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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, January 31, 1864, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85026214/1864-01-31/ed-1/seq-5/

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HEKO KE E PILLS!
REGCUTOB,
r em J® mra.
lib
CERTAIN A ' S ® SA¥E -
#•s* For the Removal of Obstructions and, the In
surance of Regidardy in the Recurrence
of the Monthly Periods.
Jf®- Thej'cure or obviate those numerous diseases that
spring from irregularity, by removing the irregularity
iteelf.
They cure Suppressed, Excessive and Painful Men
Mutation.
ttir They cure Green Sickness (Chlorosis).
They cure Nervous and Spina! Affections, pains in
the back and lower parts of the body, Heaviness, Fatigue
on slight exertion, Palpitation of the Heart, Lowness of
Spirits, Hysteria, Sick Headache, Giddiness : etc., etc. In
a word, by removing the Irregularity, they remove the
cau.se and with it all the effect* that spring from it
Composed of simple vegetable extracts, they con
tain nothing deleterious to any constitution, however deli
cate, their function being to substitute strength for weak
Hess, which, when properly used, they never fail to do,
jyjr They may be safely used at any age, and at any
peilod, EXCEPT DURING THE FIRST THREE MONTHS, during
Which the unfailing nature of their .action would infal
libly prevent pregnancy.
All letters seeking information or advice will be
promptly, freely and discreetly answered.
jj®« Pull directions accompanying each box.
jf®» Price $1 per box, or six boxes for $5.
jp®» Sent by mail, free of postage, on receipt of price.
JS®- Sold by all respectable Druggists.
DR. W. R. MERWIN & CO.,
Sole Proprietors,
No. 59 LIBERTY STREET, New York.
JjUJXIR. ELIXIR.
DR. WRIGHT’S
REJUVENATING ELIXIR!
OR,
ESSENCE OF LIFE.
TREr.AP.ED FROM PURE VEGETABLE EXTRACTS, CON
TAINING NOTHING INJURIOUS TO THE
MOST DELICATE.
X®* The Rejuvenating Elixir is the result of modern dis
coveries in the vegetable kingdom ; being an entirely new
and abstract method of cure, irrespective of all the old
and wornout systems.
jj®* This medicine has been tested by the most eminent
medical men of the day, and by them pronounced to be
one of the greatest medical discoveries of the age.
j®- One bottle will cure general Debility.
A few doses cures Hysterics in females.
j®“ One bottle cures Palpitation of the Heart
A few doses restore s the organs of generation.
From one t j three bottles restores the manliness
and full vigor of youth.
jp®* A few doses restores the appetite
DST Three bottles cure the worst case of Impotency.
O'* A few doses cures the low spirited.
O” One bottle restores mental power.
I®- A few doses bring the rose to the cheek.
9ST Tills medicine restores to manly vigor and robust
health the poor debilitated, worn-down, and despairing
devotee of sensual pleasure.
The listless, enervated youth, the over-taskod man
of business, the victim of nervous depression, the individ
ual suffering from general debility, or from weakness of a
organ, will all find immediate and permanent relief
ty the use of this Elixir or Essence of Life.
I®* Price. $2 per bottle, or three bottles for $5, and for
warded by Express, on receipt of money, to any address
Sold by all druggists everywhere.
DR. W. R. MERWIN & Co.,
Sole Proprietors.
No. 59 Liberty street, New York.
H rjTHE NEVER FAILING DOCTOR.”
A- Dr. COX succeeds when others have failed,
in the treatment of all PRIVATE, SECRET and VENE
RAL DISEASES, without the dangerous and indiscrimi
nate use of MERCURY, or without interfering with diet or
occupation. Office,
No. 67 CARMINE STREET,
Between Bleecker and Hudson, N. Y.
Hours from 9 A. M., to 8 P. M.
Dr. grindle7~~
No. 6 Amity Place,
18 PREPARED TO TREAT
VENEREAL DISEASE IN ALL ITS FORMS.
In reference to the treatment of Gonorrhoea, and its
train of unhappy consequences, the most important re
marks we relate to the avoidance, on the part of the pa
tient, of illegitimate interference. The deplorable results
of gonorrhoeal disease are only averted by common pru
dence and proper medical assistance ; but, from ncgli-
f fence in the hands of unskillful physicians, the most ca
amitous consequences not unfrequently arise. Nothing
is more common than to find patients resorting to stimu
lant resin?, ay turpcfitilife, CUbebs. or the balsam of copai
oa, in some of its preparations, before the of
the acute or inflammatory stage ; and, more
dangerous, astringents and irritating injections. This is
a common practice, not only by patients themselves, but
by those physicians who are continually advertising that
they can cure these diseases at once, without change of
diet or other restrictions. But mark the result—the de-
Slorable consequences of such treatment. Slow chronic
iflammation, obstinate gleety discharge, painful harass
ing stricture, disease of the testicles, and sometimes dis
organization and destruction of those—a miserable exist
ence, and death itself, are not unfrequently the deplora
ble results of such imprudence.
A confirmed gonorrncea cannot be arrested suddenly in
its career uilh safety to the patient ; and those who advertise
that they can cure the disease in a day or two, are totally
regardless of the deplorable consequences of their prac
tice. No cautious physician will resort to such extreme
measures, and hazard the health and life of the patient
for a few paltry dollars. Our treatment will vary accord
ing to the intensity of the disease, the time it lias existed,
and (he constitutional peculiarities of the patient. Hence
the remedies must be selected with discrimination, suited
to the peculiarities of each case.
It is, therefore, exceedingly unsafe that a man should
venture to treat his owncase. The records of our practice
attest much serious mischief that has arisen in this way.
Gonorrhoea, if neglected or improperly treated, becomes
chronic gleet; and, so long as there is the least appear
ance of a discharge, a matrimonial union is unad visable,
and correct medical advice and treatment absolutely
necessary. Office hours from BA.M.to 10 P. M.
H. D. GRINDLE, M. D.,
No. 6 Amity Place,
Between Bleecker and Amity streets.
AG re a t discovery.
AN AESTHETIC NITROUS OXIDE.
TEETH POSITIVELY EXTRACTED WITHOUT PAIN,
by Dr. HOYT, Inventor and sole manufacturer of Antes
thstic Nitrous Oxide, (not Laughing Gas) but a s-rictlv
anesthetic agent, entirely free from exhilarating effects
and perfectly harmless, causing a quiet sleep, with pleas
ing sensations and perfect insensibility to pain, under
which 1 extract teeth without the knowledge of the
>atient. Teeth filled, and artificial teeth of every descrip
tion inserted. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. Dr. HOYT,
Dentist, No. 907 Broadway, near 20th street.
MAD. DESPARD’S FEMALE MONTH-
LY PILLS are the only medicine married or sin
gle ladies can depend on with safety and certainty. Can
be sent by to any part of the United States and Can
adas N. B.—Ladies who desire to avail themselves of
Madame Despard's valuable, certain and safe mode of re
moving obstructions, suppressions, &c.. &c. without the
use of medicine, can do so at one interview. Residence.
No. 101 SIXTH AVENUE, opposite Bth st.
mHE GREAT ENGLISH REMEDY FOR
JL GOUT AND RHEUMATISM.
All sufferors from the above complaint? either of recent
or long standing, are advised to use BLAIR’S GOUT and
RHEUMATIC PILLS. They can be relied on as the most
•fife and effectual remedy ever offered to the public, and
have been universally used in Europe fer many years
With the greatest success.
Prepared in Ragland by PRQUT A HARSANT; and sold
by F. C. WELLS,A Co., No. 115 Franklin street. Naw York;
and most other Medicine Venders
Her Majesty’s Commissioners have authorised the name
and address of “THOMAS PROUT, No. 229 Strand, Lon
don,” fo be impressed upon the Government stamp affixed
to each box of the genuine medicine.
CTOR THE
ETABLE ELECTUARY in a certain euro for Files in
every form and condition. Fijtviru t Fissures, Abscesses, and
Vittratioru of the bowels are the result of neglected or
badly-treated Piles. When afflicted with either of these
distressing and dangerous aCbctions, the patient must con
sult thetD6clx>r personally at his office. No. 887 Fourth st
The of Piles, and all affections resulting from
Chis dis aae, solicited fur treatment Dr. UPHAM tea
regular physician, has devoted special attention to thte
elass cd affecuons for more than twenty years, and may
be controlled at any hour of the day. at nU Medical Office,
No. 887 Fourth nt., third door Dram the Bowery, between
Bowery and Broadway.
JSELPHO’s EREMTOM ANGLESEYiSqP
k > with Patent Lateral Elastic Joints, (Patented May 6.
containing all the advantages of celebrated An
«pt<?oßy Leg. w ith the fid iitkm of t»a Lateral or side-motion
»*, joint, by means of which foot aceemmc
fo anaven surfaces, and la pronounced by wear
as affoming great comfort, and a£ being a great 1m
p rovemem.
