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Red Wing sentinel. [volume] (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, January 02, 1861, Image 1

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THE SENTINEL
W. W. E S Editor.
PUBLISHED EVEKY WEDNESDAY,
A I N A I N N I S
AT
E W I N I N N E S O A
An Independent Democratic Journal
DEVOTED
TO THE INTERESTS AND lilGIITS 01'
THE MASSES.
At Political Journal it will try all tneaa
iirM and men by the standard oFDemocratjc
principle*, and will submit to no test but
lu»t of Democrat!* uth.
CONTENTS:
The Stntinel vr\\\ contain Congressional and
Legislative—Foreign and Domestic—Kiver
and Commercial News—Literary Mat
ter—ilea—Biographical—Jlistpncnl.
Sketches, & &o. *fcu.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
(Skrtttly in Adranee.)
One Copy, 1 year $ 2 00
Six Copies, 1 year 10 0-i
•fst 15 00
l^TSabseription to Clubs must all com
mease el the same time, and be strictly in
re a
A'JENTS.—Postmaster* everywhere are au
thorised Agent.* fur this papar.
W W I E I S O
Notary Public and Agent for the fol
lowing reliable
Fire Insurance Companies
ManeitAN i.?, Hartford, Conn
CITT Fin», Hartford, Conn.
WXEXIAI7I COILVILX,
A i'OISNET & COUNSELLO A LA W
A
GKNEBAL LAND AGENT,
RED WIN«, MINNESOTA
•j^UISTOL & PHELPS,
•Ittometjs at Isttw.
11KI) WING MINNESOT A
My
S A N O 1
4 J)
Attorney at La
N 0 A l\ VU L1C,
And Land and Insurance A^cnt
KED WING, MINNESOTA.
[JANS MATTSON,
Attorney at Law,
AND Jr/STICE Ol-' TIIK PEACE,
Bed Wing, Minnesota.
Particular attention paid to Conveyancing
ami Collecting. 107-y
Q^ G. JJK VNOLDS,
ATTORWa? AT LAW.
lied Wing, Minn.
fr#*OTiee wlthSnttth, Towno & Co. 82-
J.F. riNO.UKV, W. W. CliAUK.
PINGKEY & CLAUK,
Attorneys He Counselors :it Law,
JiEfi V,'LY( MLYN.
Odlee on Main Bt.over Bakor'a Hardware Store
HORACE wit.itKit a
I I U' W I I. I
Bankers & Land Agents
Kl WINti, Minnesota Tor.
onfly loaned. Exch.angQ A Baud Warrants1
•»ii lit. and s.)ld. Band Warrants, or MoneV
.•»»n«d to pre-emptors, on long or short time,
*ml on favorable terms.
%tT Bands bought an Isold onaoraralssion&o:
Med Wing. May. \%\1.
O W N A I E E
DEALER'S IN
REJAV,
YV
01 1 1
HI MP I jfltww •Bf!SW«ff^»»30»U»WBBWS3Sr»
IN ALL ITS VARIOUS BRANCHES,
leated in a superior manner, and on theinterior.
shortest notice.
A N S W a a Quit-Claim,Specia
Warranty, Mortgage Deeds, and Township
Plata constantly on hand and for sale at tlii
erne*.
BUSINESS CARDS.
WILDHH. O. WILI.ISTON
W I E & W1XL1STOX,
•attorneys at JLmv,
BBD WING, MKfNESOTA.
Will attend to the duties of their profession in most reasonable terms
of Ike Court* of this Slate.
ESTATE.
WING,
rVil ttttcti.l tolpoat
mant of taxes,colUic
*a^*1 *u«U
»oJtri'oi
tii'tr friend
lias ih«v uro
VOLUME 5, NUMBER 23.
HOTELS.
9 I E O O I A N O E I
Lovocstrootji'mmecliately opposite the Steam
boat Landing, ltcd Wing, Minnesota,
A. A. & E. L. TEELE PROPRIETORS
THISnow
new, spacious and commodious house
is open for the reception of guests.—
It has been constructed under the immediate
siipertisionof the proprietors.and nothing has
been Emitted to injure the comfort and convoiv
ionee of thobc whoma favor them with their
patronage. The numerous rooms are all well
lighted, ventilated and furnished in a superior
manner. In connection with the house a
good and commodious stable.
