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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, January 08, 1865, Image 8

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MASONIC DIRECTORY.
ESTERPRISE CHAPTER No. 2, R. A. M.
•—ltegiiKir convocations of Enterprise Cha-Dter No,
1, of R. A- m. ef New Jersey, will be held in the Lv
«xm, Na 60 Grand Street, Jersey City, on every Wed
nesday evening. JOHN SHEVILLE, H. P., No. 219
¥ork street, Jersey City. W. T. Woodbvjv, No. 76 York
street, Jersey CltyJ
rOETITUDE O, No. 10, K and A* M.—
Aegn'Kzr communication every Thursday evening. at 7M
©’clock, at the cor. of Corn! and Joralemon »ta., Brook
lyn, LL WIL TAYLOR, M., No. 77 Concord st 8. J.
O’Bfjkm. Seo.. No. 117 Hamilton si
ABRAMS O, No. 20, F. and A. M.—Regular
Communications, first and third Mondays, at Masonic
Temple, corner of Broome and Crosby sts. EDWARD
KIRK, Jr., M.—Residence, No 315 Grand st. Adam
Clkfdi.nen. Sec., No. 112 North Third st, Williams aurgh.
MONTGOMERY □, No. 68, F. and A. M.—
Begnter Communications Ist and M Wednewjar B-re
nintre, at Masonic Itempie. at 7% o’clock. LUTfIBB. B.
PERT. M —Residence, No. 39 Ann Afreet. COOPER
CRAWFORD BROWN, M., No 102 Broome st James
Cibsok, See.. Cor. 30th st and 10th Avenue.
EXCELSIOR □, No. 195, F. and A. M.—
Bemsiar communication every 2d and 4th Monday evo
nifi£S at o’clock, at O. F. Halt GEORGE W. RAY,
M.—Residence, No. 3H5>4 Broadwa Y Josiah Pahkin,
Sec.—Residence. No. M 3 West 35th street
2SCHOKKE □, No. 202, F. and A. M.,
regular communications Ist and 3d Thursdays, at Odd
Fellows’ Hall. (Gothic Room, 3d floor.) JOSEPH KAY
SER, M., No. 84 Bowery ; F. Sanborn, Sec’y. ; No. 119
Second street.
EMPIRE CITY O, No. 206, F. and A. M.—
BwrulM communications Sd emd Wi Ynesday Evenings,
o'clock, at Mesonic Halt 817 and 819 Broadway
qb/Me van VLIET, M., No. <7l West street Wm. a
Ames,Eoo. N.Y.
JEUREKA O, No. 248, F. and A. M.—Regu
lar communications 2d and 4th Wednesday evenings, at
No. W 4 Broadway. G. W. DILKS, h*. Residence, No.
118 Macdougsl st. Joshfh Coox, See.
ARCANA □, No. 246, F. and A. M.—Begu-
Mrccwmimlcctions Ist end 3d Mondsee a* No. 8 Union
Rmoure, at IK o’clock. WM. B STAFFORD, M.—Cuak,m
Ko. M» Wall st
MYSTIC HE □, No. 272, F. and A. M.—
Hwralar Communication Ist 3d and Mb Tuesdays,at Ms
swJc Ttompio. at 7>J O’eloeK LEON ABBKTI, M. ; 8n-
TBWBB Sjgxah Sec So. K 5 Centre street.
ABCTUBUB O, No. 274, F. and A. M.~
ttwular communications every Ist. 3d. and each altern&tf
kq mnay. at No. 817 and 819 Broadway, at 7% o’clock.
JOSEPH MATH EKS. M Residence. NO. 276 Canal st.
CONTINENTAL o, No. 287. F. and A. M.—
Regular communications Ist an£ 3d Tuesday Evenings,
«t7*4 o'clock, at Masonic Hall Nos. 817 and 819 Broad
wav. WILIoaM C. BENNETT. M.—Residence, No. 27
Wee 4 2ktrt. Albert Terhune, Sec.
ATLAS O, No. <H6’ F. and A. M.—llea-ti'.u
communlcnilora M and 4tL Ttnrodsya »» Odd Follows’
Hall. JOHN BOYD. M„ Wo. 12 Fnisfcllsi st. Gao. W
Dnaira, Bee.. Mo. 501 winiam st
&DELPHIC □, No. 348. F. and A. M.—
Reft-ulsr eommiwieatiom every 2d and 4tb Saturday
Evenmiifi, at 7% o’clock, at Masonic Hall. Nos. 827 and
fioSway ADON SMITH, Jr.. M., Ko. 3 8ou& st.
Joan W. Ehnkete Nos. 28,.5J and 37 Centre st.
CRESCENT O, No. 4Q2, F. and A. M.—Reg
ular Communications 2d and 4th Mondays, at No. 8
Union Place. WM. R. MEBRIAM. M., No. 42 Front st
W. H. II Sabin, See., No. 65 Worth st
CLINTON O, No. 453, F. and A. M. —Regu-
lar Ooxamuricahon Ist and 3d Thursday EvtDings of
averv month, at o’clock, at Na 8 Union Suuara.
K. K CHAMBERS, M. Henry Erlbau. See.
EANE O, No. 454, F. and A. M.—Regulai
eommunicsdlonfl second, fourth, and fifth Tuesdays, at
Broadway. THOS. a SOMMERS, M.-No. 112
Broedww. Jab. M. Tsmih. Hee., No. ?90 Broadway.
OTiEENWICH O, No. 467, F. w<i A. M.—
Aorular communications 2d and 4tii Fridayii. at the ear
aer of Grean and Fuurfh streets, at 7% o’ctotX DAN
£& CARPENTER, M.-Residence, No. 390 Mulberry
St Wm. B. Shovb, Sec.— Residence. No. 33Naeeaust
WELLA O, No. 485, F. and A. M.—
Beonler Communication every Thursday evening, at
Low's Building, No. 13 Court street Brooxlyia. JOSEPH
SHORT. Jr. fc M. Hjuihy Bean. Sec.
WOBMAL O, No. 528, F. and A. M.—Eegn-
K Communication every Monday Evening, at No.
Broadway, at T% o’clock. THOS. W. CbwDjßN,
HL. Mo. 30 Ann street J. G. abbs, Sec’y.
JAMAICA o. No. 546, F. and A. M.—Meets
every Tuesday, at 7:30 P. M.. at Masonic Halt Jamaica.
L L W. Bro. HENRY POOLL.Y COOPER. M., No. 11?
Fulton street New York. Bro. Pxmbpont Pottbb, Sec.,
Jamaica. L. L
METROPOLITAN CHAPTER, No. 140.
Beaular convocations of Metropolitan Chapter. 140, R.
a m . will be held at Encampmbx-t Room, Odd Fellows’
Haß. corner of Grand and Centre stereeta. first and tlsird
Frtauyw. THOS. ALYRAUGER, Sec., No. 226 Green
wiehrtnet
a.TWCTiPHTCI CHAPTER, No. TEB, E. A. M.—
SSRSa'SES
|Rsc. t No. 33 Nasmd st
MOBTON CO MM ANDREY, No. 4, K. T.,
meets first and third Mondays, at No 594 Broadway. J.
aaOVB; Recorder. Batndenee No. 33 Raosau street
About the Lodge Elections. —A. N,
"We have a communication from a brother
kirning the initials above, in which he complains
«f the fact that ballots of different colors were
need by the two factions into which the lodge
was divided, and thus each side were able to
knew who voted for their candidate, and who
for the other man. This was but a shallow de
vice, and ought not to have effected the purpose
sought by its originators, because every brother
has a right to prepare bis ballot to suit himself
and need not unless he choose, make use of the
•olers of either party. The fly-leaf of a letter—
ef which every man has at least a dozen in his
pocket, (we generally have about a email mea
evre) will answer for all the ballots required at
an election, and enable every brother to vote on
hie own hook. But the spirit which led to this
preceeding is a moat dangerous and totally un
maeonic one, and will, if persisted in, bring die
eeneione and Maeonio death in its train. Were
we in authority we should have an eye on that
Another brother states, that there were 4G
wotes cast for Master of which under the Con
stitution of the Grand Lodge, and the By-laws
of the lodge, a majority, or 24 votes were neces
sary to an election. On canvassing the poll it
was found that Bro. A. had received 21 votes,
Bro. B, 23 votes, and that there were two blanks.
The Master decided that blank ballots were no
votes, and that hence Bro. B. was elected. Our
•pinion being asked, we have no hesitation in
saying that the decision was entirely erroneous.
The voters being properly qualified there is no
restriction whatever upon a brother's vote. That
is to say that every qualified voter may approach
the polls and vote as he pleases without any one
having the right to dictate to him as to the
manner of that vote. If he chooses to vote for
some one not understood to be an aspirant, that
is his business, and if he choose to vote blank
that too is his affair, and no one has the most
distant right to question it. If then there are
46 qualified voters present, and all vote, it is .
clear that the successful candidate must have 24
votes to make his election sure. If two of the
brethren have refused to vote for either of the
•andidates, or for any other man, still they have
voled, and there is no power in the lodge or in
Masonry to cast those votes aside or to declare
in effect, by casting aside their blank ballots,
Skat they had not voted. It is the act of depos
iting a slip of paper in the ballot-box by a quah
fled voter that makes the vote, and not what
happens to be written on that slip. Admit that
a Master jh;v at his pleasure oast out of the
4MIVAB biank'’bajlois, and yofl at once give him
the power to cast out ballots, with names Oh
iliom, and thus render the election a fared. Sup.
-xise that of the 46 votes placed in the box by
she brethren 45 had been blank, and 1 for broth
er Bugby Jenkins, will it be pretended by any
man in his senses that Bro. Jenkins had received
a majority of the votes cast, and was therefore
elected ; or can it be supposed that any Master
would be sustained in thus disfranchising the
brethren because they had chosen to exercise an
undeniable right by voting to suit themselves ?
