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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, December 13, 1863, Image 2

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tho company, and tha throat moat have reached
home, for it was quickly tenanted, all the playful
tvrath of Mabel Armstrong becoming real.
“ lam not an over-tips apple, at all events,
that is ready to fall into the mouth of the first
one that looks at me without waiting for them
to even reach forth their hand,” was her scorn
ful reply.
“ No, one rather that is rotten at the heart, I
Should say."
“ Once more a truce to this,” again interposed
the one who had taken upon himself the ever
thankless offer of peacemaker. “If you must
break lances, ladies, let me be the target. But
is there a no more pleasant theme for conversa
tion on such a day as this ?—a day of golden
splendor, when all of earth and sky seems re
joicing.”
“Poetical!” sneered Mabel.
“ Yes, if so you term the ihoughts that ever
well up in my heart”
“Heart again!”
“Brain, then, if your ladyship likes it better;
that ever come unbidden to my brain when the
earth, recovering from long combat with the
dark demons of the storm, puts on her gala-day
attire, and appears in all her loveliness like a
very bride. Look you how the distant hill tops
are crowned with a snowy wreath—how the blue
smoke curls like a thousand azure serpents
through the frosty air—how the pendent icicle
glitters as if it were a prison containing an hun
dred diamonds—how the newly fallen snow glit
ters suddenly in the sun-rays—how like ame
thystine feathers the light clouds float in * the
Ixjundlese eea of the upper air’—how the trees
are frosted with glittering pearl dust and how—”
“ Beautifully that would sound in Wall
street! ’
“ It might from your lips, even there 1”
“ Now, I cry you mercy if you are descending
from yeur lofty, fancy-plumed flight, to the poor,
common-place compliments of earth.”
“ Why interrupt me then, when even I had for
gotten for a time that I was a poor, briefless
lawyer-had forgotten my bachelor’s den and
the dull treadmill round of my daily life and was
floating light as a bird in the golden regions of
the infinite?”
“ Why ? Do you not remember that some
poetical dreamer like yourself says:
‘ W hen the eagle break s his n inion.
In the Bwittaess of his flight P ”
“ And you thought that such might be my
ftte?”
“Yes, and what a fearful fall you would have
had I” and her laugh rang clear as the sleigh
bells’ chime upon the air.
“Look out how you drive I” shouted the other,
suddenly springing up and snaching the reins.
••By Heavens! vou would hive run over that
poor child, if I had not happened to have been
looking,” and he leaped from the sleigh and
gathering up a very bundle of rags in his arms,
carried them safely to the side-walk.
“ Are y ou hurt, child ?” he questioned in a ten
der voice.
“ No, thank you, sir, only frightened.”
“Well,be careful. But*you’re cold,” and he
placed some money in her shivering, blue hand.
“ Take that, little one, and run and get some
thing warm to eat,” and he sprang again into
the midst cf his gay companions and was whirled
away unhearing the blessing that followed.
“Pshaw!” said Mabel Armstrong. “Do you
take such care of every beggar’s brat you see ?
They are always in the way I”
“ Would you not have wished some one to have
done as much for your little sister, Mabel?” and
the tone of the question was both earnest and
stern.
“My eider ? She was not my sister.”
“ But she was somebody's sister and daugh
ter!"
“.Well, thank Heaven, we are not beggars
yet !*
“But you may be! Stranger things than that
liaye happened in the ever shifting tide of for
tune. She who rode in her coach last year may
be p eking rags from the gutter before the encl
of ilie present one. It is God’s providence that
BO tn a should be poor.”
•’Lecturingme, sir!” and the tall form was
dra to up, the costly shawl gathered more close
ly and the thin lip curled in scorn and offended
dignity.
Forgive me if I spoke strongly. No, Miss
Armstrong, sueh an office could never be mine,
and yet when I see any of God’s creatures tram
pled into the dust—when I see heartless wealth
crushing helpless poverty, I must speak out. But
may a kind Heaven avert such a fate from you
and yours.”
“ When we need your prayers we will petition
for them,” and she turned her back rudely on
the last speaker and commenced flirting with
one of her less sensible and sensitive compan
ions.
“.Heartless!” breathed Harry Lawton, but in
BQ low a tone as not to bo heard by any, though
ihe working of the muscles of his face, particu
li riy about the firm lip, betrayed the strong feel
ings that caused his breast to heave.
Once he had loved Mabel Armstrong, and even
row there were times when her almost peerless
teauty enchained him, until his reason awoke
and shivered the fetters into atoms. Ah! that
human flesh and blood can so belie the work
manship of the Master Craftsman, and degrade
his images of life and radiant beauty into worse
than cum ingly carved, unfeeling stones I That
bo fair a shrine can have serpents for priests,
and a creed that would make devils rejoice !
That, enveloped in the clothing of rare beauty,
bo many Geraldines walk God’s fair earth, wait
ing but the chance to charm, and, charming,
sting ! That those we look upon as formed of
finer clay than ourselves should be but very
painted vessels in which is garnered all that is
base and vile !
Anxious to conceal her chagrin, Mabel Arm
strong flung all her trenchant wit into the con
versation. and became that which Nature had
formed her to be, although only now playing a
part; became radiant in feature, and flinging
from her lips the jewels of female eloquence that
can never be other than attractive, chained every •
ear. Yes ; even those who know her best, knew
how false hearted she was, could not but listen ;
for
“ when she spake,
Sweet wot ds. like dropping honey, she did shed ;
And ’twixt tho pearls and rubies softly break
A silver sound, that heavenly music seem'd to make 1”
If she had a purpose in this display of her rare
talents of conversation, it was fully accomplished
upon one, at leas',; for, waking from his long si
lence, he first listened, and then slowly mingled,
until the rest were mere lookers-on. as he and
Mabel again flashed back their sparkling humors
as they bad done in the first place, though want
ing now the bitter tone and i>ersonality. What
ever had caused him before to look moodily—
whatever heavy clouds were about him—what
ever of sorrow had sunk its sounding plummet
into the waters of his soul, and stirred up the
dark sediment there, appeared to have passed
away, and his laugh was the clearest and smile
the brightest of any.
“Another dazzled fly drawn into the net—
another gay moth hovering around the brilliant
light of Mabel Armstrong until it. falls with
scorched wings,” thought Harry Lawton; “ and
yet I know not but that they are well matched—
ehe with her sloe-like eyes and heavy braids of
ebon hair, and Gus with his light auburn curls
and deepblue eyes. Yes; I believe they are
both heartless.”
And he turned away to watch the ceaseless I
flow of life upon the crowded walks.
But that which was passing in the minds of |
the two conversants it would have been more
difficult to fathom, for their features had been
trained in the strictest school of fashion. They,
in the language of their date, were each of them
“a . great catch that is, each was wealthy.
Mabel Armstrong was the daughter of a widower,
with but one little sister; and her vis-a-vis was
the only son of a widow, who had lavished every
thing that could possibly be of effect upon his
education, and whose sole object now appeared
to have him marry according to her notions of
rank and propriety, and she had singled out
Mabel as the pearl that should be set in her son’s
heart, forge trill of the wayward fancies of tho lit
tle god or the bow and arrows—forgetful that
youth is apt to wish a voice in the grave matter
of marriage, and that two hands pulling at th >
string will send the feathered shaft away. Ma
bel, it was surmised, was a flower ready for the
plucking of this dainty son’s hand, and often she
Lad thought the fingers were being stretched out
for the gathering, when some unknown cause
turned the hand away, and she saw her cloud
built castles vanish. Could her heart now have
been truly scanned, it would have been found
beating with joyous hope, and her brain teem
ing with the belief that she had lured tho shin
ing prize into her web; and, consequently, she
more deftly spun the entangling threads, throw
coil after coil over the golden wings, and riveted
in every possible way the chain, though ever
concealing its strong links beneath the sweetest
flowers.