Rod Wing, March 1,185S. 8Stf
E MTKNtt HOVtiK.
JACO E N N E Proprietor,
E W I N I N N E S O A
p9 "€onhoctcd with the House ii a larije and
convenient Stable. Stagesleave daily for the
Teams and Carriages on hand to
eonvcy Passengersto any part of the country.
April 24.185S.
Drugs, Medicit
."•IINXr.SOT
1 W
ins arruuts.
tUiRofno£os,andtothopur
eluis^ ftrtd salo of Roal K*tato throughbnt tho
Tarritorys Surveying, Mapreng,aud Platting
ol'evflry kind done t»oi\ er W raetlcal Mir-
Copies Qftownship maps iurnishod.^—
De^d'drawn artel a rkno« ie Igom ir.ts taken.
I-.^~A11 bu.Viness tntrustod to thorn,willre
a
f. TOWNt, I E
ACTIO N S— O YV S.
Hawkins & Co.,
oi ir.!'
inotnoul of tnrormi
nil 1 tlu public i.'oncr iil
I SL ffanfina
Of altxindx, sireli ni flouso, Sign, Carriage.
•rtain and Ornamental Painting,Graining.
Chulng, Marbling and Paper Hanging.
9*p9ai»l attention paid to all crdorafrom
•h« oountry. j.tt'
Red Wlngt.tulr t7 J5Y.
*r
II E
II E A II E
v,
i, A S
Middle ami Harness Maker
Ijiif ^rriiKKr,
T\ .1 kco -•'f:i* rv .• ml
Flsrue»tr ... -., r.
IVt.«. V-* \ip&, I'.^rvU. Combs an
*?«r- liupr in tli« lis cuoa* :••-.
o«! llorw -..'.. At"
vory
inffftics, K.
Km*))*
neco&tai, rig
ot* A r. tuude
RKrAiiHNO
the H..ti...
A
i. s:~ v,
A
14\.
SURC&Ofl AND MECHANICAL
tffi^k ENTIST
HooiiKrtvr the tifn a stoftf. .Main
lied Wins. ..
oo- tf
CEii S O O S E
CORNER OF BROAD AN1 THIRD STREKTS
A. I E Proprietor.
FIITS now Hotel is now open for the reception
1 of the traveling public, where they will
find the best of accommodations. There is a
good stahlo attached. Passengers and Bag
jrajro conveyed to and from the Boats freo of
charge. 171-ly
A O S E
MRS. MAEY FLING, Proprietress.
This popular House is now open for the re
ception of boarders.
Board bv the day or wceli famished on the
January 7,1300. 179—tf.
A 4 0 I I 5 O S E
L. F. HENDKICKSON, Proprietor.
the pr
1^SJ&^^%^S^S^1!, i1,e
er's llardwaro Stor 203-tf
I 5 0
rieto: all the rooms are well li_
nfilated and furnished, and all persons wish-[instead of asking a simpl questio
January 2nd, 1S50. 17(Jt!
pTIAS. H. CONNELLY, M. !.,
is 59.
RED WING
A I N
S GAM
I
AND—
SASH, DOOR AN BLTND FACTORY
(One IiIo••• 1-r above Freeborn's &a:v Mill.)
W
E SHALL BE PREPARED TO FTJR
i\ish ut all times, anything ii\tkc above
line of business, and shall keep "ii hand all
kinds of planed and matched Lumber, Mouhl
'IHL'S, etc.
OrJors promptly attended to, which may al
BO bo loft with Drown & Botcher.
Produce of nil kind* taken in exchange for
ork. COGEL & BETCilER.
Rod Wing, April 10, 1859. 142-ly
H. BRAND,
IlriigHist mill PhnruBMccutist
Main Street,
Who
Red Wiiu?, Mlnfiesotu
md Retail Dealer in
Paints, Oils, Glass.Extract
Gums, Bark.-. Roots, Herbs, Patent Medicines,
Perfumes, Brushes, Dyes, Varnishes, Cam
phone. Fluid, Brandies, Wines, Tobacco, Snuff
and Clears.
AIS0
Sir JAMES CLARK'S CELEBRATED FE
MALE PILLS.
All of which -»v HI be sold for cash nr a very
small advance lrom ci.stein prices. l'JSmC.
