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St. Cloud visiter [sic]. [volume] (St. Cloud, Stearns County, Minn.) 1857-1858, May 20, 1858, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025584/1858-05-20/ed-1/seq-4/

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SPECIAL NOTICE.
OHIO STITE AND UKlOH LAW COLLEGE.
This institution has been removed to Cleve
land, Ohio. Degrees Are legally conferred, and
Students upon graduating may be admitted to
practice. For circulars, address at Cleveland,
M. A. KINO, SKOUKTAMV.
NOTICE""
rpillS certifies that 1 have this day given
1 Scth W. Turner the remainder of his mi
nority, and shall claim none of his earnings
nor pay any debts of his contracting after this
date. SETH TURNER.
ATTKST: J. S. Dcnman.
St. Anthony, April 2lst, 1858. 9 3t
NSTRUCTIONS for painting, Italian Grecian,
_1 Crystal, and Celestial, which every Lady
and Gentleman will be pleased wi h, sent on re
ceipt of One Dollar in gold, or current bank
bills. Address, C. A. SYLVESTER,
So. Danville, Steuben Co., N. Y.
CHANCE FOR ALL OUT OF EMPLOY
MENT, secured by the smallest investment
ever before offered. Full particulars will be
sent immediately upon receipt of your address
and post stamp.
This is no catch-penny affair, like many
which have been offered East, but sterling va
lue and of practical utility. Address,
W
METROPOLITAN AGENCY,
"m Ypsilanti, Mich.
CLEAR TH E TRACK!
THE CARS ARE COMING!!!
7"E have just opened a large and fresh as
sortment of
Groceries, Bacon, Pork, Flour,
Feed, Grain, Nails, Cooking
Stoves, Window Glass,
&c, &c, &c.
Which will he disposed of very low for cash
or country produce, our new store, at the
lower steamboat landing.
May 18 '58. MILLER & SWISSHELM
STKI'UKX .MI1.1.Kit. IlEMiY SWISSHELM.
REA ESTAT E AGENCY,
ST. CLOUD, MINNESOTA.
TPIIE undersigned offer their services to loan
1 money upon best real estate security and
to purchase and sell property either real or
personal, for a reasonable commission.-
They have now for sale, at low prices:
20 quarter sections of good land.
50 lots, (some improved,) in St. Clou.d
20 in Nininger addition to St. Paul.
2' in Nininger city,
10 in Mound city, Illinois.
MILLER & SWISSHELM.
St. Cloud, May 13, 1858.
Forwarding and Commission.
E respectfully solicit the consignment of
Goods and Merchandize, either for store
age or for sale upon commission, at our new
store and warehouse, lower steamboat landing.
May 13, '58. MILLER & SWISSHELM.
g^Ojgrw
CHEAP CASH STORE
River St., Lower Town, St. Cloud.
rpHE subscriber keeps constantly on hand a
1 large and well selected assortment of Dry
Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, Hats and
Caps, Lady's and Misses' Bonnets and Hats,
every variety of Glass Ware, Clocks, Looking
Glasses, Violins, Brushes, Tobacco, Cigars,
Yankee Notions, &c„ &c., &c
H. Z. MITCHELL.
F. TALCOTT,
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER,
Corner First Avenue & Welles St.,
LOWER SAINT CLOUD.
TYKALER in Clocks, Watches, Jewelry,
Spoons, Spectacles, Gold I'ens, Silver
Thimbles, &c., &c, of fine quality, which he
will sell as low as any of like quality can be
bought this side of Chicago. Call and see.
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, &c, repaired in
good and satisfactory manner, and on reasona
nlle tonus.
ATTENTION.
"IT THOLE interests in the flourishing towns of
ST. CLOUD & EAST ST. CLOUD.
Lots, single or in quantities, to suit purcha
sers, t\i reasonable rates.
A rare chanc for sale investments.
All emmuni -aiions to be addressed to
C. & J. II. TAYLOR, St. Cloud, M. T.
E C. S I
DEAJ.EB IX
BOOTS, AND CLOTHING,
nAandforSHOES,e
S sale a large assortment of Boots
Shoes of th very best quality.
Custom Boots Constantly on Hand.
All kinds of custom work done to order in
the best manner. A good assor: ment of Ready
made Clothing for sale cheap. ust received a
good assortment of
SPRING & SUMMER HATS.