Ve think not, and we insist that all ballots cast
are to be counted, and that the successful can
didate must have a clear majority.
Masonic Law.—Here are a few rules
ef general application, that will be found usefel
U Masters of lodges, especially those who wield
the gavel for the first time :
1. We cannot force, we can only intnZe dimitted
brethren to affiliate. Make the meetings of the
lodge pleasant; impart instruction freely ; and
there will be few non-affiliates. This rule is in
fallible.
2. The Master is bound to regard the veto of a
Member, even though a favorable ballot of the
lodge has already been declared. The right of
rejection is absolute and indefeasible.
3. No Lodge has a right to pass a “ non-inter
•enrse law” affecting another lodge; but any
member of a lodge may veto the admission oi a
visitor from any other lodge.
4. A lodge refusing to obey an edict of the
Grand Lodge, does by that act forfeit its char
ter.
5. The Master who advises his brethren “ not
io take any Masonic publications, because they
are injurious to the interests of Masonry,” be
longs to that class of men who would prohibit
any person from learning more than they them
selves know. There are many such persons in
the world, and occasionally they become Masters
of Lodges. Heaven help the lodges of which
they are Masters 1
6. Taking the ballot upon advancement previ
ous to examination is under, every possible cir
cumstance wrong. It is opposed to every prin
ciple of Masonic prudence and justice. It is just
as erroneous as it would be to ballot upon peti
tion for initiation, and to make the due in
quiry” afterward.
7. 11 Transactions of a purely pecuniary mat
ter," where fraud is charged, may become sub
jects of lodge action. But no ordinary business
questions should be brought into the lodge.
And where a matter is carried into a court of
justice, whether civil or criminal, the lodge
should not bias public opinion by meddling with
it unless forced to do so by peculiar circum-
St EdTP.PK
8. A visiting brother may be rejected without
any examination by any member of the lodge.
Of course, “gross Injustice” may bs done under
this ruling; but what rule is there that may not
be strained to cover injustice ? The opposite
ruling, however, would authorize ten-fold worse
injustice.
9. You cannot say that a brother is rejected
“ from malice or ill-will,” because you have no
right to know why he was rejected, or who re
jected bim.
10. No brother can withdraw from Masonry.
H “ his treatment by his brethren” has disgusted
bim, he may cease his visits to the lodge ; but
should his conduct be such as to render his
brethren uneasy, he is bound to answer their
summonses, or they will expel him. “ Once a
Mason always a Mason.”
11. A brother rejected for the second degree
may apply again at the next and at every subse
quent stated meeting of the lodge, unless there
is eome Grand Lodge regulation in your State
forbidding it.
12. Reports on applications for initiation and
vaemberSiip should be in writing, that they may
he laid up among the records in the archives of
the Judge,
We are indebted to a friend for the
following:
“Masonic Bite of Memphis Pursuant to no-
tification, the brethren of the above branch of
Masonry, met at Odd Fellows’ Hall on Wednes
day, Dec. 21st, for the purpose of granting a
Charter and init lb'ng the officers of Sesoatris
Senate, No. 2, ot the city of Brooklyn, which has
been for eome time working under dispensation.
The ceremony was of a most interesting nature,
public as it was, to Master Masons, many of
whom availed themselves of the invitation to
attend, and all of whom expressed their admira
tion and surprise not only at the sublimity of the
moral, Masonic, and religious character of the
installation, but all, also, of the bright Masonic
fights whom they found to be officers of the
Grand Bodies—such names as R. D. Holmes,
Clinton P. Page, John L. Lewis, J. J. Crane, H.
F. L. Bunting , R. G. Millard, Bradley Parker,
Stephen H. Johnson, Rev. R. McMurdy, Hon.
Green Adams, Gov. Gilmore, of N. H., Gillet, of
Michigan, and many, many others.
“In the course of the evening, the III.'. Brother
Baron de Bulow, member of the Sup.’. Council
of France, was presented by Bro. Levy to the
Grand Master General, Harry J. Seymour, who
expressed his gratification at reciprocating the
flattering and brotherly reception he himself had
received in Paris by the noble brother and his
confreres. Bro. Seymour in the course of his
address, emphatically assured the distinguished
assembly, that none but Master Masons in good
standing, could receive the degrees of the Rite
of Memphis, that the symbolic degreesunder the
jurisdiction of a Grand Lodge, claimed their first
attention as being the fundamental basis of the
order; and should an erring brother bo so un
fortunate as to be expelled from his symbolic
lodge, his membership during such expulsion,
would cease in the Rite of Memphis.
“The officers of Sesostris Senate are as follows:
R. W. Dockson, 94, E. Com. Elect; A. C. Wil
marth, 93, Sen. Kt. Int.; John Ellard, 91.’.. Jun.
Kt.; Charles E. Pine, 90, Recorder; James Bliss,
92.’., Orator; William Bennet, 90.'., Marshal:
John B. Harris, 95.’., Kt. of I.; Bros. Moored
Kish, Rupp, Burmeister, Norris, Watson, Law,
and Ira Young.
“The usual collection made by all bodies of
the Memphis Rite in aid of the Hall and Asylum
Fund, was then taken up, and sufficient received
to purchase another good and square stone in
the Temple of Masonry.”
Uniformity of Work.—The following
extract from a report lately report lately pre
sented to the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, in re
gard to the Conservators, embodies the senti
ment of most of the thinking Masons, and is in
entire with the opinions heretofore presented by
us in this place.
“ As regaids the practicability of obtaining
complete uniformity of work, in letter and word,
jour committee are satisfied that the idea is
wholly utopian and illusory. No real and perma
nent good can result from an attempt to produoe
such complete uniformity. So long as the essen
tial landmarks and symbolism of Masonry in the
work and lectures are preserved, it is of little
consequence if there be some slighs difference in
forms of expression. As well might you expect
to produce perfect uniformity in the features of
each human face in the same family, as in the
modes cf expression of myriads of brethren
spread over the face of the habitable earth.
Communicated il om mouth to ear, there will ne
ceseanly be slight discrepancies in the modes or
expression, according to the powers of mind,
habit of thought, facility of elucidation, and
strength of mem»jy of each lecture. Hardly
two persons can agree upon the exact words
used by another in conveying ideas. Indeed,
your committee doubt that the discrepancies al
leged by the Conservators to exist in the work
and lectures of different jurisdictions have been
tmrpoeely exaggerated: and that, in reality, in
the grand features and essentials, while there no
doubt exists slight difference in verbiage, there
is a surprising uniformity in all the jurisdictions.
Your committee are, therefore, satisfied that, in
communicating the work and lectures, the great
object to be attained should be to preserve the
grand outlines and symbolisms of the work and
lectures, without seeking to preserve the minute
details of exact verbiage, the ipsissima verba.
And they are unhesitatingly of opinion that all
modes of attempting to preserve the work and
lectures by the introduction of notes, keys or cy
phers, whether by letters or figures, either writ
ten or printed, are unlawful and direct violations
of one cf the first covenants entered Into by a
Mason; and that these modes should be unhesi
tatingly and utterly abandoned. Indeed, in the
opinion of your committee, there is but one law
ful and Masonic way to communicate the myste
ries of Masonry, and that is by oral delivery, on
proper occasions, to proper persons.”
Masonry in the South.—lt has been
known to active Masons since the beginning of
the war, that the evil passions which led to and
sustained the rebellion had never entered the
doors of the Masonic Temple, and they have al
ways felt that when the storm of war should
cease Masonry would be one of the most potent
agents of reconciliation. The truth of this is
seen in the following paragraph from the daily
papers of the week. The very first thing for vic
tor and vanquished is to seek the common
ground of fellowship in the lodge; there, forget
ting the acts of strife, to renew the friendships
of old, and rejoice in the protection of the starry
banner of the Republic :
“ The editor of the Palmetto Herald, who has
been permitted to establish a daily paper in Sa
vannah, writes from that city on the 29th ult.:
“ On Monday evening an extra meeting of Clin
ton Lodge, No. 54, was held at Masonic Hall,
corner of Bull and Broughton streets, Bro. Simon
E. Byck, M. Last evening it was my privilege to
attend a meeting of Ancient Landmark Lodge,
No. 231, at the same hall. There were present
repi-esentatives of Massachusetts, South Caroli
na, Georg a, Alabama. Mississippi, Tennessee,
Kentucky, Virg inza, Il inois, Indiana, Colorado,
Michigan, lowa, Wisconsin, New York, Ohio, and
perhaps other States, all meeting in perfect am
ity. To-night a regular meeting of Georgia
Chapter, No. 3, is to be held, and in one or two
nights Solomon’s Lodge, the oldest in the coun
try except St. John’s of Boston, will hold a regu
lar communication. Com. R. T. Turner, one of
the oldest Masons of the city, is H. P. of the
Georgia Chapter, and M. of Solomon’s Lodge.
All the officers of Ancient Landmark Lodge were
present last evening, and the occasion was a
most interesting one.
New York, Dec. 29th, 1861. — To the
•Masonic Editor of the New York Dispatch: You
will confer a favor by answering the following:
A friend being proposed in Lodge A last March,
in May he hears of his rejection through outside
parties, but has never been notified by the Lodge
up to this time of said rejection. After eight
months have expired he goes to Lodge B, goes
through the regular form, giving age, name, res
idence, occupation and proposition fee, also ref
erences. Everything being satisfactory to Lodge
8., he is duly elected. Lodge A. hears of his
election, and B, is notified to stop tyiiu from tak
ing his degrees. Now what step has he to take
before he is allowed to advance in 8., he beiug
kfi honorable and worthy candidate, and the
motives for his rejection in Lodge A being purely
political or personal ? Has the Grand Lodge of
the Stats of New York the power to compel Lodge
Ato give the reason of said rejection ? The can
didate sincerely desires to become a Mason, his
father has been a Master Mason for upward of
twenty years, and Master of a Lodge for a num
ber of years previous to his death. By answer
ing the above questions, you will confer a lasting
favor on a constant reader. A. B. C.