O "N & E S 1
W A ii A E S
DEALERS IN
*%J.^
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry,
Bed Wing, Minnesota.
:-£TALL WORK W A A N E
Aug. 18, L539. 15lJ-tf
FAIRBANKS'
A I I
A E
O AL KI"1»S.
FAlRBANlig & GREENLEAF,
?c» I..ike street, Chicago*
RED
V.KV
vr
L. IIEXDRICKSON,
Rectifies and Wholeaaledoalerin
S until eight o'clock.
WINES $* LIQUORS,
Corner I'ium and Third Sts.. OTtf
W?:NU, MINNESOTA
0 A S J. I
ISIHOXrABL E TAILOR/
Jfext Smith, Meigs D:\r.
::'J: WING I N A
lr^\vs'ji Staudard Scales.
For Palo t-y
TIir-MASS. DICKRE
Tin Pli'c V,"urcl ut,
,No. 45 Wabash Avenue Chi
cago.
From Chamber's Momo Journal.
E E S E O
ON Till COAST OF NORMANDY.
Calmly fades the light of day—
Faintly sighs the breeze away—
Music steals from every bower
'Tis the lonely vesper hour.
Pilgrims sad, and hoary men,
Chant their beads twice o'er again—
Sunset's rays now dimly lower
O'er the pensive vesper hour.
Twilight mourns in silver gray
Daylight's last remaining ray,
Weeping gems—a pearly dower—
Pale and mystic vesper hour.
Fairies from their mossy glade,
Seeking vales now cast in shade,
Sprinkle o'er each closing flower,
Tears that cool tha vesper hour.
Spirit of the azure air
Veiled in hues so soft, and fair,
Weep for transient is thy power
As this balmy vesper hour.
Now, adieu the beauty dies,
And entombed with day it lies
Night now comes—gono is thy power
Sad and dreamy vesper hour.
I S S I S A E
This new and commodious House is situated I well looking young farmer reddened I shall not dare to tell her now
yei? ro?ts
'of
pains will he spared to make comfortable.' all Hawley, at leaf ill tho presence of
thosowhomay favor him with their patronaffe.iyoung ladies most of all in the pr.CS
Tn connection with the House is a irou.. stable, ,.*• ,lii _.-,i •-, -vj
and well ofwater. Ostler always attendance! ^*niceA g»W he loved. Ao young
rarmerin ill the country possessed a
better kept farm, or talked with
more confidence among his compeers
of stock and crops and on kindred
.subjects. Hut the glimpse of forae
pretty face or foot coming in his direc
tion, affected him like a flash of light
ning. On such occasions he never
knew what to do will his hands and
eyes, and always felt like screwing
himself into a knot hole. How he
ever contrived to approach Hester
S 3 I A & IT IXC E O N
KED WIXO, MINNESOTA.
OiTice on Main .strc^.
Jf
over Brown & Bctch-
Thomas, on the subject of his prefer
ence for her, probably remain* to thi
day as much mystery to himself as
it is to others.
But the young lady had quite an
amount of tact and cleverness stowed
away somewhere, in that pretty little
head, albeit it was set on the dimpled
inexperienced shoulders of seventeen.
Josiah Mas worth in a worldly
way much more than any of the rest of
her suitors good looking nod intelli
gent enough to satisfy any one but an
over fastidious person unexceptiona
ble in short, which was fruitful
source of merriment among the young
people in their circle. And so when
Josiah in his awkward blundering way
began to exhibit his preference for
her, in various iiltle ways, such as
waiting on her to and from singing
"Will you be at home to night, Ilet- from her being dressed with unusual
ty?" and tho speaker a tall, muscular care to spend an evening at home.
llis
hair'.
school, constituting himself her escort amazement and displeasure.
on horseback to the solitary church in
the woods and singling her or.t at
quilting parties, Hetty took it all in
the easiest coolest way possible. The
girls laughed and the young men crack
ed slyjokes at the expense of her tim
id suitor but Hetty stood up for himcan
very independently—encouraged him
out of his shyness, and very likely
helped him along considerably when
he reached "the culminating point,"
one moonlight even fug as fJUy Were
walking home together from prayer
meeting.