And was she not repaid for her labor ? Di 1
not the flushed cheek, the hand that sought her
own unseen beneath the warm robe, and trem
bled in its clasping, the ear that was bent to
catch her lowest whispered word, the eye that
flashed back the warm glances of her own, and
the lip that breathed sweet, eloquent praise, tell
of the accomplishment of the long-sought end ?
Was the flattering tale Hope now whispered false?
Fickle as she was herself, she could not believe
this acting, and cooling as he pressed more
warmly, she longed but for some quiet place
where the words would be spoken that would
Beal their fate.
But lower, softer their words became, closer
were their heads bent together, fonder still the .
unwitnessed pressure of the hand. Yes,
“In whispers low.
And sweet as softest music s gentle flow,
, The lovers spoke,”
when they were roused from their ideaLdreams
by the sudden screams of some of their compan
ions, amd starting to their feet, they saw tha
sleigh dashing along at a fearful rate, hurriedly
drawn by running horses, and driverless!
“ Sit downl” commanded Harry Lawton, in a
husky voice, as his keen eyes drank in their dan
ger in a moment. “ Sit down and keep silence,
if you can. Gus, be calm, man. Mabel, let go
my arm I” for the girl-had clung there involun
tarily almost, as if in the hour of danger he was
the one in whom she would trust. “ Keep your
seats,” he continued; “ there is a chance fir
safety if you will but keep still.” And he crawled
forward 11. the almost vain hope of securing the
lines and again controlling the infuriated horses.
“ Great Heaven! he will be dashed, to pieces!"
exclaimed Mabel, and sank fainting into the
arms of her supposed, at least, lover.
To gain the seat in front was a task somewhat
difficult, on account of the crowded state of the
alt igh and the manner in which it was dashed
from side to side; but Harry Lawton was equal
to the task, and coolly put aside even the tender
hands that would have prevented h : m. Per
fectly self-possessed—cool as if engaged in some
holiday sport—his manner exerted a great influ
ence over the otheis, and pallid faces an! trem
bling, crouching forms alone told of danger, for
the cries had been stilled.
“Be still now, for your livest” he whispered,
as he gained the seat and began climbing over
the tail dashboard, with the intention of walking
along the pole until he could secure the lines
that were flying about in all directions.
Every heart almost stopped its breathing and
every breath was stayed of the gazers both in
the nearly upsetting vehicle and upon the ground,
as his hands rested upon the backs of the bound
ing horses, maddened, affrighted still more by
the unexpected clutching of the harness. To
walk the pole was impossible, and changing his
policy in a moment, he drew himself up on the
back of one of the horses, and crawled slowly
forward until he could reach the check. In a
moment his strong, steady hands told of their
power, and the speed was sensibly lessened; in
another his control was greater; in another they
would have been subdued and all safe, but the
bits parted, and more panic-stricken than before,
the horses regained their speed, swerved from
the straight track, swung desperately around a
corner, and the sleigh coming in contact with a
mass of building materials, was shivered into a
hundred pieces I
CHAPTER HI.
THE MOTHEB AND THE BABE—REVELATIONS.
“Well, Agnes,” questioned Doctor Stillwell of
his wife, as she met him at the door on his re
turn home from visiting his patients the morn
ing after the young mother and babe had so un
expectedly been placed under his protection,
“ well, Agnes, how arc the babies, now ? Bright
as the morning, I hope.”
“ I fear the girl is not so well. She rested but
badly, and her mind wanders strangely, at
times.”
“Fever setting in? I hardly thought that
would have been the case. She could not have
been very long out in the cold—it had just began
to affect her. But we must see to this. By Ju
piter 1 Agnes, but I have taken a strange fancy
to the girl.”
“ Girl ? She wears a wedding ring.”
“Does she? I could have sworn it; and yet I
never thought of looking for such a thing. It
takes you women, mother, to see these signs
that, though little in themselves, yet mean
much.”
“I could not have helped but notice it. She
took it off of her own accord, and pointed to the
inside.”
“Bless her’ little heart! She thought you
might doubt her honor. But what did you see ?”
“ The simple letters A. 8. to B. M.”
“ No date ?”
“ I thought there had been one ; but if so, it
had been erased.”
“Confounded queer! A. 8.” And the doctor
consulted tho torn card the negro had given him.
“ Augustus 8. Yes, it’s another link in the chain
of his confounded rascality, whoever he maybe.
And it's just my luck that the thing should be
torn so as to be a puzzle. But I’ll unearth him
yet, the villain!”
“Had you not better go up at once and see
what can be done for the poor woman ?”
“ There spoke your heart, Agues. Well, it i
lucky, perhaps, that God never gave us any chil
dren. Now you can boa mother to ail the un
fortunate ; and—and I believe I should ouly have
spoiled the young rogues, if we had- them. Yes,
mother, up-stairs I go.” And he ascended in his
usual rapid manner.
A soft light stole in at the curtained window, and
the few sun-rays that entered, shone like a halo
around the twin heads resting on the snowy pil
low. The babe slept tranquilly on the arm of the
mother, and if angels watch over innocent ones
and direct their dreams, the sweet smile playing
around the tiny, rose-bud-cleft mouth, gave’ as
surance of their presence here. The eyes of the
woman, however, were staring wildly around, and
the deep hectic of the cheek, told "clearly of the
consuming fever within. Her lips, also, breathed
stiange, wandering words—words of commingled
joy and sorrow—of bright hopes and dark fears.
Not wild, but rather fanciful was the delirium
that swayed her, and all her utterances were
breathed in a low, sweetly musical voice.
“ Daughter—Bertha,” said the doctor, as he
seated himself by her side and took one of her
hands in his ownj ‘ ‘bow fares it with you, child ?”
“ If you are my guardian, you have no right to
cempel me to do ouch a deed,” was the response.
“Another black-hearted devil mixed up in the
matter,” said the physician to his wife. r ‘ How I
wish I could get some clue to it. Has she been
long thus ?”
“ With few short intervals, since daylight,” an
swered the wife.
“ Can you not gain her confidence enough to
get the child ? It will never do to leave it thus,
to nurse disease, and, it may be, death.”
“ I did, for a moment; but she snatched it
from my arms with a fearful scream, and said,
‘ I would murder it.’ ”
“ Somehow it must be done; but your woman’s
wits arc worth all the doctors iu the world, for
that. Mind and body are both diseased the
one affects the other, and it will be no easy mat
ter io cure both. Oh 1 that I had the heartless
devils by the throat, who brought her to this.
But God knows this great city is full of it.”
“See, she is becoming more tranquil. If I
judge lightly, she will soon be able to talk to you
calmly, though it will only be for a minute, I
fear.”
“ When she docs, wo will get the baby at all
events. Bless it’s bright little face.”
“ Well, daughter,” said Doctor Stillwell, re
suming the conversation, “do you not feel bet
ter now ?"
“ Who are you? What are you here for? Oh!
I know,” and she pressed her sleeping child con
vulsively to her breast-pressed it until it awoke,
crying as if hurt. Then all the mother awoke in
her lieart—then she was called back from the
dark, visionary regions of delirium, aud soothing
its plaintive sobs, began to realize tho scenes
around her.
“ Let me take the baby, Bertha! See how it
holds out its little hands. Give it me for a little
while. You shall have it back, darling,” and the
kind-hearted woman pleaded not in vain.
“Ah! the young rogue!” said the doctor.
