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Red Wing sentinel. [volume] (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, October 24, 1860, Image 1

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PltOSFECTVS.
THE SENTINEL
W. IV. E S Editor.
PUBLISHED KVEKY WEDNESDAY,
DT
A I N A I N N I S
AT
E W I N MINNKSOTA
A* Independent Democratic Journal
DEVOTED
TO THE INTERESTS AND RIGHTS OF
THE MASSES.
,s a Political Journal it will try all raeas
and men by the standard of Democratic
jrlnoiplea. and will submit to no test btit
h*t of Democratic truth.
tfdXTESTS:
9ho S*i%tin*l will contain Congressional and
Lagiatntivc—Pdrciffh and Domestic—Uivcr
»nvl Commercial New*—Literary Mut
ter— t'ales —Biographical—Historical*
Sketches, it*., A &c. &o.
TERMS OF .SUBSCRIPTION:
(Strictly la Advaase.)
*ne Copy, 1 year $ 2 0*
Six Copies, 1 year 10 00
Teu 15 00
\9T Subscriptions to Clubs must all com
tnonee at the same time, and bo strictly in
advance.
AGENTS.—Postmasters everywhere arc au
thorized Agen'.s for this paper.
IN ALL ITS VARIOUS BRANCHES,
«ntad in a anperior manner, and on the
shortcut notice.
BLANKS—Warranty, Quit-Claim ,Spccia
Warranty, Mort*aro Deeds, and Township
Plata constantly on hand and for sale at this
ftfloe.
BUSINESS CARDS.
r. wiLDia. w. c. wifctisTOJt
W I E A W I I S O
Attorneys at Law*
BED WING, MINNESOTA.
Will attend to the duties of thoir profession in
•ay of the Courts of this State.
W WILLISTON
Notary Public And Agent for tho fol
lowing reliable
Fire Insurance Companies:
MB«CHA»T9, Hartford, Conn
CITT Ffiti, Hartford, Conn.
WILLIAM COLVILL, Jr.
Al fORNXY A COUNSELLOR AT LAW
AND
E N E A A N A E N
E \%ING, MINNESOTA
jJRISTOL & PHELPS,
Attorneys at Law*
RBD WING, MINNESOTA
Sly
S A N O
P.
Attorney at Law
N O A I
And Land and Insurance Agent
RED WING MINNESOTA.
fJANS MATTSON,
Attorney at Law,
AND JUSTICE OF TUB PEACH,
Red Wing, Minnesota.
Particular attention paid to Conveyancing
and Collecting. lW-y
£J G. REYNOLDS,
Red Wing, Minn.
•Office with Smith, Towne & Co. 82-
U9BAGB WILDER ELIT. WILD1EB
W I E
Bankers & Land Agents
WIN©, Minnesota Tor.
one* leaned. Exchange A Land Warrants
Fought and sold. Land Warrants, or Money
,aaned to pre-emptors, on long or short time,
and on favorable terms.
Lands bought and sold onoom mission Ac.
Red Wing,May, 1857.
TOWNE PIERCE,
DEALERS IN
RBAL ESTATE.
W I N I N N E S O A
Wil attend to locating Land Warrants, pay
ment of taxes, collection of notes, and to tho pur
aase and sale of Real Estate throughout the
Territory: Surveying, Mapping,and Platting
of every kind done te order by a practical *ur
tyer. Copies of township maps h-.rnished.—
Peidsdrawn and acknowledgements taken.
jgjr*Atl business intrusted to them, will re
eive prompt attention!
'.o.riKBca
A I O N S N O W O S
Hawkins & Co.,
WOtJLr
take this method of inform in
thei friends and the public generally
hat they are now prepared to do
I A 1
1 53 I a 53 (a
Of allkinds, such as House,Sign,Carriage,
artain and Ornamental Painting, Graining,
glasfng, Marbling and Papor Hanging.
|3F"p*««al attention paid to all erdcrsfrom
the country. »2tf.
Red Wing, July 17 1857.
1 8 I O E S A E
IV. A A S
Saddle and Harness Maker,
(Nett door to Lawthcr's Brick Block,)
lUshSTBBXT, Ran Wrao.
o-
,t«Harnesses,pSaddles,
WUl kee constantly on hand tho very best
Bridles, Martingales, Fly
ReJs.'Wnips, Cards, Combs and Brashes, and
everything in the Harness line necessary to rig
aw« a Horse or Team. All kind of work made
order, and
REPAIRING
of all kinds done in a most superior manner
and at the shortest notice.