Persons in want, of any of the abov• named
goods cannot find them cheaper elsewhere.
RAYM3ND, OWEN, & Co.,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN
SASH, DOORS&BLINDS,
Lower St. Cloud Minnesota.
D|OORdand
Window Frames constantly on
han and made to order, else, Planeing,
Sawing and Turning of all kinds done on short
notice.
J. H. RAYMOND. 3. H. OWEN. A. SMITH.
T. JONES,
A S I
First Street, near the Saw Mill.
WOULs
respectfully announce to the citi
zen of St. Cloud and vicinity, that he has
opened a Blacksmith shop, at the above place,
where he is prepared to do all kinds of work in
his line, and hopes to merit A share of their
p.'«tronfljfe.
•.•t-*R -J- '".•••.tjjirr
STEARNS' HOUSE.
THIS
new and beautiful Hotel is situated
upon the Muff just above the, Lower Ferry
in the town of St. Cloud, commanding one of
the moat beautiful views on the Mississippi
river. The Proprietor assures all who mayarteries
visit this place that his table shall contain every
bounty and luxury which can be obtained both
at home and abroad. It is his intention to keep
the above hotel as a first class one in every res
pect.
IDK/TTQ STOBE.
S. A A
PEALKR IN
DRUGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS, 6c.
Corner First and Jefferson Streets,
LOWER SAINT CLOUD.
TTTOULD respectfully inform his friends and
the public generally that, he has just re
ceived and opened for their inspection, a full
assortment of the above.
Families desirous of procuring a pure article
of medicine, or wishing their prescriptions fill
ed with care and accuracy, will give him a call.
Bringing with him an experience of eight years,
and having acquired a thorough knowledge of
medicine previous to his engagement in the bu
siness, he feels confident that he can give satis
faction to all.
The Profession are invited to call they will
find his stock to consist of all medicines in ge
neral use.
Prescriptions carefully compounded at all
hours of the day or night.
VYE
1
1
ER S Cherry Pectoral for sale at
MARLATT'S DRUG STORE.
ADWAY'S Ready Relief for sale at
MARLATT'S DRUG STORE.
1
1
iDWAY'S Regulator for sale at
MARLATT'S DRUG STORE.
MOFFAT'S
Vegetable Pi
MARLATT'!
ills for sale at
S DRUG STORE.
OFFAT'S Bitters for sale at
MARLATT'S DRUG STORE.
AT TELLS' celebrated medicines for sale at
VV MARLATT'S DRUG STORE.
DENNIE'cured
S Electric Magnetic Plaster. Neu
ralgia by external application in four
hours, for sale at
MARLATT'S DRUG STORE.
HARDWARE STORE
C. P. & W. POWELL,
AYE received at the St. Cloud Hardware
Store, a complete assortment of
Shelf and Heav Hardware,
Locks, Latches, Bolts, Butts, and Screws,
Carpenters and Farming Tools, Planes, Saws,
Axes, Hatchets and Hammers, Shovels and
Spades, Hoes Mattocks, Nails, Glass and Putty,
STOVES AND TINWARE.
We have now the best variety of Stoves ever
brought into the Upper Country, among which
are the famous Charter Oak, Diamond Rock,
Shanghai, Wisconsin, Morning Star, Forest
Green, and Arctic Air Tight.
Our facilities for doing all kinds of work in
the Tin, Sheet Iron, and Copper Department,
are complete, —to which branch of the busi
ness we call particular attention.
J. W. METZROTH,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
DEALER
in Clothing, Cloths, Cassimeres,
Vestings and Gentlemen's Furnishing
Goods, to the inspection of which he invites
his Mends arid the public.
R. A. SMITH,
CONTINUEando
S do all kinds of House, Sign,
Carriage
ORNAMENTAL PAINTING.
THE EMERSON HOUSE,
lELAST S OLOTJX)
J. EMERSON, PROPRIETOR.
THE
above house has been refitted and refur
nished and the amplest accomodations have
been constructed for the reception of visitors
the proprietor pledges himself to spare no ex
pense to render his visitors comfortable.
.A. USTETW IB JURIST
has been erected, 60 by 35 feet, which can ac
commodate 27 Horses and 18 Oxen, and there
will always be a plentiful supply of feed on
hand, and careful Ostlers.
LIME. LIME.
A
FULL supply constantly on hand, by the
subscribers, at their kiln in Lower St.