“ And now, how do you feel ?”
I “Feel? Ab! I remember you now! You were
kind to me last night, when ” and a shudder
forbid the remainder of the sentence.
“ Kind ? By Jupiter 1 I don’t know who could
have had the heart to be otherwise. But does
your head ache, child ?”
“ Yes, and I am so hot. Please give me a drink,
a cool, cool drink.”
“As much ice as you wish, daughter,” and he !
arose, rang the bell, and ordered some. “ Never
fear me, child. I don’t belong to that set that
take all the' blood away from tho body, then I
starve one, then keep the’m dying of thirst—they j
ought to be choked themselves—and if all that
don’t do, kill them with drugs. No, no, old !
mother Nature is a better physician and nurse
than the whole tribe of doctors put together, if !
you only let her have a chance, and that’s hist
what the fools won’t do, confound them. ’No, ,
don’t fear, we’ll have you trotting around again i
in a few days, and this youngster aud I will have
a frolic on the carpet.”
“ Won’t yon please give me tho baby ?” softly
pleaded the sufferer.
“ Don’t you see it’s got hold of mother’s cap
strings and haviug a jolly time ? Let her keep
it a little while. I want to talk to you. But
first take a little ice, and then I’ll give
you some medicine.” J
“Give me my child!'’ The voice was now i
stronger.
“ Yes, pretty soon, pretty soon.”
“ Give me my child!” The demand was uttered
in a hoarser voice.
“ W ait a minute, daughter, wait a minute.”
“ Give me my child !’ It w.ts a shriek now.
“ Heavens I it won’t do to give it to her, and it
won’t do to keep it away. Wnat shall be done,
mother ?”
“ Give mo my child! You would murder it. I
know you.”
“But, daughter,” pleaded the phvsician, com
pletely puzzled.
“ Don't I kuow why you want to kill it ?
Haven't I heard you swear that you would do so?
Give it to mo!” And she rose'from the pillow
and stretched out her arms imploringly.
“ Agnes, mother, speak to her—soothe her.”
“ Oh 1 give it to me” and the hot, blinding
tears began to fall. “Give me my baby, and I’3
do anything you wish. Don’t take it away! I’ll
never tell that you made me_no, I’ll never even
whisper it, if you will let me keep my child.”
“ May the devil roast whoever she’s talkin''
about!” exclaimed the excited physician. “But’
Agnes, what’s to be done ?”
The delirium increased with fearful rapiditv,
and shriek after shriek rang through the room,
intermingled with sobs and prayers, until even
the physician could stand it no longer, and tak
ing the baby, he placed it in the arms of its
mother, who, folding it to her breast, kissed it
rapturously.
“We must try again—try some other plan,
Agnes,” ho whispered to his wife, who had striven
in vain to keep back her tears.
“ It will break her heart to take it away poor
thing.”
“Yes, and mine, too. I had rather hear a
thousand elephants roar than one woman shriek
thus. I always was a fool about such thiu"s.
But she is more quiet now. Try and give her
this powder.” ”
The wile took it from bis hands, mixed it in a
glass, and placing it to the trembling lips of the
woman, soothingly urged her to take it,
“Aha! trying poison again! It’s not the first
time 1”
And the young mother dashed the tumbler to
the floor, and striking against the marble man
tle, it shiveryd into countless; flashing particles.
“More deviltry still!” muttered the doctor.
“Viho would have thought that one so young
could have been so walled about with villainy ?”
As if exhausted by her recent fearful emotions,
ilie p diti.t soon tecame quiet, un i sank mto
slumber, tronbkd, it is tiuo, but still rein-shin-’’
after tho violent < x-. rtiou. A etching Jier intent-
ly, and conversing with his wife in a low voice,
the good doctor eat for an hour, and than the
young mother awoke again, with a sweet smile
of peace upon liar lips. Evidently thinking what
had passed before was but a phase of a distem
pered dream, she whispered, as she laid her hind
upon that of the doctor:
“Oh! I thought some one was taking baby
from me. It was such a horrid dream!”
“Never fear, daughter, no one shall molest
you, You are safe here.”
“Bate? Safe, thank God I”
*' Yes; no one shall take your child from you.”
“ Oh, thank you. But— ’’ aud then she appear
ed to become, for the first time, sensible of her
strange situation, and that they were perfect
strangers to her. “ But—you do not know who
I am.”
“No matter. Don’t think of that now. Wo
will talk of that when you are better. You will
take some medicine now ?"
“Yes. You could not mean to give ma—”
And as if ashamed of the suspicion that flashed
through her brain, she stopped suddenly.
“ Nothing to hurt you, you may depend. We
must try and quiet your nerves, and control this
fever a little, tnat’s all. You will drink it ?”
“ Yes,” was the reply, after she had scanned
the face of the physician closely for several min
utes.
“ You don’t see any lying there, do you ?” he
asked, with a smile.
“ No—thank Heaven, no 1"
“ That's one comfort. But let mother, here,
take the baby while we talk. It will rest you.”
He was trying to wean her from it, by degrees;
but his heart was ashamed of the deception ha
was practicing, as he heard the sigh of the moth
er when he took her darling from her arms.
“ Now, then,” he continued, “ you must be as
quiet as you can.”
“ But i cannot. until I feel that you do net be
lieve me to be a ”
“No matter what. I don’t believe anything
bad of you, you may depend.”
“ But what could you think when I was found
—brought in so ? Your kind wife told me all
about it. What could you think, but that I was
gfiflty?”
“Guilty! Heaven bless your pure face. I
never thought any such thing. Guilty 1 I wish
I was only half as innocent."
“ But you cannot know this. You cannot know
but that lam an imposter—an abandoned wo
man!”
“ As God is my judge, I never thought of such
a thing.”
“ But—but ”
“ But you just keep quiet. We will talk about
yourself when you get well. Now, lam a physi
cian—an old fool of a one, to be sure, but that
don’t matter—and you are my patient; so you
must just do as I tell you.- I don’t believe you
guilty any more than T do my wife ; but it
wouldn’t matter a particle to me whether you
were or not, so long as you were in distress ; and
that’s the reason why folks call me an old fool.
Il' you were the veriest street walker in the city—
God forgive those that made them so—l should
cure you, if I could, and then see if I could not
teach you the holy words, ‘ Go, and siu no mors.’
But, thank Heaven, the signet of sin and shame
has never been pressed upon your brow. I feel
it, I know it, daughter,” aud he laid his hau l
gently on her head, and smoothed her soft hair,
“just as much as if I had been acquainted with
you from infancy.”
“I am unfortunate; but not, oh! not guilty of
ajlife of shame!”
“ I dare be sworn of that. But we will talk no
more about it now. Try and sleep. Mother will
take care of baby; he will be better off, and would
only disturb you.”
“But, oh, if you should think me a——”
“I don’t think anything about it, and you
must not either. Only think that you ars in good
hands, that no danger can come to you—no, nor
your child either—and go to sleep, like a good
girl.”
“But I cannot forget how I came here and
what you cannot help deeming me to be. I had
rather have died than that. If it were not for my
child, oh, how gladly would I welcome death!”
“Tut, tut! you must not talk of dying. We’ll
have you well in a few days. We’ll have you a
happy, gray-headed old woman in time, aud this
youngster will be a great mau—a lawyer, doctor,
or, who can tell, but President ?”
“If you only knew all. If I only had strength
to tell you.”
“ Time enough for it. The first thing we must
do is to bring back the roses to your cheeks.
Just look at that little scapegrace. He’s a pat
tern of robust health for you. Don t brood over
your troubles; he’ll.grow up and defend you.”