That was a week aero. ITettv had
'Now Hetty—
But the appeal was broken off by
tantalizing laugh and
forward to
on his tormen
aud ran np the patIf to the house. Idignant ghost.
where he saw her wave her hand as Hetty,nearl
tJflinnesc&iz Forever:
RED WING, GOODHUE COUNTY, MINN., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 1861.
gate, and took Hie road homeward.
The tea tilings had been carried out,
the table set back against the wall,
the crumbs brushed from the clean
home made carpet and Hetty's Work
stand drawn up in front of the blazing
fire. A bountifully piled waiter of
great red apples, and a plate of cracked
walnuts were on it, in close proximity
to Hetty's work basket*
On one side of the fire sat Mrs.searched
Thomas, fat ?.n«| fair, at peace with
all the v.orJd,'" rocking and knitting
and refreshing herself at divers andsun
dry intervals with a bite from a half
eaten apple that lay on the corner ot
the table, and touching every now and
red and winked on the rug before her.
Hetty sat on the other side, sewing,
and busy, in thinking how she should
tell her mother that she expected a
visitor. She would have given the
world t© be r.ble to say in an oft" hand
manner that she expected Mr. Hawley
to drop in about eight. But she recol
lected with a twinge of conscience
how hard she ied to get the lady to
acnompany her husband to Aunt Ruths
spite of her forcwarniugs of a spell of
neuralgia how she had also plead
headache as an excuse for not going
herself. And she knew her mother
was quite sharp enough to draw her
own inferences from these facts, and
if ,,e 8 W besure t0 lhhlk l0
41 had committed some verye wickednact her out of the way so I might have
Josiarh alrl to myself,it.and I should
The combined noise aroused Mrs:
Thomas, and, starting into an erect
position, she rubbed her eyes, settled
her cap-border and exclaimed—
"Bless my soul, Hetty, what was
that? Somebody at the door? Who
be coming at this time of night?
"It's not late, mother—only a little
past eight. I'll go and see who it is,"
says Hetty, demurely, taking the can
dle from the table.
kNo.
As yet, neither had the courage to 'smart rap by way of variety. that the
speak to the ruling powers on the sub
ject
confidential tal with him the Ftib-ha her hand- on the handle o- the [thus believe there is a": conflict
discovered hi* mitako
need the indisrnant immlmelmg
-,- .-, I """-.
then in a caressing manner, with her into her chair and her accustomed
foot a sleek, lazy looking cat that pur- tranquility.
Mrs. Thomas was fully awakend now,
set
collar and tasteful black silk apron—
these were the chief items of Hetty's
toilet but she looked sweet and dainty
in her plain dress as if hours had been
spent in donning lace and jewels.—
Her rich hair of the darkest auburn
tinge, fell in shining folds to her warm
red cheek, and was caught up in a
running knot behind.
Eight o'clock and past! Mrs. Thom
as was dozing in her chair—her shad
ow on the opposite wall bobbing about
neve hea the last of An like a
wise little girl she was silent.
I'll venture my word on it, you wo'd| answer.
not have wondered at our:young farm- I don't believe that kiss was meant
er*s desperate enthralhnent if youjfor me after all. Wonder who it was
could have seen Hetty Thomas as she intended for and wonder if you don't
sat sewing by the fireside that cold know something about it, Hetty
November evening. mother?"
Under a pretence of being ready to Yes, you, Hetty. You was mighty
go to her uncle's (a thing bhe had no anxious to get me and pap oft'to aunt
idea of doing) she had, just before tea Ruth's this evening but 1 noticed you
indulged in an indiscriminate 'fixing, Were slicked up extraordinary, for all
up.' A neatly fitted dark calico, with you weren't going. Now, Hetty, I'm
the store h/oJc still on it, a fresh linenjgettin' old I know it but I haven't
in grotesque mimicry as site nodded to take agin. I don't like the feel of his
and fro—now almost falling forward,
and her fat hand lay listlessly in her
lap, and her ball of yarn had rolled
out upon the hearth, and puss was I blunder. Old Squire Thomas used to
busy converting it into Gpi'dian knots, delight in rehearsing the story when.