Cloud. R. A. SMITH, & CO.
N E W S O E
ITE-W GrOODS.
O W I E S
In Upper St Cloud, Stearns Co., IE. T.
THE
subscriber would respectfully announce
to the citizens of St. Cloud and vicinity,
that he has established himself in the Dry
Goods business, in the building formerly occu
pied by L. A. Evans, (and directly opposite
Proctor & Clarke's Hardware.Store,) where he
has just opened his large and well selected
stock of
Jewelry, Bonnets, Fancy Silk, Dry
Coo is, and Ready-made Clothing.
Of every description, and of the very best
quality, which he is now offering for sale on
the most reasonable terms. His entire stock
was purchased in New fork, at such prices,
that he flatters himself cannot be undersold by
any other establishment of the kind on the Up
per. Mississippi. He hopes by diligence and
attention to business, and having for his motto,
"Quick Sales and Small Profits,1'
to merit a share of public patronage. All per
sons in want of anything in his line will do well
to give him a call and examine his stock before
purchasing elsewhere, as he can sell as cheap
as the St. Paul merchant*.
St. Cloud is the point at which the Reel Riv
er trains cross the Mississippi on their way to
St. Paul, which prove* it to be the natural
junction of land travel between these two great
of trade. It is at the present head of
steam navigation on the Mississippi. Boats
run regularly, during the Spring and early
Summer months, from St. Anthony to this
place. A
The map gives its position correctly with
reference to all the most important points in
the territory, but the peculiar beauty of its
location, and fertility of the surrounding coun
try cannot be transcribed. Within fifteen
miles of St. Cloud, on opposite sides of the
river* end at different points of the compass
are eight lakes, varying in size from 1 mile to
5 miles in circumference, all, save one, beau
tiful, exceedingly, three of them at least, deep
enough to float a man-of-war. Wooded banks,
clean pebbly shores plentifully mixed -with
cornelian and waters abundantly supplied
with fish.
.. When Gov. Stevens made his survey of a
northern railroad route to the pacific, in '53,
he camped "on the western side of the Mis
sissippi, below Sauk Rapids." The place was
nameless—the present site of St. Cloud but it
is here his route leaves the river. In the sum
mer of '55 a claim cabin was built on the spot
where we now write, a good saw mill, the
frame of a large Hotel and eight other dwell
ings were put up that summer. This last fall
there were three hundred and thirty-two votes
polled in the precinct. Not the votes of Indi
ans or Half Breeds, for there are none here.
A majority of the inhabitants of the county
are hardy Germans, with sturdy wives and
children, cultivating the soil and working at
mechanical employments.
The subsoil is sand and although the soil is
from one to three feet deep, a rich black loam
supporting a rank vegetation, the drainage is
so perfect and the air so pure, that breathing
is a perpotual pleasure. As yet, our physi
cians have discovered no diseases peculiar to
the climate, no indigenious complaint except
the "Minnesota Appetite" which requires one
fourth more treatment than a modest Pennsyl
vania or Ohio attack of a corresponding dis
ease.
Then, wc have no dram-shops but plenty
of beer for Hauns, a Catholic chapel, a Baptist
and Episcopal church, regular Cumberland
Presbyterian, Baptist and occasional Episcopal
service. A beautiful school house, part of the
time two schools, and a first class Temperance
Hotel.
Any body who wants to drink whiskey in
peace had better not come here, for the treaty
by which the land was acquired from the Sioux,
forbids its' introduction and the Legislature
has passed a law enforcing that provision but
people of moderate means and industrious hab
its who have children to educate, will find few
places where the opportunity for correct moral
training, healthy development of muscle, and
the means of pecuniary independence are bet
ter combined.
There are immense tracts of pine lying above,
from which the mills at St. Paul, St. Anthony
and the Minnesota Valley are supplied. These
employ a large and ever-increasing force of
men, horses and oxen, who are to be supplied
with provisions clothing and feed. The soil is
waiting for an opportunity to produce unlimit
ed quantities of food, without troubling the far
mer crushing clods while the Mississippi from
St. Paul to Little Falls can afford to turn a mill
at almost any point and has water power
enough to do the manufacturing for a Conti
nent.