Assweb. It is a law of the Masonic society that
the lodge in which the petition of a candidate is
first presented acquires jurisdiction over him, of
which jurisdiction they can only be deprived by
their own consent. It is therefore the duty of
every lodge, before proceeding to initiate a can
didate, to ascertain in a Masonic manner that he
has not previously been rejected in another lodge.
Should such prove to be the case, they must then
stay all proceedings till the consent of the reject
ing lodge has been obtained in writing. The
Grand Lodge cannot interfere because one of the
inherent rights of a lodge which has never been
and never can be surrendered to the Grand
Lodge is, the right to decide for itself who shall
be received into its fellowship. No legislation,
no exercise of power by the Grand Lodge can
alter or abridge this right. If the cause of re
jection be as you state—though we are at a loss
to know how you found it out-the candidate
may, after the lapse of six months, present his
petition anew, and perhaps, the political excite
ment having subsided, meet with a more favor
able reception. At all events, he can do nothing
without the consent of lodge A.
The scarf -was at first an ensign of
chivalry. The preux chevaliers of the brave
“ old days” wore their scarfs of the colors pre
ferred by their lady loves. Often the lady herself
bestowed her own scarf upon her knight; in
that case it became his prize and property,
which, according to a law of chivalry, he wore
until some more fortunate champion deprived
him of it at the tourney, or until he had accom
plished the enterpriseo enjoined upon him by his
6 When the feudal orders of knighthood were
founded, the scarf, by its form and color, served
as a distinctive insignia; and it was employed
for the same purpose by the leaders of different
factions, or the chiefs of hostile armies. The
scarf was for them and their soldiers what a dif
ference in uniform or decoration, or a rosette or
cockade is for warriors and politicians now-a
days. The Crusaders wore a white scarf, and
they carried it en sautoir, or slantwise, in which
fashion it was worn until the Seventeenth Cen
tury. At present it is usually bound like a girdle
round the waist.
During the intestine struggles of the factions
of Armazac and Orleans, the former were dis
tinguished by a scarf of red, and the latter by a
simple band of white linen. The royal armies at
a later period wore scarfs of white, while during
the Revolution of ’9B the members of the Na
tional Assembly and public officers generally
wore a tri-colored scarf In England, the favor
ite color of the scarf has been red ; but in the
civil wars, white was usually worn by the Cava
liers, while at least a portion of the Roundhead
treops adopted green.
This article of costume, or decoration, is now
usually termed a sash, whether worn from the
shoulder or about the waist. Knights Templar
call it a baldrick to distinguish it from the sword
belt, although the sword may be suspended from
either. The sash now worn by Masons probably
originates from the scarf of the chivalrie ages,
though Dr. Mackey thinks that it is derived from
the Zennar, or sacred cord, placed upon the can
didate in the initiation into the mysteries of
India, and which every Brahmin was compelled to
wear. This cord was woven with great solem
nity, and being put upon the left shoulder,
passed over to the right side, and hung down as
low as the fingers oonld reach.
A Venerable Chair.—The oldest Ma
sonic Chair in Ireland was presented to Lodge
No. 3 by Bro. Thomas Aldworth Cocker, P. M.
No. 3 (I. C.), and was occupied by Viscount
Doneralle (Hayes Bt.Leger),atDoneralle House,
when the Hon. Mrs. Aidworth (then the Hon.
Mies St. Leger) received the first and secons de
grees. The chair originally belonged to the Hon.
Viscount Kingston, and was used at Michelstown
Castle by him aa Grand Master of the Masonie
body in Ireland. The Viscount presented it to
Lodge No. 25, held at Doneralle, whence it was
given to Lodge No. 25, removed to Cork. Bro.
W. A. Hacket, P. M., No 3, proposed a vote of
t : anks to Bro. T. A. Cocker, which was seconded
by Bro. W. P. Rothwell, S. D., and entered in the
minutes of the Lodge by Bro. E.' W. Wigmore,
Sec. This highly interesting Masonic relic is
finely carved in the Corinthian style, and has
been completely renovated after a lapse of 150
years since the data cf its manufacture. It may
be remarked that, during the very troublous
times from 1798 to 1826, the chair and Masonic
paraphernalia were locked up for periods of four
and ten years respectively, as Masonic bodies
were, by the provisions of the Limited Acts,
prevented from assembling.— Masonic Mirror,
Dec. 17.
Public Installation of Americus
Lodge, No. 535 This was decidedly one of the
most successful affairs of the season, and reflects
great credit on the brethren entrusted with the
arrangements. Corinthian room, in Odd Fel
low’s Hall, the largest room in the city, was filled
to repletion with the brethren, and their families
and friends. In the East we noticed Deputy
Grand Master Holmes, D. D., G. M. Bay, R. W.
Brothers Millard, Macoy, Pratt, Sickles, and oth
ers, W. Bro’s. Kirkham, Pinckney and Clarke.
The installation services were conducted by M.
W. Bro. Simons after a formula of his own. R.
W. Bro. Holmes then delivered a brief address,
concluding by presenting in behalf of the breth
ren, to B. W. Geo. E, Simons the retiring Mas
ter, a service of plate, which was acknowledged
by the recipient in a neat and appropriate speech.
Certificates of honorary membership medevi
ally illuminated and framed, were presented to
B. W. Bro. Millard and W. Bro. A. H. Wilson.
A season of refreshment followed, when the
proceedings were terminated by a volunteer con
cert under the direction of Bro. Illsly, winding
up with the 100th Psalm by all present, in glori
ous style.
Naval Lodge, No. 69, had a public
installation on Wednesday evening last, in the
presesce of a crowded assemblage of ladies and
gentlemen. By the way, we note that at all the
public occasions of this season, and they have
been much more numerous than usual, the only
limit to the audiences has been the capacity of
the lodge halls for their accommodation, and all
have evinced an attention to and interest in the
proceedings, most gratifying to the brethroo.
The officers of Naval Lodge, were installed by R.
W. E. P. Breed, assisted by R. W. Robert Macoy,
relieved by the occasional introduction of some
very fine ringing under the direction of Bro.
Richard Horner. A brief but eloquent address
followed from M. W. Bro. Simons, and then a
choice collation formed an appropriate conclusion
to the exercises. Such occasions tend to cement
the ties of brotherhood, and always create a
favorable impression on the uninitiated, for which
reasons we most heartily commend them, and
trust they may continue to increase in favor with
the craft.
Presentation in Polar Star Lodge,
No. 245—At the regular communication ot this
lodge, held on the 4th inat., the retiring Master,
W. Edwin Bouton, was made the recipient of a
valuable Past Master’s jewel and a silver pitcher
of rare and curious workmanship. The Masonic
devices on it are, in front, tha mosaic pavement
supporting the columns, altar and lights; on the
rides the figure of Time, and the broken column,
and Jacob’s vision—the whole raised in bold re
lief and beautifully chased, by Bro. E. P. Curtis.
The presentation was made by W. Thon. Abbot,
and the response by Bro. Bouton was worthy of
the occasion.
List of Officers of Lodges recently
Elected :
OLIVE BiIANCH, 39.—John R .Anderson, M.; C. Fitch
Bissell, S. W.; John B. Condy, J. W.; Henry S Rider,
Treas.; Orville J. Waterman Seo.; Chafes H. Gjodrich,
S. D ; John W. Henderson, J D.; Frank W Adams. Daniel
C. McNaughton, M. C.; R. D. Nettleton, Chaplain; God*
leich Schening, Tiler. Meets at Leroy.
HIRAM, 105—Hawley Klein, M.; Henry Waters. S. W.;
Chilian M. Farrar, J. W ; Jas. B. Dubois Treas.; Wm. A.
Jarrell. Sec.; Henry Smith, S. D.; Walter S. Lewis, J. D.;
John Masters, Hiram T. Green, M. C.; J. Hazard Hartzell,
Chaplain; John B. Hunter, Tiler. Meets at Buftalo.
HANOVER, 152.—Albert W. Hull, M.; Johnson Ward, 8.
W.; H. A. Cook. J. W.; D. Blanding, Treas.; J. G. Record,
Sec.; G. C. Chesbro. S. D.; C. L. Norris, J. D.; Ezra Snow,
G. W. Cook. M. U.; Win. Colyill, Tiler. Meets Wednesday
on or next preceding the full moon in every month, and
on each second Wednesday thereafter, at Forestville.
OCEAN, 156 —Edward C. Harris, M.; James Riley, S.
W.; Warren C. Bennett J. W.; H. Lindeman, Treas.; H.
C. Velvin, Sec.; T C. Whitely, 8. D ; J. S. Trewin, J. D.
Meets at Masonic Temple, 2d and 4th Mondays.
DARCY, 187 —S. Latz, M.; Wm. Hyanes, S. W.; George
Stevenson, J.W.; W r m. Chuck, Treas.; M. Kolasky, Sec ;
A. Magner, 8. D.; a. Simon, J. D.; N. Cohn, B. Ash, J.
Dumbie, Trustees; H. Davies, G. W. Stone, M. C.; J. Oer-
KiR; QrgShfet; 15. Passman, Tiier. Meets corner Broome
and Ci osby streets.
TEMPLAR, 203—P. L. Buchanan, M.; J. 8. Browne, 8.
W.; C. H. Morison, J. W.; Wm. Hutcheson, Treas.; J. 8.
Stitt, Sec ; Thoi Kerr, S. D.; J. J. Wallace, J. D.; T. W.