Vu lIM EoW tad thirty- years’ experience In his profen
Also, SELPHO’S ARTIFICIAL HAND, so aremgad th-it
Ute wearer can open and shut the fingers. Ac g a
For further information, address 612 Broadway, n. y
Caution'to
KEBTELL, FemaleThysician, No. 102 Chambers st
deems it her duty to caution ladies against impostors, who
appropriate her advertisements, word for word, merely
substituting some Ignorant and wholly irresponsible per
son as “Madame.”
niese persons have spurious “ Female Monthly Pillit”
and other poisonous compounds to deprive the unwary or
«£sil wdupeu as well of their means as of their health.
That ladies may avoid these impositions, Madame Res
ell feel® called upon to give thie caution.
SIK. LINES CAN BE CONSULTED ON
/ ALL DISEASES OF FEMALES, WITH UNPARAL
LED SUCCESS, at Ko. U1 East 1301 »t. near 2d Ayo.
Hundreds are ruined beyond
redemption in this life by not calling on
Dr. HUNTER at first: he has for thirty yeari, con
fined his attention to of a certain class, in
which he has treated no less than fifty thousand
cases, without an instance of failur< The remjliea
are mild, and there is no interruption to buries or
change of diet Dr. Hunter 1-. in constant attend »n..jd
from 7 In Die morning ulC.’ at night, ;.l his 010
office, No. 3 Division street. Charges moderate and a
cure guaranteed. Separate rooms <> that toe patient sees
no one but the Doctor himseli. '■ . crocyiu every
instance. His great remedy, Dr. HUNTER’S RED
cures certain diseases, when regular treatment and ali
other remedies fail; cures without dieting or restriction
in the habits of the patient ; cures without the disgusting
and sickenlhg effects of all other remedies ; cores in new
cases in lesstiuu. six hours ; cures without.the dreadful
consequent effects of mercury 7 , but possesses the peculiar
valuable property of annihilating the rank and poisonous
taint that the blood is sure to absorb, unless his remedy is
used. This Is he claims for it. and what no other
will accomplish. Its value in this respect has become so
well known, that scientific men in e very department of
medical knowledge begin to appreciate it, lor hardly &
week passes that he Is not consulted by druggists, chem
ists. and physicians in regard to w-me pitiful patient who
)■•!.« e>. eansi.' . the f1,.1f of the t aeulty, a.ud still the
disease v.ili appear. What human being, with any pre
tention to Cbrisiianiiy will say that this medicine should
not be made known far and wide? Its popularity is so
gr at. that there is not a quack doctor In lhe city that has
not st acked it ; and when they find their lies are not so
easily swallowed, they then pretend that they can make
it It is $1 a vial, and cannot be obtained genuine any
where but at the old office, No. 8 Division street. Book ot
300 pages for nothing.
ATAR R H I
D!! R GOeDALE’S
A CATARRH
i„.„4y,_ REMEDY,!
It penetrates to the very seat of this terrible disease,
and exterminates it, root and branch, forever.
Dr. GOODALE
is the first and only person who ever told the world what
CATA E E H
really was—where it commenced—and
WHAT WOULD CURE IF.
Price, sl. Send a stamp for a pamphlet.
Prepared by R. GOODALE, M. D., New York.
NORTON A CO., Sole Agents,
No. 612 Broadway, New York.
IVES.—This article enables those whose health or
circumstances do not permit an increase of family, to
regulate or limit the number of their offspring without in
juring Hie constitution. It is the only safe and sure pre
ventive against Pregnancy and Dijsease. The above article
can be sent by mail to any part of the United States or
Canada, two for sl, and $5 per dozen.
Dr. G. W. BOND’S SPANISH FEMALE MONTHLY
PlLLS.—These Pills are the only medicine married or sin
gle ladies can rely upon with safety and certainty for the
Immediate removal of Obstructions, Irregularities, Ac.
They should not be used during pregnancy. Price $2 per box.
Each box contains 72 pills. Sent by mail.
The Doctor can ne consulted on all diseases of a private
nature. e>itment, a quick cure, and moderate charge
guaranteed.
GEORGE R. BOND, M. D.. Office, corner of Grand and
Orchard streets, over the Shoe Store. Entrance No. 65
Orchard street. Established 1832
N. B.—The public are cautioned against buying spurious
imitations of my French Male Safes or Preventive; the
genuine can be had only at my office.
DU. EARL’S ILLUSTRATED MAR
RIAGE GUIDE AND MEDICAL ADVISER. (200
pages). Mailed everywhere in sealed
envelopes on receipt of 25 cents.
PROF. AUZA’S PREMIUM COM
PIIESS andurethralsupport-
ER, (mechanical appliances)instant
l-v arrests an d speedily cures without
medicine all forms ot seminal weak
nesfj resulting from excesses, impru
deuce or advanced years, They are
. approved by the highest medical au
thority. Price $5.
DR. DUVAL’S LADIES FRENCH MOXA is the only
recognized infallible remedy for restoring nature to its
proper channel. Price $2.
DR. DUVAL’S LADIES ELECTRO PREVENTIVE TO
CONCEPTION will last a life time, is safe, infallible, and
is a blessing to those who are necessitated to limit their
offspring. Price ?2.
TARQUARE’S VULCANIZED RUBBER GOODS for
gentlemen (to be had nowhere else). 50 cents each, or $3
per dozen.
The above articles ar a forwarded secure from notice,
with full directions, on receipt of price. Address
DR. WM. EARLE & CO.,
Medical and SnrgicaliAgents,
No. 58 White street, N. Y.
Dr. cox would respectfully
inform the public that he has returned to the city
with the view to greater facilities in doing business. He
can be consulted with the most honorable confidence, on
all diseases peculiar to Fern ales. His Japan secret is
unquestionably acknowledged to be the champion remedy
for monthly suppressions.
Office,
No. 67 CARMINE STREET,
Between Bleecker and Hudson, N. Y.
R S r7 WORCESTER,
FEMALE PHYSICIAN,
No. «9 HUDSON STREET,
Has had 18 years experience as Midwife. She attends La
dies and Children at their residences, or will furnish rooms
with board for ladies In confinement, and every attention
w’jll be paid to their comfort and happiness. Ladies in
trouble will do well to consult Mrs. W. Consultation free.
DR. LEWIS’S
CELEBRATED REMEDIES
are well known throughout Europe to be the most certain
and effectual ever discovered for every stage and symp
tom of SECRET DISEASE, including
SECONDARV SYMPTOMS,
STRICTURES, SEMINAL WEAKNESS,
And all Diseases of the Urinary Passages, without loss of
time, confinement, or hindrance from business. They
have effected most surprising cures, not only in recent
and most severe cases, but when salivation and all other
means have failed; and when an early application is
made to Dr. Lewis for the cure of a certain disorder, fre
quently contracted in a moment of Inebriety, the eradica
tion is generally completed in a few days ; and in more
advanced and inveterate stages of Secret Infection, char
acterized by a variety of painful and distressing symp
toms, a perseverance in their use (without restraint in diet
or exercise) will ensure to the patient a permanent and
radical cure.
Consultation and advice gratis. Charges moderate.
Eooms arranged so the patient secs none but the Doctor.
Office No. 7 Beach street, between Varick st. and West
Broadway, N. Y.
DR. EDWARDS’ ’ ‘ CONTRECOUP ’ ’
has, after many years’ use, been pronounced inval
uabie by his lady patients, to whom he refers, whose
health would not permit an increase of family. No pre
ventatives or restraint on the feelings, or noxious pills are
needed. Also the Japanese secret of lemoning obstruc
tions, suppressions, «tc., promptly and surely ; no instru
ment or medicines needed. Both obtained by enclosing
$1 to Dr. EDWARDS, No. 71 Hudson avenue, Brooklyn.
Dr. Edwards’ Magical Invigorating Pills, $1 per box.
CARD TO THE LADIES.
DOCTOR LEWIS, Female and Surge >n. begs
leave, to acquaint the Ladies of New York and environs,
that he devotes bis practice exclusively to the treatment
ofFEMXLE Diseases, such as
Pain in the Back and Loins; Leueorrhoea, or Whites;
Frofuse or Painful Menstruation; Cessation of
Menses, or Turn of Life; Chlorosis, or Green
Sickness, Hysterics, Ac., Ac.
ABSENCE OF MENSES, OR OBSTRUCTIONS,
TREATED WITH PROFK.ASIONAI. SKILL (SURGICAL OR MEDICAL.)
STERILITY OR BARRENNESS, cured in all cases
where there is no physical defec t
A PREVENTION FOR CONCEPTION ALWAYS QN
HAND.
Ladies that wonid f;v or nt, Lewis with a call, will
meet with honorable and scientific treatment.
OFFICE, Nfi. 7 BEACH STREET, between Varick and
West Broadway.
Consultation in all the principal languages, from 9 A.
M. to 9P. M.; Sundays from 9tollA. M. Rooms arranged
so the patient sees none but the Doctor. Consultation and
advice gratis. Charges moderate.
Consultation at the patient’s own residence promptly
attended to.
Communications by mail punctually replied to, and
medicine sent to all parts of the United States and Cana
da as ordered.
Excellent rooms fitted up in style for accortimodatlm of
ladies.