“ Defend me ? Oh, that God would raise up
some one to do so!”
“ Well, he has, if you’ll trust to my arm, and it
s no baby one.”
“ If you do not think me guilty, what do you
think ?■’
Her mind was ever returning to the starting
point.
“I shall think you a very disobedient little
girl if you do not stop talking, and sleep.”
“But I cannot. Believe me, it makes ms
more quiet to talk to you—to see your face brim
ming with kindness bent over me—to feel the
clasp of your hand, that tells me I can depend
upon it. It is something so strange to feci thus—
to know even a moment of conscious security.”
“Well, little lamb, if you will take me for vour
present shepherd—we will talk about tho future
seme other day—you may sleep without having
any fears of wolves. Time, if I Knew more about
you, I would know better how to act. But that
is not necessary. No one knows you and knows
you are here, except the policeman who found
vou in the street, and he will hold his peace on
his own account, my servants, who know their
places too well to tell tales out of school, aud my
goed wife and myself, who don’t belong to the
tea-drinking, tattling school. Physicians and
physicians’ households often see strange sights
that the world never knows of, so set your little
heart at rest on that score.”
“But I should'be so much happier if I could
only unbosom myself to you ; for, strange as it
may seem, I cannot but look upon you as my
preserver.”
“ Well, if you think it best, you can give me
the prominent points in your life, filling up the
particulars when you get’ stronger; and yet I
think you had better defer it. What say’you,
Agnes?”
“It might be for the best. Perhaps she will
rest more quietly when she has thus reliever! her
overcharged mind. Ido not always think it boat
that the heart should be forced to bear its suffer
ings silently and alone,” was the reply of the
wife.
“ Well, Agnes, you know the promptings of a
woman’s heart better than I do, and I know
yours is always right. But still I must say'l
don’t approve of the practice of sick folks re
hearsing long stories.”
“ No; you like to talk too well yourself, Doc
tor,” laughed bis wife.
“ You got me on the hip there, mother, though
I can recollect the time you used to say that I
made shoit calls and told short stories. Heigh
ho! that’s a good many years ago, ain’t it, wife ?”
And ho laughed in reply as he saw a blush
mounting up to the temples of his better half.
“ Let us hear what Bertha has to say,” was the
quiet response. “ A pretty name, child.”
“It was my mother’s.’' And the eyes were
quickly flooded with tears.
“By Jupiter!” exclaimed the doctor, “you
have put y our foot in it this time, wife. It bought
it was always poor I who blundered about peo
jilo's feelings like a bull in a crocketv shop. But
no matter, daughter, we’ll listen a little while—
not long, remember. But first, another powder.
There, that will do: and don’t'forget that I
charge you not to try your strength.”
“ My mother—alas, she died when I wa.s very
young,” began the young womau, “ was.an Ital
ian, though born in this country. My father
was an American, and he also died when I was
but a girl. I was left to the care of a guardian.
His name— —”
“ Now I don’twant you to mention anynames,”
interrupted tho doctor, “ I want the bold facts
first, without any names, for I might chance to
know some of them, and I want to think of the
matter without anything to influence my judg
ment. Will you remember this, daughter?”
“Yes. Daughter! oh, how sweet that name
sounds to me after so many years.”
“ You shall hear it often then. But go on.”
“As I said, I was left to the care .of a guar
dian. My father bequeathed me a large amount
of money—how much I don’t know ."
“ And he tried to cheat you out of it. The in
fernal scoundrel.”
“ Don’t interrupt her, Doctor,” whispered his
wife.
“Well, I won’t again; but I have no patience
with such confounded knavishness. Aud, by Ju
piter, the world is full of it.”
“ My guardian,” resumed Bertha, “ was a man
who I had feared even when a little girl—a dark,
morose looking man. Some time after my fatb
ci's death he took me to his own house. He had
no wife, but a repulsive looking woman who act
ed as housekeeper, and beat me and shut ms up
whenever she saw fit, threatening to kill me if I
ever told any one. Tnis continued for a year
or more when I was sent awav to boardiug sciiool
am?_”
“ A perfect do-the bovs hall, I’ll bet my life,”
interrupted the irascible old doctor again.
“Don’tnotice him, Bertha, but go oil,” sug
gested the wife.
“ I was kept there for several years, and being
brought back was at once led into the room
where my guardian was confined at the time by
sickness. He requested another grim-lookiug
man who was present, and who he said was my
father’s lawyer, to read the will my parent hail
left. I remember little of it, except that it men
tioned a large property and this clause, which
was read over and over aaain as if to impress it
Upon my mind, ‘ that if I ever married without
the consent of -my guardian first had been ob
tained,’ those- were the very words, ‘I should
forfeit all.’ Knowing my father’s love for me, I
did hot then believe, girl as I was, that he could
ever so have fettered me, and on a subsequent
occasion, more than a year afterward, I acci
dentally found the will lying unon his desk, and
thimgh I caught but a hasty glance at it, de
cided in my own mind that it had been added by
another band ami in other ink than the oue that
wrote the remainder.”
“ByJupiter! I know it was. The rapscal
lion 1”
“During all tins time my woman keeper—far
I »aa confined as in a prison—never allowed ma
to go our alone, and even when aecompauiedb.it
seldom, tormented me aM the time, and frequent-
x NEW YORK DISPATCH.
ly boat me most unmercifully, especially when
she had been drinking to excess.”
“ The hag I the devd’s sister 1”
“ But I cannot dwell ou those days of torture
now. Another time I wiU enter fully into par
ticulars. Once I was surprised to meet a young
man iu the room we usually occupied in the day
time, for I was invariably looked in my own roo m
as soon as night came—in summer to sit at the
grated casement aud dream in the darkness of
happiness, and in winter to creep to bed and so
keep from fr eezing.”
“Jupiter Ammon!" exclaimed the d >ctor, the
tears rushing to his eyes even at the thought of
that fair, youug girl brooding over her sorrows
in the dark hours, and driven to bed by the
cold.
“As I eaid, I met a young man there. He
was but I cannot describe him no farther than
that he was, to my young eyes, all that was
gentle, kind aud noble.”
“Yea, I know, ‘love’s youug dream.’ But
go on.”
“ For an hour we sat aud conversed together,
and when I was again shut in my lonely room,
I sat for many long ones aud watched the stars and
thought what his coming could mean. Never
before had I seen the face of man there except
my guardian, and occasionally, though very
rarely, the one I saw on the occasion of the will.
No, not even that of butcher or baker. If any,
by chance, came to the door when I was there, 1
was quickly driven to my own room, and dared
not return again until called. Once, only, I did
so, and found the same young man there. I
did not even enter or speak to him, but the
woman beat me so for it that I bore the marks of
the cruel whip upon my shoulders for more than
a month.”
“Theinfernal,brutal,hard-hearted old harri
dan 1”
“I neglected to say that I was always liber
ally supplied with gold, but what use was it to
me when I could not go out to spend it? True,
tho woman would get anything I wished, though
I always imagined she kept the greater part for
herself. But I did not think of these things
then. From the day I first saw the young mau
he appeared to visit the house often, though I
did not see him, and as it appeared to me it was
always in the absence of my guardian, but of this
I could not be certain. But wo met spine imes,
aud those moments Were indeed bright ‘spots in
my existence. Not that I loved him then, but
that it Was like sunshine to see some pleasant
face, where all was so dark, gloomy and forbid
ding. I must not dwell thus, and yet how can 1
tear my heart away from those few short days of
glorious beauty in my sad career? At length,
after mouths had past, during which I had seen
him every week, and sometimes even ofteuer, he
began to bring me books, flowers, flue fruit aud
music. The very things in which my heart most
delighted. His stay, too, was lengthened, and
when I was driven back to my den, for so my
brutal keeper called it, and I believe looked
upon me something as one would a beast whose
duty it was to guard, my heart was far too full of
happiness to think of my sorrowful surroundings.