Cook, J. Donaldson. M. C.; G. Baker. P. J. Post, T. P. Pas
call, Trustees ; S. Merritt, Jr., Chaplain ; J. Conway, Ti
ler. Meets cor. of Bth avenue and 18tn street, every Fri
day.
ENTERPRISE, 228—Charles C. Curtis, M.; Stephen P.
Sheffield, S. W.; Stephen Johns, J. W. Meets at Masonic
Temple.
WASHINGTON, 240—S, O. Bigelow, M.; A. E. Williams,
8. W.; J. Sj Havens, J. W.; J. 8. Lyon, Treas.; W. Perkins,
Bec ; G. H. Randel. S. D ;J. C. Combs, J D.; J. H. Ruckle,
J. Weber, M. C.; W. W. Kenton, Tiler. Meets at Buffalo.,
PARISH. 292. Th os. Lotbrop, M.; Jas D. Hall, 8. W.;
W. Richardson, J. W ; A. B. Bidwell, Treas.; George F.
Bates, Sec.; M. R. Hubbard, 8. D.; Geo, L Carpenter,
J. D.; Jas. M. Corns, Chas M. Boice, M. C ; Joseph Free,
Tiler. Meets at North Buffalo.
AMITY, 323—Samuel C. Seaman. M.; Joseph Souza, S.
W.; Dcminicus Snediaer, J. W.; Wm. Drew, Treas.; John
J Tindale, Sec.; J B. Seymouj, S D ; 8. W' Mead, J. D.;
Wm. Deland, Undendoffer, M. C.; A M. Underhill, G.
J. Wood, Alvin Graff Trustees; A. M. Underhill, Chap
lain; G J. Wood, Marshall; Geo. F. Taylor, Organist;
Sewell Bisk, Tiler. Meets at Nos. 817 and 819 Broadway,
on 20 and 4th Fridays.
CORNER STONE, 367.—Th os. W. Ec?leston. M. Gaorge
J. Scammell. 8. W.; Ed. W. Corcoran, J. W ; Wm. Foulks,
Treas.; John J. Davies, Sec.; Jesse W Hurst, S.D.; Jo
siah D. Hunt J. D.; H. C. Eno, George Smart, M. C.; Jos.
O. Parr, Organist; Wm. 8. Harris. A F. Calkin?, Jacob
Baker, Trustees; 8. D. Hazen, Isaac I’. Mailer, Thomas
J. Gill, Fin. Com.; A. K. Irving, Tiler. Meets at Brooklyn,
E. D.
LONG ISLAND, 382 —John H. Besher, M ; Aaron H.
Davison, S. W.; Charles S Baldwin, J. W.; John Wilson,
Ireas.; 11. V. Aston, Sec ; Isaac Thomas, 8. D.; Henry
Vanderveer, J.D ; Edwin N. Wood, W. Harkness, M.C.;
John E Johnson, D. E. Smith, George E Wheeler, Trus
tees; W. Vakfcrd, Tiler. Meets at Brooklyn.
GENOA. 421.—8. Mosher, M;C. C. Husted, 8. W; A.
Niblo, J. W Meets at King’s Ferry, Cayuga Co ,N. Y.
BTAB OF HOPE, 430—John L. Nostraud, M.; Thomas T.
Griffin, S. W.; Daniel Scott, J. W.; Thomas Camden,
Treas ; James Denbigh, Sec.; Joseph Morrell. S. D.; Wm.
H. Brown, J. D.; John J. Ewrich, Tiler. Meets at Brook
lyn,
KANE. 454 —Thomas S Sommers M. ; Wm. B. Bibbins,
8 W. ; Royal E. Deane, J. W. ; Sylvester K. Comstock,
Treas. ; Jas M. Tighe, Sec. ; btepnen R. Fisk, 8. D. ;
Chas. E Hanner, J. D. ; Arnold C. Hawes, 8 8 : Thos. D.
Mason, J. S. ; Chas R. Leffingwell, S. C ; Henry F. Herk
ner, J. C.; Rev. Wm. P. Btricklan-J, Chaplain ; Robert C.
Rathbone, Isaac M. Dean, Ivah Chase, Jr., Trustees ; Rob
ert Dillon, E. C. D. Klttridge, Fred. K. Parsons, Finance
Committee ; Win. K. O. Brien, Royal E Deane, James F.
Ferguson, Delegates to Masonic Board of Relief; Theo
dore Evans, Representative to Kane Lodge, No. 55. New
ark, N. J. ; Edward Bricoult, Representative to Ledge
L’Avenir and L’lndustrie Charlerou Belgium ; Robert C.
Rathbone, Marshal; Geo. C. Rathbone, Organist; Wm.
Smi.h, Tiler.
ANCIENT CITY, 452 —Thomas Robinson. M. ; Henry
Prosens, 8. W ; Chas F. Platts. J. W.; Edward Stearin
Treas.; Chas. G. Coult, Sec. ; Henry Ausiey. S. D ; Ad
am Coak, J. D.; Amza Fuller, Tiler. Meets at Aloany
ARCHITECT,SI9.—Wm. H Marshall, M. ; Joel O. Ste
vens. 8. W’. ; De WittC. Arnold, J. W. ; Amas D. Ash
mead, Treas. ; John B. McKean, Sec. ; J. A. Pendleton,
Chaplain ; Benj. W. Blott, 8. D. ; F. A. Ruteler, J. D. ;
W. Kerry Marshall, Thos J. Gambia, M. C. ; John Com
well, Thomas J. Marshall, Jr., James R. Silli'nan. Trus
tees : Edward Wright, Tiler. Meets at Eighty-sixth
street, between 3d and 4th avenues, Wednesdays.
i©- Wanted.—An Organist for a BasonSc
Lodge—first and third Mondays. Inquire at No. 365 Grand
t-treet
The Members ot Amity Ko. 323,
F. and A. M., are hereby notified to attend a special com
munication of the Lodge at its rooms. Nos. 817 and 819
Broadway, on Sunday. Sth inst., at 2 o’clock, P. M , for the
purpose of paying the lait tribute of respect to our deceas
ed brother. Mr Phillip D. Frefigh. The members of Man
ahatta Lodge, No. 489, and the fraternity generally are in
vited t« participate in the funeral ceremonies.
SAMUEL C. SEAMAN, M.
John J. Tinpale, Secretary.
Architect Lodge, %o. 519, F. and A.
M.—The Mtmbersof Architect Lodge are hereby sum
moned to attend the Regular Communication, held on
Wednesday evening, January 11th, 1865, at Masonic Hall,
86th street, between Third and Fourth avenues, for the
purpose of hearing read a circular from the Grand Master
John B. McKean, Sec. WM. H. MARSHALL, M.
40- Fourth Animal ite-Trdon
IN Ain OP THE
CHARITY FUND
\ o»
EXCELSIOR LODGE, Na 195, F, and k. M..,
IRVING HALL,
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16th, 1865.
The Committee of Arrangements having this re union
in charge will spare no pains to make this interesting oc
casion acceptable. The occasion is a charitable one, and
appeals to all the best and noblest sympathies of the fra
ternity.
Tickets can be obtained from the Chairman of the Com
m ttee, J. V. Schenck, No. 631 Broadway ; W. B. Overton,
Secretary, Belmont Hotel, Fulton st ; or George W. Ray.
No. Broad wav. Price, Two Dollars each, to admit a
gennemioiand y chalrm , in .
Wm. B. OtWrton. Sec’y.
Notice.
Having secured the valuable services of
WM. A. KELSEY,
So long and favorably known in this city as a competent
business man, would most respectfully call the attention
of our numerous friends and the public generally to our
flue assortment of
WINES. LIQUORS AND CIGARS,
as also the addition to our stock of
CHOICE GROCERIES,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL,
At No. 744 BROADWAY.
KOBT. 8. DUNHAM A CO.
(Late R. 8. & G. W. Dunham.)
Wm. A. Kelsey calls the attention of Ills friends to the
above notice, simply adding that whatever benefits the
house of R. 8. Dunham A Co. benefits him particularly.
Thacklng you all for past favors, cordially solicit a con
tlnuance of the same.
Asseriean liliai’«wile Ag«®cy.
Ali KINDS OP KEGAIiA, JEWBIA XZLHIAB;
BQUIPHjiN-M, JKWE.I.SIY, etc., on hand and iwmaw
tnred to orter, tor LODsAb, ifHAUTEBS, coSMAI®
KHriSS, ete.
SNGaAVISCL SHOTB ULAWNG, and GILBINa
D. B. HOWU. No. SB BBOADWAY, N. ¥'
N. B.—Swords made to order, sxkl bang wlfii Frios’l
Patent Sword Hangings.
Knight Tejielasb’ Bnnuzj)EEr3«n.A«s on
1@- Special.—Mendum’s Nectar Bourbeß
is particularly recommended by eminent physicians tc
persons tronolod with Coughs. Coid.% and aM hrornbiij
HlecUoi’a Frinelpal d«dxyt» No. 90 Cedar street, oi
1 Broadwav.
NEW YORK DISPATCH.
aST George W. Ray,
IMPORTKH AND DHAUra ni
HAVANA BEGA KB,
Fo. ’W®£ A b’ Bo’aDw'a Y,
Comer Doane at Hxw Ycax.
riWoSf -yg^^° !^M ’ aooo ,
T. W. Cewtiln,
DEALER IN
PAPER, TWINE,
PAPER MAKERS’ MATERIALS,
&c.,
No. 20 ANN STREET,
NXW YORK,
(Near William.)
gamoel R. syr&biwh,
ENGRAVER AND PRINTER.
Na 194% BOWERY,
Three doors above Spring st., New York,
FEW PLATES, Ae.