Our natural meadows produce a grass from
four to six feet high, and the beef killed off our
prairies is quite equal to any stall fed we have
ever eaten. Our venison is fine at ten cents
per pound, rabbits, prairie hens, partridges,
ducks, &c, plenty. Thousands of bushels of
acorns for the hogs that are not here to eat
them. Fuel for the labor of cutting and haul
ing off the ground and there is no likelihood
of the supply running out soon, as the "Big
Woods" extend from this place some twenty
miles or more, down this side of the river, and
from eight to twelve miles back. Our prairies
are all dotted with strips of wood land, "Oak
Openings" which just look like old orchards,
dense thickets of plum trees bearing delicious
fruit, grape vines, doing likewise, thousands of
acres of hazel bushes and strawberry vines, en
gaged in the same business while some hun
dred acres are in the cranberry trade and turn
out an article, which for quantity and quality
cannot be excelled. Theblackberries, redrasp
berries and hops tack up their shingles in the
woods and seldom disappoint the most san
guine expectations of their customers. There
is still land ten or fifteen miles back which set
tlers can get, at government price, by building
a cabin and living on it until it comes into
market. Actual settlers can buy lots here at
from one to five hundred dollars, and specula
tors can have the same lots at from five to fif
teen hundred.
In some of the river towns back, places that
will be pleasant villages', lots can be had gratis
by those who will build and live on them.—
This, in places where a house can be built for
fifty dollars, that would be a palace compared
to the dens rented in large cities for 4 and 6
dollars per month, while the lot, with only the
aid of a grubbing hoe and a few days labor,
would bring vegetables to feed a family, and
every township has 600 acres appropriated to
the support of schools.
JAMES P. KENNEDY,
II as on a a
SOLICITS
... r-,..
the patronage of all persons in
need of the services of a practical Mason
and Plasterer. His longexperience in the
above branches of trade assures him that he
will give universal satisfaction his charges
are as reasonable for work as it can be done by
any one.
WM. J. PARSONS,
COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
MINNEAPOLIS, M.T.
BEEDE & MENDENHALL,
A N E S
NORTH-WESTERN LAND & COLLECTING
AGENTS,
I N N E A O I S
O. W. CUBTI8S. H. C. LESTEK.
CURTISS & LESTER,
DEALERS IN REAL ESTATE,
Minnesota.
HAVEWinona,
for sale Prairie, Timber, and Bottom
Lands, in Southern Minnesota. Lots in
St. Cloud, Winona, Minneiska, Wazeca, Carolia,
Altona, &c, &c. Guarantee 26 per cent, on
monies invested with them. Negotiate loans
on farm securities. &c.
B. THOMPSON,
WATCH-MAKER AND JEWELER,
Haln 8treet, Upper Town,
so?- .AJN "X'jnLoasnr, *&> m,
WATCHES,
F. MONTI.
Clocks and Jewelry repaired
on the shortest notice. All work war
ranted, and entire satisfaction guaranteed.
I O S WK3W/W S
OF
•ft*
1
it btouD ViWHta
TUB ST. CLOUD VISITER will not be the or-
gan of any party or sect, but the members of
any can be heard through its columna in any
article of suitable length and sufficient literary
merit. Thefirstpage will contain tales, poe
try, anecdotes &c and western readers will
always find a summary of news gleaned from
Eastern exchanges, while a large space will
be devoted to giving Eastern readers correct
information about the great North-West. In
this department we expect the assistance of
several hundred local reporters, farmers and
their wives, Red River traders, lumbermen,
land agents, surveyors, hunters &C, men and
women who dwell in the land, walk up anda
down and go to and fro in it but we will
use all possible dilligence in making personal
observations and not mislead our readers by
false or exaggerated reports.
On all moral andpolitical questions the Vis
iter will aim to deal fairly by those who dif
fer with it but the editorial department will
never represent anything but the convictions
of the edftor. Consequently its creed will be.
1st. .The Divine law is the Supreme law in
all lands created by its author.
2d. All men are created free and equal in
their right to life, liberty and the pursuit of
happiness.
3d. The Bible, and the Constitution of the
United States are anti-slavery and human
chattledom is unconstitutional in any associa
tion professing to receive either as fundamen
tal laws.
4th. Paying taxes is as unwomanly, as vo
ting and is a privilige which should be exclu
sively confined to "white male citizens, of this
and other countries," until women share with
them the responsibility of saying what shall
be done with the money they arc required to
contribute to the public treasury.