Leather and Saddlery Hardware at Whole
ale and retail. Country Shops will bo sup
Bed at the lowest prices. 192ma
REMOVAL
REMOVAL! REMOVAL
E O A
O W N & E E
have removed their stock «f
J» their Brick Store on Main Street, heretofore
occupied by 8- B. Foot.
Ned Wing*June IS.,
VOLUME 5, NUMBER 13.
HOTELS.
E O O I A N O E
LevCoHrcet,immediately opposite the Stvnin
boat Landing, Red Wing, Minnesota,
A. A & L. TEELE, PROPRIETORS
THI.SnowE,.
new spacious and commodious house
is open for the reception of guests.—
It has been constructed under the immediate
supcrtisionof the proprietors,and nothing has
been omitted to insure the comfort and conven
ience of tho.»c who may favor them with their
fmtronnge. The numerous rooms are all well
ighted, ventilated and furnished in asnpcrior
manner. In connection with ths house is a
good and commodious stable
Red Wing,March 1.185S. 8Stf
E W I N O E
JACOB BENNETT, Proprietor,
E WING MINNESOTA
J^Connected with the ITonsc 1* a large and
convenient Stable. Stages leave daily for the
interior. Teams and Carriages on hand to
eonvey Passengers to any part of the country.
April 24.1S58. 90-tf
I I I S O N O S E
CORXEB OF BBOAD ASB TUIBD 8TBEETS
A. MILLER, Proprietor.
THIoSf
new Hotel is now open for the reception
the traveling public, where they will
find tho best of accommodations. There is a
go»d stablo attached. Passengers and Bng
gairo conveyed to and from the Boats free of
charge. Wl-ly
A O S E
MRS. MARY FLING, Proprietress.
This popular House is now open for the re
ception of boarders.
Board by the day or week famished on tho
most reasonable terms
January 7,1860. 170—tf.
O O E O S E
L. F. HENDRICKSON, Proprietor.
This new and commodions House is situated
on Plum street, Red Wing. It has been built
and furnished under the spocial supervision of
the proprietor, all the rooms are well lighted
ventilated and furnished, and all persons wish
ing to get the worth of their money are res
pectfully invited to give him a call, and no
puins will be spared to mako comfortable all
those who may favor him with their patronage.
In connection with the House is a good stable,
and well of water. Ostler always in attendance.
January 2nd, IS50. 17Jtf.
A S U. CONNELLY, M. D.
PHYSICIAN Sc SURGEON,
BED WIXO, MINNESOTA.
Office on Main street, over Brown & Betch
er's Hardware Storo. 203 tf
1850. E WIN 1850.
S E A A N I N 9 I 1
—AMD—
SASH, BOOR AN BLIND FACTORY
(One Bloek above Freeborn's Saw Mill.)
WE
SHALL BE PREPARED TO FUR
nish at all times, anything in the above
line of business, and shall keep on hand all
kinds of planed and matched Lumber, Mould
ings, etc.
Orders promptly attended to, which may al
so be left with Brown & Botcher.
Produce of all kinds taken in exchange for
work. COGEL & BETCHER.
Bed Wing, April 19.1859. 142-ly
II. BRAND,
Drnggtsv and Pharmaceutist
Main Street, Red Wing, Minnesota
Wholesalo and Retail Dealer in
Drugs, Medicines, Paints, Oils, Glass.Extract
Oums, barks, Roots, Herbs, Patent Medicines,
Perfumes, Brushes. Dyes, Varnishes, Cam
phenc. Fluid, Brandies, Wines, Tobacco, Snuff
and Cigars.
ALSO
Sir JAMES CLARK'S CELEBRATED FE
MALE PILLS.
All of which will be sold for cash at a very
small advance from eastern prices. 193m6
O N A E S I N
W A A E S
AND
E A E S I N
E A I E S
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry,
Red Wing, Minnesota.
ALL WORK WABRANTED..£3
Aug. 13,1859. 158-tf
A I A N S
A E N
A E S
OF ALL KINDS.
FAIRBANKS & GREENLEAF,
33 a street, Chicago
E N I S O N
Rectifiet and Wholesale dealer!
