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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, November 29, 1863, Image 3

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SuiMlay WLitioiie
Dk.' earus' illijs'iSated mar-
RIAGE GUIDE AND MEDICAL ADVISER. (200
pages). Mailed everywhere .n sea-cd
Cn pRoP e3 AVzA?S P VRBMiuM OOM
PRESS and URETHRAL SUPPORT
ER, r mechanical appliances) instam-
I }y arrests and speedily ,curcs without
medicine all forms oi seminal, weak
ness resulting from excesses, unpru
(|ence or advanced years, lhey are
approved by the highest medical atj-
FRENCH MOXA is the only
recognized iutallible remedy for restoring nature tons
LADIES ELECTRO PREVENTIVE TO
CONCEPTION will last a lifetime, is safe, intalliblc, and
is a blessing to those who are necessitated to limit their
4>tfsrring. Price $2.
TA EQU A RE’S VULCANIZED RUBBER GOODS for
gentlemen ito be had nowhere else). 50 cents each, or $3
nor dozen.
The above articles ara forwarded secure from notice,
w?.h full direct ions, on receipt of price. Address
DK. WM. EARLE A CO.,
Medical and SurgicaLAgcnt®,
No. 58 White street, N. Y.
'H,B. LINES CAN BECONSULTED ON
1 I 0 ALL DISEASES OF FEMALES. WITH UNPARAL
t-VLE l> s I'CCHSS. At Vo. 151 Fast I3UI st. near 2d Av.
DK. TVBENNE’S infallible reme-
DIES, Specific and Preoentive and GoW Piflx, cure all
casefi, and in all stages of disease. No other medicines are
■required. Sate and pleatant A trial will prove their ex
cellence. Treatment by letter sent to all parts of the coun
ry. For sale by all respectable d rnggists. Send red stamp
or circular, to principal office, No. 710 Broadway, N. Y.
C >strolcijy. •
TXY-TOBMISTRY. MADAME HOPE,
Jljj recently from the Sonth,andthe greatcstastrol >-
ctsr in the world, as hundreds can testify that visit her
Sally, can l>e consulted on all the affairs of life, never fails
to advise plans bv which every one may t>e relieved of
their present troubles, unfolds the mysteries of the future
to such a nicety that every one who visits her is as-
Uirfehed st her marvelous predictions. No. 165 Sixth
avenue, between Eleventh and Twelfth street. Ladies,
50 cents. Gentlemen, SIOO.
F OOK HERE !—ARE YOU IN TROU
jU ble?
Have you been deceived or trifled with T
Have your fond hopes been blasted by false promises!
If K go to MADAME ROSS for advice and satisfaction.
In love affairs she was never known to fail.
Fhe brings together those long separated, and shows a cor
net likeness of future husband or absent friend.
Lucky Numbers Free.
Ko. 98 W. TWENTY-SEVENTH STREET,
Between Sixth and Sevent h Avenues.
Name on the Door. Ring the Basement Belt
A BETTER ASTROLOGIST IS NOT TO
/JL t-e found in the United States than Dr. L. D. and
Mrs. aD. BROUGHTON. They succeed in giving satis
faction when all others fait They can be consulted on
all affaire of human life, such as courtship, marriage,
traveling, removals, Jaw suits, obtaining situations, re
covering property, welfare of absent friends, Ac. ; also,
sickness; if the sick party will recover or die of the pres
ent sickness; if recover, the time they will begin to
amend ; w hat part of the body is afflicted, and what
treatment and medicines are best adapted for the sick
persons. Ladies, 50 cents ; gentlemen. sl. Questions an
swered toy letter, enclosing sl, and phrenological exami
nations made. Office No. 120 Greene street, below Prince.
MRS. MARION JAMEsT INDEPEN*
DENT CLAIRVOYANT, No. 170 Third Avenue,
may be consulted daily by Ladies on all matters, business
and medical. Mrs. James never fails to give correct in
form ation of lost or stolen property, absent or lost friends,
or of past present or future events. Also detects and
Eucccssfully treats all diseases no matter of how long
standing. Mrs. James is a genuine Independent Clairvoy
ant, and has nothing whatever to do with Astrology. La
dles in search of information on any subject should not
fail to consult her. Gentlemen not admitted. Questions
answered by mail on receipt of sl.
Mme. c. de prage, autgraphist,
having had several years’ experience in all the
principal cities in Europe, will now efferher service to
the American public, for the first time, on past, present
and future affairs of life ; will send a correct likeness of
your future husband or wife, by enclosing a lock of hair,
ana age, with 50 cents. Address
Mme. C. DE PRAGE,
Station A, Spring street. New York.
WrS. GALLIEBS, LATE OF NINE-
E TEEKTH street, wishes to inform her numerous
friends and visitors, that she is now permanent y located
st No 105 East Fortieth street, between Third and Lexing
wn avenuee. Hours from 10 to 9. Gentlemen not admit
ted. __
A BUSINESS AND MEDICAL CLAIR-
VOYANT, who has no equal in America, and is the
lady who first advertised in this city and Boston, and
slo’ooo reward is offered to any person who can surpass
her in giving correct information on lost or stolen goods,
jawsuits, absent friends and business matters of all kinds.
If vou have trouble, no matter how serious, she can allay
it ’for yon. She also prescribes for all diseases ami is
making great cures. N. B.—This is no hunftuig, nor does
she wish to impose on the unwary. Please lest her skill.
This lady also manufactures a wash called Chinese Hyso,
an infallible remedy for removing freckles, tan anil sun
burn, and renders the skin perfectly soft and smooth : a
highly perfumed and elegant article for the toilet. La
dies, fry it. Please remember this is the only independent
Clairvoyant in this city. She can refer to the most promi
nent citizens of New York, Philadelphia, Boston and other
cities. Cail and satisfy yourselves. Office No. 153 East
Thirtieth street, between" Third and Lexington avenues.
"KfO imposition7Hthe never fail-
JLli ING MADAME STARR, from Europe, who was born
with a natural gift She consults on the past, vreseut and
future, on all affairs of life, brings together those Jong sep
arated, causes speedy marriages, shows you a correct
likeness of your future husband or absent friends; drunk
enness cured ; numbers free. Ladies, take notice—you
that have been deceived by false lovers, yon that have
lieen unfortunate in life, call on this great European Clair
voyant and Aslrologist, tor it is true facts Which induce
her to say that her equal is not to be found, which is
proved and tested by hundreds who daily and eagerly
visit her. Caution, look out, good news for all. $5,000 re
ward for any one who can equal Madame Starr, the great
European Claiovoyant, in her profession or skill. She
»*<• tells yon fhe narie of the person you will marry. No
humbug. No. 101 East Seventeenth street, corner of Third
avenue. Name on the door. Gentlemen not admitted.
Madame shaeffer, the seventh
daughter, has a natural gift to tell about love,
■marnage. absent friends, business and journeys. No. 235
Second street, between Avenue C and Union Market.
Ladies, 25 cents. Gentlemen not admitted.
MADAME ESTELLE, SEVENTH
Daughter, can be consulted on Love, Marriage, Sick
ness, Losses in Business, Lucky Numbers and Charms.
®atisfhction guaranteed. Ladies, 25 cents ; Gentlemen, 50
wonts. Cal) at No. 114 Varick street, near Broome.
WHO WOULD NOT GO TO MAKE
their tortune? Go ye, one and all, to see Misb
"WELLINGTON, the renowned English Prophetess, uni
▼entally acknowledged the best of all Astrologists, who
’.guarantees to secure to those who consult her health,
wealth and happiness, and warrants to impart to them
information oi the utmost importance, relative to iaw-
Miitß, journeys, absent friends, love, courtship, mar
riage, hidden treasures, enemies and troubles; in fact,
of all affairs in Ute. Brave soldiers, learn your doom or
glory, Hfe or death. If vou seek your own prosperity
and felicity you’ll not delay to visit or address by letter
this highly gifted and beaut iful young lady, at No. 191
Sixt): avenue, opposite Eighth street. Miss W. is the only
person In tills city who has the genuine Roman and Ara
bian tailsmens for love, good luck and business affairs—
warranted for life. Lucky numbers given, as also highly
respectable city reference. Drunkenness cured and un
faithful wives and husbands reclaimed.