And just then came a double rap at lever all the parties interested happened
the door—so loud, sudden and self-as-jto be present. He would shako his fat
surcd that Hetty started up with a sides at Josiah's discomfiture and
hisany
little shriek and set her foot on puss
tail, who in turn gave a voice to herlaugh
Here you wind up my ball
and sweep up the hearth, while" I go
said and agreed to bring father meshes of the yarn. 'Drat that catl'jh* manliness, candor and spirit oi
and mother "arom.d on- the subject." All this time Josiah was standing on 'conciliation. W quote the following
'Josiah had not been to the house since'one foot on the cold porch: witht Jlis passage:
probably feeling verv much like a hands.in his overcoat/pockets, wonder- ••There" is a class of men in the North
dog venturing on the premises of a ing if Hetty had fallen asleep, and and perhaps in the South, small in
man whoso fold he has plundered, every 'now and the giving the door a numbers and influence, who assume
to the door.' says the old lady, whose from Connecticut, made a speech on
feet were struggling in the perplexing!the' 11th, inst., which is noticeable for
ect and Hetty feeling as it ^ie wish- to take the candle, and'as she Rtepped it cannot be reconciled without either country a few weeks ago An ineid nt
SENTINEL
*'I nevor was so frightened in all my
life! The mean scamp! Who could it
be? Hetty, have you any idea''"
But the dutiful daughter was, to allDixon
appearances, innocent as a sucking
dove.- She soothed the old lady by
representing that it might have been
one of the neighbors, who having drank
too much, had mistaken the
house and the house wife. She
the entry for the missing
spectacles, dropped in the scuffle e
arranged the rumpled cap border
wound up the tangled«yarn stirred the
fire—all in the most amiable manner
possible, and at length had the satis
faction of seeing her mother subside
She had anew idea in her head, and.
instead of settling herself for another
nap, she pursued the train of thought
and her knitting, both at the same
time, with wonderful rapidity. At
length stopping and looking keenly at
Hetty—
"I suppose it's a queer idea of mine,
Hetty, but I've a notion that man was
'Siah Hawley."
My! but if'Hetty's face did not fire
up then! You might have lit a candle
by it. These incipient symptoms did
not escape the wary inquisitor.
"Pears so to me. 'Cause those
hig whiskers were so much like his'n,
and the awkward way he gripped me
with his great paws!"
Hetty wns wonderfully busy. She
bent over her work and drew the
needle through so quickly that the
thread snapped, and then she was
soof
much engaged in threading her needle
again she did not even have time to
quite lost my eye-sight, yet. I've heard
something about this between you and
'Siah IIav.hjy. What are you playih'
possum for? Out with it, I say
Our little schemer tlms abjured,
mado a clean breast of the matter
much relieved to find that mother
hadn't nothiif agin him," and would
"give father a talk about it, and bring
him round."
Hut, Hetty, I want you to tell 'Siah
Td rather he'd not make such a mis-
big whiskers about my face I don't
approve of promiscuous kissing."
'Siaii never heard the last of that
wife's tart replies, and both would
until the tears ran down their
cheeks.
"Never mind, 'Siah*' Mrs. Thomas
would say consolingly. Let himtive
laugh, lie'a have been only too glad
to have been in your place twenty
years ago. He had hard work to get
a ki».s fiora me then. And I hope it
will be a lesson to you and Hetty agin
the impolicy of concealment and under
hand doin's of all sorts."
SENATOR DIXON, VS. SENATOR SEW*
ARD.
Senator Dixon, Republican Senator
P^*t'6ontrpY£rByis^
In the hurry, al.rs. ihorppson forgot flict between two civilizations, and that: at h»s own re
jqucst, arriving in
to put oft the ordeal as long as out into the front entry, the setting] freedom or slavery perishing. The lis related as having'occurred during these, during the past forlnight,bav^
possible,j* any rate to have one more room door slammed after her. She great, body of those I represent do notihis ministerial career which thepropc^ working on half time, and now
**k """on
-,
a id hall door at the moment, and, opening.the systems of labor in the different|withb profit, if not with ploasrT.-.. His
aqgb and a^ he sprang scratching of the old lady's vigorous ai guarantee which may not be releas-ias you please."