•ja.o«evtloAxa.cl.:S*ox
WINES 4* LIQUORS,
RED
Corner ITnmaad Third Sts., 97 tf
WIwG, MINNESOTA
A I 8 W A I W
SURGEON AND MECHANICAL
DENTIST.
ms over he a to Mai at
W in 70m
'T» II O A S S I
FASHIONABLE TAILOR!
Next door to Smith, Meigs & Co.'s Bank
Ri'D WING MINNESOTA.
mbc 17, 859. 178-ly
E. L. HOWARD'S
Blacksmith Shop,
COBNEB OF MAIM BROAD WAT.
Is where you ca.. set work- done cheaper than
at any other shop in Red Win*. Particular
attention iriwntoHOKSE SHOEING.
May 5i 59. U6-A
EVEN UNT O E A
Over the seaside town,
With the roofs go old and gr»}'i
Over the hills so bare and brown,
Sihketh the light away—
Fadeth theflushfrom the cloud Where last
tested the lip of Day.
The sea hath a sorrowingsound
In its restless voice to-night—
And the mist its wreathing its white arms
around
Where the beach gleamed still and
white—
Reaehing up to the darkening hills,
To be saved from the sea to-night.
Saved from the icy grasp
Ofthe waves that mutter and crawl,
From the cold blue hands, all dripping,
that clasp,
The shivering sands like a pall—
Weaving a shroud of a misty cloud
Thatfloatsas they rise and fall.
Filled with a stony glare
Are the eyes that gaze from the shore
Peering through mist and the darkness
there,
While the waters clash and roar—
White are the lips that shuddering moan,
"He will come, ah! never more."
Over the seaside town
With its roofs so old and gray
Over the hills all bare and brown,
Cometh the rosy Day
Braiding with gold white threads of the
mist
Flinging them down on the spray,
Crowned with the beauty of morn,
Break the waves on the of radiant
shore.—
On theircrests a wild glory newly born,
As they bow to the powerthey adore,
Staining the beach with kisses of fire—
Glorified, wave-trodden floor
Staining the sunlighted beach
With kisses caught from the sky,
But the morning lips ofthe waves fahall
reach
To Surer lips as they fly
Brighter the tresses that dip in the surf
Than the glow on the sands where
they lie!
—There's a sound of hurrying feet—
There are sobs by the wild sea shore
There are anguished shrieks' which the
waves repeat
But still, through their sullen roar,
Comes the sad refrain from the echoing
main
"He will come, ah, never, more."
E A S O A MANIAC
About a year since, a gentleman in
the interior of Wisconsin became in
sane and was sent to the lunatic asy
lum at Madison in that State. He was
a physician by profession and was a
gentleman of superior cultivation and
of remarkably prepossessing appear
ance. He was about thirty years old.
Some six weeks ago he escaped from
the asylum, and went to Chicago.
There he encountered an old friend,
who loaned him quite a snm of money
having no suspicions of his insanity.
With this money he supplied hirase'lt
with new and elegant clothing, and
started fot Laporte, Indiana a thrifty
village^ on the line oi the Michigan
Southern railroad. He remained there
long enough to win the affections of a
wealthy, young widow, and was mar
ried to her. During the brief court
ship he exhibited no indications of
lunacy, but shortly after his marriage,
he commenced conducting himself in
a maner which startled and shocked
his wife and her friends.
Among other mad fancies he be
lieved he was a sheep, and insisted
upon crawling round on his hands and
feet bleating in the most absurd man
ner. He would then fancy himself a
rattlesnake and make frantic attempts
to bite the members of his household.
The unhappy lady, at length worn out
with watching him and endeavoring
to restore his reason made preparations
to send him to the Asylum at Indian
apolis, Indiana. But as is frequently
the case insanity had sharpened his
wits and he adroitly escaped. We
next hear of him in Syracuse, N. Y.
where he actually purchased a block
of buildings, the necessary papers wore
made out and he was to call the next
day with the money. He was to pay
an outrageous sum for the property,
and it is aaid the parties with whom
he made the bargain, chuckled vastly,
over the propitious winds which had
blown them so. profitable anid fresh a
subject. But they saw no more of
him. The lunatic started westward.
At Buffalo he bargained for an im
mense amount ot corn, to be delivered
in New York, and then proceeded to
Cleveland. He arrived here last week
and endeavored to negotiate for some
real estate on Kinsman street, but he
talked so absurdly that the parties
with whom he had interviews refused
to treat with him.