5th. Slavery, Intemperance, Affectation, Ig
norance, Idleness, Land Monopoly and Large
Cities are the seven great evils which curse
the East, with a multitude of miseries more
wonderful than the "seven wonders" of the
world and they must be abolished before the
reign of peace on earth and good will to man,
can be fully established,
6th. St. Cloud, in despite of all we could do
to prevent, will, at no distant day, be a large
city and it is our duty now, to do what we
can in laying the foundations for as much, of
the good, and building defences against as
much, as possible, of the evil attending these
hoards of.crippled humanity.
7th. Our motto is the true philosophy of
life. Be sure you have turned your face to
liberty and light, your back to the bondage
and the flesh-pots of Egypt. Look straight
towards the better land and to the greatest
amount of good you can nccomqlish on the
journey. Then—"go forward!" What! into
the Red Sea of toil, of danger and apparent
death? Yes! If the path of duty lies through
the deep waters, "go forward!" and the irre
sistable right arm shall divide the waves.—
Amen and Amen.
JANE o. SWISHELM Editor.
TERMS Single copies $2,00 per annum
2 copies $3,00 5 copies for $7,00 10 copies
for $12,00 20 copies for $20, all strictly in ad
vance, and no papers sent after the time ex
pires for which it has been paid. Single cop
ies Sets. Letters on business to be directed
to the publisher.
IBZE^EOKE^ZR/IIDOIE-
rpiIIS town is situated on the Sioux
J. Wood river, and is the Western termi
nus of the Minnesota and Pacific railroad
the point laid down by Capt. Pope on' his
map as the head of steam navigation on the
Red river the Valley of the Red river is
about twenty miles wide on either side of the
stream, and about five hundred miles long
the surface is level and drained by numerous
streams which are skirted with elm, ash, bass
wood, white wood and pine of the largest
growth, the remainder of the valley is prairie,
composed of rich, black loam free from sand
barrens or swamps. Red river is a deep, slow
stream, has no islands, sand bars or snags to
obstruct navigation the banks are about 25
feet high, and not subject to overflow many
of the tributaries of the Red river are strong
ly impregnated with salt, and indications of
iron and coal are numerous in the vicinity.
The farmers of the valley of the Red river
gave to Major Wood as the average of their
crops wheat 30 to 40 barley 40 to 80 oats
40 50 and potatoes 200 to 300 bushels to the
acre. At Pembina, [200 miles north of Breck
enridge,] ex-Gov. Ramsey says, on the 2d
October, 1851, water melons and cantelopes
were served to us for dessert, and the first frost
that occured was on the night of that day,"
[see address before the Minnesota Agricultu
ral Society, Oct, 10th, 1856.] Two large set
tlements have long existed on Red river—
Pembina and Selkirk, both of which yearly
raise a large surplus of the products of the
farm the whole valley of the Red river is
rapidly filling up with an energetic and intel
ligent population the country being exceed
ingly healthy, and should the indications of
iron.and coal lead to the discovery of those
minerals as large as is anticipated, this valley
will soon be swarming with a population en
gaged in agriculture, mining and manufactur
ing, supplying eastern Minnesota, Wisconsin,
Iowa and Missouri with the products of their
labor and skill the Minnesota and Pacific
railroad will be placed immediately under
contract as by the terms of its charter it must
be finished from Stillwater to St Anthony with
in two years, and completed to Breckenridge
within ten years from the 3d of March, 1857,
or forfeit its franchise as well as the lands do
nated to it.
Breckenridge is also at the point where Gov.
Steven's survey of a route for the Pacific rail
road crosses the Sioux Wood river, an exami
nation of the Western States, and a reference
to the writings of Gov. Stevens, ex-Gov. Ram
say or the Congressional documents containing
the reports of Maj. Long and Capt. Pope, can
not fail to convince that such is the geograph
ical position of Breckenridge that all that
portion of the Territory of the United States
which lays west of the Mississippi and north
of the head waters of the Minnesota rivers
must forever be tributary to that city, and
that Breckenridge is to be not only the com
mercial centre for/Hhe north-west, but will
forever be the gate city onthe great north-west
highway of nations.
Breckenridge is now being improved by the
Proprietors, who are erecting dwellings for
themselves, a hotel, grist mill, saw mill, a
shingle and lath machine, &c.
Eor further particulars enquire of
HFNRY T. WELLS, Minneapolis,
CHUTE, St. Anthony,
CHAS. N. M'KUBBIN. St, Paul,
*N. Executive Committee,
Or to GEO- F. BROTT, Breckenridge.