The great want of a qualified physician to treat all
the numerous diseases that the female system is heir to,
is too sensibly felt by the American female. (This lovely
country of Liberty gives too much liberty to pretending
ciuacks and unscrupulous humbugs.) It is with pleasure
tnat I offer my services to the sex, whose health should
be considered the greatest, blessing of man’s existence.
A. LEWIS, M D., Physician tor Females,
Ne. 7 Beach st, between Varick and West Broadway.
New York City.
If ADAME RESTELL, FEMALE PHY
XTA BICIAN and PROFESSOR OF MIDWIFERY, who
has successfully treated all diseases of Females for thirty
years, can be consulted, as usual, at No. 162 Chambers st,
or by letter, and medicine sent by mail
Her FEMALE MONTHLY PILLS are the only medicine
married or single ladies can rely upon with safety and
certainty for removing obstructions, suppressions, Ac.. Ac.,
from whatever cause.
Price $1 per box. Sold at No. 162 Chambers st, and 127 W
Liberty st, and No. 403 Hudson street, N. Y., No. 244 Grana
street, WiJHamsburgh, and Nos 175 and 217 Fulton street,
Brooklyn. Can also be sent by mall, in neat letter form,
Iler infallible remedy for barrenness can also be sent
by mail.
11. B.—Ladies wno desire to avail themselves of Madame
Restedi’s valuable, certain and safe mode of removing ob
structions, suppressions. <tc., Ac., from whatever cause,
without the use of medicines or instruments, can do so at
one interview. Ladies from a distance can return the
aarne day.
MADAME RESTELL,
Female Physician and Accoucheur,
No. 162 CHAMBERS ST.. New York City.
THE LADIES’ FRIEND IN NEEdZ
The UTERINE PROTECTIVE, for Suppression of too
Menses. an>d Certain. Pregnant females ought not to
use it, as it would cause miscarriage. Mailed, with dimo
lions, on receipt of sl. •
Dr. CHANNING. No. 16 Lfeoanard st. If «w Tort.
rpilE HIGHEST GASH PRICES PAID
X for OLt> NEWSPAPERS of every description, old
PAMPHLETS ef even' kind, old BLANK BOOKS and
LEOGERS tliat are written full, and all kinds of WASTE
PAPER from bankers, insurance companies, brokers, pa
tent medicine depots, printing-offices, book-binders, pub
lic and private libraries, hotefe, steambeate, railroad com
panies. exnre.se offices. Ac.
STOCKWELL & EMERSON, 2S ANN ST.
mPOTTANTI
Send all Boney and Postages to SoWlen
ky Hamden’s Express, Ko. 74 Broadray, as
they have t'nMed States dovernment perniis
lion to forward to the Array at Baltimore,
Frederick City, Fortress Slonree, Washkig*
ton, Port Royal, and ether points, for half
ratee. Their Express fe the eldest in the
United States. Their Great Eastern and
Exprescos sent as feeraerly.
pulton
TOENJAMXN & WEST, WHOLESALE
COMMISSION FISH DEALERS.
Noe. 1 and 2 FULTON FISH MARKET,
New York.
M. BiEAg.AMnr. B W. Wk£;
Moon, crakdadd *
WHOLESALE
COMMISSION FISH DEALLI'.S,
Kod. 8 aad < FULTON FISH MAkKET_
DUri®Y HALEY & CO., Vf noksoie and
Commission
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OP FISH,
Nos. 11 and 12 FULTON MARKET, NEW YtLRK.
Dudley Hai.lt. Wu. C. Oj?vrck.
Q B. MiLLSI GO?, Wholesale oomiai9-
O® *iou FISH PE A L E K F,
Kofi. IS and M FULTON FISH MARKET.
New York.
S. B. Miu.uk. O- Mills®,
ROOKER & JEALEY, Wholesale Com
mission
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF FISH,
No. 25 FULTON MARKET New York..
TBCt. R. CuouKKa. Caleb BA»gy
BARNES, WRIGHT & Co., Wholesale Mid
Retail Dealers in OYSTERS and GLAMS,
No. 90 FULTON FISH MARKET, New York.
N. B. —Orders for Shipping punctually attended to.
Pickled Oysters furnished to families at tae shortest r-©'
tice, and delivered to any Dart of the Citv.
]V EW YORK COUNTY VOLUNTEER
COMMITTEE.
OFFICE, NEV’ BUILDINGS CORNER CHAMBERS
STREET AND BROADWAY, ADJOIN
ING NEW COURT HOUSE.
(Entranck ox Broadway.)
3 O ,“O O O
VOLUNTEERS WANTED.
I®°* The following are the pecuniary inducements of
fered :
COUNTY BOUNTY, caAh down #
STATE BOUNTY $75
UNITED STATES BOUNTY to new recruits 302
UNITED STATES BOUNTY additional to vet-
eran soldiers. 10G-$477
Total. $777
Applications to be made personally at the office of
the Committee.
C. GODFREY GUNTHER. Mayor.
MATTHEW T. BRENNAN, Comptroller.
ORISON BLUNT, Supervisor.
ELIJAH F. PURDY, Supervisor.
WILLIAM R. STEWART, Supervisor,
WILLIAM M. TWEED, Supervisor.
GEORGE OPDYKE, Auxiliary Member.
County Committee,
ORISON BLUNT, Chairman.
$2,000,000 W
YORK.—Subscriptions are hereby invited to a Loan of
Two Million Dollars authorized by an ordinance of the
Board of Supervisors, approved by the Mayor, October
31, 1863, entitled “An ordinance for the procurement of
Substitutes for drafted soldiers for the armies of the
Union, provided the same can be counted and alii wed on
the quota of the City and Couuty of New York in any fu
ture draft ”
The proper books for such subscriptions will be opened
at the Comptroller’s office, on and after TUESDAY, the
17th day of November instant, and remain open until the
whole sum shall be taken
Subscribers will be required to deposit with the County
Treasurer, at the Broadway Bank, within five days after
entering their subscriptions, the amounts subscribed for
by them respectively, and on presenting his receipts for
the money to the Comptroller, they will be entitled to re
ceive Bonds of the County for equal amounts, redeema
ble on or before June 1, 1864, with interest from the
date of payment at the rate of six per cent per an
num.
MATTHEW T. BRENNAN, Comptroller
City ot New York, Drpartment of Finance, ?
Comptroller’s Office, Nov. 16,1863. J
OFEIOE OF THE STREET COMMfS-
SIGNER, No. 237 Broadway, New York—TO CON
TRACTORS.—ProposaI, inclosed in a sealed envelope,
indorsed w ith the title of the work, and with the na no
of the bidder written thereon, will be received at this
office until Thursday, February 4th, 1864, at eleven
o’clock, A. M.
For building a Tender for Engine Company No. 53.
For building a Tender for Engine Company No. 13.
For building a Tender for Engine Company No. 30.
For building a Tender for Engine Company No 31.
For new Beli for Essex Market Tower.
For building a House for use of Hose Company No.
48.
For building a House for use of Engine Company
No 23.
Blank forms of proposals, together with the specifica
tions and agreements can be obtained at this office.
Dated Street Department, New York, January 25th,
1864.
CHARI.ES G. CORNELL,
Street Commissioner
TO IB ON WORKERS—SEALED PRO-
POSALS will be received at this office until 12
o’c’ock, M.. of Wednesday, Feb. 10,1864 fat w’hich hour
they will be publicly opened), for FURNISHING and
SETTING in PLACE around the New Reservoir about
8,200 lineal feet of IRON RAILING.
Drawings and Specifications can be seen on application
at Engineer’s Office, Rotunda, Park
THOMAS STEPHENS, ) Croton
ROBERT L DARRAGH, z Acqueduct
A. W. CRAVEN, ) Board.
Office Croton Acqucduct Department, Rotunda, Park,
Jan. 22,1864 L
CIITY OF NEW YORK, DEPARTMENT
OF FINANCE, COMPTROLLER’S OFFICE, Janu
ary 4,1864. -INTEREST ON CITY STOCKS .-The Inter
est on BONDS and STOCKS of the Corporation of the
O ty of New York, due February 1, 1864, will be paid on
that day by DANIEL DEVLIN, Esq., Chamberlain of the
City, at the Broadway Bank.
The Trar sfer Books will be closed TUESDAY, the 12ih
instant, at3o’clock, P. M.
MATTHEW T. BRENNAN, Comptroller.
The committee on donations
AND CHARITIES of the
BOARD OF COUNCILMEN
will meet
MONDAY, February Ist, 1864,
at 2 o’clock P. M., in Room No. 5, City Hall.
All parties having business before the Committee are in
vited to attend.
SAMUEL T. WEBSTER,
WM. S. OPDYKE,
JOHN BRICE,
Committee on Donations and Charites.
mHE COMMITTEE ON BELGIAN
JL PAVEMENTS of the BOARD OF COUNCILMEN,wiII
meet on
WEDNESDAY. Feb. 3d, 1864,
at 1 o’clock, P. M . in Room No. 5 City Hall.
Parties interested in papers awaiting the action of the
Committee, are invited to attend.
GEORGE McGRATH,
DAVID R. JAQUES.