A BONA FIDE ASTROLOGIST THAT
.Til everv one can depend on, is Mme. WILSON, who
tells the object of your visit as soon as you enter. She
telife the past, present and future of your life, and warns
you of dangers, and brings success out of the most peril
ous mid makings. N. B.—Celebrated Magic Charms. No.
189 Allen street, between Houston and Stanton, over the
Bakery. Charges, for Ladies and Gentlemeto ftOconte.
Madame harvey, n©. 67 sheriff
STREET, near Rivington. Ladies, 25c. tosl. Gentle
men not admitted.
Come, maidens—come, wives
And learn the futures of your livca
I unfold the future.
And tell of the past;
Bring those long separated
Together at last
Those who want riches.
Give me a call;
I have lucky numbers
For one and for all.
important!
fiend al! Money and Packages £® Mfflers
fry Harnden’s Express, Ko. T 4 Broadway, as
t&ey have United States Sovermnent permis
sion to forward to the irnty at Baltimore,
Frederick City, Fortress Washing
ton, Port Royal, and other points, for hall
rates. Their Express fe the oldest in the
United States. Their Ereat Eastern and
PUBladelpbia Expresses sent m formerly.
■OICH! AND RACY !
JI IL BOOKS. CARDS, PRINTS, etc., etc.
DON’T FAIL TO SEND FOR CATALOGUES.
Address E. VINRACE.
P. O. “Box So. B,’’ SHI KLEY VILLAGE,
Mass.
OUBLE CYLINDER PRESS FOR
BALE.—A large Hoe Double Cylinder Press for
Kaie, size 57x40. Can be seen running every Thursday,
Friday and Saturday mornings, at No. H Frankfort street,
IL Y. Price $2,000. For particulars, apply at
JOSEPH T. PRESTON’S,
No. 11 Frankfort street
Dye your coats !—dye your
VESTS !—Overcoats, Pantaloons and other gar
ments. can be cleaned and dyed, WITHOUT REMOVING
THE LININGS, or even ripping them apart, at a cost ef
ceuts to $1 50, at the
FRENCH STEAM SOOURIN-G
AND
DYEING ESTABLISHMENT,
Of EUGENE DUMONT,
No. 88 Third avenue, near Twelfth street
RIF FI N iC K 9
VX DEALERS IN
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS,
No. 93 SOUTH STREET,
New York.
APPLES, POTATOES, and ONIONS
Of all kinds put up in the best manner for shipping
ic juiy i.lMnate.
MERIOAN patent.
METALLIC COLLARS
VS.
STEEL COLLARS.
AMERICAN PATENT
METALLIC COLLARS!
METALLIC COLLARS !
VS.
STEEL COLIDARS;
THE AMERICAN ENAMELLED METALLIC COLLAR
®<)MFANT nail the attention of the public to the Bniwrk7
My of their UoDars over the Imported ‘ Steel”
Ufeeanw they are superior—lst. in enamel, therefore more
<ftirabl< ; 2d, lhey are more pliable ; 3d. the metal they
are mam of is a non-conductor, and there is no danger ctf
Wing a tarect for lightninj? (the soldier with a mußket in
hie hands during a thunder shower can appreciate this);
ilh. their Turn-over Collar ie the only article of the kind
manufactured—the imported being an imposition, a hum
hug, and only a turn-over in name Enclose $1 for a
•’Choker,” or 31 50 for 8 genuine ” Half Turnover” Col
lar. to Box 5,178, New York Post Office, and receive it by
return mail. Agente wanted. The trade luritished with
eriecß by sod rejwtug
jtMEHJUAN ENAMELLED METALLIC COLLAR CO ,
C. H WELLING,
lie S< FINK STRKET, WEW FORK.
NAU-
V' SHON leaves . .
Christopher street at } ' IUI
Spring street at 954, and 3‘a-
Dey street at 12/4, and 3
Morris fct. (pier 4) at 10 J, and 4.
Lauds at Fort Uarr.iJi n.
7C'EW~’yOBK TO LULL’S tfERRY,
PLEASANT VALLEY, and FORT u
LEE.
FARE, TEN CENTS;
On and after Oct- 5 A 1863,the
Steamer THOS. E. HULSE, Capt Gic. W. ANNxn.
Wil) leave until further notice as follows •
From FORT LEE A. M.
From FOOT OF SPRING ST4 P.M.
SUNDAYS INCLUSIVE.
■pQ'A'i'IONAL BATTLE PINS.—
Me L ’Llan, Grant,*s3
Ro sec ra ns, Banks,
Mrape, Gilmore,
I’VRNSin 1 ’ VRNSina ' Hooklr,
; Sigkl and Foster.
All on Me seme pattern
ns the cut, only differing
ha tile-grounds and
dat'.s. Perfect photo
graph likeness in each
If pin, plated with fine gold
By enclosing One Dollar, a sample will be sent by mail.
AGENTS WANTED IN AND OUT THE ARMY.
The above is the exclusive property of the inventor.
J. BARNET & CO.,
No. 609 Broadway, N. Y.
CE3ITS FOR THE BEST WATCH
GLASSES.
PLEASE KEEP THIS TN SIGHT,
H J That vou can have Fine Watches, Chronometers,
■ a and Duplex Movements put in repair, and war-
I 9 ranted to give perfect satisfaction, by expert-
B 3 enced and skillful workmen, at CAMPBELL’S
S JEWELRY STORE. No. 339 FOURTH AVENUE,
first block below Harlem and New Haven Rail
road Depot, New York. Banjo, Guitar and Violin Strings
for sale.
AV.A. 81 A. V. A.
e Bl PROPHYLACTIC Rubber
goods or “Cheeks” to natural consequences.” Prices $2,
$3, $4, and $5 per dozen. Forwarded in neat boxes. Send
for circulars- Gentlemen invited to call and examine
goods before purchasing. Goods ex-changed until suited.
& C. MACKEY & CO.,
No. 81 Nassau street. New York.
HO RAT T O F. AVERILL
COUNBELLOR-A.T-L A W.
Ar.d ADVOCATE IN ADMIRALTY,
Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds,
No. 167 BROADWAY,
Rooms No. S and 11.
G~6od~news to SMOKERS-
KO.
“AKB>UCAn'b"rD’S I BYB SMOIdKG TOBAOCO/'
WHeh is equal if not superior to the English. This Tobacco
has less narcotise in it than any other Tobacco. A perscc
smsiing itnii; find it has a sweet flavor, and isvery iges
sant to smolie. All persons smoMng a pipe, snouM give
'' he “AMERIGAN BIRD'S-EYE TOBACCO”
a trial—we guarantee you will enjoy a good smoke. It
&aves no deleterious effects; and does not act upon tha
serves like ether Tobacco. Sold everywhere.
’llll SELF-RAISING
FLOUR
Makes more and sweeter BREAD and CAKE than any
other Flour in the market.- Call for
. HEY’S FLOUR.
For sale in all trie principal Groceries in the city.
WEIGLY st DE WALT, Manufacturers.
No. 318 Greenwich street, N. Y.
d eTw .
FOR THE COMPLEXION.
-
This delightful preparation is the most efficacious and
valuable article yet known for beautifying the complex
ion, and imparting to the skin that clearness and white
ness so much admired and coveted. It contains no min
eral substance, chalk or powder, of any kind, but is a
purely BOTANICAL PREPARATION, free from all in
jurious ingredients and as pure, and innocuous as the dew
from Heaven. It removes TAN, FRECKLES and DIS
COLORATIONS, prevents Wrinkles, Rough and Sallow
Checks, improves and preserves the beauty of the Com
plexion, and renders the skin white, soft, smooth and
clear. It is a fragrant and delicate perfume, and will be
found a delightful addition to the, bath. Sold by Drug
gisu-. D. D. GRIFFIN. General Agent,
Nos. 779 and 781 Broadway.