But I still linger when I,Tike my fate, should be
hurrying swiftly onward."
“ Take your time, daughter,” replied tho phy
sician, though his heart was more than impa
tient to hoar the end, and it required alt of his
boasted eelf-control to keep within bounds.
Take your time. Earth has far too few groan
spots in its usually arid sands to ba lightly
passed by.”
“As hrs visits became more frequent, my ar
gus-eyed keeper appeared to relax her watch
relaxed until at length we were left to ourselves,
often for hours at a time. Music, reading and
ordinary conversation were sufficient at first,
but the day came when ourselves was the con
stant theme, and, need I say it ? love the inspi
ration. My keeper must nave been listening,
when our vows were pledged, for she taunted
me with it immediately afterward aud said she
should tell my guardian.”
“The old she-dragon 1"
“In vain I wept and plead that she would not
do so, for I had before felt the power of his re
sentment. She fulfilled her threat, first taking
all the money I had in the world as a bribe to
silence, and then laughing at me for being such
a simpleton as to give it her. My guardian sum
moned me to his usual sitting-room when at
home, for he was often abroad and I did not see
him for weeks at a time. It struck me that he
appeared more than usually repulsive and was
evidently, or he assumed to be, intensely angry.
I have since learned to my sorrow that was the
latter. Trembling in every limb I stool before
him-and awaited my fate.”
“ Shut the door!” he exclaimed roughly.
I obeyed and,resumed my place near the
chair in which he was seated, like a very crimi
’ nal awaiting sentence, although Heaven knows
I my heart acquitted me of anything that even
bore the semblance of guilt.
“ So, so my lady 1 So, my pretty minx,” he
began, “ you have dared to receive visits from a
gentleman without my knowledge and—”
“Master! Doctor! Doctor atiflwell 1" shout
ed the negro servant, bobbins unceremoniously
into the room. ”
“What the devil is the matter now?” ques
tioned the physician, in an angry voice, for he
was wrapped up body aud soul in the story of
his fair patient.
“ Here's a sleigh been and upset, aud some
thing less than a dozen broke their legs.”
“I wish it had been their necks, before they
troubled me 1” lie growled'forth, and yet he hur
ried away as if he had no interest in remaining,
for his heart was made of far less unfeeling stuff
than his tongue.
“ I’ll be back as soon as I can, Agnes. Take
good care of the babies. Go to sleep now,daugh
ter! This is the curse of a physician’s life. Give
her another powder, Agnes. Mind not another
word of the story until I am present to hear it.
Scipio Africanus,. get my coat, hat aud gloves.
Have you the gig ready ? Good-by, daughter
good-by, little one—good-by, wife,” aud he dish
ed down the stairs as if he’intended to dislocate
every oue of his own limbs, aud scolding the ne
gro at every breath.
<To he continued.)
Jperlal Rattos.
Hotliers ! Mothers ! !
Mothers ! ! !
DON'T KAIL to procure Mm. WINSLOW’S SOOTHING
SYRUP FOR CHILDREN TEETHING.
This valuable preparation h the prescription of one or
tfce most tjqterieiMHl and in New England, aud
haa been used tho past TEN YEARS with neoer-failuis/n»c
oom in THOUSANDS OF CASES.
It not only relieve* the child from pain, but Invigorates
tha stomach and bowels, corrects aetditv, and gives tone
and energy to the whole system. It will Instantly relieve
GRIPING IN THE BOWELS and WIND COLIC,
aed overcome Convulsions, which, if not speedily reme
died, end in death. We believe it is the Ikaf and
llevifiy in the in all cases of DYSENTERY and
2HARRHCKA IN CHILDREN, whether it arises from
Teething or from eny other cause.
Fall directions for using will accompany each bottle.
None genuine unless the fac-simile ot CURTIS St PXR
KINS, New York, is on the outside wrapper.
Sold by all Medicine Dealers.
-Principal Office, No. 43 DEY ST., New York.
FRICK ONLY 25 CENTS J*ER BOTTLE.
W 703 Broadway—To3.
THE HAIR R3GENERATOR
has been the subject of thirty years’ study and a long ex-
K fence It cures all diseases of the scalp, pimples, itch
. dandruff, prevents the hair railing and turning gray,
aud when already gray restores it to its original color. It
may be applied at my rooms if preferred. Separate
apartments lor ladies. Price of the box complete, $2;
one single bottle, 75 cents. Prospectus sent free.
Particular attention paid to childrens as well as to
ladles’ and gentlemen's Hair dressing. '
ARTHUR GENTIL,
Purveyor by special appointment to the Court of Russia,
and deeerated with the Order of Saint Stanislaus.
ST. Watehcs. $7.
A Beautiful Engraved Gold-Plated Watch, Lever Cap,
small size, English Mwements, perfect time-keeper. Sent
iree by mall, in neat case, for only $7. A Solid Silver,
akune as above, $7. Specially adapted to the
ARMY.
CHAS. P. NORTON Sc CO., t
33 and 40 Ann street. New York.
Medical and Electrepathlc Institute.
BABCOCK 4 TOBIN respectfully call the atten
tion of invalids to their new and successful Treatment of
Se most obstinate forms of Chronic and Nervous Disease,
the scientific use of Voltaid and continuous currents or
eetricitv, Sulphur Baths, and concentrated remedies.
Dr. TOBIN has tu»cd this form of Electricity in his prac
tice Jor the lartjseven years, and has cured numerous
easos of I’araijfcis, Epilepsy, Caturrh, Consumption,
Kidney and Liver Disease/ Dysjicpsia, Constipation,
Neryoue Debility, and ia all Female Complaints
nevdr tails to\gjve entire satisfaction. Dr. BABOOCK
has paid snpHa.l attention to Cancer, Scrofula and Tu
mors, for tire last fifteen years, during which time he has
removed Iwxndreds of cancers with great success, and
without slic nse of the knife, specimens of which can be
teen at our institute.
N. BABCOCK, M. D.,
C. TOBIN, M. D.,
No. 27 BOND STREET.
The Great English Remedy.
SIR JAiiraThARKE'S
CELEBRATED FEMALE PILLS.
Prepared from a prescription of Sir i. Clarko, M. D.
Physician Extraordinary to the Queen.
This well-known medicine is no imposition, but a sure
and safe remedy for Fea-a’c Difficulties and Obstructions,
from any cause whatever; and although a powerful tern
edy, it contains nothing hurtful to the constitution. To
nfitrriod ladies It is peculiarly suited It will, m a short
time, bring on the monthly period with regularity.
In all cases ot Nervous and Spinal Affection, Pain in the
Back and Limbs, Fatigue on slight exertion, Palpitation
of the Heart. Hysterics, and Whites, these Pills will effect
a cure when all other means hive failed; and although a
powerful remedy, do not contain iron, calomel, antimony,
or anything hurtful to the constitution.
Full directions tn the pamphlet around each package,
which should be carefully preserved.
For full particulars, get a pamphlet, free, of the agent.
N. B.—sl and 6 postage stamps enclosed to any author
ized agent, will ensure a bottle coxitaining over 50 pills by
return mail.
SOT D BY ALL DRUGGISTS
JOB MOSES, No. 27 Courtland st. New York,
<ole United States Agent.