SAMUEL T WEBSTER.
_ Committee on Belgian Pavements.
mHE COMMITTEE ON FIRE DEPART’
_IL MENT of the
BOARD OF COUNCILMEN,
will meet on
MONDAY, Feb Ist, 1864.
at 11 o'clock, A. M , in Room No. 5, City Hall.
Parties desiring to be heard before the Committee will
please be in attendance
GEORGE McGRATH,
JEREMIAH HEFFERNAN,
CIIARI.ES RILEY,
Committee on Fire Department
gLjttrokrO-
BETTER ASTROLOGIST IS NOT TO
lie found in the Unit'd States than Dr. L D. and
Mrs. S D. BROUGHTON They succeed in giving satis
faction when all others fail. They can be consulted on all
affairs of human life, such as courtship, marriage, travel
ing, removals, law suits, obtaining situations, recovering
property, welfare of absent friends, &c. ; also sickness;
if tne sick party w ill recover or die of the present sick
ness; if recover, the time they will begin to amend; what
part of the bodyjis affileted, and what treatment and med
icines are best adapted for tlie sick persons. Ladies, 50
cents; gentlemen, sl. Questions answered by letter, en
closing sl, and phrenological examinations made. Office
No. 120 Greene street, below Prince.
Madame estelle, seventh
Daughter, can be consulted on Love, Marriage, Sick
ness. Losses in Business, Lucky Numbers and Oharma.
Satisfaction guaranteed. Ladles, 50 cents ; Gentlemen, $1
Call at No. 114 Jr arick street near Broome.
Mrs. galliers can be consult*
ed on all affairs of life, such as Courtship. Mar
riage, Removals. Business, Sickness or Death. Satisfac
tion guaranteed in all cases. Fee, 25 cents. No. 105 East
Fortuth street, between Third and Lexington avenuesj
Gentlemen not admitted.
BY-PALMISTRY. - MADAME HOPE,
recently from the South, and the greatest astrolo
§ist' in the world, as hundreds can testify that visit her
ally, can be consulted on all the affairs or life, never fails
to advise plans by which every one may be relieved of
their present troubles, unfolds the mysteries of the future
to such a nicety that every one who visits her is as
tonished at her marvelous predictions. No. 155 Sixth
avenue, between Eleventh and Twelfth street. Ladies,
50 cents. Gentlemen, $1 00.
Look here i-are you in trou
BLE!
Have you been deceived or trifled with T
Have your fond hopes been blasted by false promises T
If so, go to MADAME ROSS for advice and satisfaction,
in love affairs she was never known to fail
She brings together those long separated, and shows a cor
rect likeness of future husband or absent friend.
Lucky Numbers Frejj.
No. 98 W. TWENTY-SEVENTH STREET,
Between Sixth and Seventh Avenueg.
Name on the Door. Ring the Basement Bell.
BBBtMimi itwin ■wnmniinmwfw mu iiMsim'ifa—
Mrntg.
The eureka music hall,
No. 562 BROADWAY.
OPEN DAY AND EVENING.
ADMITTANCE FREE.
TWENTY WAITER GIRLS IN ATTENDANCE.
CIGARS, WINES, ALES, AND LIQUORS,
Of the choicest kind, served to customers, while
BWEET MUSIC
is discoursed by the Choir.
HARRY LEE, GEO. E. HATSTAT.
QPItA READING FOR THE LEISURE
O HOURS.—LIVELY AND GAY.
Spring Mattraas 25 cents.
Mysteries of the Jiridal Chamber 25 “
Private Looking Glass—or Nature Revealed..., 37 “
Fernaie Policy Detected K 3 ••
Tom Brown’s Jest Book 13 «•
Each, or the fl v efe-T
ONE DOLLAR, POST PAID.
J H. FARRELL. Bookseller. No. 15 Ann street
SIX PER CENT.
CITIZENS’ SAVINGS BANK,
Corner of BOWERY and CANAL ST
OPEN EVERY DAY FROM 9 to 3,
And on
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, and FRIDAY EVENINGS
from sto 7. Bank-Books in English. German, and French.’
Deposits made on or before Jan. 20, will draw intere s !
from Istinst.
GEORGE FOLSOM, President
Seymour A. Bunce, Secretary.
Dr.EXE],, Wl XTHROP Vco..
No. 40 WAU. STREET , ’
BANKERS AND BROKERS
Dealers in u. s. government securities an<> gold
STOCKS and BONDS bought and sold on Commission at
the Brokers’ Board.
MERCANTILE COLLECTIONS made on all points in
the United States and Canada. P “
DREXEL «t CO., ROBERT WINTHROP
Philadelphia. Of the New York stock Exchange. ,
NEW YORK DISPATCH.
and giaw.
rYstow & HARDENBROOK,
No. 765 BROADWAY. r-yiS
Offer for sale a -Htge stock f t
FIA NO S AN D MELO DI. ON S, «ITITf
Of all the leading makers, at the lowest
MANUFACTURERS’ PRI' J ES.
Having a targe ai;d varied assortment, they afford unu
rvai facilities for comparing and selecting an instrument
f ve price r- ceh'ed in imtaimente if oe-ired.
OLo FIANCE f\KEN IN EXCHANGE
AT A FAIR VAL.UATTO?
jtej- Attention is invited to a xw si vns or
PARLOR GRAND PIANOS,
©f which they have the Sote Agency, which are perfectly
unique in design and unite the highest beauty of form with
an unsurpassed richness, fullness, and brilliancy of tone.
These Pianos, for elegance of model, are entirely unri
valed, and are especially adapted to ParlorH and Dra ving
Rooms. Being or an entirely new shape, and equal in qua!
ity to the best Grands, while they occupy less space, they
commend themselves to universal favor.
PIANOS TO RENT on moderate terms, and the rent
•Bowed on the price if the instrument is afterward pur
chased. Second hand Pianos for sate at low rates, vary
ing from $75 to
Also, agents for Carhart, Nebdham & Co’s celebrated
Melodeons and Harmoneums, and have an assortment con
stantly on hand.
BRISTOW A HARDENBROOK, No. 765 Broadway,
George F. Brjstow, ) (Between Eighth and Ninth sta.)
W. A. Harpexbrook. ( New York.
AT OR ACE WATERS’S, No. 481
BROADWAY.—Pianos, Melodeons, Harmoniums,
and Musical Instruments of every description, at the very
lowest cash prices. The Horace Waters Pianos and Melo
deons are made of the very best materials. Warranted
for five years, and guaranteed to give entire satisfaction.
New and second-hand Pianos, Melodeons and Cabinet Or
gans to rent; monthly payments received for the same.
A large assortment of second-hand Pianos, very low.
Pianos and Melodeons tuned, repaired, moved, boxed and
shipped. HORACE WATERS, Agent, No. 481 Broadway.
S’ " T E I N W A Y & SONS
GOLD MEDAL
GRAND, PKRfW
SQUARE 'nin
AND
UPRIGHT
PIANOFORTES,
ire new acknowledged the best instruments in America,
ts well as in Europe, hevD'-g taken
FwENTY-BIZ FIRST PREMIUMS, GOLD AND SILVEB
MEDALS,
at the principal fsirs hfcld in this country within tiie lasi
seven years, and in addition thereto they were awarded a
FIRST PRIZE MEDAL.
at the
GRAND INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION
in London, 1863, for
rcwißjrrm,
CL BAR,
BRIIXMKf AXD
STMFATHBTIC TOKB,
with Excellence of Workmanship as shown in Grana and
Square
PIANOS.
There were 269 Pianos, from all parts of the world, en
tered for competition, and the special correspondent oi
“ Messrs ißdorsement by the Jurors is em
pharic, and stronger, and more to the point than that ol
any European maker.
“Tliis greatest triumph of American Pianofortes in Eng
land has caused a sensation m musical circles throughout
Hie continent, and as a result the Messrs Steinway are in
constant receipt of orders from Europe, thus inaugurating
a new phase in the history of American Pianofortes, by
creating in them an article of export.”
Every Pianoforte warranted for Five Years,
WARM ROOMS,
lbs. 82 Ann 84 WALKER STREET,
Near Broadway, New York
©tuin
npHE HAMBURG AMERICAN PACKET
COUPANY S IRON MAIL STEAMSHIPS,
SAXONIA, Trautmann, 2,500 tons,
HAMMONIA, Schwkksen, 2,100 tons,
BORUSSIA, Haack, 2,100 tons,
GERMANIA (new), Ehlers, 2,900 tons,
BAVARIA, Meier, 2,460 tons,
TEUTONIA, Taube, 2,400 tons.
Will leave alternate Saturday, from Pier No. 21, N. R.,
fooi of Fulton street, taking passengers for Southampton,
London, Havre, and Hamburg, at the following rates :
First Cabin, $105; Second Cabin, $62 50; Steerage, $37 50;
payable in gold. „ ,
Certificates of Passage from Southampton, Havre, or
Hamburg, to New York, are also issued by
C. B. RICHARD A BOAS,
General Passenger Agents to the Company,
No. 181 Broadway, N. Y.