WEDDING, VISIIING, BUSINESS,*
and ADDRESS CARDS,
IN TBS LArKST Bms AT MOPXiRAn FtaCfft
OBSERVE THE NUMBER—I94I
Rig&lia, Jewels, Robes, Ac., for Chapters, Councils, ct
OazAruandewos; Improved sword-hangings, Ac., furnish©-'
3t the lowest prices. Maaonle'bublicatlotw, foreign ary
iomcetic, on hand at all times.
MACOY A BZCKELB. No. «0 Broome st. K- V
ami (Bmb,
Calicrapht is a universal accomplish
ment among educated Chinese. They adorn their houses
with the autographs of eminent men, and the various pro
ductions of artistical scribes are very highly appreciated
The Chinese fancy revels in accomodating the signs of
their language to shapes of flowers, and birds, and ani
mals, to ancient jars, tripods and seals, to the leaves of the
bamboo, to legendary tales, to groups of men and pictures
of nature. Six varieties of writing are studied; the
square, the round, the official, the ornamental, the run
ning, the condensed. Sometimes the characters are writ”
ten with such rapidity, the pencil not being lifted from
the paper, as to be illegible to any but the initiated; some*
tin cs every stroke is elaborated with all the care of a
miniature artist. They are sometimes painted a footlong,
with a free hand and a coarse brush; at others, the finest
camel-hair pencil is used to produce characters in the
minutest perfection; and, to say the truth no handwriting
in the world can be compared, in variety of forms or artis
tic grace and beauty, with that of the Chinese. No pres
ent is more highly valued than a scroll or a fan on which
a person of literary reputation has written the aphorism
of a sage or the verse of a poet.
A letteb from Mexico mentions a
singular kind ot lottery which is annually drawn in that
capital, and gives a copy of the printed notice which has
been posted up on the subject: “In the Convent of San
Larenzo, in this capital, there is drawn every year, on
the eve of the Octave of the Ascension, a lottery of
masses, which are said on the following day for the souls
of those who have gained prizes. The number of them is
in proportion to the sum received, and a certain part of
the masses are also applied to the souls of all those who,
having taken part in the lottery, have not gained prizes.
Notice of the whole is afterward given to the public—that
is to say, the list of the persons who have gained, and the
number of masses applied to each of them. Those who
wish to put any soul in the lottery may apply at the said
convent. The entrance is half a real for each soul. The
money is received by the porter.”
A singular affair occurred recently at
Vienna. A gentleman and a lieutenant in the army meet
ing in the street, the stick of the former struck by acci
dent the sword of the latter. Each party turned round,
apparently expecting the other to apologize, when at last
the civilian remarked, ‘‘Why the deuce do yoa pass
through the streets with your spit stickingout in such a
manner f” High wor: s followed, which ended in the offi
cer prosecuting his adversary for an insult to his military
honor by an injurious epithet applied to his sword. The
president of the police court, before vhom the case was
brought, severely reproved the civilian lor the expression
used; and the court, considering that the accused could
not be in the possession of h s lull mental faculties, ad
mitted txtenuating circumstances, and condemned him to
a fine of fifteen thalers, (about two pounds.)
An English lieutenant has invented
a new style ot engine which is designed to be exceedingly
compact and simple in its details. It is merely a cylinder
fitted with a very deep piston. This piston has a cylinder
Inside of it, running at right angles with the bore of the
main cylinder. There are two pistons in the cylinder,
which connect by rods to a crank shaft running through
the large cylinder, lhe deep piston also connects to this
crank shaft, so that when it has made one stroke, carry
ing the crank shaft part of the stroke, the small cylinders
in the main piston act on the shaft, and also impel it The
whole engine is no larger than the cylinder, everything
being enclosed in it. Steam is used on the smaller cylin
ders first and then let into the larger one.
A frenchman has invented a process
whereby from a photograph a clay model may be me
chanically and accurately cut, frem which a plaster cast
is produced which is a life-like resemblance of the sitter.
The photograph is taken in a circular room, every part of
the person being photographed at the same instant A
statuette or half sized bust is produced, at the will of the
sitter. The name given to this new art Is photo-sculp
ture. A London house has attempted the thing, but as
compared to the French, the works produced are poor
and clumsy. The expense of the first cast is fifty dollars,
each duplicate being five dollars.
Grafting Animals.—The Intellectual
Observer says : Dr Paul Bert has published a work on the
curious subject of animal grafts. He succeeded in mak
ing Siamese twins of a couple of rats, and in many other
monstrosities. He exclaims : “Itis a surprising spectacle
to see a paw cut from one rat, live, grow, finish its ossifi
cation, and regenerate its nerves under the skin of ano
ther ; and when we plant a plume of feathers under the
skin of a dog, what a miracle to see the Interrupted vital
phenomena resume their course, and the fragment of a
bird receive nourishment from the blood of a mammal.”
Fhtroleum.—Every individual in the
community blessed with a speculative turn of mind, and
who has a few dollars to spare, is turning his thoughts to
petroleum stock as the best paying of any in the market.
We call the attention of all such desirous of handsome div
idends, to the advertisement of the “ New York, Philadel
phia and Baltimore Consolidate! Petroleum and ./Mining
Company.” This company, with a capital of $1,500,060.
divided into three hundred thousand shares, holds, in feo
simple, 535 acres in the heart of the oil region, on which
there are .thirteen wells in operation. For safe invest
ments, tills Company’ presents reasonable inducements.
A novel method of killing whales is
by the screw of a steamer. When the steamer Moeris was
entering the Straits of Messina on the 12th ot October, a
strong shock was felt by all on board, and a most unusual
agitation was noticed in the water near the screw. The
engineshaving been stopped and a boat lowered, it was
found that a whale had got entangled wi;h the screw,
which had inflicted a deep and mortal wound just beliind
the head. With some difficulty the dead monster was ex
tricated and hoisted on deck, when it was found to meas
ure twenty one feet four inches in length, with a maxi
mum girth of thirteen feet nine inches.
A German missionary in Newark, in
writing of the condition of his countrymen, refers to those
of New York and Newark thus: “New York contains
150,000 Germans. Of these 43,000 are Jews, 46,00 G are Ro
manists, and 61,010 are Protestants. Of the latter, not
more than 13,000 attend divine service. Newark has a
German population of 24,000, of whom 3 000 are Jews,
6,000 are Romanists, and 15,000 Protestants.” Brooklyn
also has a large German population, and it is lamentable
that but few comparatively of that race are habitual at
tendants upon any church.
A number of working coppersmiths
of Paris are forming a society for the foundation of a firm
to be conducted by the members themselves in common.
A capital of twenty five thousand francs has already been
raised by two hundred and fifty shares of one hundred
francs each, subscribed by two hundred and eight work
men. The intention of the association is to gradually
unite as many members as possible of the trade as asso
ciates in workshops to be successively added to the estab
lishment.
History records seventeen instances
of the partial congelation into ice of the vast surface of
the Black Sea since the beginning of the Christian era.
The year 762 Is positively mentioned as having witnessed
its all but total freezing over. It is a curious circumstance
that the severe winters of this region have vary seldom
coincided with those remarked in other parts of Europe.
It is thought probable that the great frosts of the Euxine
must have been owing especially to local causes.
It is stated, as a new discovery, that
wonderful effects may be obtained by watering fruit tree
and vegetables with a solution of sulphate of iron. Under
this system beans will grow to nearly double their size,
and will acquire a much more savory taste. The pear
seems to be particularly well adapted to this treatment
Old nails thrown into water and left to rust there will
impart to it all the necessary qualities for forcing vegeta
tion as described.
A man named Pourriwas lately sum
moned on an English jury, and excused himself by sajing
that he was a foreigner, not able to speak English, and
had to feed with his mouth five hundred young pigeons
and if he were engaged as a jurymari they w-ould die di
rectly, as there was no other man in the country who
could feed them as he could. The plea was allowed.
A good test for gold or silver is lutar
caustic, fixed with a piece of pointed wood.’ Slightly wet
the metal to be tested, and rub it gently with the caustic.
If gold or silver, the mark will be faint ; but if an inferior
metal, it will be quite black. Jewelers who purchase old
gold often use this test
The Internal Revenue Recorder is
the title of a new weekly just commenced by P. C. Van
Wyck & Co. It is devoted entirely to matters of interest
under the Internal Revenue Law. it is one of the most
useful publications we have met with. The office is at
No. 4 Dey street.
Divine service will be held at the
rooms of the New England Relief Association, No 194
Broadway, to day (Sunday), at 3% o’clock P M , by Rev.
a r. Thompson, when a sermon commemorative of Mat
thew Ager, late of the Bth New Hampshire Vols.. will be
preached.
Freekrika Bremer utters benedic
tions upon America in its grievous trials. She says her
heart is here now more than ever, and were she younger,
she would be here soul and body, and mix among those
who take care of the sick and wounded.
Universal Safety Matches.—Read
the advertisement of this Ingenious and useful Invention
in another column of this issue of the Die patch. These
matches must soon take the place of .the dangerous arti
cles now in common use.
A tunnel was discovered at the con
ecript rcamp In New Haven, recently, leading from the
KB*r4-honse to the outside ef the camp. The tunnel woe
, cizhty feet leng, and about the circnaference of a flour
i
Tee Philadelphia Press of Dec. 30th,
18f4, announces in its renort of operations of the mint that
since the eoinmencement of coinage in 1797, the value of
' gold coined haa been $777,421,471; of silver, $133,804,937.
They havr a maxi in Ellsworth, Me.,
44 years of age, who haq never used an ounce of tobacco,
nor drank a drop of tea, coffee, beer, cider, wine, or any
kind of intoxicating liquor in liij life.
A twelve-inch steam-whistle has
been let up at the locomotive works in Manchester, Eng
land, which, it is said can be heard ten miles, and has a
very decided effect upon the sleepers in the morning.