Meanwhile his friends, and particu
larly his wife in Wisconsiu (tor he has
a wife and two children in that Stale) look of infinite wisdom.
TH
E RE WIN SENTINEL
KED WING, GOODHUE COUNTY. MINN., WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 24. 1860.
were making every effort to ascertain
his whereabouts. They traced hitn to
Syracuse and from there-to tins city.
His brother arrived here on Saturday
morning last but found that the lunatic
had left on the previous evening's
train for the West, he followed
oh Saturday morning. At Toledo
he learned that he had gone West
West on the Michigan Southern train,
and he perseveringly continued the
chase. At Adrian he found and cap
tured him and took him home.
When not in his rabid fits few would
discover the unfortunate man's true
condition. He would make very ab
surd propositions and offer exhorbit
ant sums of money for property that
bit his fancy, but he would do so in so
candid and captivating a manner, as
to in most cases disarm suspicion.—
Cleveland Flaindealer.
DESPOT'S REASONS.
The follow is an extract from Judge
Douglas' speech at Cleveland.
But these Republicans tell you that
slavery is wrong, that it is a great
crime, even more ruinous to the white
man than the negro, and that it should
be put down, everywhere, and at
allSouthward
hazards. My answer to that propo
sition is simply this, that in every
free country the people must be per
mitted to determine for themselves
what institutions arc right and what
are wrong. The right to decide
whether a law is wise or
unwise,vent
whether an institution is just or un
just is a fundamental principle of sclf
evernoient tho world over. The
tyrants and enemies of free govern
ment always resort to this same argu
ment that you must not allow the peo
ple to decide for themselves for fear
that they will make bad laws—(Laugh
ter and applause.) Ask the Emperor
of Austria why he docs not allow his
German subjects to have a voice in
making the laws under which they
live and he will tell you that
he would be glad to do so but for
the fact that the people will ruin them
selves by bad laws if he only gave
them the chance. (Laughter and ap
plause.) Go down into Naples, and
if you can find him, inquire of that fu
gitive Bourbon why he did not per
mit his people to have a voice in the
making of their laws and he will give
vou the same answer. Then pass over
into old England, the country that
boasts of its freedom, and inquire of
its aristocracy why they deprived Ire
land of her separate parliament and
deprived her of the right of self-gov
ernment at home, and the auswer will
be that the Irish would have ruined
themselves by bad laws if they had
the chance given them. From there
oome to America and inquire of Mr.
Seward and Mr. Lincoln, and Father
Giddins, and other leaders of the Re
publican party, why they do not allow
the people of the American Territories
to decide the slavery question for them
selves, and they will tell you that they
would surely ruin themselves by adopt
ing slavery. Applause and laughter.)
It is plain that whenever you interfere
with the great right of every people
to decide for themselves what laws
and institutions are best apapted to
their happiness, you strike down the
fundamental principle of self govern
ment itself. ("True.")
A
TKNXESKE DEE PARK.—A
Nashville (Tcnn.) correspondent of the
Rochester Union & Advertiser dis
courses as follows:
We have visited two estates near
Nashville, both of which are worthy
of notice. The first is that of Gen.
Harding, a gentleman of large heridi
tary wealth, whose extensive lands are
situated five or six miles from this
city. I cannot now remember how
many acres he possesses his park alone
contains 800 acres. We here saw be
tween two hundred and three hundred
deer, which on our approach displayed
all their native attitudes and habits,
and scampered away, fleet and grace
ful also a herd of elk, between which
and us a magnificent buck of the same
species kept moving on guard, with
such evident impatience, and with
such an ominous tossing Of his long
pointed antlers, that we took another
direction as we were well convinced
that these, his natural weapons of war
fare, were long enough and sharp
enough to reach through and beyond
our carriage. His predecessor in the
patriarchial honors of the heard, we
were informed, showed himselfso com
bative and dangerous to visitors that
his horns were sawed off as a preean
tion of necessity but either taking this
mutilation to heart or being unable
any longer, to maintain his position
against his younger competitors by
force, the old fellow abdictcd his
throne and now passes his days in re
tirement. It was curious to notice
that while the deer proper all ran at
our approach, the female elks, of a
closely kindred species, considered
themselves safe while their male guard
ian kept a guard on line between them
and ii*'. In this Fame park wo came
upon a social gathering ot about thir
ty buffaloes, consisting of bulls, cows
and calves the juniors basking lazily
in the sun, and the patriarchs chewing
a
their cuds with great gravity and
E DOlJGLAS A E
TTT* vTifw« AWTire Axm r*w "ourcS PCW$fe
HI S VIEW S ON TH E LAN O
THE GOVERNMENT.