May 10, 1S58. tf.
BUILDING.
THE
undersigned takes this method of in
forming those who may have houses to
build mills to frame, or carpentry and joinery,
in any or all of its branches, that he is prepar
ed to take contracts, and do all kinds of work
in this line, on the most reasonable terms and
in good, workmanlike manner.
THE PRE-EMPTION LAW.
1. The settler must never before have had
the benefit of pre-amptloAlSBder the act.
2. He must not, at the. it*" of making the
pre-emption, be the omjp^Qf/'820 acres of
land in any State or Territory of the United
States. "':"£'1fe-#'' J--
3. He must settle ofc and Improve the land,
in good faith, fo* -his own exclusive use andof
benefit, and not with the intention.of felling
it on speculation and must not mike, directly
or indirectly, any contract or agreement, in
any way or manner, with any person or per
sons, by which the title which he may acquire
of .the United States should enure, in whole
or in part, to the benefit of any person except
himself.
4. He must be twenty-one years of age and
citizen of the United States or if a for
eigner, he must have declared his intention
to become a citizen, before the proper author
ity, and receive a certificate to that effect.
5. He must build a house on the land, live
in it, and make it his exolusive home and
must be an inhabitant of the same at the time
of making applications for pre-emption. (Un
nearest neighbor but the same ii«nnw
A
8
A minor who is the head of a family, or a
widow, may also pre-empt, their families being
required to live on the land.
The settler is required to file a written de
claratory statement of the intention to pre
empt, before he can proceed with his pre-emp
tion.
FEES—1st. The fee required by the regis
ter, for filling a declaratory statement, is one
dollar.
2d. For granting a pre-emption the register
and receiver can receive fifty cents.
THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY,
PHILLIPS, SAMPSON & GO'S
NEW A A I N E
DEVOTED TO LITERATURE, ART ANDPOLITICS.
ITS AIM WILL BE
FIRST In Literature, to leave no province
unrepresented, so that while each number will
contain articles of an abstract and permaneut
value, it will also be found that the healthy ap
petite of the mind for entertainment in its vari
ous forms of Narrative, Wit, and Humor, will
not go uncared for. The publishers wish to
say, also, that while native writers will receive
the most solid encouragement, and will be
mainly relied upon to fill'the pages of the AT
LANTIC, they will not hesitate to draw from the
foreign sources at their command, as occasion
may require, relying rather on the competency
of an author to treat a particular subject, than
on any other claim whatever. In this way
they hope to make their Periodical welcome
wherever the English tongue is spoken or read.
SECOND In the term AUT they intend to in
clude the whole domain of aesthetics, and hope
gradually to make this critical department a
true and fearless representative of Art, in all
its various branches, without any regard to
prejudice, whether personal or national, or to
private considerations of what kind soever.
THIRD In Politics, the ATLANTIC will be the
organ of no party or clique, but will honestly
endeavor to be the exponent-of what its con
ductors believe to be the American idea. Ii
will deal frankly with persons and withbarties,
endeavoring always to keep in view that moral
element which transcends all persons and par
ties, and which alone makes the basis of a true
and lasting national prosperity. It will not
rank itself with any sect or anties, but^ith that
body of men which is in favor of Freedom, Na
tional Progress, and Honor, whether public or
private.
As an earnest of the material at their com
mand, they subjoin the following list of literary
persons interested in their enterprise wishing
it, however, to be distinctly understood, that
they shall hope for support from every kind of
ability which desires the avenue of their col
umns, and in the remuneration of which they
shall be guided purely by their sense of intrin
sic merit:—
W. H. PRESCOTT,
R. W. EMERSON,
WSI, C.BRYANT,
W. LOXGFELLOW,
REV. F. H. HEDGE,
N. HAWTHORNE,
J. G. WHITTIER,
O. W. HOLMES,
J. R. LOWELL,
J. L. MOTELY,
G. W. CURTIS,
H. MELLVILLE,
PROF. C. C. FELTON,
PROF. F. J. CHILD,
E. P. WHIPPLE,
**mm
til lately a single man might board with his I V»m««rf«Vh7- I
nearest neighbor, but the same r««nir«d W &W2 WJ not merely
now required
of a single as a married man, except that if
the settler is married, his family must also
live in the house.)