TO EGULAR MAIL LIKE ’ for BOSTON,
JIX VIA GROTON, STONINGTON. NEW
LONDON, PROVIDENCE, NEWPORT,
TAUNTON and NEW BEDFORD.
Intand route—the shortest and most direct—carr ing
the Eastern mail. ”
The steamers PLYMOUTH KOOK, Captain J. O. Geer,
and COMMONWEALTH, Captain J. W. Williams, iu con
nection with the Stonington and Providence, and Boston
and Providence Railroads, leaving New York daily (Sun
days exoeDtedjfrem Pier No. 18 N. R., at 5 P. M., and Gro
ton at B:3O'P. M. ; or on the arrival of the mail train, which
leaves Boston at 5:36 P. M.
The PLYMOUTH ROCK, from New York—Monday
Wednesday and Friday. From Groton—Tuesday, Thurs
day and Saturday.
The COMMONWEALTH, lYom New York—Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday. From Groton—Monday, Wed
nesday and Friday
Passengers proceed from Groton, per railroad to Provi
dence and Boston in ihe Express Mail train, reaching said
6 laces in advance of those by other routes, and in ample
me for all the early Morning Lines connecting North and
East. Passengers who prefer it remain on board the
steamer, enjoy a night’s rest undisturbed, breakfast, if de
sired, and leave Groton in the 7:15 A. M. train, eomnccting
at Providence with the 10:40 A. M. train for Boston.
A Baggage Master accompanies ths Steamer and Train
through each way.
For passage, berths, state-rooms, or freight, apply on
board the steamer, or at the Fright office, Pier No. 18
North River, or at the Office of the Company, No. 115
street, corner of Courtlandt street, N. Y.
W. 3L EDWARDS, Agent
New York, Feb. 28,1851.
T? B IE RAILWA Y.-
FASSENGER TRAINS LEAVE,
VIA PAVONIA FERRY,
FOOT OF CHAMBERS BT., as follows, viz:
7:00 A. M., EXPRESS, for Buffalo, and principal inter
mediate Stations.
8:30 A. M., MILK, dajlt, for Otisville, and teterme*
diate Statiom.
10:00 A. M., MAIL, for Buffalo and intermediate Sta
tions.
4:15 P. M., WAY, for Port Jervis, Newburgh, Warwick,
and intermediate Stations.
5:00 P. M., NIGHT EXPRESS, daily, for Dunkirk, Buf
fklo, Rochester, Canandaigua, Ac. The Train ot Saturday
runs through to Buffalo, but docs not run to Dunkirk.
7:00 P. M., EMIGRANT, for Dunkirk, and principal
Stations-
CHAS. MINOT. Gcn’l Su®»t
ATENT AGENCY
M OFF-ICES.
EstaMishedin 1846.
MESSRS. MUNN & CO.,
Pv Editors of theScie7dificAnierican t
soEicrroßs of American
& EUROPEAN PATENTS,
With a Branch Office at Wash
ington. During the past seventeen years MESSRS. MUNN
A CO. have acted as Attorneys for more than 20,000 in
ventors, and statistics show that nearly one-third of all
the applications for patents annually made in the United
States are solicited through the Scientific American Pat
ent Agency. All business connected with the Examine
tion of Inventions, Preparing Specifications, Drawings.
Caveats, Assignments or Patents, Prosecuting Rejected
Cases, Interferences, Re-issues and Extensions oi Patents,
and Opinions of the Infringement and audity of Patents,
(dll receive the most careful attention.
Patents secured in England, France, Belgium, Austria,
Russia, Prussia, and all other foreign countries where Pat
ent Laws exist. A Pamphlet of “ Advice How to Secure
Letters Patent,” including the Patent Laws of the United
States, furnished free. All communications confiden
tial. Addx«i»—
MUNN & CO.,
No. 37 PARK ROW, NEW YORK.
FJoNNEB’S united states type
vy FOUNDRY.
Kos. 28, 30 and 32 Centre street, near City
Bail, Sen- fork.
TO PBISTBF.S AND PUBLISHER?.
The undersigned beg to call your attention to their
NEW SERIES OF SCOTCH CUT FACES, frua Pearl to
Pica, just finished, (having been gotten up with a view to
durability in newspaper printing), specimens of which
ean be furnished on application ; surpassing, if possible,
their Original Scotch Cut Faces, which have given such
universal satisfaction throughout the United btates, the
Canadas, and South America.
THE FANCY TYPE DEPARTMENT exhibits an Oiisur
passable quantity of styles, of Home Origin, and selected
Iron England. I-rance and Germany. And their NEW
AMERICAN SCRIPTS, ROUND HAND, and ITALIAN
SCRIPTS, BORDERING, etc., are not to be excelled in
this or any other country; and this rhe undersigned
make bold to say of their specimens—as they have readi
ed a point originally aimed after—that is, to excel in
ality of the article furnished, and in the variety of styles
presented for selection—surpassing all similar establish
ments. The several styles have only to be seen to be ap
preciated.
Particular attention is called to their German depart
ment. wherein is shown as splendid GERMAN FaCKS
and STYLES as can be seen in the German Confedera
tion or the United States. Particular attention having
been given to the selection, in obtaining the styles from
the best type foundries throughout Germany, whether
for Book, Job, or Newspaper printing.
Every article, necessary for a, perfect Printing
Office furnished as above.
P. S —We suggest to all who may honor us with their
Satronage, by letter, requiring credit, to have such or
era accompanied by references.
l®“Any publisher of a newspaper, who will insert tills
advert!*ement—together with tills note—three times before
the first of December. 1863, and who will furnish ns with
a copy of the paper- in which it appears, will be allowed
the amount of his bill on his purchasing /ire times ths
amount from us in articles of our manufacture.
Printers desirous of receiving our specimen sheds as
they are issued, will plem send us their cards.
JAMES CONNER'S SONS.
TjTRENCH CORDIAL COGNAC BIT
JL? TERS.—These Bitters, whose reputation has long
been European and is fast becoming general in this coun
try, are composed of the purest Cognac produced in
French vineyards, in combination with rare and delicious
Algerine ano Asiatic herbs and spices. Invented by the
celebrated Chemist. Lc Roux, they have proved them
selves invaluable.
IN MALARIOUS DISTRICTS.
IN ALL AYFRCHONS OP THS
LIVHR, KIDNEYS AND DIGESTIVE ORGANS.
They are an agreeable prophylactic and rapid and car
tain estre l in Diarrhoea, Dysentery, Cholera, Chills, Fevers,
Dyspepsia. LownesjKof Spirits, Heartburn, Colic, Loss of
Appetite, and kindred diseases; and they are regarded to
France. Germany and Russia m
THE FAMILY MEDICINE OF THE AGE.
Druggistsand Grocers throughout the Union wli? find
the French Cognac Bitters a valuable source of profit for
when their virtues have once been tested purchasers will
notremain without them. Unlike the other so called
Bitters in the market, they do not depend for their sue
cess upon egregious puffing, mis shapen bottles and
“cure everything' s labels; ana as they arc not composed
of refuse New England Rum, proof-spirits, or wmilai
cheap poison, they never harm their patrws or give tron
tie to the surgeon.
Wholesale and Retail Agents can be supplied in aay
quantity with these splendid Bitters, by the
BOLE AU THOR? ZED AGEN T FOR THE UNITED
STATES,
8. STEINFELD,
Ko. 70 Naseau street New York
« EDGER COFFEE ROOMS,
XJ Ko. 37 ANN ST.
(OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.)
ROAST MEATS, per elate F eente.
OYSTERS, stewed and fried ;12 cents.
SOUPS,. 6 cents.
LODGING per night 25 cents
IR HENRY PELHAM’S
Advertisement app°are<l in the New York Dupa'Ch
scire months since, inquiring for the Heirs of Sir Hen-y
Pelhim. The party advertising can receive valuable in
f rinetjr>r by addresdr.y Box No 2.714, N.Y, city Post Office.
Q CENTS PER ROUND PAID CASH
e F for White Rags, and t > 7 cents per pound paid for
Old Books, Newer ape rs, and Pamphlets, at
THOMAS C. BENNETT’S,
No. 49 Ann fit., and No. 183 William st, cor. oi Spruce.
City Government,
PROCEEDINGS OF THE COMMON COWCIU
pemciAL.]
