red to:
PROTEST OF E N WALKER.—-I
ilized
to the
ptain of her Majesty's steamer lea-
a
Majesty.
rus'thatofficer^ressly: received m)rj.wc' _of. them of gre'^t ^rilnhncy,
sword and-pistol, as well as the arms
of Col Rudler, and the surrender was
expressly and in so many words to
him, as the representative of her Brit
On board the steamer- Icarus, Sept.
5, i860,
Benjamin. Wo^.irt'tlioTHird/Distiacr
in the piatee oT'^rampt6n| declined} 1
Jas.'t£e'rrlgan7 Fourth IMstncty" Sur
Elijah WardV Seventh District Tamv
themany
Hall ratified Wood's nominan
tion.
Now is the time to. fill y6ur cellars'
with .potatoes ajcul all soVts ofobtin**n
and vegetable's. Leave the wind,OW«
4p£u until it IA cold enough to IVOOM
the grohnd—then bank up, leaving a
small aperture forvent'datLou. --..:'..,
WHOLE NtJMBEJt 220.
tflliS'PIJTIJRE SKAT O O W E
A N POPULATION
From tho New York World.
Senator Seward has said in his
recent speech at St. Paul
The power of this government herd
after is not to be established cither| Prince on the Throne all the time, ex
on tho Atlantic or the Pacific coast,
The seaports will be the mouths by
which we shall communicate and cor
with Europe but the power
that shall speak and shall eommmu
nicate and express the'will of the men
on this continent, is to bel ocated in the
Mississippi Valley, and at the sources
of the. Mississippi and the St. Law
rence. [Loud applause.] In other
days, studying what might perhaps, to
seem others, trifling and visionary, I
have cast about for the future, the
ultimate central seat for the North
American people. 1 had looked at
Quebec and Ne Orleans at Was
ingtou and San Francisco, at Cincin
nati and at St. Louis, and it had been
the result of my best conjecture, that
the seat of power of North America
would yet be found in the Valley of
Mexico, that the glories of the Aztec
capital would be renewed, and that
city would become ultimately the cap
ital of the United States of America.
But I have corrected that view, and I
now believe that the ultimate, last
found seat of power on this great con
tinent will be found somewhere with
a radius not very far from the spot
where I stand, at the head of naviga
In nearly all the speeches made in
the course of his western journey, Mr.
Seward has given utterance to state
ments like the above, exhibiting a
wider reach of view than is common to
many men now in public life, and, soa
far as they are just, .most distinctly
marking the difference between a states
man and the common herd of politi
cians. Tho prediction with which he
flattered the pride and the hope of
the people of Minnesota, is a remark
able one, made enpasgant, and without
demonstration, but doubtless the re
sult of a careful study of the move
ments of population, industrial power
and trade upon the American conti
nent
A few facts and obvious inferences
•rom them will show the probability of
Mr. Seward's prediction. The cen
tre ofpopulation, as well as industrial
power in North America, moves to
ward the Pacific from year to year in
.obedience to laws above human con
trol and in aline of direction which it isdignation
not possible for political influence or
or sectional seal, iu the long run, to
deflect. The coming census, which
jrowth during the last decade, ha?
Unsuspected revelations in its leaves.
But they were visible prophecies in
the census ot ten years ago. That
document showed that, including
the United States proper, tho
Canadas and contiguous provinces.,
the present centre of our pop
ulation, white aud black, is a little
west pf Pittsburgh, an£ the center of
industrial and productive power a lit
tle further to the east and north. Com
pare this fact rrith their position be
fore the ^riatwav of emigration had
s^ept. over the West and left it popn-
The comparison proves that the
movement ot'both these centres is to
the westward and to the north of west,
and the census of i860 will abundant
ly verify it. In five or six more de
cades those centres will have touched
or passed Chicago. Aft area of a great
circle drawn through Pittusburg and
Chicago, then, is the line from which
this centre of population and power
will not greatly depart. Projected
westward it falls not far from the point
indicated by Senator Seward as thethe
ultimate seat of power in America.^—
it cannot pass far beyond that
point' is clear, from the configuration
of the Country—The-'' narrowness of
the Pacific coast States—the position
original letters of Capt. Salmon to! ot the great American desert, and. of
Walker, the reply of I Walker fn -his
own hand, and the ^protest," which I
wrote out at his dictation. •...
the Missouri river, and the remarkable
westward •.deflection of the, Rocky
mountain range in Nebraska,
frSrThefe arc now more spots
on the sun than have been seen be
fore in .many: years..- Spmc- of these,
are visible through a smokeA. glass
to tho naked. ey£. Several stars,
winch from their ascertained distance,
must "have Ijoen as Targe as our sun,
have fotauy disappeared from 6nf sky
and the question has been raised by
astronomers^ whether the light and
W I A* W A E H»»*to thersfitt are .gradually fading
away. A tins.,would be acpotn paniod
by.the destruction, .of .all Uie. plants
and animals on the earth, it is rather
an ".Interesting question." 'The "Sun's
The Market Hall, City,
Congressional Convention nominated tight and boat ard rHtfiiriishefHijr the
i*„..:„.„:^ W I I I I ™^_•- -4~darksfKrts at-the-present-time aHeut
"frer'eerVfc E"» ^aa^
Ilox. HEUSCTHEL T. JoH'Nwrauad-i.the
dressW the Democracy of Cincinnati,
YnttheWiftsrifift, itt SixjthMreetjmark
et space. "Ate advocated:.jhe. prince
p»e^f«onMt^ejenj^pi^
!aflk
0
«4 8SP
Hejmbli
JJBJ!