Judge Douglas had a most enthusi
astic reception at Dubuque. In the
opening of his speech, he referred to
the mission of the north-west, in the
Union, the land policy of the Govern
ment, &c. He said:
You have done me no more than
justice in assuming that my public life
has been chiefly devoted to promot
ing the interests of this great north
west and yet, in having that one
grand object in view I have never
lost sight of my obligations to the en
tire Union. I believe that it is theso,
mission of the north-west to save this
Union from the tierce and hostile fac
tions that rage between the extreme
North and South. Yes, sir, our pe
culiar location, our geographical po
sitions, enables us more than any oth
er portion of the country to bind this
glorious Union together. Bordering
upon the Mississippi and upon the
great Lakes with commerce floating
and Eastward, wc have an
equal interest in the North and South.
We can never consent to any arrange
ment that would deprive us of ourteresting
Eastern trade. Nor can we ever per
mit a toll gate to be established on
the Mississippi river, that would pre
our free navigation to the gulf
and upon tho ocean. I confess that I
feel a just pride in witnessing the
growth of this great north-western
country. I remember Iowa when
there was but a few scattering settle
ments on the west bank of the Missis-
sippi river.
I was personally acquainted with
nearly all the original settlers of this
Territory. I took a deep interest in
their welfare, and I had the honor to
write the bill that admitted Iowa as a
State into the Union. After the State
was admitted, you having failed at
the first Legislature to elect Senators,
the Democratic State Convention of
Iowa, did me the honor to ask me to
look after their interests until your
own Senators' should be elected. I
think I can appeal with entire safety
to the Senators, not only of Iowa but
of every northwestern State, to bear
testimony that I never have been faith
less to their interest. These remarks
are not confined to Iowa alone. I had
the honor of writing and introducing
the bill that admitted Wisconsin as a
State into the Union, and also the bills
that admitted Minnesota, California
and Oregon into the Union. I hadmiliated—never,
the honor to pen and advocate and car
ry through the Senate the bill that
organized the Territories of New
Mexico, Utah, Washington Kansas
and Nebraska. While organizing
those Territories my attention was es
pecially given to the land system—up
on which the interests and prosperity
of all our new Territories and new
States so much depends. I early dis
covered that our land system was vic
ious and defective in one particular.
That portion of the system which of
fers the public lands at auction, and
places the speculator on an equality
with the actual settler, is unwise ana
unjust to the people of the new States
and Territories. In no State of this
Union are tho misfortunes and mis
chiefs of that system of speculation
more visible than upon these beautiful
praries of Iowa. I hnve often had
occasion to say in the Senate of the
United States^ and now repeat it to
you, that if Iliad my way, there never
would be anothe public land sale on
the American Continent, [Tremen
dous applause.] I would apply the
pre-emption system and the homestead
bill to all our public lands, and I
would allow the title to remain in the
Federal Government until some actual
settler would avail himself of the pre
emption and the Homestead bill.—
(Cries, "that's right," and ap
plause] I originated the idea of a
Homestead bill when a member of the
House of Representatives some sixteen
or seventeen years ago. I introduced
the bill into the House, and have re
newed it in the Senate from time to
time, up to the last session of Con
gress. I trust the day will come when
wc can correct the evils Of our land
system, by confining the occupation of
the lands to the actual settler, and ex
clude the speculator. [Applause.] I
would carry out that system not only
as a matter of justice to the settlers
of the States and Territories, but as
matter of public policyfiwthe govern
ment. The public lands ought never
to be made a source of public revenue.
So long as they have been' made so.
they have tended to' embarrass the
Government' rather than aid it The
land sales have been large Whenever
the country was prosperous, and they
have been nearly nothing when hard
times came upon us. In good times
there has been a superabundance of
foreign goods imported, and a Mir
plus in the treasury arising from that
superabundance. We then derived
10,15, 20 or 25 millions of dollars a
ycar'from the public lands, creating a
vast surplus in the treasury at the
very time when we did not want it
but the moment a pecuniary crisis
zm&
WHOLE NUMBER 221.
came, and you needed money, the
th
land
tem failed ydu—henc thes«
sys
vast
pub-
sums derived from the sales of the
lie lands, when we did not want rev
enue, has contributed in no small de
gre to that system of revulsions in
our finances, which caused this country
so much of suffering and oppression.