Confederate (Rebel) Honey.—Fac
simile Treasury Notes, so exactly like the genuine, tiar
where one will current the other will go equally as
Wed ss<>’iu C'ar.eJerato Notesn 'a‘i den iminatlotu sent
j) mail, p jstago paid, ou the receipt of {5, by
W. E HILTON. No. 11 SpruOb N. Y.
T E KiTF N G’S
AMBROSIA,
FOR
TTFTFI ETA.TR.
JfO;* -
Certificate of Mrs. Brown, whose photograph may bft
•ton at all Drug Stores in this and other ottter :
This is to certify that, about eighteen months age, I Mtifr
menced wdng Stk&i-iag’s Ambrosia. My hair was short;
thin, and rapidly falling out. 1 tried many Hair Toctas.
Lav iterators, 4c., without receiving any benefit Soon
after using the Ambrosia, my hair ceased falling out, and
commenced growing so tepidly as to astonteh me. Now,
my hair is th I at, soft and glossy, and is five feet few
Inches in length—when let down, reaching to the floor.
This wvuderfttl result I attribute solely to the use ofßrna
i.iKa s Ambroma, as since I commenced using it I have aj>-
plied nothing else te my hair.
Mrs. LUOY A, BROWN,
St. Nicholas Hotel. M. Y.
BEWARE OP AN IMITATION !
DO NOT BE DBOKIVSD I
ASK FOR
STERLING’S AMBROSIA
AND TAKE NO OTHER.
IS YOUR HAIR FALLING OUT It
IS YOUR HAIR'TWIN ?
IS YOUR HEAD BALD t
ARE YOU TROUBLED WITH DANDRUFF f
OR
ANY DISEASE OF THE HAIR OR SCALP WHAtt
EVDR T
If so, do not delay for an hour tha tuo of
STERLING’S
AMBROSIA.
STERLING’S
STERLING’S
STERLING'S
AMBROSIA.
AMBROSIA.
AMBROSIA.
FOR THE HAIR,
FOR THE HAIR,
FOR THE HAIR,
AN OILY EXTRACT.
AN OILY EXTRACT,
AN OILY EXTRACT.
MADE FROM ROOTS.
MADE FROM ROOTS,
MADE FROM ROOTS,
BARKS AN D HKRBSL
BARKS AND HERBS.
BARKS AND HKttBS,
AMBROSIAL SONG.
For man a power, woman's glory.
Through me glows the esseece fine
That for Eve's full locks in Eden
Drip d from every flowery shrtno.
O how Adam prized the treasure—
How he gloated on eaoh curl.
Flowing sof t im angel’s plumage
Rotund her perfect brow of peart!
Wotfd you have this power, this gtary T
Wo«kl you laagh at changing time t
Would you dread not blighting fever.
Or the aridnexs of clime r
Would you be like your first parents.
With a glorious crown of hair
Waving, curling, glowing o’er yen
In the dryest, darkest air!
Hate you setKCs disease and dandruff t
Love you Gleanliness like (hose
Who made their exquisite toilet
Long ago by Kden 8 rose t
Wish you for the perfect beauty?
Fine you for the fadeless glow ?
Then, without a doubt of triumph.
To my guardian Stirling go!
DR. H. H, STERLING,
Stectfagte AmbroAte.
MEAN.—No greater ««««(*« oon ba perpetrated than te
exhibited by some of the former ae&aoiates of Dr. Sterling,
who have under taken to succeed in palming off upon Um
public articles of a similar name to the “ Ambrooia."
they possess any merit, which is questionable, they do not
deserve fee support of the public, because of their attempt
to secure to themsedves a patronage at the expense of fee
former. To rob Dr. 3. of bis reputation, and his Ambrosia
its extensive usefulness, te both a meanness and an im
position upon fee public .
STERLING'S AMBROSIA ta foe sale by att DruggM&
Ji®
it®
Dr. STERLING’S AMBROSIA
Is a stimulating, oily extract of Roots, Barks, and Sfartw
It will cure all diseases ot the Bvah> and ttchuig of the
Head ; ♦•irtirely eradicates Dandruff, pre agents uie tra.tr
irom falling out, or from turning prematurely gray, cau&
tog it to grow thick and long. It is entirely -Qfferont
all other preparations, and cau be relied oa,
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS !
BEWARE QF IMITATIONS!
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS I
BEWARE OF IMITATION* I
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS ’
BEWARE OF IM ITaMONS I
SOLD BY
SOLD BY
SOLD BY
St»LD RY
SOLD RY
SOLD BY
SOME DRKGGWrs.
SOME DRUGGISTS,
SOME DRUGGISTS.
SOMB DRUGGISTS.
SOME DRUGGTOTS.
SOME DRUGGISTS.
FOR WHAT REASON !
FOR WHAT REASON ?
FOR WHAT REASON ?
FDR WHAT REASON ?
FOR WHAT REASON ?
FOR WHAT REASON ?
THEY BUY IT CHEAPER
THEY BUT IT CHEAPER
THEY BUT IT CHEAPER,
THEY BUY IT CHEAPER,
THEY BUY IT CHEAPER.
THEY BUY Xl’ CHEAPER
AND DEFRAUD THE PUBLIC.
AND DEFRAUD THE PUBLIC.
AND DBFRA'UD THE PUBLIC.
AND DEFRAUD THE PUBLIC
and Defraud the public.
AND DEFRAUD THE PUBLIC.
THE ONLY GBNUiyB
THE ONLY SKNUINK
tHB ONLY GENUINE
fHE ONLY GENUINK
THE ONLY GENUINE
THE ONLY GENUINE
IS DR. STERLING'S.
IS DR. STERLING'S.
IS DR. STERLING’S.
18 DR. STERLING’S.
IB DR. STERLING’S.
IS DR. STERLING’S.
“ Among the vast extent of vegetable extracts, thq meet
efficecioue are oftem the moat simple and commonplace.
By a happy combmation of these simple remedies of Na
ture, Dr. 11. H. Stew.ing has compounded a valuable
athmulMit for fee hair, which, when properly applied, can
never fail to secure the mod beneficial result*. It te for
sate by all druggists. Call for ‘ SneßLOta’a Ambrosia.’ ”
Nome Journal.
Johm C. Lar, Esq., writing to Dr. Stkruitg, tells the fed
lowing : “ For over six mouths I was compelled to wear a
wig, owing to the low of ray hair. * * * I tried a tew
bottles only of your ‘Ambrosia.’ when my head became
entirely covered with a crop of fine young hair.” Your
druggtet has it.
A correspondent inquires : “Will Sttrmxg’s Ambsosia
cause the hair to grow out of a buffalo robe that has been
tong in uae, a«d beceme bare in spots T” We should be
glad to restore our correspondent’s favorite robe to re
sptctfibilltT—but we can only recommended the article
su» valuable for barren intellects, giving him the firet
choice of application. It is for gale by your druggist un
doubtedly.
A. H. CAJfPRei.r., Esq., pays of Stksljno's AwesostA :
u After my hair had beoome so thin as to cause ma muck
ahum, a friend advteeM me to try your preparation, and,
I am glad to say, that new my hair has again began to
grow, and I shall soon have a better bead of hair (haul
over bad.” Ask your Druggist for It-
STERLING’S

ok '• &
<:■ / ?•«
! ’''DHAwrJ & ENGRAVED FROM LIFE.
To have thick, glossy, goft and healthy growing hair, it
is only necessary to use Sterling’s Ambrosia —the No. 1
bottle at night No. 2in the morning. Its effects upon the
scalp are ooeling and invigorating—its results what we
have asseverated. Sold by Druggists generally.
EETt tea well known fact to thousands in the oity or New
York that this the'only article yet discovered that will
Cure the Diseases of the Bcalp, and cause fee Hair to
Grow.