The highest cash prices paed
lor OLD NEWSPAPERS of every description, old
PAMPHLETS of every kind, old BLANK BOOKS and
LEDGERS that are written full, and all kinds of WASTE
PAPER from bankers, insurance companies, brokers, pa
tent-medicine depots, printing-offices, book binders, pub
lic and private libraries, hotels, steamboats, railroad com
j auies. express offices. Ac.
STOCKWELL & EMERSON, 25 ANN ST.
SPECTACLES— BRAZILIAN PEBBLES
and Double-Vision Glasses, in gold, silver and other
frames.. Also, the celebrated Eye-Preservers, so hlghl
appreciated at the Eye Hospital and the Eye Infirmary,
being superior to any other article, giving ease and vigor
to the weak, and preserving the perfect sight tor many
years. Professor FRANKS, Oculist and Optician, Lec
turer on the Human Eve and Optics, accurately and scien
tifically adjusts these far-famed spectacles to defective vi
sions at his office, No. 288 Grand st, corner of Eldridge.
Scents per pound paid cash
for WHITS RAGS, and 5% cents tor old NEWSPA
PERS, BOOKS and PAMPHLETS-
THOMAS C. BENNETT,
No. 49 Ann st. and No. 183 William st., cor. of Spruce.
IN(HNG BIRDS.~ZS7OO6~SELECTED
GERMAN CANA RIES, in full song, guaranteed, with
a complete variety of Fancy and Singing Birds, from all
parts of the world. CHAS. REICHE .t BRO.,
No. 51 Chatham street opposite Chambers.
WfIAH AGENTS WANTED
• VW TO SELL THE
©NEW NATIONAL MEDAL
and Battle Pins of General Mc-
Clellan and the other Generals-
Tbe Medal has McClellan on one
side and the American Eagle on
the other ; the size, of a $5 gold
piece ; fine gold plated. 'The
above cut is a true copy of the
Pins and Medals. The sample
of Fir swill be sent by mail on
receipt et sl, and the Medals on the receipt of 25 cents by
return mail. J. BARNET & CO., No. 609 Broadway.
■MTODEBN HORSE SHolsiNG
ESTABLISHMENT.
ADJOINING THE METROPOLITAN STABLES,
NO. 94 CROSBY STREET,
NEW YORK.
DR. WM. PTSHELDON,
LATF. OF THIRD AVENUE HORSE R. R. COMPANY,
.Having secured “aright” from the Goodenough Horse
f hoe Manufacturing Company. No. 1 Dey street, to use
this improved Horse Shoe, begs to state to all who value
the comfort of that noble animal the horse, that having
superb tended the shoeing of some two thousand horses
v ith this shoe-replacing bar and round shoes, speak with
shoe deMCe aS the great and invaluable benefit of this
Horses cannot fall on Broadway shod with this shoe, as
hundrecs can testify—it is a perfect road shoe, preventing
interfering,overreaching—a positive cure for weakjknoet
tender or bruised heels, thrush sand or quarter crooks
keeping the foot sonud and healthy—lasting much longer,
costing no more.
A fair trial, and no charge if not satisfactory. Any quan
tity of certificates can be seen at the office.
.Sound tooted horses shod with these shoes will remain
sound.
Bhatts and Skating
g KATES
EOR T,IR MILLION,
and everything in the Skat
f mm—ing line.
“ THE LATEST KINK ”
WOODH A M ’ S
SELF-€L E A N I N G
FASTENING
can be applied to any skate. Skates Made, Ground, an
Repaired, at
ALFRED WOODHAM’S
Sportsman’s Depot,
No. 424 Broadway, N. Y
KATES! SKATES? SKATES!
SKATES FOR THE MILLION 1
ALFRED WOODHAM S
Sportsmen's Depot,
No. 424 BROADWAY, N. Y.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Learn to skate in one-half
HOUR wing the AMERICAN PARLOR, or
FLOOR skates.
Fer s»)e by alll Shale. Dealers. Manufactures by
>. BTEIBNS, No. 21S st., New York,
And No. US Kilby si., Boston.
gallsi and ganrluQ.
gECOND ANNUAL RE-UNION
NORMAL LODGE, No. 523, i’. a-a A. M. (fl,
BAND MASONIC BALL
IN AID OF
TOE WIDOWS’ AND ORPHANS’ FUND
©y
Normal Lodge, No. 523, F. & 5. ill.,
JN
IRVING HAL L,
ON
WEDNESDAY EVENING, DEC. 16, 1803.
DANCING TO COMMENCE AT 9 O’CLOCK.
Musk by Pcdwortii'g Celebrated Bands.
The Committee of Arrangements feel authorized in
making the positive assertion that this, the
SECOND ANNUAL RE UNION OF NORMAL LODGE,
will be the most distingui of the season.
The members of Normal Lodge will appear in regalia;
and it is earnestly hoped that the Fraternity at large win
co-operate with them, and also appear in regalia.
TICKETS, admitting a Gentleman and Ladies, TWO
DOLLARS’, and can be obtained of any of the following
Committee, viz:
R. W. GEO. H. RAYMOND,
WM. A. KELSEY, CHAS. M’NEILL,
COR. M. SULLIVAN, AMOR J. WILLIAMSON,
JACOB SHIPSEY, WM. BUCKLEY,
E. R. CHAPMAN, JOHN WILDEY,
JOHN GRIFFIN, JOHN DALEY,
WM. BURNS, M. C. FORDHAM,
HENRY E. KELSEY, ANDERSON McDEVTTT,
DAVID KEENE, HENRY D. STOVER,
HENRY C. MALLETT, WM. B. COGSWELL,
THOS. W. COWDIN, JOHN N. JONES,
EDW. S. LARNED, JOHN HOWARD WOOD,
WM. F. COSTENBADER, RICHARD C. WHITE,
BILLINI BUCK, CHAS. EARLE,
RICHARD DUNN, JOHN W. BROWN,
SAM'L P. WHITE, HARDING WESTON,
WM. R. BABCOCK, JAS. A. GILBERT,
WM. EATON, AINSWORTH BROWN,
GEO. W. BILL, JOHN S. LENG,
EDW. A. FREEMAN, JOHN KENNEDY,
E. C. ANDREWS, AUG. C. VAN ARSDALB,
JAS. H. HAMBLET, GEO. S. SMINCK,
WM. H. SHAW, WM. S. GUERINEAU,
L. W. OGDEN, M. D., WM. 11, ARCHER,
WM. H. LOUNSBERY, ISAAC M. LEWIS,
N. ESPENSCBEID, F. h. LOVELL,
WM. N. DICKINSON, FRANCIS E. ELDRIDGE,
LORENZO JOHN REARDON,
DAVIT} H. OAKS, WM. IL STOCKING,
GES). -H. BKIGGS, ROBT. S. DUNHAM.
R. BURNETT SMITH, B. F. HOWARD.
CHARLES H. YALLALEE,
HERMAN F. BAUER, Chairman.
Secretary.
rjIHE ANNUAL BALL OF THE NEW
JL YORK HAT FINISHER S TRADE ASSOGI-
ATION will be held at IRVING HALL,
ON THURSDAY EVENING, Dec. 10th, 1803.
Tickets, sl. To be had of the Committee, or atOflfe
the door on the evening of the Ball. Joseph Fox. Ch»m-
JOHN W. SUMNER, Brest. W. D. Spinning, sec-
THE 35TH ANNUAL BALL OF THE
NEW? YORK FIRE DEPARTMENT, for the
BENEFIT of the WIDOWS and ORPHANS of DE- SO
• 'EASED FIREMEN, will take place on MONDAY
EVENING, JANUARY 25th, 1864, at the
ACADEMY OF MUSIC.