6. The law requires that more or less im
provement be made on the land, such as break
ing, fencing, &c but pre-emptions are gran
ted where a half-acre is broken and enclosed.
7. It is necessary that no other person, en
titled to pre-emption, reside upon the land
at the same time.
9. No one is permitted t0 remove from hisS
a
!?m°?'e
ml
to the Land Office a written or printed appli
cation, setting forth the facts to his case of the
1st, 2d and 3d requirements here mentioned,
with a certificate appended, to be signed by
the register and receiver, and make affidavit
to the same.
10. He is also required to bring with him a
respectable witness of his acquaintance, who
is knowing to the fact of his settlement, to
make affidavit to the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th and 6th
acquirements here mentioned, with the same
set forth on paper, with a corresponding blank
certificate attached, to be signed by the land
officers.
11. The pre-emptor, if a foreigner, must
bring with him to the land office, duplicates
of his naturalization papers, duly signed by
the official from whom they were received.
own land, and make prce-mption in the same *i A & r~
st*t* ov t«rritorv. I Federal Territories, seeking no favor
required to bring with him it
EDMUND QUINCY,
T. W. PARSONS,
J. TlIROWBRlDGE,
MRS. H. B. STOWE,
MRS. GASKELL,
MRS. L. M. CHILD,
MRS. KIRKLAND,
MRS. PIKE,
MISS ROSE TERRY,
W. COLLINS,
G.
SHIRLEY
E. M.
JAMES HANNAY,
W. PHILLEO.
The Publishers will aim to have each num
ber of the magazine ready in time for distri
bution and sale, in the more remote parts of
the country, on or before the first day of the
month for which it is intended.
TERMS.—The ATLANTIC MONTHLY can be
had of Booksellers, Periodical Agents, or from
the Publishers, at Three Dollars a year, or
Twenty-five Cents a Number.
Subscribers remitting three dollars, in ad
vace, to the publishers, will receive the work
for one year, pott paid, in any part of the Uni
ted States within 3000 miles.
A liberal discount made towholesale dealers,
and to postmasters and others who act as
agents, to whom specimen numbers will be fur
nished without charge.
The Publishers will not be responsible for
contracts made by agents. All persons order
ing through that medium must look to them
for their supply.
All communications for the Atlantic must be
addressed to the Publisher.
A. SCOFIELD,
CARPENTER* BUILDER
WOULCloud
A. E.HUSSBY.
respectfully inform the citizens of
St. and vicinity, that he continues
to execute all orders in his line of business.
*tm$mmmjtmm±
THE NEW-YORK TRIBUNE,
1868.
THE TBIBENE commenced its eighteenth year
on Hie 16th of April last.' It has neaily com
pleted arrangements, by an outlay of more than
$50,000 on a new Press, and other machinery
and adjuncts to reduce to the lowest point the
time which must elapse between the making up
its forms and the reception of its issue by
its patrons. No expense orlaborwill be spared
to render its advice from all quartersas prompt,
full, graphic andTellable as those of any rival.
With correspondents at the most important
points in either hemisphere, and an editorial
staff chosen from the best writers in our conn
try, it endeavors to deserve the unequaled cir
culation which wasaccorded it some years since,
and which, in spite of the hardness of the times,
it still retains.
THE TRIBUNE'S course on the great question
offhedayis guided by principles which will
stand the test of ages. It wars upon Slavery,
"not in the abstract merely, but in the United
States," regardless of the fact that the slaves
are a powerless caste and belong toa loathed and
down-trodden race, because it realizes that un-
their immediate victims, buCurse,
to the whole comot
munity which endures and upholds them. Iff
the same spirit, it opposes Fillibusterism and
and every form of National rapacity or aggrcs^
sion, profoundly convinced that "RIGHTEOUS
NESS exalteth a nation/' and that territory
won by conquest or spoliation never did and"
never can truly strengthen the nation fhns ag
grandized. Regarding Freedom in Labor as
the .only safe, benificent basis of National
growth and prosperity, it contends for that
Freedom not only in Kansas but on every ace
a I
%rantin% «OTIC
a
party .interest,
doctrine or tribunal that would render them
the nursery and home of Bondage. The varied
development and diversification of Home Indus,
try, the repression of Intemperance, Violence
and Crime, the improvement, by every practica
ble means, of the condition of the needy and
unfortunate, are among the objects to which
our efforts are steadfastly directed. In short,
without assuming to be wiser or better than
others, we aim to be found always the foes of
Wrong, Abuse and Evil, and the champions of
Truth, Virtue and Reform.