Uikc a pleasant revenge fists to cause him to relinquish his ed, «nd ought not to be relinquished Master Colonel Pi
entress, siie slipped away hold and fly as if pursued by some in-, Whenever the public, mind shall will faithful old feliow,
choking with
1
a
conflict with!gandists
in the different Wit pro
with the peaceful'servantt
Mother is going over to aunt Ruth sit she suddenly found herself iu the states incompatible with the peaceful servan man Tom an old negro about YMHU«43ffl» pr I'OBT MOUJ/IIHE.-
to spend the evening, and wants me embrace ofa stout pair of arms: a existence of our Union. W believe Uixtv -five vears of age stands" in re
to go but I guess I wont. I've been whidkered face in close proximitv that slaveholding and non slaveiioidmg lation to him of* a cortfideni -irul forg on the outride, the soldiers with
woiking on father's shirts all day, be-to her own and
eonnnni .JM
sides doing the dairy work, and I'm think about the
as tired as can bo. So I guess they'll situation, she receirc
have to go without me. Don't come1 a heartv smack-full
I shall be thro'.matron upa
'kO. murder and it aint Obediah.' This declaration is in direct contra--tlon by tlie Senalt
She had by this time diverted herself diction to the following declaration of faithful old servant.:
smoth.- open,for.i
WHOLE NUMBER 281.
The great question which the Re
publican party is called upon to answer
is, whether they will endorse Senator
or Senator Seward whether it
recognises the rights of slavery under
the constitution, or whether it will in
sist that slavery "has no constitutional
guarantee that ought not to be relin
quished-"
NEW SOUTH
O E N O O
A O I N A
Colonel Francis "YV". Pickens, who
ha* just, been elected Governor of
South Carolina, is a native of that
State, and is about fifty years of age.
He has been in public life for the last
twenty years, and represented his na
tive State in Congress from 1835 to
1845, during which period he enjoyed
the entire confidence of his.constitu
ents, and was regarded as one of the
leading spirits in the national legisla
ture. The position to which ho
hasmaster.
just been elevated has naturally at
tracted towards him the eyes of the
whole country, for there is no disguis
ing the fact that upon his acts depend
to a great extent the peace, and, it may
be, the perpetuity of the republic.—
Colonel Pickens is a man of no ordin
ary ability, and no one has ever ques
tioned his courage or resolution. He
was a particular favorite of Calhoun,
and enjoyed the confidence and per
sonal friendship of South Carolina's
greatest son. He was among the most
ardent advocates of nullification, and
it is almost needless to say that he is
at present an uncompromising States
rights man. An anecdote is related
him as having occurred during the
nullification excitement, winch, as it is
particularly illustrative of his charac
ter, deserves to be told here. At a
meeting the remark was made that the
occasion was one 1hat might excite
fears and apprehension, when Colonel
Pickens is alleged to have replied as
followsi
Fear! fear! Mr. President, I was
born insensible to fear.
Such is one of the traits in the char
acter of tho man who has been elected
at tho present critical juncture to con
trol for good or ill the destinies of
South Carolina.
Tho name of Pickens is one of the
most celebrated in the Revolutionary
history of our country. General Pick
ens, the grandfather of the subject of
the present sketch, rendered Aiosg ef
ficient service in the war of Indepen
dence. He commanded at the impor
tant battle of Cowpens—a battle which
iike that of Trenton, is regarded as
the turning point in tho fortune ol theissued
conflict, and both of which were fought
about the same time. No purer or
more disinterested patriot lived than
General Pickens, and none deserved
better of his country. No personal
sacrifice appeared too great for him,
and when Congress offered to pay thetheir
expenses he had incurred in the cause
of his country he refused to accept
thing in the wav of compensation
or otherwise. Col. Pickens, the father
ot the present Governor of South
Carolina, had a command in the warlicense.
iM ISl2, but was never engaged iu ac
service.
"VVe have stated that Col. Pickens
represented for a period of ten years
his native Stato in the national legisla
ture but he has occupied other exalt
ed public positions of confidence and
trust. President Polk tendered him
the post of Minister to St. Jamee,
which he declined and he also de
clined an appointment from President
Tyler as Minister to the French Court.
He accepted, however, the important
post of Minister to the Court of St.