PRIGE $1 DO PER BOX-CONTAINING TWO BOTTLES
DR. H. H. STERLING,
Soto Proprietor,
No. 493 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
FOB SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS
STERLING’S AMBROSIA.
gastetteYg gitters.
HOSTETTER’S
CELEBRATED
STOMACH
BITTERS.
PROTECTIVE MEDICATION.
GREAT TRUTHS
IN
SMALL COMPASS.
HOSTETTER’S
STOMACH BITTERS.
WHAT THE BITTERS ARE:
A pure, delightful Vegetable Balm,
To cheer the spirits and nerves to calm.
Protect the system from Miasma's bfl«e,
Rouse torpid Mature, and the strength sustain,
THEIR INGREDIENTS.
Juices of plants, roots, barks of virtue rare,
By chemic art expressed with patieu: care.
And the mild spirit of the soundest rye—
Purest of all diffusive stimult
RESULTS OF THEIR USE.
Digestion rallies, appetite revives.
The food assimilates, the patient thrives.
Dyspepsia vanishes with all Us throes,
Aud peaceful sleep succeeds disturbed repose.
EFFECTS ON THE LIVER.
The billious sufferer, languid, listless, trale,
Physicked for years, perhaps, without avail,
Finds m the BITTERS all he asks or needs.
And lives to smile at doctors and their creeds.
OPERATION ON THE BOWELS.
Relaxed, constricted, or the seat of pain,
These organs should not for one day remain,l
rhe cause of each extreme you can expel-
The Bitters tone and regulate as weiL
EFFECT ON THE DEBILITATED.
The flaccid muscles firmness soon acquire.
The frame gains flesh, the eye resumes its fire;
Strength to the limlw. hope to the neart returns,
Till staff and crutch the convalescent spurns.
BROKEN CONSTITUTIONS.f
The constitution tried by pain or care,
Or wild indulgence, te not past repair;
This genial Tonic, as the healthful dews
Quicken parched lierbs, Its wasted power renews.
CHILLS AND FEVER.
Damp, cold, exposure to malarious fog,
Bring on of lite a tearful catalogue;
But fntennittents, whatso’or their kind.
Hostetter's Bitters scatter to the wind.
SICK HEADACHE.
This torment dire, that all enjoyment kills,
X!C‘ ds «ot to pungent scents dr drastic pills.
’Tis from the stomach that it takes its rise •
Tone with tlie Bitters, and tlie anguish flies.
WANT OF APPETITE.
Without due nourishment life’s pulses wane.
The blood grows thin, and dullness clouds the brain.
But this Efixer sets tlie system right,
Aud Good Digestiou waits on Appetite.
THE BITTERS AFTER SICKNESS;
Exhausting fever leaves its victims low.
And, unassisted. Health’s return is slow ;
Then with the Bitters weakened Nature aid,
For in each drop vitality’s conveyed.
AS A GENERAL PREVENTIVE.
By night and day, on river, sea, or laud.
In instant peril of disease we stand ;
But its dread arrows harmless seem to glide
Fast all with this invigorant fortified.
IMPURE WATER, 4c.
Roam through the world through every climate range.
Here is the ant>dote ’gainst every change ;
Water impure it tempers, and inures
Mttti to all hardships m all temperatures.
SEA SICKNESS.
Who has not felt how feebly words essay
The qualms one feels on shipboard to portray!
Dreful them no more, defy old Neptune’s power.
The Hitters cure the nausea in an hour.
AN UNADULTERATED TONIC.
Of all the liquors borne across the sea.
Not one- mark that—from acrid poison’s free.
These Bitters stand ’mid stimulant's alone,
Powerless to irriiate, though prompt to toue.
A MILD APERIENT.
Remember, too, aperient root and herb
Are blent with those that relaxation curb
In this rare mixture ; give this tact due weight,
That while the Bitters tone, they regulate.
A GENTLE CORRECTIVE.
If oil the stomach food to acid turns.
And pungent gas the inner membrane buru.l,
This grand corrective soon removes the ban.
And from the heartburn frees the inner man.
A SAFE AND GENTLE ANODYNE.
Why not with all the opiates dispense.
That shake the nerves and paralyze the sense,
When these rare BITTERS soothe both mind and framo,
Inviting both to yield to slumber’s claitu !
THE WORLD’S OPINION.
Touching the BITTERS, this grand fact te cleari
Their fame fills all the Western Hemisphere,
Known in all lands, washed by its oceans twain.
Hbalth, Hops, and Vigor follow in their train
AVOID COUNTERFEITS.
Hostetter’s Bitters share the common fate
Of all tbings-good. Impostors imitate.
Of these beware. Discreetly use your eym.
From honest houses purchase your supplies.
CAUTION.
THE GOVERNMENT INDORSEMENT.
In order to guard against dangerous impositions, tha
public are requested to take especial ix>te of the beauti
fully engraved proprietary stamp, through which tha
Government of the-United States officially authenticates
every bottle of HOSTE ITER’S BITTERS. This shield,
thrown by the Government over the proprietors and the
public for their joint protection, te placed conspicuously
across the cork and over the neck of each bottle, and can
not fail to strike the eye of the most casual observer.
Nothing that purports to be HOSTETTER’S BITTERS can
be genuine unless the stamp is there.
It te also proper to state that the BITTERS are sold ex
clusively iu glass, and never under any circumstances by
the gallon ter the barrel. Imposters and imitators are
abroad, and the only safeguard the public have against
them te to see that the Bitters they buy bear the engraved
label and note of hand ot Messrs. Hostetter <fc Smith, aud
the Stamp above mentioned.
Prepared and sold by
HOSTETTER & SMITH,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
FOR SALE BY
DRUGGISTS,
GROCERS and
STOREKEEPERS
throughout the globe.
NEW YORK OFFICE,
Ko. 476 BROADWAY.
Stm&ay WLHion. Bee. 13.
S BALSAM OF
WILD CHERRY.
THE MOST RELIABLE REMEDY F&R
COUGHS. COLDS, WHOOPING COUGH. INFLUENZA.
DIFFICULTY OF BREATHING. ASTHMA. BR&N- *
CHITK, LIVER OOMPLAINT, HOARSR-
NESS, SORE THROAT. SPITTING
OF BLOOD. CROUP,
PHTHISIC,
PREDISPOSITION TO CONSUMPTION,
AND EVERY AFFECTION OF
THE THROAT, LUNGS AND CHEST.
8A peculiar and inoattmable quality of
thte remedy te th ®ases of long standing
and severe chapter yield as readUy to
its healing influence as those of more re
cent origin and milder nature—thus hap
pily illustrating the “power of medicine
over
That this medicine performs all that it
promises, let those testify who can speax
from experience:
FROM 0. KIRKWHTTE, ESQ., OF MADISON, N. Y.
“It tea pleasure to me to acknowledge the virtues of DR.
WISTAR’S BALSAM OF WILD CHERRY. My case has
for several years been pronounced one of ixcuradle co.x-
SUMPttOK. Wtetar's Balsam was recommended. I have
used it, and it has been a source of incalculable relief to
me. I think it te the best remedial agent for lung or
throat complaints. Although not desirous of becoming
notorious as puffing your specific,! feel sustained in re
commending this to all suffering from coughs or colds. ’•
FROM S. TEACHER, M. D., OF HERMAN. N. Y.
“ For more than a year past I have sold Dr. Wistas’s
Balsam or Wild Cherry, and so far as I know, it has
given universal satisfaction. It seems to cure a Cough by
loosening and cleansing the Lungs and allaying Irritation,
thus the cause } instead <y’ drying it up and leaving the
cause behind.'