Tickets may be procured of the Managers, or of the fol
lowing officers :
C. GODFREY GUNTHER. President,
No 46 Maiden Lans.
JAS F. WENMAN, Secretary,
No 146 Pearl street.
ALBERT J. DELATOUR. Treasurer.
No. 25>< Wall street
FIIHE THIRTY - SECOND ANNUAL
E BAuL OF THE
THISTLE BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION
Will take place in the
CITY ASSEMBLY ROOMS
ON THURSDAY EVENING, DEC. 10th, 1863. gSim
The managers, in soliciting the patronage of the S;< tti'h
Societies in the city and vicinity, and the public in gene
ral, beg most respectfully to state that they will snare no
t ffort to make the 32d Annual Ball oi the Association one
of the best of the season.
MUSIC BY ROBERTSON’S CELEBRATED BAND,
And MR. CLELAND, the famous Highland Piner.
Moor Manager, Prof. J. A. Macpherson. Tickets, sl.
J LEONARD’S DANCING ACADEMY,
• Corner of 69th street and 3d avenue.
DAYS OF TUlTlON—Wednesdays and Satur- J®
days : 3 P. M. for Misses and Masters, 7 for Ladies, hi'liu
and 8 for Gentlemen.
The NEXT ASSEMBLIES will take place Monday, No
vember 23, and December 21.
Brooklyn dancing academy.
C. 11. RIVERS’
PRIVATE DANCING ACADEMY,
No. 33 SCHERMERHORN STREET, CORNER
COURT STREET. Ofe
All the fashionable dances are taught in cue courXof
lessons.
The rooms, having been enlarged and newly fitted-ap,
are complete in every respect.
Located in the most select neighborhood of Brooklyn,
retired but central, being but a short distance from the
City Mall.
SCI REES for the pupils, their parents and friends.
SEND FOR A CIRCULAR.
CITY ASSEMBLY ROOMS, No. 446
BROADWAY.—This establishment, having
been entirely renovated and put in the very best
possible condition, is new offered to the public on
flip most reasonable terms. The attention of Com-Lrffife
mittees having in charge
DINNERS, RECEPTIONS, COLLATIONS, CONCERTS,
BALLS, ami PUBLIC MEETINGS,
is respectfully solicited. The best and most satisfactory
accommodations guaranteed.
GEORGE W. VESEY, Superintendent.
A POLLO, No. 410 BROADWAY.—The
JTW. Advertiser is nrepaxed to m&ke arrangements
lor Palis, Concerts. Suppers, Ac., for the ensuing sea
son. Committees making engagements dealt with on ZjJb®
favorable terms by making early application. Oink
GEORGE ALKEIL
HOLLICK’S greatest PHYSIOLOGI-
CAL WORK. THE MARRIAGE GUIDE ; or. Nat
ural Htetory of Generation; being a Private Instigator for
Married Persons and those about to Marry (both AKrte and.
Female) in everything concerning the Physiology and Re
lations of the Sexual System, and Die production or pro
vention of Offspring—including all the new discoveriea,
never before given in the English language. By F. Hol
liek, M. D. This is a really valuable and interesting phy
siological work. It Is written in plain language
general reader, and is illustrated with colored plates. All
young married people should read tliis book; but still k is
a book that must be kept locked up, and not lie about the
house It is a book of about 430 pages, well bound in a
cloth gilt binding, and I send it free of postage at ONE
DOLLAR per copy. Cheap enough. Send cash orders to
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[Written for the New York Dispatch.]
A MEMORY.
.5. Gordon Ammons,
Do you remember the sylvan grave,
Where, hand in hand, we used to rove
To the mousy rock in the deep, cool dell,
Whore the tiny cascade gently fell;
And where the birds, around, above,
Warbled rneir melodies of love ?
Do you remember the words I sai l
No other maiden I e’er should wed ?
And. looking in your eyes of blue,
Deemed none were half so dear as you:
And when you all my love repaid,
We never dreamed our love could fade.
Alas! for blissful hopes of youth,
Ar.d promises of love and truth;
You've been a bride for many a year,
But I am not your husband dear;
And I h;. v<- long been wedded too,
But she who wed me was not you!
Nor are our hearts quite broken yet,
Jho’ 1. for c ne. can ne’er forget
Those hupoy days of love and peace,
Until all du mory shall cease :
Bright spots of May In Life’s December—
I m very sure you do remember!
(Written for the New York Dispatch.)
FATALLY WOUNDED.
BY MRS, OIAVIA HING
“ Herbert Merton, SeverJth Michigan, wound
ed ; since died.”
(.That .was the item that had turned to ashy
whitene'ss the lips of Aggie Wilde, and sent the
death agony of despair quivering through every
nerve, as clasping tightly the paper in her trem
bling hands, she sat, her deep eyes fixed with a
painful fascination upon the one name in all that
terrible Ust.
And no wonder ; for, through childhood and
voutli, the two had been inseparable, and up to
the time of Herbert’s departure, there had been
no clouds to shadow the bright, clear sky of their
happiness.
Wealthy and beautiful was Aggie Wilde, the
belle of the little Western village, and countless
were the suitors that had fluttered about in the
bewildering blaze of her fascinations, till wearied
with her light joyousness, they had left the field
in despair of ever gaining from the laughing
beauty even one glance of encouragement, or an
avowal of the passion her sprightliness had in
spired. But Herbert Merton—for years she had
looked upon him as a brother, one in whom she
could confide every joy, and the thousand little
annoyances that checker even the happiest life.
“ Wounded, since died.” How like a knell that
one sentence trembled through her heart, and
how in that awful moment did her thoughts go
sadly back through all their happy childhood,
recounting each playful word of fondness and
frolicsome adverture, up to the eve of his de
parture, when, clasping her hand, he had potired
into her ear the old, old story, his deep, dark,
earnest eyes looking the feeling that was burning
in his heart.
Herbert Merton loved the sweet, bewitching
girl, and responding to the nation’s call, going
forth'to battle for the right, he had come to tell
her of the one great secret of his life, and for
the first time Aggie realized that not as a bro
ther, but as something nearer and more dear,
did she regard the brave and noble youth, who
in this moment of parting had told her that
when far away, ’mid dangers and privations,
every quivering tendril of his heart would be en
livened by sweet remembrances of her.
And then, had “the woman” of her nature
sprang to life—a kind and tender oft'ection, un
felt before, had stolen into her heart; and the
parting, that eve, beneath the old locusts, was
not that of friends long tried and true, but the
sad and tearful parting of two loving, ardent
hearts, suddenly merged and mingled into one—
the parting of two natures with but a single
thought, and that the love they bore each
Other.
McClellan’s mighty army, to which a nation
looked with pride and hope, was before Rich
mond. A terrible battle was raging, and strew
ing that bloody field were the bodies of the loved,
for whom, at home, would vainly fall the bitter
tear of mother, wife and sister. Aggie Wilde!
Poor Aggie! With pale cheeks, and a fearful
anxiety weighing down her heart did she await
the result, hoping, praying that in that awful
carnage the life of Herbert Merton might be
spared.
But, alas! for human hopes ! " fhUZg
wounded—since dead!” With these few words,
all joy had departed.
Herbert had fallen, and what was there now in
life for her ? Ah 1 how many hearts have been
plunged from the bliss of perfect happiness
how many homes darkened since the summons
went forth, that the loyal and brave were to de
fend their country at the price of blood !
Crushed to earth was Aggie Wilde. The blow
was greater than the frail nature could endure,
and cne week later, mid the raging of fever and
delirium, the last drop of life-blood was scorched
and dried up in the veins, anil the sweet spirit
winged its way to realms of everlasting rest,
there to rejoin her soul’s companion. Just as
the bright sun sank, shedding it's last ravs upon
the distant hill-tops, tinting the fleecy clouds
with crimson and gold, a gleam of intelligence
lighted the wan face, the lips murmured “He is
waiting,” a sweet smile wavered for a moment
around the pure mouth, and Aggie Wilde was
with her loved one and her God 1
American Muslins. —The new Ameri
can fabric has just been successfully introduced.