It A I N O AD\'ERT1K1NC
do
do s«n lines
Onccoltimn per year,
•Jo .. .six inonChif ~.**»
Half column ]cr year*-."
do six mouths
Fourth colfiniti per year
do six months.
10,00
•w,os
140,00
40,09
9*900
tbM
16,00
rf.
Eachsquare( 10!ine*,or lcss)flrst insertion
EtichBubiscqiieiitinsertion*..*•••• fit
Legal Notices, per xq..(firit insertion) *9
each subsequent 44
Al u:1vertic»]iic]iUcontinntctiKti.orderedo
•AdvcrtisementtsetlndonDlcc*Icmn-,KPr-*
tdditioual.
fST Ad vcrtiecrocnts rllbc changed erfto
ait desired, by paying 25 cents a square t*
ffompositloft.
1 W ASTERS every where. are onr aathorfctfol
Ajrentn. No paper mailed till the subscription
pirce LH remitted..
E E A O NATIONS.
It is astonishing how many nations
seem at this moment absolutely expir
ing. There is the Kingdom of jfk
pies*, which lias existed as separate
and independent nation for a hundred
and fifty years, and with a Bourbon
cept during the few years of the pow
er of Napoleon I. This nation, the
seat for ages of all that is luxurious
and most voluptuous, now seems not
merely changing its dynasty or alter
ing its boundaries, but merging its na
tional existence into that of Sardinia.
Tuscany has already gone, and--the
Roman States of the Church, so far as
their civil power is concerned, threat
en to follow as rapidly as-possible, aud
it is doubtful how long Austria can sur
vive. Thus much for Europe.
In Asia, the descendant of Mjthom
met, against whom all Christendom has
contended vainly for ages, is now rap
idly giving away under the encroach
ments of old age. Steam, rather than
gunpowder, is the death of this em
pire, which for ages was the dread of
Europe. Even as lately as within
twenty years, when Miller, the half
crazy interpreter of prophecy, was pre
dicting the downfall of this power iu
i843, it seemed, of all things he said,
the most incredible, that it should bo
so near its dissolution. It seemed
most incredible to ordinary minds, and
yet about that very time, Nicholas tho
Emperor of Russia, actually visited tin*
Courts of France and England and
proposed its dismemberment, Euro
pean powers could not agree about
the spoil, aud so it has stood until now,
that the madness of a few fanatical
Druses has brought Christian nations
to a pretty unanimous feeling, that it is
nuisance which ought to be abated
and without delay.
A very singular thing it is* however,
that our nation has.had: the first and
greatest provocation of any, a cause of
complaint not yet settled, in the mur
der of an American family at Jaffa, for
which no satisfactory atonement has
yet been made indeed, the paltry sum
of two hundred dollars, and the impris
onment of four of the perpetrators for
a short time was all that was offered.
The sum we believe, has been increas
ed to two thousand four hundred dol
lars, but none of the perpetrators of
the outrage have been brought to pun
ishment. W might have sent a fleet
and bombarded half a dozen towns,
but'-negotiation- has been preferred.—
Other offeuces have awakened the in
of the world. Turkey is
about to die, through an inevitable ne
cessity, but we are not going to be tho
executioner.
On the opposite side of the Asiatic
continent whole kingdoms would haro
passcd away, year by year, in India,
and now China is crumbling into ruin
the oldest nation upon earth lying to
give place to anarehy and foreign con
quest, and dismembermhent and con
tusion of all kinds. Nothing see'mtiin
ly can stop this and it is only tho ques
tion whether the rebels or the foreign
troops shall first attack the Imperial
City -and the reigning dynasty.
In all these cases France, or France
and England, seem to be the agent of
this destruction of national life," tho
most wholesale, sweepiug and pro
ductive of great historical changes that
the world has seen since the breaking
up of the Roman Empire. France,
however, is but the occasion inward
decay is the cause. A high wind may
blow down a bushel of worm-eaten ap
ples but it is the worm, and'. not tho
wind, that really did the business. ,S«
it is witli: nations. The eagles gather
because it is a carcass and the Emper
or's eye is keen upon every weak spot
on the map of the world, and he scents
prey atar off, and is sure to be in.
time to take his share, '.
But in all eases the outward dissolu
tion is preceded .by an inward decay,
somo great moral rottenness, that lias
iTestroyed the vitality ST the natfonaP
spiHt. AVHeYr a "na«on dies, it is gen
erally because some new spirit, najr be
gun, to work, and old formst die to
make room for new ana better ones
The bottles are old and the wine is
new. Thus it is that religious liberty
has destroyed Turkey, thus that Chris
tianity is de'stoying China, and thus
that the march ot. Rberty is destroying.
Naples, and Rome, and.'Austria,
The murderer ot the two persona
whose bodies were found on mountain
road, between Fayettville, Arkansas,
and Vau Buren on the 2 lilt/, was
brought to FayeUviHe. Atargccrowd
I/incoir£s election"
dissolution of ftt6 to wiw^ojhifeitioti, pecuniary as well as in -ilie
replied emplmtWSflfj'nft. m*Tne& beneficial effects upon agriculture,
tng wiW vclf large arid clitlMunnstic.
f-
collected ahd "insisted hanging htm
at once,'-ftut repeated efforts of
some of the wos influential, citjzeps,
qro\y.d was finally pj-c^ilpd ripen
to allow tus cantor* to take hrmTo»ck
id the comity in ^liicKUio^ Was
committed. Hel was fmobalny 4wnfc
next day., llisiwjfr is, ia: custoiry
as an a
vyf()
.,
The clear profits of 4lte Fair .at S
TheJScrnl
jYnlmaf:iclure 'alKUfutf'fit*afT*/oO
I izmtkeie :-.j-^sag a iSi ftgssttsM aid ^f.itoM «A

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