The absurd story about the phoeaix
grew out of the fact that phoania es always roosted tn ash
trees, and hence when they took wing they were said to
“ rise from their ashes.”
Five millions, six hundred and ten
thousand cents, and three millions, one hundred and
forty-five thousand two-ccnt pieces were coined at the
mint in the month of November, 1864, akne.
Captain Erricsson’s new wrought
iron gun, 13-inch bore, sent a solid round shout out of
sight. It is “ presumed” that it went outakte of eight
miles.
The merchants of New Haven have
just sent to the soldiers of their State three hundred and
fifty pairs of gloves and one hundred pairs of mittens.
The Postoffice did a very lively busi
ness in dead letters last year—over three and a half mil
lions.
About $100,000,000 worth of cotton
was raised during the last year in Egynt
Sheep are dying in Massachusetts
from eating laurel.
The Newspaper Publishers’ Conven
tion assembled at Columbae, Ohio, on Wednes
day last. Committees were appointed to memo
rialize the Legislature and Congress against a
prohibitory tariff on paper. It was resolved to
raise the price of all weekly papers to two dollars
and a ball a year, and to increase the rates of
advertising. A State Publishers’ Association
was aleo formed.
A man in West Hartford, Conn., on
last Wednesday morning shot a crow in a tree
with a Colt revolver. The ball, after going
through the head of the bird, passed into a
dwelling-house a quarter of a mile distant, and
struck hfrs. J. M. G. Brace on the arm and fell
to the floor. She was not injured, the blow being
scarcely felt.
The fcteamer Tamar arrived at As
spinwall on the 17th ult. from Greytown. The
bar had so closed up the chanusl of the harbor
at Grey town, that it was impossible for tho small
river steamers to get out, and the passengers
who lately arrived there in the Golden Rule from
New York had to ba sent over the bar in small
boats and canoes.
Mr. Farwell, the new Maine Senator,
is a good specimen of a min physically, and is
one of a family of twenty-one children, by two
mothers, fourteen of whom were sons, not one
of the latter being in weight less than 200 pounds,
nor below six feet in bight. The father is stall
living, at the age of ninety-four years.
The Illinois Central Railroad is mak
ing an effort to have the capital of that State re
moved from Springfield to Decatur, and offer, as
an inducement, $1,000,000 to build a new capitol
at that place, The people at Springfield are in
consequence much exercised on the subject.
The friends of Rev. H. W. Beecher,
at Peekskill and vicinity, who were recently edi
fied by that gentleman’s enthusiastic eulogy on
the apple as a fruit, made him a New Year’s pre
sent of a huge apple pie, two and a half feet in
diameter, and cooked most deliciously.
Press prosecutions in Prussia are
still carried on with great vigor. The editor of
the Berlin Punch has been sentenced to five
weeks’ imprisonment for publishing an article
reflecting on a sovereign with whom Prussia is
on terms of amity.
The Suez Canal Company are now
having built at Ismail, in the centre of the Isth
mus, a large Roman Catholic church, which, in
pursuance of the wishes of the Empress, will be
dedicated to St. Francois de Sales.
The protracted colliers’ strike in
South Yorkshire, England, has come to an end
the men who turned out having resumed work
on the master’s terms. It is estimated that in the
struggle the men have lost at least half a million
of dollars in wages.
The Portland Argus, which has just
been compelled to raise its price, says there is
not a paper in Maine, with a single exception,
which is paying the interest on the money in
vested .
While workmen were engaged re
pairing a building on Holliday street, Baltimore,
a floor gave way, burying seven or eight men
in the ruins. Three dead bodies have been taken
cut.
The noted cases of the New York
banks resisting the claims of the city to a right
to tax them, are now up before the Supreme
Court of the United States.
The French Imperial Prince, only
B,j years old, went shooting, recently, with his
father, and killed three pheasants and four rab
bits.
It is said that the South American
Congress have interfered to prevent war with
Spain until they have tried further negotiations.
Chief Justice Chase’s only sister,
Mrs. Henry B. Walbridge, died on Friday last,
Dee. 80th, at Toledo, Ohio.
The will of Col. Colt, of Hartford,
has been contested by his brother.
initial
Z&p Sixteenth Assembly IMstrlrt Ihl-m
.Association (19th Ward).—The first Regular Meeting of this
Asscciation will be held at Dingiedein’s, Third avenue, be
tween Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth streets, on Friday evening,
Jan. 13th, at 7Jfj o’clock.
J. W. CULVER President
Simon Seward, Recording Secretary.
GRAND ROMANCE OF THE WAR.
LIFE IN THE SADDLE ;
OR,
THE CAVALRY SCOUT.
BY NED BUNTLINE,
Lsite of the Ist Regiment N. Y. Mounted Rifles.
niuetrations by Barley.
Price 25 cents.
The author, in hie preface, dedicates this work to his oM
comrades of the Ist New York Mounted Rifles and the
11th Pennsylvania Cavalry; illustrating, as it doos, many
of the most exciting scenes through which both regiments
passed in the campaign on the Blackwater and in the
vicinity of Norfolk and Petersburg.
The story is written in Ned Buntline’s best style, and is
a most graphic, exciting and thrilling portraiture of tire
scenes and incidents of an eventful campaign.
Mailed free of postage on receipt of price.
FREDERIC A. BRADY,
PUBLISUSK,
No. 22 Ann street, N. Y.
Ask a’w'y bookseller or news
dealer tor Dawley’s New War Novel, No. 7,
MOSBY THE GUERILLA.
10,000 SOLD THE FIRST WEEK,
Illuminate i cover, price 26 cents. Trade $12.50 per 100.
T. R. Dawley, publisher. No. 13 Park Row, N. Y.
LADIES’ LETTER OF ADVICE,-
Jr.YE ANATOMICAL ENGRAVINGS.
Has information never before published.
Sent free, in a sealed envelope for W cents
Address BOZ 4,652, NEW YORK Poet Office.
TLf ATRIMONY. - WHY EVERY MAN
IT H should marry. Why every woman should marry
All may marry to know. Read the IHustratod Marriage
Guide and Medical Adviser, by WM. EARL, M. D., 200
rages. Mailed in sealed envelope on receipt of M coats.
Address Ko. 12 While street. New York.
toiietmgis.
PEEK! N~S & BROTHER,
WHOLESALE j4FD RETAIL DHAJ-KRS KN
CARPETING,
QFL CLOTHS, MATTING,
STAIR PODS.
WINDOW SHADES, Ah.
He, BOWERY, NEAR HESTER ST.,
New York
H. B. PERKINS,
J. P. PERKINS.
46 O KATES FOR THE MILLION,”
O WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
JI--.. ~
—-IfwoODHAM'S PATCI
■ ———— ” neviuE.
“LATEST KINKS,” Woodham and Winant’s Patents
eombh ed. „
SKATES of ALL APPROVED KINDS.
SKATES MADE. GROUND and REPAIRED.
ALFRED WOODHAM, No. 424 Broadway, N. Y.,
(Between Canal and Howard streets )
CHARLES S. SPENCER.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR
AT LAW.
PROCTOR AND ADVOCATE IN U. 8. COURTS,
No. 339 BROADWAY (first floor),
NEW YORK.
OABD.-DR. LEWIS HAS NO CON
N ECTION whatever with any other office in th s
city. His old established Priva'e Medical Institute is
only at No. 7 Beach street, three doors from West Broad
way .where the Doctor himself can be consulted as usual,
frem BA. M. till BP. M. Established 1840.
STEWART * CO.
Win continue to sell at
EXTREMELY LOW PRICES,
The balance of their
POPULAR STOCKS
Prior to closing their Annual Inventory.
BROADWAY and TENTH St
gPBli’G IMPORTATIONS.
REGARDLESS OF THE PRICE OF GOLD I
Our regular supplies of
GENT’S FURNISHING GOODS!
LADIES’ FURNISHING GOODS !
BOY’S AND GIRL’S UNDER WEAR, &c.,
continue to come sn.
HOSIERY
Of English, French and German Manufacture.
UNDER-SHIRTS, DRAWERS, &c.,
For Ladies, Gents and Children.
All sizes
GENFS FRENCH DRESS SHIRTS.
TOILET ARTICLES,
TIES,
SUSPENDERS.
GLOVES,
COLLARS,
DRESSING-GOWNS, &c.
BOOTB & BALDWIN,
No. 605 BROADWAY,
Below St Nicholas Hotel.
AT K , M . MACY’ S ,
HOUSEKEEPING GOODS,
LACES AND EMBROIDERIES.
HOSIERY. GLOVES AND UNDERWEAR,
RIBBONS AND FRENCH FLOWERS.
YANKEE NOTIONS AND FANCY GOODS
XKST ALWAYS ON HA»D A FULL STOCK BEST
QUALITY FRENCH KID GLOVES, 50 CTS.
A PAIR under the regular prices.
R. U MACY,
Nos. 204 and 206 SIXTH AVENUE, near 14th st.
AT HARRIS’S KID GLOVE EMPO
RIUM.
IF YOU WANT TO BUY
A GOOD PAIR OF FRENCH
KID GLOVEB,
FOR $1 50 AND $1 75,
GO TO HARRIS’S. No. 873 BROADWAY,
CORNER OF EIGHTEENTH STREET.
BE ECONOMICAL AND TRY
THE UNDRESSED AND SEAMLESS.
THE BEST FITTING KID GLOVES.
ALSO, A FULL ASSORTMENT OF MISSES’ AND
CHILDREN’S KID GLOVES.