The jaconet muslins, that have been so largely
imported, have been produced and printed here
in a manner that will successfully compete with
anything of foreign production. 'These muslins
are very light, ten yards to the pound, and are
finished with about one-eighth of the stareb that
is required for ordinary cambrics. The manu
facture of tbi s style of goods has been intro
duced here under the auspices of Mr. Arnold Pe
ters, one of the most skillful mechanics in New
England, and who has for years exerted himself
to induce our best manufacturers to leave cem
mon goods to ruder hands, and apply themselves
to those fabrics not easily produced, which al
ways find a market and at remunerating prices.
The Masonville and Manehang goods have been
finished in this style at the old Providence Dye
ing, Bleaching and Calendering Works, and their
appearance is quite equal to any of the same
class of goods that wo have seen of foreign pro
duction Providence Journal.
rWnttCK for Use New York Dispatch.)
IH E BEAUT IFU L.
Ry Atneita,
J lo>c • beautiful! the tiniest flower
’t:wtk<s to life in hcihc sequosiemi bower,
i.e w beauij* io the smiting /ale,
.•'•.nd Kives its fra;,rance to the pacing gale:
:-<.i :arv exotics, rich, varied hue,
V« he; e<n the sweets di<il like evening dew.
Ghana by their splendor, and their sort, perfume,
Disarming fate of much of care arid gloom.
Bloom on, sweet flowers, and gladden us on our way 1
Ye are bright and beautiful, tbv’ brief your day.
Ik vc the beautiful! the pale stars shed
Their lambent light upon earth’s lowly Ped,
And c’< n reflect a brightness in the soul,
‘1 hat willing yields to the bemgn control;
Then quickly looms a glowing train of thought—
How Man from God’s great master-mind was wrought—
When erst the stars for joy together sang.
And Heaven’s high courts with hallelujahs rang ;
Ha bright and l- r.utiful! still kindly shine,
And guide the way to light and life divine.
I love the beautiful! the sings,
As on yon leafy bough she folds l>cr wings,
And joyful list I to the soft retrain,
Till Music’s seif seems blended with the strain :
Oh, for thy pinions, bird of silvery wing 1
Then would I soar away, and, soaring, sing—
V\ hile my glad song, perchance, might e’en impart
A happier impulse to some care-worn heart.
Sing on, bright bird! your notes, so soft and clear—
All beautiful they greet my listening ear.
I love the beautiful! the moon’s pale beam
Reflects her image in yon rippling stream,
And gilds the snow-capped waves that sink to rest,
All placidly upon old Ocean’s breast;
Enwrapt in slumber, peacefully and lone,
The wearied form upon the couch is thrown—
Charmed by the spell of the soft moonlight hours,
When fancy revels in love-lighted bowers.
On, beauteous orb! w hile wearied mortals sleep,
Fail proudly o’er the shoreless upper deep.
1 love the beautiful! soft zephyrs sigh,
And distant echoes plaintively reply ;
Sut rounding hills, and dales, the strains prolong.
While laney weaves them in harmonious song ;
E’en the rude blast, borne on the wintery wind,
Rushing with madness ’gainst the easement blind,
Or roaring fiercely, like the billowy surge,
Falls cn my car, like some grand funeral dirge ;
Sigh on. soft zephyrs 1 winds, repeat your knell!
To me, how beautiful your mystic spell.
I love the beautiful 1 the azure sky,
All dotted o’er with clouds, that, doaking high,
Tint with soft splendor Heaven’s boundless dome,
As through the realms of space they swiftly come ;
I love to watch them skim the milky-way—
Chasing each other as in sportive piay—
And often gaze out on the starry sphere,
To see them form, then break, and disappear;
Float cn, ye clouds! then melt in ether blue—
Ye are beautiful to my enraptured view.
J love the beautifulit matters not
Whether in palace grand or rustic cot.;
And wheresoe’er ray weary way may wend,
I pause at Beauty’s shrine, the knee to bend ;
The beauteous flowers—as sweetly do they bloom
To grace the bridal, or bedeck the tomb—
And sparkles just the same the radiant gem,
In darksome cave, or monarch’s diadem ;
And thus my heart e’er finds a strange delight,
In al! that’s fair, and beautiful, and bright.
■Written for the New York Dispatch.)
AGUES BARTON.
A STORY OF .LOVE AND TRUTH.
V.\ WILV.I'I ». UUSBNBML.
“Yes, I married her, and shall I tell yon
■why?”
I had often asked him why he had married the
deformed woman he called wife, but never had
obtained any answer. At this time, however,
something appeared to have opened his heart
and to have rendered him mere than ordinarily
communicative. We sat in the twilight on the
stone steps of his grand old frame house, for ac
cording to the common term. " he was well to do
in the woild.” In fact he could count his
acres by the hundreds, and his bank stocks
and railroad shares by the thousands. Even
as we sat there 1 could see the distorted form of
his wife limping abon'. ths interior, and as the
tire Basket, cheerily into ablaze, discern the
tears and broad livid seams upon her face. That
seme strange accident had rendered her thus 1
was confident, for she was evidently educated
and possessed that rare gift in womanhood, “ a
low, sweet voice,” that ever fell upon the ear soft
as a summer’s evening melody—attractive as her
face was repulsive. Yes, I was confident that
there must have been some strange accident in
the matter, but how r. man elegantly educated
and refined, wealthy and traveled, should have
bound himself to one thus deformed, had ever
been a puzzle. Andi was far from being alone
in longing to fathom the mystery, for it had been
a fruitful theme of conversation for many years.
Vainly, however, had the gossips striven’ to lift,
the veil to read the inner life of that homestead
or learn of the past and its ghastly secrets.
And why should we admit the prying eye of
idle curiosity to revel amid and make merry
with the transactions of the inner, holier shrine
of life? Why throw open to a gapmg and cen
sorious world the record of our loves and of our
sorrows ? Is there not in every human destiny
something that should be hid—something too
tender for the hard hands of triumph to toss
aboutand make a shuttlecock of? Are there not
lines written in the record book of your earthly
journey and mine that should be open to no eye’s
but the angels—that should die with us and be
buried in the dust and ashes of forgetfulness ?
Truly “ the heart knows its own sorrows and the
stranger should not intermeddle therewith.”
But as we. eat in the twilight and watched the
clouds swiftly sweeping southward, so the clouds
of past years appeared to sweep across the soul
of him who sat by my side, now thin and evan
escent, now tinged with sunshine and flushed
with beauty, and now dark and steadfast and
leaden. And yet he was not an old man ; for
but a short time previous had he crossed the di
viding line, the “half way house” of the poet.
But hrs once dark locks were streaked with gray,
and upon his face you read the unmistakable
lines of pain, sobered down by present content
ment, even happiness. Yet his’words were not
breathed without an effort, without pain, and it
was evident that every fibre of his heart quiv
ered at the thought of rehearsing the past.
“ Shall I tell you why I married her ?” he asked
again. "The. story is a brief one, and perchance
not uninteresting. You shall hear it.”
" But will it not give you pain?” I asked.
“ Pain ?” be answered, solemnly, and with tear
ful eyes and tremulous voice. “Pain? yes, but
net such pain as you conceive. It is pain only
that one of God’s most beautiful and perfect
creations—most noble women—should be mar
ried thus by chance, accident, destiny—call it by
what name you will.”
“ She, then, was'once beau—”
“Hush! Let me tell my story in my own
way, and question me not. Agnes Barton was
but why should she not also enjoy this glorious
evening, and—and listen to the redital of the
tale wherein she was the chief and unfortunate
actor? Come hither, Agnes,” he continued,
calling his wife, in a voice sweet from emotion
and love. “Come, sit by my side, while I tell,
for the first time to strange ears, the story of our
wooing.”
“ Ernest 1” she replied, in her strangely musical
voice, as she laid her hand gently on his arm.