118 SOLUTIONS.
Vinrcas, The City of New York im again ba an
visited by the ieii destroyer, Death has again been
among ns, and tins time has struck down one of
our most valued citizens, one of the most remark
able men of his day and generation. John Hughes,
.Archbishop of New York, has been summoned be
fore the great Architect of tbe Universe to account
for the use made of the attributes of greatness
conferred upon him by the Creator, which have
bo distinguished him among his fellow-men, and
which have so indelibly placed the mark of supe
riority upon every act of his life. He died on Sun
day, the 3d instant, at his residence in Madison
avenue, at the advanced age of sixty-five years;
and
Whereas, It is manifestly the duty of the Com
mon Council, the representatives of the people of
this city, all classes of whom regret the death of
the excellent divine—many of whom will mourn
his loss as they would the loss of the head of their
own household—to give expression to their sorrow
for his death, to add their feeble tribute of respect
to his memory, and to place on record, among the
archives of the city’, their appreciation of the con
servative course pursued by him as a public man,
his indomitable perseverance in the cause of truth
and justice, his exalted virtues and Christi in pi
ety, as well as to lend their aid in transmitting to
posterity a record of his noble deeds, his good
works, and his disinterested and invaluable ser
vices in behalf of the country of his adoption, at a
time when such services as he only could render
at the Courts of Franc e and Rome, whither he was
sent in a semi-official capacity, by the President of
the United States, were of such inestimable value
to the nation; be it, therefore,
Resolved, That in the death of John Hughes,
Archbishop of New York, the country is called
upon to mourn the loss of a conservative, influen
tial and enlightened citizen; the City of New York
has lost a great and good man; the numerous, in
telligent and conservative denomination of Chris
tians of which he was the acknowledged head in
this country, has lost a wise, zealous and indefati
gable advocate, counsellor and guide; the religion
of which he was such a conscientious and devoted
disciple has lost an able and powerful advocate, its
peculiar tenets a learned expounder. His death is
a great public calamity, for we look in vain for one
in any respect his equal, or one so well qualified
to fill the place made vacant by deceased; and
while we deplore his loss, we ask, in all humility,
of Him who has thus afflicted us, to rad so up in our
midst one to fill his place, who shall possess those
great qualities that have rendered him so dear to
us, so serviceable to his country, aud so advan
tageous to religion and to society.
Resolved, That while we thus give expression to
our sense of the loss experienced by our city, our
State and our country, by’ the death of Archbishop
Hughes, we are not presumptuous enough to sup
pose that we are adding in any marked degree to
the general sorrow, or that our action will materi
ally add to his world-wide fame, and the renown
he has acquired in those peaceful triumphs of mind
over matter, that have characterized every’ impor
tant act of his useful life. Sentiments of profound
regret will continue to be entertained and expressed
by all classes of our citizens. His memory will re
main enshrined in the hearts of the inheritors of
his faith, for all time to come, and his name and
fame will be transmitted to posterity, and be re
vered and hallowed to the remotest generation.
The many edifices he erected and dedicated to the
service of the living God, the homes for the help
less and dependent orphans he has founded, and
the institutions of learning he has established, will
remain lasting monuments of his disinterested
ness and devotion to the cause of Religion, of Char
ity, of Education, and will continue to retain in
grateful remembrance, by future generations, the
name and fame of John Hughes, the first Arch
bishop of the Diocese of New York.
Resolved, That in his life, we recognize a con
tinued succession of deeds of love, and adoration
for his Divine Master. So in his death we behold
the signal for the departure from this sinful world
of one who had performed every duty to his God,
his country, and his fellow-man. The former was
a beautiful commentary on the benefits an *l ad
vantages of our Republican form of Government,
which not only admits of, but assists in, the eleva
tion of its lowliest citizens, as it did him, from the
humblest walks of life, to the highest dignity in
the Church, and in the State, and to the first place
in the affections of the people; the latter will in
culcate a moral lesson more impressively grand as
we contemplate the advantages of endeavoring to
imitate the example of Him who was meekness
and loveliness personified; Him who has promised
dignities and honors, such as the mind of man can
not conceive, to those who in this life, as did the
lamented and venerated deceased, take up their
cross and follow Him. From our knowledge of
the devout and holy life of the deceased prelate,
and the hopes of a blessed immortality enter
tained and cherished by him, it is not presumptu
ous in us to believe, that in his last moments he
realized the beatific vision so beautifully and im
pressively described in the words of “The dying
Christian to his soul,”—that
“The earth recedes, it disappears,
Heaven opens on my eyes; my ears
With sounds seraphic ring:
Lend, lend your wings, I meunt, I fly;
O ! Grave, where is thy victory ?
O! Death, where is thy sting?’’
Resolved, That out of respect to the memory of
the deceased prelate, and in consideration of his
private virtues and public services, this Common
Council will attend his funeral in a body, with
their staves of office draped in mourning; that
they will cause the flags to be displayed at half
mast on the City Hall and the other public build
ings on the day set apart for the funeral rites and
ceremonies; that the public buildings and offices
of the Corporation be closed on that day; and that
a Special Committee of five members from each
Board be appointed to make the necessary arrange
ments for attending the funeral obsequies.
Resolved, That the Clerk of the Common Council
is hereby authorized and directed to cause a copy
of the foregoing preamble and resolutions to be
suitably engrossed, appropriately framed, duly
authenticated, and transmitted to the Vicar-Gen
eral, in order that it may be placed among the
archives of the Diocese, there to remain as a slight
memento of the esteem and veneration in which
the distinguished deceased was held by the muni
cipal authorities of the City of New York; and be
it further
Resolved, That as a further mark of respect to
the memory of the deceased this Board do now ad
journ.
Adopted by Board of Aidermen, Jan. 6, 1864.
Adopted by Board of Councilmen. Jan. 6, 1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 6, 1864.
D. T. VALENTINE. Clerk Common Council.
AN ORDINANCE
To provide for a continuance of the aid heretofore
granted to the families of volunteer soldiers from
the City New York, serving in the army of the
Union.
The Mayor, Aidermen, and Commonalty of the City of
New York, do ordain as follows:
Section 1. The sum of five hundred thousand
dollars is hereby appropriated for the purpose of
continuing the aid heretofore granted by the Cor
poration to the families of volunteer soldiers from
this city, who are now serving, or who may here
after volunteer, or be Ordered to serve in the army
of the United States, engaged in defending the in
tegrity of the National Union.
Section 2. The Comptroller, who shall be the
Treasurer of the fund hereby created, shall have
power to appoint one Assistant Treasurer for each
Senatorial District of the city, which Assistant
Ehall make payments to those persons entitled to
relief under the provisions of this ordinance, resi
ding in the several Wards comprising such Sena
torial Districts. The compensation of the Assist
ant Treasurers shall not exceed one hundred dol
lars per month, each, which the Comptroller is
authorized to pay out of the fund hereby created
and appropriated.
Section 3. The Comptroller is hereby author
ized to borrow, on the credit of the Corporation of
the City of New York, the sum of five hundred
thousand dollars, and to issue bonds of the Cor
poration therefor, in the usual form, which shall
be designated and known as the “ Volunteer Fam
ily Aid Fund Bonds number Eight,” aud the same
shall be transferable at the pleasure of the holders
thereof, either in person or by attorney, only upon
the books of the Corporation, at the office of the
Comptroller, and certificates of such transfers
shall be indorsed thereon by the Stock Clerk.
Section 4. That said bonds shall be signed by
the Comptroller, countersigned by the Mayor,
sealed with the common seal of the Corporation,
and attested by the Clerk of the Common Council.
They shaU bear interest at a rate not exceeding
seven per cent, per annum,payable semi-annually,
on the first day of May and November in each year,
and the principal shall be redeemable on the first
day of November, one thousand eight hundred and
seventy- two.
Section 5. For the payment of the principal of
said bonds, and the interest to accrue thereon, the
faith of the Corporation of the City of New York,
and also all sums which may hereafter be received
from the United States, or from the State of New
York, for the purpose of reimbursing the city for
the moneys distributed in pursuance of this ordin
ance, are hereby solemnly pledged, and the Comp
troller is hereby authorized and required to re
deem and cancel the same, from time to time, at
or before their maturity.
Section 6. The Assistant Treasurers shall pay
over the moneys, placed in their hands for that
purpose, only to persons presenting orders signed
by a majority of the members of the committee
acting for the wards in their respective districts;
said committees shall consist of four members,
each including the Aidermen and Councilmen, as
acting for the several wards: together with a citi
zen or citizens, to be appointed by the Aidermen
and Councilmen, which citizens must be residents
of the w’ards for which they are to act, except that,
for the purpose of this ordinance, the Second and
Third Wards shall be deemed and treated as be
longing to and forming part of the Fir st Ward.
Section 7. The monthly allowance to the head
of each family shall not exceed six dollars; for each
child of the soldier under fourteen years of age one
dollar and fifty cents; provided that not more than
twelve dollars per month be paid to any one fam
ily. Payments shall be made semi-monthly, and,
for the purpose intended by this section, four
weeks shall constitute a month. The oldest child
of the soldier shall be considered the head of the
family in case the wife is not living. In the case
of widowed mothers having sick children, allow
ance may be made to such children the same as
children of the soldier, in the discretion of the
Committee.
Section 8. No order for relief shall be given to
any person who is not, at the time of making the
application, a resident of this city, and who was
not a resident at the date of the enlistment of the
soldier on whose behalf the application for relief is
made. Relief shall only be allowed to the families
of such soldiers as have been mustered into the
service of the United States, and are actually doing
duty in camp or garrison; excepting that the fami
lies of those who are sick or wounded, or have
been killed, or have died from the effects of wounds
received, or diseases contracted while in the ser
vice of the Government, shall be entitled to the
same allowance as they would if the soldier were
in actual service. Nor shall relief be allowed to
the family of any soldier who belongs to the Inva
lid Corps, unless such soldier is counted and al
lowed on the quota of the City of New York, under
the proclamation of the President of the United
States, dated
Section 9, All persons applying for rellefaiall
be required to produce a certificate from the col
onel or lieutenant colonel of the regiment, or the
officer commanding the corps to which the sol
dier belongs, that he is a member of such regiment
or corps; and the Ward Committee shall indorse,
on the back of the certificate or other evidence of
enlistment, the date, name and applicant, relation
to soldiers, and the monthly allowance, which in
dors* ment must bo signed by a member of the
committee. No payment shall be made to or on
behi'l? of the families of commissioned officers, or
or soldiers who have deserted.