Attention ladtes~fursL not
witJDstandhig the high rata of go.d, the N. Y. Manu
facturing Co. will sell at last year’s prices. Ladies call
ing early can take their choice from cur large and well
seleoted stock, .and obtain GREAT BARGAINS at about
half the price psjd elsewhere. Altering and repairing to the
latest styles equal to new. A receipt given to purchasers
to insure against nuths Depot, No. 83 CHATHAM ST.,
opposite Crook’s marble Hotel. FLEMING, Manager.
LOOK FOR THE MAMMOTH 83.
'Rjnao’B GARDEN. Begins at Th.
IP CONCLUDE"! AT 10:15.
x.Ksee and ManagerWM. WHRATLBT.
SECOND WEEK AND BRILLIANT SUCCESS
OF THE /
GREAT IRISH DRAMA
entitled
THE SHAMROCK,
Written expressly for
MR AND MRS. BARNEY WILLIAMS,
and produced
AFTER MONTHS OF PREPARATION,
AND THE LAVISH EXPENDITURE.
Mr. BARNEY WILLIAMSasPAT MALLOY,
With the song of “ Pat Malloy.”
Mrs BARNEY WILLIAMSasMAGGIE.
THE ENTIRE STRENGTH OF THE COMPANY
IN THE CAST.
SPLENDID SCENERY,
BEAUTIFUL MUSIC,
COMPLETE APPOINTMENTS.
STARTLING SITUATIONS,
INTRICATE MECHANICAL EFFECTS,
ELABORATE FURNITURE,
ALL NEW.
Seats secured six days in advance.
Broadway theatre.
25th WEEK of
MR. J. K. OWENS’ GREAT ENGAGEMENT.
SPLENDID DOUBLE TRIUMPH I
SOLON SHINGLE and THE LIVE INDIAN,
SOLON SHINGLE and THE LIVE INDIAN,
The merriest and most successful comic productions
EVER KNOWN TO THE NEW YORK STAGE,
To commence with THE PEOPLE’S LAWYER,
[The unparalleled success of which, notwithstanding its
run of 120 consecutive nights, continues unabated. The
public are, however, advised that the piece must now
soon be withdrawn].
MR. JOHN E. OWENS as SOLON SHIN GUE.
To conclude with the screaming comicality,
THE LIVE INDIAN.
The Live Indian. Miss Crinoline,
and Tom Brown Mr. JOHN E. OWENS.
In rehearsal. PAUL PRY and COMEDY OF ERRORS.
Secure seats in advance.
Q bIM PI C THEATRE.-
Doors open at 7Commenoee at 7>i
FIFTH WEEK
AND UNDIMINISHED SUCCESS
of the Great Local Sensational Drama, in Five Tableaux
and a Prologue, entitled
THE STREETS OF NEW YORK,
the production of which at this theatre has drawn the
LARGEST AUDIENCES
ever assembled within the building, who nightly re ceive
its
MAGNIFICENT TABLEAUX
WITH IMMENSE APPLAUSE.
Box office open daily from 9 to 4, where seats can be se
cured
SIX DAYS IN ADVANCE.
Tf OX’S OU) BOWERY THEATRE.
Lessee, Director and ManoßcrG. i*. fuX
LAST WEEK
OF
MISS FANNY HERRING,
O’NEaL THE GREAT.
Judith O’Moore (with songs)Miss Fanny Herring
Elenor O’NealMiss R. Denvii
Donald Moore O’BrienJ. B. Studley
THE LOTTERY TICKET.
Wormwood. G. L. Fox ; Susan, Mrs. 11. Chapman.
PAUL JONES. THE PILOT.
H. Chapman, Wm. St Maur. C. K. Fox, J. McCloskey.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 13.
FAREWELL BENEFIT OF
MISS FANNY HERRING.
FANNY HERRING
Would respectfully inform her friends and the public that
HER FAREWELL BENEFIT
AND LAST APPEARANCE BUT ONE,
will take place next
FRIDAY EVENING. JANUARY 13.
AT FOX’S OLD BOWERY THEATRE.
On which occasion will be presented a bill of
UNUSUAL ATTRACTION.
FOUR CHOICE AND SELECTED PIECES,
in which
MISS FANNY HERRING
will appear.
SUPPORTER B\ THE ENTIRE COMPANY.
BOX BOOK NOW OPEN.
New bowery theatre.
Sole Proprietor Mr. J. W. Lingard
Stage Manager-Mr. N. B. Clarke
Second weex of the unrivaled Equestrienne Pantomimist
and Melodramatic Actress
MiSS LEO HUDSON,
WITH HER TRAINED STEED SENSATION.
OVERWHELMING SUCCESS OF MAZEPPA.
Leo Hudson sustaining the character of Mazeppa, making
the terrific flight ascents and descents while bound to the
back ot the wild horse. The drama of
HANDSOME JACK,
And MY YOUNG WIFE AND OLD UMBRELLA.
BOWERY THEATRE,
FRIDAY EVENING, JAN. 13th,
BENEFIT OF
MISS LEO HUDSON,
WHBN SHE WILt APPEAR IN
THE MOST ATTRACTIVE EQUESTRIENNE AND
PANTOMIME PIEuES.
SEE BILLS OF THE DAY.
IMTBS. F. B CONWAY’S
IVJL PARK THEATRE. BROOKLYN.
THIRD WEEK.
CROWDED HOUSES.
NAIAD QUEEN.
Every Evening during the week.
Mr and Mrs F. B. Conway, Mlle. Annie Kruger, Mons.
Charles Henri, supported by a powerful Company and
Ballet
HELLER’S SALLE DIABOLIQUEJ
No. 585 BROADWAY, opposite Niblo’s.
HELLER, THE ILLUSIONIST,
HELLER, THE PIANO SOLOIST,
HELLER. THE PANTOMIMIST.
HELLER.
MONDAY, JAN 9rh. 1865
LAST WEEK OF THE PANTOMIME,
LAST WEEK OF THE PANTOMIME,
Which will most positively be withdrawn to make way
for a
NEW PROGRAMME OF LEGITIMATE MAGIC,
Positively the LAbT SIX NIGHTS of
MADLE. KATE PENNOYER,
and
LAST SIX NIGHTS OF THE PRESENT SERIES OF
ILLUSIONS.
MATINEES on WEDNESDAY and on SATURDAY,
at 2 P. M.
Doors open every evening at 7!£; commence at 8
OOD’S MINSTRELS,
No. 514 BROADWAY. No. 514,
Commence at 7’4 o’clock.
IMMENSE SUCCESS. CROWDED HOUSES.
HAMLET, HAPPY UNCLE TOM.
SECESSION SOOTHER. PHOUR PHUNNY PHELLOWB.
MILLER AND MEN, RIP TEARING JOHNNY,
I CHOOSE TO BE A B ABY.
COMIC BANJO SOLOS, ON TO RICHMOND, Ac. by
THE STAR TROUPE OF THE WORLD.
BRADY’ GYMNASIUM Nos. 82,84 AND
86 Louisiana Avenue,
WASHINGTON, D. C.
ABNER S. BRADY,
Bole Proprietor
OPEN EVERY EVENING.
7MTISS AUGUSTA BOND IB NOW
iy B prepared to receive pupils to instruct them on the
Plano forte. Every pains taken to advance pupils as fast
as possible, end at the same time give them a thorough
knowledge of music. Terms mate known on application
at her residence, No-141 Rivingstoa street.
j\)WRY’S HIDING ACADEMY,
CO K. FIFTH AVENUE, sad \ 'S
THIRTY NINTH STREET, zffi?-.
h now open for
PLEASURE AND INSTRUCTIVE -
RIDING. K
MUSIC
every
TUESDAY. , „ %
THURSDAY, AND
SATURDAY
EVENINGS.
Nature uhvbi'lißD
AT THE
EJSW YORK
MUSEUM OP ANATOMY,
Wo. 518 DKOiOWAY,
THE YORK
MUfIEHM O? AHATOMT,
MO. BROADW AV g
OF WON ©IS R 8
TO BE SEEN ONLY
AV THE
NSW YORK
Saß&ay San. S.
ALLACK’S.
Prom ietor and]Manag<r,
Mr. LESL’RK W ALL ACK.
MONDAY,
Fourth time this season. Sir E. Lytton Balwer’s stand,
ard play of
MONEY.
TUESDAY—(First time this season), the fine ccroefly of
SECRETS WORTH KNOWING.
WEDNESDAY—MARRIED LIFE.
THURSDAY—MASKS AND FACES.
FRIDAY—THE'WIFb’S SECRET
SATURDAY—SECRETS WORTH KNOWING.
HOW SHE LOVES HIM am shtfttf
be reproduced.
A new drama is in active preparation.
Due notice will given nf the next renresentsttons of
the CLa NDESTINE MARRIAGE and TO MARRY OR NOY
TO MARRY.
Doers open at 7M; overture at 7%.
jgARNUM’S "aIMERIOAN MUSEUM^—'
THIRD WEEK OF THE GORGEOUS SPECTACLE.
PERFORMED TO CROWDED HOUSES WITH
LI ANT SUCCESS
EVERY AFTERNOON AT 3, EVENING AT 7X>
RING OF FATE ;
OR.
FIRE. AIR. EARTH AND WATER.
Previous to which, in the AFTERNOON,
THE TAILOR OF TAM WORTH,
And in the EVENING, the Yankee Farce,
THE VERMONT WOOL DEALER.
First appearance of the celebrated Clogist,
TIM HAYS.
MORNING, AT 11,
m THE LIMERICK BOY.
Together with Favorite Songs, Elegant Dances, etc.
ANOTHER MAMMOTH FAT WOMAN,
Mrs. Battersby, weiging nearly 700 POUNDS, and W
husband,
A LIVING SKELETON WEIGHING 67POUND?.
Just added a rare and curious animal .
tub i>klLb, (Oynocepacelus leucophus),
Formerly belonging to GEN. BEAUREGARD and cap
tured by the FEDFRaLS a’ SaVaNNAH.