“ Ernest, why—”
“Why should not he. not the whole world
know the true woman that I call wife? Nay,
nay, Agnes, we have far too long indulged our
morbid feelings, and now let all who will learn
the story. Sit, then, by my side—closer—closer
still, so,” and he drew her, iover like, to him.
“But why do you wish me to hear, Ernest, of
what I only know too well ?”
“ Because I would have you near me when I
tive over again other days, for
" Sickness, and sorrow and rain
to.-, to ottr tru? love as jinfci to t no chain."
“ Yes, Ernest, I know, and
' True and just to each other, Robin,
Whatever ill tonguos may say ;
Honing the best of each other. Bobir?)
Through the darkest and direst dv ?
So I will e’en [listen, and in silence if I can to
the words my heart have lotijr » tn o W n t 0 be true.’
‘ ‘ Let me sketch, then.) briefly, oar early lives,
m order that you Way fully understand my
story. Mme you already know, at least all that
is required; but 1 must paint you, Agnes, as I
first saw hex-, she was
“ Ernest’l”
“ It Oannot be flattery to speak of you now as
you were in other days, even before—but I wul
Bt>t anticipate. Agnes Barton, my wife now.
was the belle of the city of P -, in her more
youthful days. Her form was faultless, her eye,
but that remains even yet undimned, and you
can judge of its pristine beauty; her hair, it was
not curling or waving, but rippled around her
brow and head, as yon nave sometimes seen tiny
waves around a stone in a brook, dancing in the
sunlight. Her ”
“ Ernest, enough of this,” broke in the low
whispers of bis wile.
“ Well, dearest, so let it be, then, for if J would
I could not paint you as you were then.”
“ To your*partial eyes.”
“ Not so, but to all the world who looked upon
your dazzling beanty.”
“ Once more, Ernest, enough of this.”
“Well, then, to proceed. My wife was the
daughter of a merchant, and liberally educated.
Her father, when 1 first saw her, was wealthy,
but confidence in one who betrayed him brought
him to the very verge of bankruptcy. I, at the
time, was following my profession—the law—and
was employed by him to eave what 1 could from
the wreck ”
“Andhis honor, Ernest.”
“ Yes, that, at least, my dear wife and I suc
ceeded in doing so, and enough property to pur
chase a little homestead far from the scenes of
his ruin in which he could spend the remaining
years of his life in peace, although not in afflu
ence. While thus engaged, Agnes and I, of
course, ftequenfy met—became well acquainted
—in short, learned to love one another. I will
not, dare net speak of those days of golden
promise.
“How like a sweet dream they appear, Ern
eet.: ’
“Yes, Agues, a happy dr?am from which one
has been most cruelly awakened. As I said,
Agnes and I learned to love each other and we
bet ame betrothed. I parted from her one sun
nier evening when earth and sky appeared eur
leited with their beauty—parted but to return m
a short time and claim her before heaven and
‘arth as my own. We had all been truly happy
that evening and little dreamed that the sharp
sword of sorrow and suffering and death was
suspended above cur heads bv as slender a
thread a» < ne of her own golden inure,”
"Ernest,” interrupted his wife with Sa| sad
smile, "Ernest, this is the fanciful talk of a
lover.”
" Agnes, we were lovers then—and have been
.ever since 1” and he drew her still more closely
to him. ■ “But let me on. In a few days I re
ceived tidings that her father was seriously ill.
With all speed I dispatched my business and
hastened to her side in time. Yes, thank God!
in time to see how a Christian looses the fetters
of r/rth endputeon a robe of immortality. It
was near the sun setting when I stood by his
bed side. The flame-like orb was still warmly
shooting its fiery arrows to earth, yet slowly
sinking to its western couch. With rosy hues
its raye flushed the pale face of the departing
one and lingtred ami’d his thin hai. as if angel
fingers were already weaving a golden crown of
iromos tai splendor about his brow. And—nay,
Agnes, it is not for such an one we should
vetp ”
lie low sobs of his wife had interrupted his
narration, and it wn«seme minutes before he
precetded, and then with a voice hushed almost
to a whisper be went on.
“Few and simple were his parting words
words of truthful, holy import. With his fee
ble, icy, trembling hand he placed that of his
daughter—of Agnes—in my own, bade me pro
tect and cherish her, and’ then was with the
angels.”
Have I not done right in doing so ?” he
asked, solemnly, when the sobs of his wife were
again
“The funeral ceremonies over—dust given to
duet an.l ashes to ashes—Agnes accepted a
home with a friend, while I was forced again
to active business until time should, with its
soothing influences, soften the blow and render
it proper for us to be united.”
“Well, the months rolled on, and—but I must
hasten to a conclusion, for the clouds are grow
ing heavy, and a t bunder-storm will soon drive
us in from our pleasant seats. Already the
sweetl.riars, roses, and violets are offering up
their perfume as incense of thankfulness for the
comin g rain, that will soon moisten their parched
roots and purify their dusty leaves. Aye, the
storm will soon break over us, and as it is in Na
ture now, so it was in our lives then. But wo lit
tle dreamed of the tempest hurtling above us un
til it burst in fury, blinding-destroying. How
well it is that we cannot see the handwriting of
the future upon the walls of the present!
•' It matters not to tell of the minor influences
or irtereuts of those times, so I hasten on. Dur
ing my business, I contracted that most loath
some if all diseases, the small-pox, and was hur
ried from my boarding-house to the hospital.
How strange it is that at such a time all of hu
manity disappears from the hearts of those we
are wont to call friends 1 Tended only by hire
lings, I daily grew worse; and when death ap
peared to be' standing by my side, the physician,
who had found out from my ravings, and subse
quently from letters that were in my pocket, of
my love for Agues, wrote her of what he consi
dered to be my certain doom, as the same time
advising her not to come near me. As if a heart
like here could idly hear the news, and as idly
remain away 1”
“ Ernest—husband 1”
i “ Suffice it to say she came, and, despite all
warnings, took her place by my side, and nursed
me until—until. "
“No matter wha t—go on, Ernest.”
“Until the fell disease laid its fold touch also
upon her ! But, wl'v dwell upon those days of
sufl'ering honor ? We both lived. I, thanks to
Ato.ee, unmarked ; but she, alas! she, my beau
tiful anil beloved one, with her beauty blasted;
her loveliness gone, her wealth of sunny, rip
ping hair shorn, and ”
■ • Ernrst.” again interrupted his wife, “why
mourn for the transient rose blush that the first
frost blasts and destroys?”
“ True, we should not mourn for the past, for
it comes not back again ; but who can gaze upon
the faded flower, once glorious in its beauty, and
not sigh a regret for its pristine splendor and
perfume? But let me proceed. As I said, Agues
lost her beauty in tending by- my bedside, and
when we were again free to go abroad into the
world, how I cursed the chance that had thus
marred God’s most perfect handiwork.”
“ Cnreed, my husband? Oh, you could not!”
“Yes, even cursed, forgetting that as He
created, so also could He destroy, and that every
act of His hand was tempered with both justice
and mercy. Leaving behind us the pestilential
city, we sought a country home where we could
be united, though I had a very difficult task to
bring Agnes to consent, for she would, with her
generous heart, have released me, and bade me
go foi th into the world and take a fairer bride.
Thank God! such a thought never even entered
into tooy dreams for a single instant. No! no
matter'if the world has called me both proud
and heartless, lam not guilty 7 of that crime; for
crime it would have been in the eyes of high
Heaven and the angels. Well, we lived a life of
retirement, she with her former friend, and I at
a hotel near at hand, until the time when our
health should be re-established. It came at
length—the glorious Spring day that was to
close upon my perfect earthly happiness, for who
would not be happy with such a wife in pros
pect ?”
“ Ernest!”
“ Nay, Agnes, interrupt me not, but let me tell
the story as it is—and was. It, appeared as if
that day of regal sunshine and beauty would
never come to an end. But it did at last, as ev
ery thing else in this world will. I left her when
the shadows were gathering darkly and throwing
their ebon vail over the burning disc of the sun.