Slciton 10. The only persons entitled to parti
cipate in the distribution ol moneys appropriated
by this ordinance are the wives, children aud
widowed mothers, and infirm and unmarried or
widowed sisters and aged and infirm fathers of
such soldiers as supported them prior to their en
listment. But nothing contained therciu shall be
understood to authorize the giving aid from the
fund hereby created to those able to support them
selves without it.
Section 11. Each Ward Committee is hereby au
thorized to employ a Visitor, who must be a resi
dent of the Ward for which he is appointed, whose
duty it shall be to visit all applicants at their resi
dences, and to ascertain, by careful investigation,
the truth of the allegations made by such appli
cants, and no order of relief shall be paid by either
of the Assistant Treasurers, unless the Visitor of
the Ward in which the applicant resides shall certi
fy the same to be correct. Whenever the applica
tions in any Ward shall have reached.six hundred
the Comptroller may employ an Assistant Visitor.
Whenever the number of the applicants in any
Ward shall exceed one thousand two hundred the
Comptroller may,if he deem itlnecessary,employ an
additional Assistant Visitor, and it shall be the fur
ther duty of the Visitors to attend the meetings of
and perform such clerical duties as may be pre
scribed by the Ward Committees, and also to at
tend at the distributing offices of their Senatorial
Districts on the days assigned for paying persons
from their respective Wards.
The compensation of the Visitors shall be two
dollars per day each.
Section 12. Each Ward Committee may expend
for rent, gas, and other necessaries, a sum not ex
ceeding twenty-five dollars per month, which the
Comptroller is authorized to pay out of the fund
hereby created and appropriated, on bills certified
to be correct by a majority of the Committee.
Section 13. Each Assistant Treasurer shall, at
the expiration of every second week, render to the
Comptroller a detailed statement of his disburse
ments during the preceding fortnight; and the
Comptroller shall transmit a summary of such
statements to the Common Council, together with
an account showing the condition of the fund.
Sec, 14. In case the Assistant Treasurer shall
discover that the party to whom any ticket or order
for relief has been given, is not entitled by this
ordinance to the allowances named thereon, he
shall withhold further payment, and immediately
notify the Ward Committee by which it was issued
of the fact and reasons therefor. If no payment
has been made on the ticket, he shall at once re
turn it to the Committee. Every person who shall
willfully make, or cause to be male, any false
statements or representations, for the purpose of
obtaining a larger sum than that to which they are
entitled under this ordinance, shall thereby be
deemed to have forfeited all claims to participate
in its benefits.
Section 15. Payment shall be made directly to
the party in whose favor the ticket is given, but if,
by sickness or other unfavorable circumstances,
such person is unable to make personal applica
tion, the Assistant Treasurer shall require a satis
factory authority for making payment to his or
her representative. In no case shall payment be
made for or upon more than one ticket to the same
person. If, in the opinion of the Ward Commit
tee, it is advisable, in consequence of intemperate
habits, or from other causes on the part of any
person entitled to the aid hereby provided, to pay
the amount in groceries or other necessaries, in
stead of money, then an order to that effect on the
Assistant Treasurer, signed by r majority of the
Ward Committee, shall be given to some person
authorized by the Committee to furnish such ne
cessaries.
Section 16. The Comptroller is hereby author
ized to procure, fit up and keep in order a suitable
room for the accommodation of each of the Assist
ant Treasurers and the applicants in their respect
ive districts, and also to appoint not exceeding two
clerks, one interpreter, and one janitor for each
district; the compensation of the clerks shall not
exceed sixty dollars per month each, and the in
terpreter and janitor shall each be allowed for
their services at the rate of forty-five dollars per
month.
Section 17. The Comptroller is hereby requested
to solicit the aid of the police to assist in carrying
out the provisions of this ordinance.
PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF SUPERVISORS.
BILLS.
Resolved, That the billsor claims of the following
namedpersons,fordamagesallcgcd co havebeensus
tained by them in consequence of the riots in July,
1863, be audited and allowed at the amounts herein
after specified, and that the Comptroller be and is
hereby authorized and requested to pay the same,
upon the parties executing a release in full of all
demands against the City and County of New York;
and the Clerk of this Board is hereby directed to
transmit to the Comptroller the original claims
above-mentioned, with the testimony and accom
panying papers, viz.:
Nathan Abrahams, additional $625 00
William F. Buckley 300 GO
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan. 19,
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 23, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILLS.
Resolved, That the bills or claims of the follow
ing named Policemen, for damages alleged to have
been sustained by them in consequence of the
riots in July, 1863, be audited and allowed at the
amounts hereinafter specified, and that the Comp
troller be and is hereby authorized and requested
to pay the same upon the parties executing a re
lease in full of all demands against the City and
County of New York; and the Clerk of this Board
is hereby directed to transmit to the Comptroller
the original claims above mentioned, with the tes
timony and accompanying papers, viz.:
Roundsman John T. Gay, Nineteenth Pre-
cinct ¥lB 00
Patrolman John Cook, Nineteenth Precinct..l9 00
“ Thomas Henderson, Twenty-ninth
Precinct 3 00
“ Peter Mclntyre, Twenty-ninth Pre-
cinct 18 GO
“ Charles C. Leaycraft, Twenty-ninth
Precinct 20 50
“ John Walsh, Twenty-ninth Pre-
cinct 34 50
“ George W. Holman, Twenty-ninth
Precinct 75 00
“ John Cooney, Fourth Precinct.... 76 00
“ James Adams, Tenth Precinct... .20 00
“ Samuel Rothchild, Tenth Precinct. 10 00
“ John J. Hart, Tenth Precinct 9 00
“ Isaac Mead, Tenth Precinct 8 00
“ Henry Sandford, Tenth Precinct. .10 00
“ Charles E. Swett, Tenth Precinct.. 500
“ David McCaul, Eighth Precinct... 2 00
“ Charles W. Mehrer, Eighth Prec’t. 7 00
“ John C. Andre, Eighth Precinct.. .18 00
“ W. H. Carlock, Eighth Precinct.. .18 00
“ Simon Burns, Eighth Precinct... .10 00
“ James Acftms, Eighth Precinct.... 300
Roundsman Joseph O. Conner, Twenty ninth
Precinct 15 00
Sergeant S. B. Smith, Ninth Precinct 18 00
“ J. Mangin, Ninth Precinct 3 00
“ J. Thompson, Ninth Precinct 2 50
Patrolman J. A. Croker, Ninth Precinct..... .50 00
“ J. Walsh, Ninth Precinct 20 00
“ S. Blackwood, Ninth Precinct 20 00
“ H. D. Whittemore, Ninth Precinct 24 00
“ Felix Larkin, Ninth Precinct 20 00
“ Thomas McDonald, Ninth Precinct3l 00
“ Arthur Cholwell, Ninth Precinct.. 200
“ Daniel Cady, First Precinct 2 75
“ William E. Brown, First Precinct 5 00
“ Daniel Kennell, Twenty-first Pre-
cinct z 2 50
Sergeant Taft, Sixteenth Precinct 2 00
Patrolman Leonard Doncourt, Sixteenth Pre-
cinct 3 00
“ John S. Gillespie, Sixteenth Pre-
cinct 4 00
“ Eldred Polhamus.... 25 00
Captain John F. Dickson, Twenty-eighth Pre-
cinct 15 00
Patrolman Daniel Polhamus, Twenty-eighth
Precinct 10 00
“ James H. Bryan, Twenty-eighth
Precinct 16 00
“ Michael Holly, Twenty-eighth Pre
cinct 37 00
“ Jacob Von Gerichtero, Twenty-
eighth Precinct 7 50
Sergeant Michael O’Connor, Twenty-eighth
Precinct 14 50
Patrolman Joseph Knight, Twenty-eighth Pre-
cinct 2 75
“ Bernard Blessing, Twenty-eighth
Precinct 2 00
Sergeant William Groat, Twenty-eighth Pre-
cinct 8 00
“ Henry P. Wolf, Twenty eighth Pre-
cinct 8 50
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan. 19.
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 23, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILL,
Resolved, That the bill of Cornelius Allison, for
board of witnesses for December, 1863, be audited
and allowed at one hundred and eighty-three dol
lars and fifty cents, and the Comptroller directed
to pay it from appropriation for “ Support of De
tained Witnesses.”
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan. 19,
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 23, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILL.
Resolved, That the bill of William Moore, for
supplies furnished New County Jail for December,
1864, be audited and allowed at four hundred aud
thirty-two dollars and thirty cents, and the Comp
trofier directed to pay it from appropriation for
“ Support of Prisoners in the County Jail.”