I have urged in the Senate over
and over again the indispensable ne
cessity of confining the public lands
to the actual settler, and allowing no
speculator to get possession except
for cultivaion. [Cries of "good," and
applause.] My policy always has
been to make every inhabitant of
the new States and Territories a land
holder, as far as it was possible to do
by our legislation. [A voice,
that's "right!"] After extending
these privileges to the settlers, my next
step was to confer on the settlers of
Territory all the right of self-govern
ment possessed by the people of thecult
States. [Applause.]
Will some good Republican point
to us a tingle act of Mr. Lincoln's in
favor of a Homestead bill either in
Congress or out of it
I I
E SYRIA N E I I O N
The Boston Traveller has a very in
letter from its Beirut corres
pondent, under date of August 30, by
which it appears thatFuad Pasha is
in earnest in his work of visiting pun
ishment on the murderous authors of
the Syrian masacrcs:
"The penalty in which he is making
these fiends in human form pay is in
deed terrible. The manner, of the
execution at Damascus, on the 20th of
August, of the Commander- in Chief
of the Bashi Bazoucks, with one bun
dred and nine of his officers and men,
added not only a bitter pang to the
sharpness of death for the orimn
themselves, but was a Bhock to the in
tolerant Damascene which must have
completely humbled them. The crim
nals were strangled, a manner of
death which is peculiarly terrible to
the Moslem, for they never strangle
and living creature. 'Beams were
thrown across from window to winble
dow in the narrow streets, and the
criminals were drawn up with a rope
around their necks, and were left by
the executioners to dangle and die in
their agony, without any of the usual
aids and appliances used in America
for the breaking of the neck, and con
sequently shortening of the death
agonies of the victim. Never was the
haughty city of the Moslems so hu
in the days of
thefavor
Crusaders, was the pride ot the Mos
lems brought so low.' And this was
not all. Three hundred
of.the
wealth-
PRACTICA JOKING.
A great many years ago, before the
introduction of steam navigation into
the waters of Long Island Sound, Capt
Thayer whose name will be remem
bered by many of our readers as one
of the pioneer captains in steamboat
travel, commanded a sloop in the wa
ters ofTaunton river. One morning
being at tho landing in Bcrkely, and
having occasion to cross to the other
side, he entered a barn or shed where
the boat's oars were kept with which
he was to cross.
While thcro a hen came cackling off
her nest, having laid an egg. Being
a practical joker it occurred to him to
to operate a little upon the superstit
ious fears of the inhabitants of that be
nighted town. Ho accordingly picked
up the warm egg, and wrote on its sus
ceptible shell with his pencil, "Woe to
the town of Bcrkly," and replacing the
egg, left the barn.
In due time the nest. was. cleared of
its eggs, and the one bearing the' in
scription discovered. The wonderful
news at once "telegraphed'* from house
to house through the town, and before
night, hundreds had journeyed to the
spot to seo it for themselves. Conster
nation was depicted on every counten
ance in view of the impending'calami
ty which they were certain the phe
nomenon denoted. It finally occurred
to them to ask counsel of their pastor
in this their hour of terror. Parson A.
was accordingly sent for, and arriving,
the cause ot alarm was made known to
him, baeked up by an exhibition of the
eg*.
The parson examined it attentively,
after which he laid it down, and for
many minutes seemed lost in reflection.
His parishoners thought they saw in
Business Cafidsofflvc1iRc«,1 year, S6.0O
^Ao^X ten lines do—•-•••'-•10,00
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this fresh cause for alarm, and one and
another would ejactulatc in hoarse
whispers, "The! Lord, wrote it! tho
Lord wrote it!" At length ttte old
man arose, as if to address them, and
stretched to his full hight, exclaimed.