In my own. room (for, far removed from the din
and bustle of life, I had courted silence and soli
tude, save when with her) I was seated, thinking
not of the dusky past, but the rosy future,
when ”
“Ernest, husband, I beg of you to forbear.”
“ No, dearest, I must not falter now,” he re
plied, twining his arm Stillmore tenderly around
her, and then proceeding as if he had not been
interrupted. "When on my ear burst the ever
startling cry of ‘fire 1’ in my anxiety to save my
wedding apparel, I neglected to seek my safety
in flight. Oh, fatal, fatal mistake! The house
was a frame one, and burned like tinder, and
when I opened the door all was in flames, and I
was driven back by the dense smoke. Hurriedly
I beat out the window, but alas ! it was far too
high to jump from with the slightest chance of
safety. What should Ido ? where turn ? In the
whirlwind of conflicting emotions, I stood para
lized for a moment, and then thought again of
the stairs. I recollect only the lurid flame—the
impenetrable volumes of smoke—nothing moro
<for many weeks.”
“ Again, Ernest, I beg of you to pause.”
“ What followed.” he cohtinusd, “ I learned
from other lips. When all hope of my safety ap
pea red lost, a female form, clad in light, snowy
garments—dressed as a bride—darted through
the gaping, affrighted crowd, and ascended the
burning, tottering stairs. In a moment she was
enwrapped in flames! Still, comet-like, she sped
on, regardless of all. My name alone rang from
her lips, for love had made her proof against the
deep burning tongue of the demon of the flames
in her heart, if not in her flesh.”
“Ernest!”
“ But men, strong, active men, who had be
fore shrunk back'appalled, could not calmly see
her perish thus, and followed in her flaming
track. Together, wrapped as in a fiery ghrQufi,
we were boi ne from the tottering mass, that, in
a moment after, fell with a fearful crash, iw jf i>;
anger at being robbed of its prey.”
“ Thank Go>l 1” involuntarily fell i’f-om mv lips
“ As I said,” he continued, gfter a brief paused
“ 1 can but continue my f&wy aB l learned it long
afterwards. . I waif carried to the house where
Agnes ffeiaed. Insensible; she still retained her
Cor sdotiA&sßS, though it was many weeks before
sb? KCOvered sufficiently to leave her bed; and
Bled I say that the first journey she essayed was
to my side? And how did she find me?"’
“ Husband, I beg—”
"Unscathed by fire, I lay there, perfect in
every limb and feature, but mind wrecked—a
lunatic! May yours.and mine never be sad
dened by such a visitation. I could not de
scribe my state if I would, for words are power
less. But the pen of another truly says ”
“ At least, husband, spare us that.”
" No, dear wife, the tale would ba unfinished
without it. For tills time forgive me, and let me
continue. The pen of another truly says: • The
fever of delirium! when incoherent words wander
on the lips ef genius ; when the sufferer stares
strangely and vacantly on his ministaring friends
orstarte with freezing horror from the arms of
familiar love. Ah! what a dread tenant has the
dormitory then 1 No food taken for the body, no
sleep for the brain 1 A human being surging
with diabolic strength against his keepers a
human frame gifted with superhuman vigor only
the more rapidly to destroy itself. Less fearful
to the eye, but more harrowing to the soul, is the
dormitory whose walls enclose the sleepless vic
tim of remorse. No poppies or mandagora for
him.’ ”
'* And she—your wife—found you thus ?” I
could not keep from asking.
“ Aye, the f . nnd me thus, and ”
" Beneath my touch, Ernest, and the sway of
my voice, you sank into a quiet, refreshing
» umber, and ”
“ Awoke, Agnes, wife, for what?”
" No matte r, husband.”
"To find—great heavens! how shall I tell the
horrors of that moment ? To find you ”
“ What I am, Ernest.”
“ Y es, and my rale is told. The sequel you
already know—l married her. Do you remember
the story of the English girl, who, when told that
her lover had returned from the bloody Crimea,
crippled, disfigured for life, and would, of course,
release her from her engagement ? .Do you re
member the nroud, noble answer of that brave
English girl? ‘ Tell him,’ she said, ‘ that, if there
is body enough left to contain his soul, that 1 wUI
matry him r Even so I felt, and have been far
more than rewarded. But come, my story is
finished let ns in. The storm is bursting upon us,
and the thirsty earth is. sponge-like, beginning
io drink up the fa’ling drops.”
Effects of Mormonism.—Among the
Mormons, after rears’ practice of polygamy, a
.physiological inferiority among the people-mil
str ke the most casual observer. The common
est form of this, and perhaps the first that de
ve ope itself ie a certain feebleness and emacia
tion of the person, while the countenances
of almost all stamped with a mingled air
of imbecility and brutal ferocity.
ftrng for
PuNIBHMENTOF Ibl.E HUSBANDS IN New
Zealand.—The head chief often interferes in minor raat»
ters of a domestic nature. For instance, if a lazy.le’.low
has a wife or two and a. few children, and through his
lore for fishing, daneivg. and loitering idly about, neg
lects to bring in the necessary supplies for his family, a
complaint is made, the chief visits the house in person,
find, it he sees just cause for punishment, he orders out
the population of the village. Men, women, and children
arm themselves with a stiff birch made of small canes,
then form a long doubk line, about six feet anart, and
await with anxious glee the approach of the delhiquent.
At last be is placed at one. end of the line, amidst a siia»v
er of yells, screams, jibes, <tc The worn is given Ijy ,he
cliie.', and away he darts at his utmost speed through tho
ranks, e> cry one endeavoring to hit him as ho passes. Ac
cording to bis deserts, he may get. off with r inning the
line once, or ne may have to do so twice or thrice : but ne
is skilled in cunning and fleetness that can run the line
even once without having his skin tickled for him by the
hearty application of the birch, wielded by some strong
wcmanl As the punishment is not of a fatal kind, th©
whole affair creates unrestricted merriment If the vic
tim is a smart fellow’ he may escape with few- blows; but
it he is sulky, heavy and dogged, he pays fur it. For one
month afterward the families of victims provided for
by the public at large, under the fatherly superintend
ence ot the chief. At the expiration of that tlraa, if he
has all nis domestic matters in perfect order, as a gbbdL
father and provident husband ought to have, he again re
sumes his place in society, and shortly afterward, per
haps, helps, with an experienced hand, to flagellate some
one else.
An Objectionable Fashion.—Fanny
Fern, discoursing upon the vagaries of the present day,
most sensibly proceeds:
“It may be. fashionable, and, therefore, right, for ladies
to lead dogs by a chain through the street—to me, it is a
most repulsive sight. Now, that is just the sort of woman
who would consider herself disgraced bv carrying a little
baby in public; but the patience with which she wifi ’.■■nd
lier.-elf to all Carlo’s antics and caprices, is most, astonish
ing.— Which occupation is the more ‘lady-like? uf th©
two, may be an upon question. I wonder what, is ‘a
lady,’anyhow r—for in these fantastic days my mind is
getting befogged on the subject. I. thought ‘ ladies’ didn’t
crowd three-double into an omnibus, when every seat
was already tilled. I thought they didn’t, talk so loud in
any public place of amusement as to spoil the pecio.-in
ance for you I thought, if you were examining a piece of
. goods in a store, they didn t twitch it from under vour
fingers before you had (tone with it. I thought 1 !<t: es’
didn’t tell you what your name was, every time they
passed you in the street; but still, though I m%y be w.d©
astray on each and all of these points, I will insist, after
all. that ladies shouldn't lead dogs in public. It is a U very
well for a ‘little miss’—how I hate that expression—nr a
‘gent’—which word makes me as sick; but if the ladies
only knew—but they .don’t, and, after all, I can’t hrav©
their anger by telling them.”