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan. 19,
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 23, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILLS.
Resolved, That the annexed bills received from
the Commissioners of Harlem Bridge, be audited
and allowed as follows, viz.:
For salaries for the month of December,
E. W. Smith, Chief Engineer $231 67
T. E. Bickels, Assistant Engineer 133 33
E. Rogers, “ “ 133 33
C.V, Hough, Receiving and Property Clerk 100 00
John Roach, for iron work 2,553 50
John S. Kenyon, hardware 50 16
And the Comptroller directed to draw his warrartt
for the same, and charge the amount to the appro
priation for the “Construction of Harlem Bridge.”
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan, 19,
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 23,1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILLS. •
Resolved, That the bills of Cornelius Cassidy,
John Lynch, Michael J. McCarthy, Thomas Smith,
William D. Scally, and Edward Travis, for services
as Constables at Court of Oyer and Terminer,during
October, November, and December, 1863, be au
dited and allowed at eighty-seven dollars each, and
the Comptroller directed to pay them from appro
priation for “ Officers’ and Witnesses’ Fees.”
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan. 19,
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 23, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILL.
Resolved, That the bill of A. Oakey H ill, Dis
trict Attorney, for disbursements, expenses aud
charges in his office for th* half year ending De
cember 31, 1863, and amounting to three thousand
eight hundred and twenty-one dollars and twenty
nine cents, be audited and allowed and the Comp
troller directed to pay it from appropriation for
“County Contingencies;” provided that the
amount of bills paid in any one year to the Dis
trict Attorney shall not exceed the amount of col
lection on forfeited recognizances made by said
District Attorney during said year and duly de
posited and accounted for by him according to
Statute.
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan* 19,
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 23, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILLS.
Resolved, That the bills of the following named
be audited and allowed as follows, viz :
Proudfoot A Quirk, repairs and painting
Civil Court Rooms $l6B 05
C. Lockwood & Co., articles Civil Court
Rooms 53 13
And the Comptroller directed to pay them from
appropriation for “ Repairs to County Buildings.”
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan. 19,
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 25, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk,
BILL.
Resolved, That the bill of Keyser A Co., amount
ing to four hundred and forty dollars and twenty
six cents, for repairs, Ac., to stoves, &c., in Civil
Court Rooms, be audited and allowed, and the
Comptroller directed to pay it from appropriation
for “Lighting, Cleaning and Supplies.”
by the Board of Supervisors, Jan. 19,
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 25, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILLS.
Resolved, That the bills of Keyser & Co., for
cleaning and putting up stoves, Ac., in Civil Court
Rooms, be audited and allowed at five hundred
and forty-six dollars and sixteen cents, and the
Comptroller directed to pay them from appropria
tion for “ Lighting, Cleaning and Supplies.”
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors. Jan. 19.
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 25,1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILLS.
Resolved, That the bills of the following named
be audited and allowed, as follows:
G. 8. Humphrey, oil cloth, Coroner’s Office.sl® 50
C. Lockwood & Co., articles, County Offices.. 62 00
And the Comptroller directed to pay them from
appropriation for “ Lighting, Cleaning and Sup
plies.”
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan, 19,
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 25, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
BILLS.
Resolved, That the bills of the following named,
for materials, Ac., furnished for construction of
New County Court House, be audited and allowed
as follows, viz.:
J. B. & W. W. Cornell A Co., iron 514,2.55 53
J. G. Dubois & Co., window sashes 713 39
Wetmore & Co., iron and steel 424 98
Ingersoll, Watson & Co., desks 145 00
And the Comptroller directed to pay them from
appropriation for “Construction of New County
Court House.”
Adopted by the Board of Supervisors, Jan. 19,
1864.
Approved by the Mayor, Jan. 25, 1864.
J. B. YOUNG, Clerk.
[Written for the New York Dispatch.]
GREENROOM SKETCHES.
BY CVXX ABELL.
SCANDAL.
After a silence of some time, I am almost at
a loss how to commence. Since my last sor
rows have fallen fast upon me ; the green-room
has worn a sombre appearance. It has had no
power to cheer the drooping spirits or soothe
the aching heart. Would that I could recall
the past, and have by my side the dear lad,
now no more; but vain all regrets. “Lave de
vo'.iring Death’ ’ will have his victims, and when
he selects the pride of our hearts and the joy
of our eyes, we must submit, suffer and endure.
To leave the temple of the mimic world and
attend a death-bed is one of the saddest reali
tiesjn existence—the noise and tumult of a
crowded house buzzing in the ear saddened
and changed by the moaning voice of a dar
ling son about to leave you forever is indeed
h .'art -rending.
“Let me go to sleep, father,” from those
innocent lips that never uttered a word to the
detriment of any living being, is pleasing to
remember, but when coupled with the reflec
tion that you will hear them no more, becomes
a terrible reality that makes life burthensome.’
Sweet boy, rest in peace! You will never
more grace the stage-box with your presence,
smile at the performance of those you loved,
weep at the misfortunes of the good, or pity
the unhappy. The profession has lost a youth
ful admirer, tlie world a noble soul, the family
a beloved member. Ohl if by a word or look
1 have ever seemed harsh, let. thy gentle spirit
pardon. But I must check this train of
thought, for we become childish too often in
tracing our own sorrows. Ever cherished
shade of my precious departed, forgive me—
eternal blessings be thine. Adieu.
“ I don’t like such and such a person,” ex
claimes a professional brother to me one morn
ing ; and “ why?” I replied. “ Well, I can’t
exactly say; but I don’t like him.” “Can
you not give a reason?” I inquired. “No,”
he said ; “he always treated me politely, but
then they say he is no better than he should
be. This I had from a person wlio is likely to
know—one who came from the same place;
and knew all the family, they were a strange
set; pretended to be religious some of them ;
but I understand it was all hypocrisy.” I ex
postulated with my friend, saying : “Do not
judge by what others say. The person of
whom you speak is a most excellent character,
one who has imparted knowledge to many in
the profession without any arrogant assump
tions. For my part, I must confess having
long admired him, not only for his learning,
but also for his goodness of heart. He is the
most accomplished man I know in the pro
fession at tbe present time. A philosopher
and a student, withal, give him some claim to
consideration. A polished gentleman aud a
natural wit, in fact, everything that is cal
culated to give a position in society he
has, and yet this censure. Why is it? I
never heard him speak in disrespectful terms
of anybodyr It is a sad picture of the
depravity of the heart. This expression of
likes and dislikes is one of the most miserable
failings belonging to the profession. A truly
<7001? heart never forms a bad opinion of any
human being till convinced of the fact that
they deserve it, and then they arc always cau
tious how they express themselves.
A dreadful state of excitement was the con
sequence of an article that appeared in one of
the papers in reference to a certain love affair
wherein a number of prominent professionals
figured. Some took sides with one party,
some with another. The green-room was all
talk for several days, and the company felt an
interest to have the affair quieted, for the sake
of the position of the parties, and, as one said,
to save scandal.
“Scandal!” exclaim* an old stager. “ Would
yon deprive mankind of their greatest- luxury ?
Scandal! —why it has been present in all the
conversations that I have heard for the last ten
years. Scandal!—it nearly ruined me. As
far back as I can remember in life, the minis,
ter was the subject of it. He was falsely ac
cused of an intrigue, and died of a broken
heart. Next it assailed my own family. I
cared little about it then, and often joined the
hue and cry against my fellow-mortals. I
used to chuckle when looking at the victims
of scandal, and wonder how they like 1 their
situation. It was only when I began to suffer
from its shafts myself that I could comprehend
its meaning. Platonic attachments were al
ways my weakness. I never loved a woman
passionately in my life, but the most delight
ful hours I have ever known sprung from
friendship for them, chilled often by the re
marks of others. ‘Don’t you think they are
too intimate altogether?’ would be the expres
sion from one. Then another would siy:
‘ They need not hold their heads so high if
the truth was known, it might pull down their
pride.’ This would be said in an adjoining
dressing room loud enough for me to hear.
One evening on returning home, I found a
note from some anonymous correspondent
which read as follows :
Sir.l must write to tell you that your atten
tions to Miss are too pointed not to give
birth to slander. Elder - is quite shocked
and thanks heaven that you are not a member of
the church. Ho is also happy that the father
and mother of the young lady (you are so very
intimate with) are in their grave.
Yours. A OmitsrUK,
This note coming from, I know not whom,
gave me no uneasiness ; but I found out that
my dear young friend had been served with
’one in which my character was handled any
way but gently. It had i s effect, causing an
estrangement between mys If and one of the
most charming females I ever was acquainted
with. She became afterwards the wife of a
clergyman ; we ;often met in society, but
he being of a jealous turn of mind, seemed not
happy to have us converse. Her brotiier be
came my most intimate friend, and died in my
aims. His sister named one of her children
after me. When acting, I often see him in
front robed in the friendly countenance of
his mother. If playing tragedy, I feel tl.e
fact more keenly. If comedy, the smile is
often sprinkled by a tear!
5

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