We hire nobody to obtain subscribers for ug,
employ no travelling agents, offer no premium
or prizes, but a single copy of our paper to any
one who, because he approves its general char
acter and believes its circulation will exert a
salutary influence, procures and sends us a list
of twenty or more subscribers. If there be
any who believe Republican principals would
be commended andhuman well-being promoted
by extending our circulation, we ask him to se
lect some neighborhood in which our paper is
not generally taken, and send us as many sub
scriptions as can there be procured. Those
who desire specimen copies for this purpose
will be gladly supplied.
THE TRIBUNE is printed on a large impe
rial sheet, folded in quarto form, and mailed to
subscribers on the following
TERMS
DAILY TRIRUNE, per anum $ 6,00
SEMI-WEEKLY TRIRUNE.
One Copy, one year 3.00
Two Copies, one year 5,00
Five Copies, one year 11,2-5
Ten Copies, to one address 20,00
WEEKLY TRIBUNE.
One Copy, one year 2.00
Three Copies, one year 5,00
Five Copies, one year 8.00
Ten Copies, one year 12,00
Twenty Copies to one address, and
any larger number at the rate of $1
per annum 20,00
Twenty Copies, to address of carh
sulscriber, and any larger number at
the rate of $1,20 each, 24.00
Any person sending us a Club of twenty or
more will be entitled to an extra copy.
Subscriptions may commence at any time.—
Terms always cash in advance. All Itnere
Jte addressed to
HORACE GREELEY & Co.,
Tribune Builuing?,
No 154 Nassau-st., New-York.
A'etc York, April, 1858.
THE ECLECTIC COLLEGEOFIREDICIKE,
I N I N N A I O I O
1.MIE
Spring Session of 1858 will commence
on Monday the 8th of February, and conti
nue sixteen weeks. A full and thorough course
of lectures will be given, occupying six or se
ven hours daily, with good opportunities for
attention to practical Anatomy, and vrjsli am
ple Clinical facilities at the Commercial Hospi
tal.
The arrangements of the chairs will be as
follows:—
T. E. St. JOHN, M. D.,
Professor of Anatomy and Physiology.
J, F. JUDGE, M. D.,
Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy.
A. J. HOWE, M. D.,
Professor of Surgery.
C. H. CLEVELAND,. M. D.,
Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics.
..WM. SHERWOOD, M. D.,
Professor of Medical Practice and Pathology.
J. R. BUCHANAN, M. D.,
Emeritus Professor of Cerebral Physiology and
Institutes of Medicine.
JOHN KINO, M. D-,
Professor of Obstetrics and diseases of Women
and Children.
The terms for the Session will be the same
as heretofore, viz.:—Matriculation, $5,000
Tuition, $20,00. Demonstrator's Ticket, $2,00
Every Student is required to engage in dissec
tion one Session before graduation. Gradua
tion, $20,00. Ticket to Commercial Hospital,
(optional) $5,00.
The lecture rooms are newly finished, neat
and comfortable, and in a central locality,, (in
College Hall, Walnut Street,) where Students
will find it convenient to call on their arrival.
Tickets for the Session may be obtained of
the Dean of the Faculty, at his office, No 113,
Smith Street, or of Prof. C. H. Cleveland,,
Secretary of the Faculty, No. 139, Seventh
Street, near Elm.
A
JOHN KIKO, M. D., Dean.
SCHOOL DISTRICT.
VTOTICE is hereby given that the Commis-.
131 siohers of Stearns County, & T., at their
last session, established School District number
three in said county, with the following boun
daries, to wit: The fractions of sections 12,
13 and 24, and sections 14 and 28 in township
124, north of range 28 west.
JOSEPH EDELBROOK,
Clerk of Board of County Commissioners.
THE COLLEGEJOURML OF HEDICI1 SCIENCE.
Monthly Magasine of 48 rages} conducted
by the Faculty of Tne_Eclectic.College of
Medicine, is published at One Dollar aTear,
payable in advance. The volume of the Jour
nal commenees with the year. Communications
for subscription or for specimen numbers,
should be directed to
Dr. C. H. CLEVELAND, Publisner,
139, Seventh Street. CineiNaatJL O*
ii

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