Important Rules.—The Philadelphia
Sunday among msriy rules laid down for indi
viduals “riding in passenger railway cars,” has these two
of importance and interest to the fair sex :
Ist. If you are a laxly, force your way into the car, no
matter how full it is, and “look daggers,” if you don’t
speak to them, at every masculine who does not rise and.
tender you his seat. If the ctir should not happen to be
full w hen you enter, flop yourself down, spread out \ <>:>r
crinoline over at least three seats, and ‘ never surren
der” an inch of your territory, no matter how many pas
sengers may come alter you.
2d. If you are a lady, talk very loud, (if you h.v. e any
body to talk to,) or put on one of those charming, smiling
grins, if you have good teeth, and if you haven’t, tn both,
cases keep your mouth shut. Another way to a.traet at
tention. if you are in company with a lady friend, is-to
converse in a low tone, so that everybody can hear you,
about your fellow-passengers.
Oh, dear! how many there are, to the sorrow and an
noyance of mankind, who carry out these injunctions
with resolute pertinacity.
Skillfully Detected.—An officer of
Palermo, in command of a detachment h.iving.rece vecl
information that a young conscript had concealed him
self in a villa near that city, proceeded thither, and stated
the object of his visit to the lady of the house, who im«
mediately affirmed that he was mistaken, and produced
her two daughters as the only inmates of the house. The
officer, after a minute search, finding no one else, told
the lady that one of her da lighters must be t tie delinquent.
The lady protested against this insinuation, but Uki offi
cer, recollecting the judgment of Solomen, intimated to
the young ladies that they must both go with him to i'i©
barracks. At this announcement one of the young lad es
blushed, and the other grew pale, and thereby di covered
the trick. The officer at once requested the pale lady to
put on clothes of the other sex, and follow him to his regi
ment.
A terrible commotion is at present,
agitating the serenity of the feminine portion of th • com.
munity inhabiting one of our fashionable up-town ho
tels. An edict has been issued that has stricken witlx
horror many an o’er tender heart The fact is, the pro
prietor of the establishment in question, has had the Jparl
-to levy a tax of $1 per day upon each of his fair
patrons who chances to be the possessor of a poodle, th©
lately fashionable terrier, or any other equally dainty
pet. The board for such a possession is therefore in con
sequence $7 per week. Thus there is consternation and
rebellion among many fair dames and demoiselles, and.
they feel themselves martyrs to man's proverbial neart
lessness, and 3 declare their injured pets to be ‘‘ poor
little abused dears.” We would sympathize with them i£
it was in our power.
Astonishing.—The New Haven Pal-
ladlum vouches for the truth of the subjoined truly as
tounding circumstance: “ A lady, while walking in th©
streets of New Haven a few days ago, had her dress
stepped on by a gentleman and torn shockingly. He apol
ogized for the accident, of course, as a gentleman should.
As he was proceeding in his apologies, the lady stopped
him, attaching the blame solely to herself, ana claiming
she was in the fault for having her dress sweeping.th© *
sidewalk.” Of course the astonishing part of the affair
was madam’s acknowledgment of being herself at fault.
Young Ladies of the Past and Pre 5-
ent.—A modern researcher for facts remarks: Young la
dies formerly studied Shaksj/erc, and made themes eg
acquainted with Pope and Milton, but nowadays all snchi
nonsense has been laid aside. Why should our young folks
study what is never talkediof ? Being versed in floss and
worsted yarn, entirely posted up in the polka, with a
smattering of the piano, does more toward making up
“ an accomplished lady” than all the old logy classics or
scientific poetry ever written.
Among the women of England there
were, in 1861, lObankers, 7 money lenders, 274 commer
cialclerks, 25 commercial travelers, 54 brokers, 38 mer
chants, 29 farriers, 419 printers, 3 shepherds, 43,974 outdoor
agriculturists, 13 ladies were doctors, 3 bone-setters, 6 were
reporters or short-hand writers, 3 parish clerks, t choris
ters. 4 teachers of elocution, 17 dentists, 2 knacker 1 , 4
conjurers, 1 astronomer, 8 “naturalists.” Anenierpris ng
race, certainly!
A Romantic Fancy.—On the shores
of the Adriatic flea, the wives of fishermen whose hus
bands have gone far oft' upon the deep, are in the habit at
even tide of going down to the sea-shore and singing, ar
female voices onlvcan, the first stanza of a beautifil
hymn ; and after they have sung it, they lisienftill thiy
hear borne by the wind across the desert sea ihe seco i’d
stanza, sung by their gallant husbands as they are toss <1
by the gale upon the waves, and both are
Mrs. Partington says “ that wh?n
she was a gal, she used to. go to parties, and always had a
beau to extort her home. But now,” says she, “the gala
undergo all sorts of declivitcs ; the task of extorting them
home resolves on their dear selves.” The old lady drew
down her specks, and thanked her stars that she had!
lived in other days, when men could depreciate the worth
oi the lemale sex.
Little Girls.—A philosopher with an
unusually tender heart rece.ntly declared : "There
something Inexpressibly sweet in little girls. L oTe j y ' > '
pure, innocent, ingenuous, unsuspecting, fall o- .At
to btethers, babies and everything. They’
dowers, diamond dewdrops m the breath
i a eKte >uia ever bocomewo,n Xni™;£i S
Beauty’s DcTy to be Seen.—An ar
dent admirer Qf the fair sex thus express s his opinions
“A beautiful w oman is like a great truth or a great happx
v.pSfi. and t 0 cover herself with a green
veil,’ or any similar than the sun has to
wear green spectacles.”
Definition of a Coquette.—A co
quette is fond of fancy for a moment—faithless for 1 ii
year—fickle for ever—a painted doll—a glittering trifle—a
feather—a toy—a bubble—a transitory pleasure—an eter-
• mil pain—an embodiment of absurdities—and a collection
ot contradictions.
A young man advertising a short
time ago for a wife, expressed a desire that she should be
pretty and entirely ignorant of the fact. We don’t be
lieve the present century can produce such a phenomenon
as he requires.
The question has been asked, why is
it considered impolite for gentlemen to go in the presence
of ladies in their shirt sleeves, while it is in every way
correct for the ladies themselves to appear before gentle
men without any sleeves ? It is still unanswered.
Advertising for a Wife. Some
anonymous individual curtly asserts that advertising for
a wife is just as absurd as it would be to get measured for
an umbrella!
A Bachelor’s Idea of Wedlock.—-
One of the casualties of life.
Artful Ravens. —Captain M’Clure,
the Arctic voyager, says ihe raven may be seen,
when the winter is so cold that wine is frozen
within a yard of the fire, winging his way
through the air as vigorously as though he wera
breathing the soft and warm atmosphere of an
Bnglish spring. Two ravens once established
themselves as the friends of the family in MerceK
Bay, for the sake of the scraps of food thrown
to them by the men. But the ship’s dog, re
senting this infringement of his vesied rights,
used to fly at them, trying to catch them with
iiis mouth. Observing this, they were wont, just
when the mess tins were being cleared out on tha
dust heap, to throw themselves intentionally int
his way, and, when he sprang at them, fly only a,
few yards off; and when tho do" made another
run, they made another flight, until they had
lured, tempted and provoked him to the shore a.
consideraole distance. They then flew swiftly to
the ship and the dust heap, and had generally
picked out the best scraps, and made no email
way in devouring the whole, before the return o£
the outwitted and mortified looking dog.— Diclt*
ens' AU the Year Hi und.
Wild Geese.—The migratory habits
of these wild fowls have elicited the fallowing
rhapsody from agoose-quill driver, who seratchea
for the Newburyport Herald : “ The wild geese
have commenced their southward flight. Fol
lowing the warm weather, they have been np to
the Arctic sea that Dr, Kane discovered, hatehed
their young in the sunny coves where the ver
dure of summer is almost shaded by the ever
lasting icebergs, roosted for a night on the North
Pole; and they now follow the warm weather
back to the tropics, to feed on the produce ot
eternal summer, bathe in the tepid waters be
neath the ever-blazing skies, rind go to roost oa
the equator.”
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