WOODBOFFE’S BOHEMIAN GLASS-BLOWERS
will exhibit TWO GLAnS STEAM ENGINES.
CIRCASSIAN GIRL, FAT GIRL. GIANTS, DWARFS’-
ALBINO BOY. LIVING O TERS. LEARNED SEAL,
FRENCH MOVING FIGURES. AND A MILLION OTfii
ER CURIOSITIES
AdmiMlon. 30 cents: Children under ten. 15 cents.
AN AMBURGH & CO ’S MENAGERIB
AND GREAT MORAL EXHIBITION,
Nos. 538 and 541 Broadway.
OPEN DAILY FROM 10 A M to 10 P. M.
STILL MORE ADDITIONS I
/ ■ -h
JUST ARRIVED,
THREE BACTRI.IN CAMELS.
The only genuine two tumped camels that have been
seen m tliis country for forty rears
Also. ONE aRABIaN DROMEDARY.
A DROVE OF bIX CAMELS
is now included in this collection. There has also very
recently been added to this Menagerie a J
MONSTER HAMADRYAS BABOON,
OR LION SLAYER I
iTom Abyssinia, the first cneever brought to America.
These enormous monkeys, i" their native country, roam
in immense droves, driving the inhab tants from villages
and spreading devastation wherever they go. They pur
sue lions and stone them to deash. This collection now
contains bv far
THE GRANDEST DISPLAY
OF ANIMATED NATURE
ever witnessed in America, including
THE RAREST BEASTS AND BIRDS
OF ALL COUNTRIES,
and presenting
" °£oo¥d^oF^L T
THREE PERFORMANCES DaAv.
at ll)a> A. M.. 3 and S% o’clock. P M., introducing
ALE THE TRAINED ANIMALS.
ADMISSION, ONLY 25 CENTS.
HIPPOTHEATRON. Be-ins at iTT
14TH STREET, (opposite the Academy of MiiriicJ
MONDAY EVENING. JAN. 9th
AND EVERY EVENING TILL FURTHER NOTICE.
GRAND MATINEES
ON WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY, AT 2’4.
COMPLETE, UNPARALLELED, AND
TRIUMPHANT SUCCESS
Of the New and Original G’and
COMIC ENGLISH CHRISTMAS PANTOMIME.
HARLEQUIN BLUE BEARD,
with its new and gorgeous
SCENIC AND SPECTACULAR EFFECTS,
TRICKS, TRANSFORMATIONS, COMIC SCENES,
AND IMMENSE CAST,
ENDORSED BY THE PRESS AND
PRONOUNCED BY THE PUBLIC
to be without exception
THE MOST STARTLING AND HUMOROUS
Pantomimic and Burlesque Production
EVER GIVEN IN NEW YORK.
HOUSES CROWDED TO OVERFLOWING.
PEALS OF LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE
at each renresentation of
HARLEQUIN BLUE BEARD,
While interne admiration is manifested at
THE UNEXAMPLED SPLENDOR
of the raise en-scene, costumes and appointments, and the
novelty of the magical tricks and transformations, which
are admitted to
ECLIPSE ALL PRECEDENT
in the pantomimic world, and are tue marvel of
THE EQUESTRIAN ARENA.
Harlequin, M. Carron; Columbine, Marietta Zanfretta;
Pantaloon, Francois Siegrist; Sprite, Mr. Hansken; and
Clown, Mr. N. Austin. Other characters in the burlesque
opening and comic scenes bv
THE ENTIRE COMPANY
AND ONE HUNDRED AUXILIARIES,
forming a mammoth constellation of beauty and talent
THE GREAT PANTOMIME
is given in addition to
THE GRAND EQUESTRIAN
AND GYMNASTiC PERFORMANCES,
in which
MADAME LOUISE TO URN AIRE
AND ALL THE GREAT ARTISTS
OF THE TRIPLE STAR COMPANY
WILL APPEAR. WILL APPEAR.
Notice —ln consequence of the crowded state of the
house, ana repeated «ppUvaLiuns ac me box oaiuc,
SEATS CAN BE SECURED
SIX DAYS IN ADVANCE.
Tubkish hall, No. 720 Broadway’
LIVING ILLUSTRATIONS OF TURKISH LIFE.
TURKISH SINGING, MUSIC AND DANCING.
EVERY EVENING and on SATURDAY AFTERNOON.
Admission 50 cents. Reserved Seats, sl.
fl AM p b~ei7l’s’m in str'bls*.
" > BOWERY. Opposite Suring et
POSITIVELY THE LAST 6 NIGHTS
of Tillitson s celebrated
OCTOPLEXZARA TROUPE
of Comedians, Vocalists, Dancers and Pantomimists
1F YOU WISH TO SEE THIS BFST VNTWRTAINMENT IX THH CITY
GO TO CAMPBELL’S.
NO ADVANCE IN PRICES.
Thursday Afternoon, Jan 12, Benefit of H. 8. Rumsey.
CAMPBK LL’S MiNSTREirH ALL,
BOWERY, opposite Spring st
Complimentary Benefit of the world renowned
JOBNNY BOGKER
SATURDAY EVENING J AN. 14.
MAKE A NOTE ON’T
BRYANTS' MINSTRELS.
MECHANICS’ HiLL, No. 472 BROADWAY.
MONDAV, Jan 9, and during the week.
CROWDED IIQUSES.
IMMENSE SUCCESS OF
ARTEMUS WARD AMONG THE MORMONS.
Dan Bryant as “ Artemus.” in which he will introduce
BKIGHAM YOUNG’S DANCING GIRAFFES.
Evenings with Shakspoke, Les Miserables, Black Chemist,
Tinpanonion, Plantation Peculiarities; Dan Bryant as
Sole-0 wen Shingle, family Circle, 30 cts.; Parquette, W
cts Doors open at 6M; Commences at
irMwiiwinwapm—ynwama—D
ami gmutofl.
L - A
ACADEM 7 OF MUSIC,
JANUARY 23d, 1865.
TICKETS, THREE DOLLARS.
For Sale at the Hotels and Music Stores.
IniBST ANNUAL BALL OF THE
' E. D. LAWRENCE
SOCIAL CLUB,
IRVING HALL, /I®
JANUARY 26th, 1865.
Music by Dodworih Band. Supper will be furnished at
the Hall by Mr. Harrison. Tickets $1 00, can be obtained
of the President, G. A. Flock, No. 1284 Broadway, or of
the Secretary, A. W. Orr, No. 3 West 41st street, or of any
member of the club.
Eighth annual ball
OF THE
NSW YORK CALEDONIAN CLUB. W
at the Jra®
CITY ASSEMBLY ROOMS, KWM
THURSDAY EVENING,
Jan. 12th, 1865.
TICKETSTWO DOLLARS.
ADMITTING A GENFLEMAN AND TWO HADISS.
HILLGROVE’S DANCING
Nos. 93 and 95 Sixth avenue, opposite B'h
street. New classes are now forming on Monday ig®
and Thursday afternoons. Also, an Evening Class/Wm
for Ladies and Gentlemen. (Apply en school
only.
miIENOR’S PRIVATE dancing
.g ACADEMIES, No. 65 West 34th street. Open
Wednesdays and Saturdays No. 90 South Bth st.,
Brooklyn, E. D.. Mondays and Thursdays. These jOYB
beautiful rooms to let for soirees, balls, Ac. Send
for circulars.
OFFICE OF THE STREET COMMIS-
ER, No 237 BROADWAY—TO CONTRACTORS.—
Proposa 1 s, inclosed in a sealed envelope, indorsed with;,
the tl le of the work, and with the name of the bidder
written thereon, will be received at this office until
Wednesday, January 18,1865.11 o’clock, A. Al
For furnishing gas to and lighting all the public lampg
in the City of New York, lying south of a line commenc
ing at the East river, at the foot of Grand street, and run
ning through Grand street to bullivan street, through
Sullivan sheet to Canal street, and through Canal street
to the Hudson river, for the term ot one year.
For furnishing gas to and lighting all the public lamps
in the City of New York, lying north of a line commenc
ing at the Esst river, at the foot of Grand street, and run
ning through the middle of Grand street to SiiUivaH
street, and through Sullivan street to Caral street, and.
through Canal street to the Hudson river, and south of a
line commencing at the East river, at tbe foot of Thirty
fourth street, and running through the middle of Tairty
lourth street to the Hudson river, for the term of one
5 Also, for furnishing gas to and lighting all the pnblls
lamps in the City of New York, lying north of the middle
of Thirty-fourth street, and eonth ot the middle of Seven
ty ninth street, from the East river to the Hudson river,
for the term of one year.
Also, for furnishing gas to and lighting all the public?
lamps in the City of New York, lying north of the middle
of Seventy ninth street, from the East river to the Hud
son river, for the term of one year.
Blank fo» ms of proposals, together with the specifica
tions and agreements, can be obtained at this office.
Dated Street Department, New York, January 7th t
CHARLES G. CORNELL.
Street Commissioner.
Sitkiwa/w »AMsnrrci»»t'nw.y»»«flßra> Hiaiiw at' awigi. un n-1 AMUKMtnn
R.WEST, FEMALE PHYSICIAN AND
Accoucher, No. 27 Duane street, between Chatham
and Centre sts , makes it his special practice to treat all
female complaints, from whatever cause produced ; is
sure to give rdtet to the most anxious patient in twelve
hours time Private rooms. N. B.—Dr. West’s Monthly-
Tonic is a never Jailing remedy. Sent everywhere. Price
$5 00. •
Dr. west, an old and expert-
ENCED Practitioner, is enabled to guarantee a cure
in all private cases, by safe remedies and 'without change
cf diet or hindrance from business. Call at No. 27 Du(U)9
st, between Chatham and Centre.

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