Petersburg, where his courteous, irank
and manly bearing won him the esteem
and respect of every om.
it did notyeur paternal gods correct your own\\Q me you wo'ald enjoy yourself belter! (r-r.Sorne natures are so sensitively
ana ciror that slavery ha-s any eonstJtntioii- if you stay at home. Hut y—
the abolitionW slavery^ the way will be'Pickens, your father,and my old master
I know that vou will tell
AHi^f disappeared vn an the kitchen end laughter, in te her trepidation, "me his is too slow eH then go fast-lMisrisnppi I took from pocketceive no harm, unless thou hast sore
|porcfi and then Le tumed from tbejnew varac to the rescue. |er, if yon can, and I will go with you/'jtbirtetn hundred dollars in money and-placcs.
died•
He was a
special favorite with the C/.ar, from
whom he received many marks of at-
tention. He represented the United
States at the Muscovite Court for the™
A
Master Colonel
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his gold watch, and I let nobody know
it, and I came on foot through the
wood* and brought it'safely to you n\
Carolina—you know, masterf "and if
you die in Russia, you shali die in myr
arms like your father." *..
So Tom went to St. Petersburg, an!
he was the head man at the door on all.
state occasions, and acquitted himself
with all the dignity due to his position.1
When Col. Pickens was about to leave
St. Petersburg, he said to his old ser
vant, "Tom I am gomg. through
Germany, and I want to send a courier
with very important dispatches to our
Minister, Mr. Dallas, in London.—*
Now, Tom, I shall make you courier
you shall so with my dispatches to Mr.
Dallas."
Tom accepted the Mission, and wo
do him but justice when we say that
he discharged his duly with prompt
ness, correctness and fidelity his
In conclusion, we may state, that
Col. Pickens is a man of medium
height, of pecnliarly 'prepossessing
marmers, and, as his election at this
particular time proves, is exceedingly
popular in his native state.
OdrThe New Orleans Delta pub-'
blishes a number of letters from Tex
as, among others, one from Ex-Lieut.
Governor Jubbock, which represent
the policy in that State as almost un
animous for secession. The greatest
indignation is expres»ed at the refusal
of Gov. Houston to call an extra ses
sion of the Legislature.
[N.Y TIMES WASHINGTON CORHES-
POXOEXCK.] Private letters received
from Mr. Lincoln by a special
friend of his hero, urge modera
tion and forbearance. He de3 res
everything done that ic possible, with
out regarding his party or the North,
to harmonize the sections. He speaks
in high terms of the articles in the
New York Times and the Alabama'
Journal.
8S|r*IIendcrson, the actor, was sel
dom known to be in a passion. When
at Oxford, he was one day debating
with a fellow student, who not keep
ing his temper, threw a glass of wine
in the actor's face, when Henderson
took out his handkerchief, wiped his
face and coolly said That sir, was
a digression now for the argument."
LAW SuruKMii.—The Mayor ot Mo
bile, like the Mayor of Savannah, has
his proclamation^ aklng grounds
against vigilence committees and the
practice of mob lynching, so much re
sorted to in the South. Tins is a time
ly movement. If the Cotton States
intended to set up 9 Southern confed
eracy, their people must first discipline
minds to submit to law. Without
a greater respect for the law, they can
establish no popular government «t air.
The despotism of the sword will fol
low tho despotism of the mob, and the
people lose their liberty through their
CWMudge Hoffman, of the Supreme
Court of New York, has decided that
Sunday amusements are illegal, and
the law which prohibits ihem constitu
tional in a proceed tire to recover a
penalty of $250 from the defendants,
who are proprietors of the New York
Stadt Theatre, for a violation of the
Sunday law in giving a dramatic per
formance on Sunday.
E REAL SUFFEUEKS.—The New
York correspondent of the Philadel
phia Ledger, in speaking of the crisis,
says:
Tho severest sufferers are those
who attract the least attention an
I a
a
1,K'
manufacto'rie
it they have no"'work at all."
world. I
l'001' working girls, employed
ok
bmdcne.s, printing estabhsh-
an'
1
0P8«
read ade cloth
hoiwands and th« usapc^
5
S^-
V*
,5|/
working men are doing won-
strong as possible. It i»aaid that the
greatest vigilance is observed in eyery
yon ran do strung that they are wounded worse"
by the point of a firig* than others are
iciccns," Paid the by the "point of a pin
O^TBe not affronted at a jest
in my arms the banks of the lone throw ealt at thee, thou wilt
—. —....-..n ^,, .,«-,.r..- ." un throw eal at thee tho wilt re
If
re-

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