“ I consider It as good a Cough Medicine, if not better
than any with which I am acquainted.”
PRESIDENT, OF THE MORRIS COUNTY BANK.
FROM JESSE SMITH, ESQ , MORRISTOWN, N. J.
“Having used Dr. Wistar’s Balsam or Wild Cherry
for about fifteen years, and having realized its beneficial
results in my family, it affords me great pleasure in re
commending it to the public as a valuable remedy in
cases of Weak Lungs, Colds, Coughs, and a remedy
which I consider to be entirely innocent, and may be
taken with perfect safety by the most delicate in health.”
FROM MARCUS McALLISTER, ESQ , OF MORLEY, N.Y.
“In the early part of last Winter I was suddenly at
tacked with a very severe Cold, which settled on my
Lungs, producing a painful Cough, Soreness and Inflam
mation of the Throat and Lungs, together with a prostra
tion of the whole system. After suffering for three months
I tried a bottle of Dr. Wistar’s Balsam of Wild Cheruy,
aud received immediate and permanent relief. Since
then I have used it in other cases of Colds in my family
with the same satisfactory results I can conscientiously
recommend it to all who suffer from Coughs, Colds, or
any Pulmonary affection as the best remedy which can
be had.”
WISTAR’S BALSAM OF WILD CHERRY.
None genuine unless signed I. Butts.
For sale by
J. P. DINSMORE, No. 491 BROADWAY. NEW YORK.
SETH W. FOWLE & CO , No. 18 TREMONT ST., BOSTON r
And by all Druggists.
I S T I L L E D DEW.
FOB THE COMPLEXION.
This deUghtftil preparation te the most efficacious and
valuable article yet known for beautifying the complex
ion, and imparting to the skin that clearness and white
ness so much admired and coveted. It oontahwno min
eral substance, chalk or powder, of any kind, but tea
purely BOTANICAL PREPARATION, free from all in
jurious ingredients and as pure and innocuous as the dew
from Heaven. It removes TAN, FRECKLES and DIS
COLORATIONS, prevents Wrinkles, Rough and Sallow
Cheeks, improves and preserves the beauty of the Com
plexion, and renders the skin white, soft, smooth and
clear. It tea fragrant and delicate perfume, and will be
found a delightful addition to the bath. Sold by Drug
gists. . D. D. GRIFFIN. General Agent,
Nos. 779 and 781 Broadway.
IMPORTANT !
Send all Money and Packages to SoMien
by Hamden’s Express, No. Tl Broadway, as
they have United States Government permis
sion to forward to the Army at Baltimore,
Frederick City, Fortress Monroe, Washing
ton, Port Royal, and other points, for half
rates. Their Express Is the oldest la the
United States. Their Creat Eastern and
Philadelphia Expresses sent as formerly.
rfeYE YOUR COATS!—DYE YOUR
JLx VESTS !—Overcoats, Pantaloons and other gar
ments, can be cleaned and dved, WITHOUT REMOVING
THE LININGS, or even ripping them apart, at a cost at
from 75 coats to SI 50. at the
FRENCH STEAM SCOURING
AND
DYEING ESTABLISHMENT,
Of EUGENE DUMONT,
No. 88 Third avenue, near Twelfth street.
FME R I (JAN PATENT?
METALLIC COLLARS
vg.
STEEL COIXARS
AMERICAN” PATENT
METALLIC COLLARS!
METALLIC COLLARS!
vs.
STEEL COLLARS !
THE AMERICAN ENAMELT.ED METALLIC COLLAJL
QO MP ANY call the .attention of rhe public to fee superior
ity ot their Collars over the Imported ‘ Steel” GoUant
because they are superior—lst, in enamel, therefore mor#
durable ; Ud. they are more pliable ; 3d, the metal they
are made of is a non conductor, and there is no danger et
Si target for lightning (the soldier with a musket in
ids atirirg a thunder shower can appreciate thisk
eir Turn-over Collar is the only article of the kin<
UWtauftictured—the Imported being an imposition, a huuv
bUK, aud only a turn-over in name Enclose jl for a
• Cupter,” or $1 50 for a genuine “ Half Turn over” Gol
fer, to Box 5,173, New York Post Office, and receive it by
return maU. Agents wanted. The trade furnished with
’D METALLIC COLLAR GO .
C. H. WELLING,
No. 9< PINE STREET. NEW YOBK.
Good news to
WHITT AM & LAWRENCE,
No. 395 PEARL STREET, NEW YORK,
are now manufacturing the
“AMERICAN BIRD’S EYE SMOKING TOBACCO,"
Which teequal if not superior to the English. This Tobaooo
has less nareotine in it than any other Tobacco. A person
smoking it will find it has a sweet flavor, and is ver/ ffiea
sanl to imoke. AU persona smoking a pipe, should give
fee
“AMERICAN BIRD’S-EYE TOBACCO”
ft trial—we guarantee you will enjoy a good smoke. It
leaves no deleterious effecte, and does not act upon the
Serves like other Tobaoco. Bok* everywhere.
H EY ’ S
SELF-RAISING
FLOUR
Makes more and sweeter BREAD and CAKE than any
other Flour in thd market- Call for
HEY’S FLOUR.
For sale in all the principal Groceries hi the city.
WEIGLY A DE WALT, Manufacturers.
__ No. 318 Greenwich street, N. Y.
PATENT OFFICE,
ESTABLISHED 1842.
During the past Twenty Years, Messrs. MUNN & CO., in
connection with the publication of the Weekly Illus
tjl-vtkd Scientific amebican, (the only paper devoted to
fee Mechanic Arts in the Country,) have a’.ted as Attor
neys for procuring Letters Patent in the United States
and all foreign countries
They would state that they have acted, during this pe
riod, as agents for more than
THOUSAND INVENTORS.
In fact, they have become identified with the whole bro
therhood of inventors and patentees, at home and abroad.
Thousands of inventors for whom they have taken patents
hove addressed to them mort flattering testimonials ; and
the wealth that has inured to the inventors whose patents
were secured through their Office, and afterward Illus
trated in the Scientific American, would amount to many
millions of dollars 1
Messrs. MUNN & CO. never had a more efficient corps
of Draughtsmen and Specification Writers than those em
ployed at present; and they are prepared to attend to
Eitent business of all kinds, in the quickest time and on
io most liberal terms.
For further information, send for a pamphlet which con
tains the Patent Laws of the United States, and much,
other valuable information of importance to inventors
and all others who own patent property. Also, pam
phlets of information furnished regarding theJPatent Lawr
of all Foreign Countries.
For further particulars address MUNN ,t CO., No. 37
Park Row. New York, or corner F and 7th streets, (oppo
site Patent Office.) Washington, D. C.
SEPARATE
SL BOXES —BLACK
and BROWN, warrant
ed the best, cheapest
and most durable in the
world. Dyes the most
beautiful Black and
Brown instantaneously,
without injuring the
Hair or Skin in the least.
BoWbyaU Drugsjteta. Depot. WQ - M pey iitreet
Beautiful villa plots,
UNION FLACK LONG ISLAND.
45 minutes from South lerrj. Cars hourly.
Plots 50 by Kx). 50 by 2f4), 100 by SM. 200 by2oo feet; high
drv tovel and perfect, running from street to street.
Depot three minute#* walk. Commutation 6 cents a trip.
ana water escellent-
y ofptofs. SSTOt $1,200, $2,400. 25 per cent
down, lialance in ten years to parties who improve.
Cut this notice out for future reference
call for a man on the property
T. B. CHASE.
No. ill Fulton street,
Stwad Floor, Roam 1.

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