"If the Lord wrote that, lie did riot
know how to spell Berkeley!" and bid
ding them good day, walked off.-
Their eyes Were opened, and they saw
in it at once the trick of some mische
vious wag, but it was not till some
time afterwards that they found out
the author, to whom they ever after
wards owed a grndge.-Newjiort News
CORRECT SPEAKING
We advise all young people to ac
quire in early life the habit of good
language, both in speaking and writing
and to abandon,- as early ag possible,
all use of slang words and phrases.—
The longer they, live, the more diffi
the acquisition of such language
will be and if the golden age of yoiuh,
the proper season for the acqusition of
language, be passed in its abuse, tho
unfortunate victim of neglected educa
tion is very probably doomed to talk
slang for life. Money is not necessary
to procure this education. Every mr.ii'
has it in his power. He has merely
to use the language which he reads,
instead of slang which he hears, to
form his taste from the best speakers
and poets of the country, to treasure
up choice phrases in his memory, arid
to habituate himself to their*use—
avoiding at the same time, that pedan
tic precission which shows rather tho
weakness of vain ambition than tho
polish of an educated mind.—Home
Journal.
J. "WRITE S O E LEDGER!»'
Bonner, of the Ledger, has captur
ed another celebrity. President Bu
chanan about to join the loug array of
its contributors. He promises to com
inence work a£ he "gets leisure,"
which he fears will riot be until after
tho 4th of March. And then he pro
poses to open with a biograpical sketch
of WILLIAM LOWNDES, of South Car
olina. This is not only enterprising
in Mr. Bonner, but graceful and senst
in the venerable President. "We
have no doubt his contributions will
have decided intrinsic interest, and
certainly the spectacle of a President
of the United States becoming a con
tributor to a newspaper is unusual
enough to attract attention'.
The following is his reply to Mr.
Bonner's request:
WASHINGTOX, Sept 8, i860.
DBAR SIB: I have received your
of the 3d inst, and shall most
cheerfully comply with your request
and furnish Vou a sketch of the life of
William Lowndes, as soon as possible.
iest, most haughty, and anstocratic ofH was one of our greatest, wisest and
the citizens, who had been adjudged
guilty of participation in the massacre,
were condemned to hard labor for life
in the galley at Constantinople. Hand
cuffed in gangs, and guarded by Turk
ish soldiers, they passed on their way
to their doom, their wives and their
relatives tearing their hair and ren
eing their garments in utter despair.—
It was a sight to move spmpathy, but
the remembrance of the six thousand
victims of their merciless fanaticism,
and three thousand women and girls
sold by them into slavery and worse
than slavery, is sufficient to quell the
risings of pity. The Travellers corrcs
pondent states that Syria is more tran
quil than it has been for many
months."
purest statesmen that have ever ad
orned our country, and yet his memory
has been sadly neglected. The truth
is that my public duties occupy my
whole time at present. I had hoped
I might enjoy some leisure after the
adjournment of Congress but in this I
have been dissappointed. If not be
fore, I hope to furnish you the sketch
soon after the 4th of March. Thi.*
trom me will be not ouly be a tribute
to justice but to gratitude.
Yours, very respectfully,
JAMES BUCHANAN.
ROREUT BONXEK, Esql
NOVEL METHOD OF WIXNIXG A
WIFK.-A young, beautiful and wealthy
lady, widow of a French officer who
lost his life at the assault of the Malak
off, has Chosen a second husband after
a somewhat eccentric fashion, arising
either from martial disposition, or tho
difficulty of a selection between no
less than ten sighing aspirants for her
hand. Madam invited tho
ten gentlemen to breakfast at her.
country villa, and, having thus united"
her suitors, informed them that sho
would unite herself to the one who
would hold iu his baud a watch for
her to fire at and break with a pistol
at twenty paces. Nine of the party
did not care to run the risk exacted
by this female Travis, but the tenth, a
young merchant, courageously deter
mined to iulfill the condition imposed.
Madam loaded her pistol forth
with, and went into the garden follow
ed by the company. The twenty
paces were measured, the mercantile
hero' pulled out his watch, gallantlv
refusing one riot much larger than a
franc offered by the lady,*and fearlessly
assumed his place. The Amazon
took deliberate aim, bang! went tho
pistol, and down went the watch,
pierced to the cap. The gentleman
unharmed by the adventure, has mar.
ried the rich widow and bought a
new time piece.
Qhe of those terrible casualties
which startle us from a dream of se
curity occurred iu Wood County a
tew days ago. Samuel Ililes Esq.,
was hunting, and seeing an object
through some brush, mistook it for a
deer, and with fatal aim tired—killing
a man instantly, the ball passing d£
rectly through his head W llttyo
riot been able to learn his name —h0'
was a German, and a young maiv of in
dustrious habits.—Stevens Pt. linery.-

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