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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, August 11, 1867, Image 8

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BASE BALL.
GAMES TO BE PLAYED.
Ajigust 12 —Mutual vs. Atlantic, on the Union Grounds,
Brooklyn, E. D. Gates to be opened at 12
M,
•* 12—Perseverance vs. Washington, at Hoboken.
” 12—Mohawk vs. Peconic, on the Mohawk Grounds.
•» 13—Actives, of N. Y., vs. Champions, of Jersey
City, at Jersey City.
•* 14—Mutual vs. Union, of Morrisania, on the Union
Grounds, Brooklyn, E. D., (return game).
** 14—Mohawk vs. Peconic (2d nines) on the Peconic
Grounds.
** 15—Eckford vs. Oriental, at Greenpoint.
•• 16—Mohawk vs. Union (2d nines).
•' 16—Reporters vs. Scorers, return game, on the
Capitoline Grounds.
; ! «• 19—Union, of Morrisania, vs. Athletic, of Plv.fa-
delphia, on the Union Grounds, Brooklyn,
E. D, Home-and-home game.
” 19—Mohawk vs. Independent.
’• 19—Franklin, of N. ¥., vs. Jerome Par*r, at Red
House.
•» 20—Mutual vs. Athletic, of Philadelphia, on the
Union Grounds, Brooklyn, E. D.
. •• 21—Athletic, of Philadelphia, vs. Eckford, on the
** Union Grounds, Brooklyn, E. D.
•• 21—Actives, of New York vs. Excelsior, of Brook
lyn, on the Capitoline Grounds.
21—Oriental vs. Eclectic, at Red House (return
game.)
•• 22—Star vs. Oriental, at Greenpoint.
•• 26—Mutual vs. Nationals, of Washington, at
Washington.
•• 26—Union vs. Active, at Newark.
•' 27—Mutual vs. of Baltimore, at Balti
more.
•* 27—Actives, of New York, vs, Fulton, of Brooklyn, .
on the Satellite Grounds.
•* 27—Union vs. Eckford, on the Union Grounds,
Brooklyn, E D.
28— Mutual vs. Athletic, at Philadelphia.
29 Mutual vs. Quaker City, at Philadelphia.
•• 30—Mutual vs. Keystbne, at Philadelphia.
31—Mutual vs. West Philadelphia, at Philadel
phia.
“ 31—Champion vs. Peconic, at Jersey City.
THE THREE BEST AVERAGES IN THE MUTUAL
CLUB, OF NEW YORK.
Matches. Outs. Average. Runs. Average.
Waterman...B 17 2-1 37 4-5
O. Huntß 19 2-3 37 4-5
R. Hunt 9 23 2-5 37 4-1
IRVINGTON CLUB, OF IRVINGTON.
Matches. Outs. Average. Runs. Average.
Walters 9 25 2-7 34 3-7
Lewis7 21 3-0 26 3-5
fiweazy9 21 2-3 31 3-4
ATLANTIC CLUB, OF BROOKLYN.
Matches. Outs. Average. Runs, Average.
Pearce 6 11 1-5 31 5-1
Starts 13 2-3 25 . 5-0
Galvin 4 13 3-1 18 * 4-2
SENIOR CLUBS.
THE MATCH FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE MA
SONIC HALL AND ASYLUM FUND-NEW YORK
vs. BROOKLYN.
This match, which came off on Thursday last, accord
ing to programme, proved to be a decided success in all
respects, and the Masonic Committee having the matter
in charge, express themselves as highly pleased with the
profitable results, some eight thousand tickets being
disposed of. The contest was probably witnessed by a
far greater number, as there were at least 2.000 lookers on
who stationed themselves at every available loop-hole
and crack in the fence surrounding the field, while doz
ens of carts and wagons of all descriptions wore impressed
into service, and mounted by a crowd of outsiders eager
to witness the sport.
The scene at the beginning of the game was of the
most pleasing and interesting character. The many
flags and streamers of the various clubs, the pretty and
tasteful uniforms of the members of the different nines
playing, and the vast assemblage, among whom were
many ladies, all contributed to make up a view but sel
dom witnessed even upon a Metropolitan ball ground.
The Brooklyn players were somewhat behindhand in
making their appearance, but at a little after three
o’clock, everything being in readiness, the umpire chosen
Mr. John A. Lowell, of the Lowell Club, of Boston, called
upon the nines to begin play. The record is as follows: (
First Inning— New York.—Pike led off with a good hit
to right field, and secured his first, stole to second, and .
reached third on a passed ball, getting home finally on a (
bad throw by Macdiarmed to pitcher. Goldie and H. O. (
Kelly striking fouls, were both caught out by Macdiar
xned. Devyr reached his first on a fine hit to right Held,
but was left on his base, Birdsall popping one up, which
was nicely taken by Patterson. <
First Inning—Brooklyn.—The Brooklyn players did not «
succeed even as well as their opponents, going out in i
one, two, three order, Crane hitting a foul and falling a t
victim to Kelly; Patterson being disposed off at first by <
Pike and Goldie, and Rogers being subjected to similar <
treatment by Devyr and Goldie. s
Second Inning— New York.—The New Yorkers scored 1
more runs in this inning than in all the others put to- I
gether. W. J. Kelly reached his first, Crane failing to 1
handle the ball quickly; Hatfield, by a splendid hit, made s
his second and sent Kelly to third; Pabor put one up for
Swandell, which was not taken, and the consequence
was full bases and nobody out; Walker distinguished
himself by hitting a grounder to left field, and made his I
first, giving Kelly and Hatfield a chance to get home; ]
Pike helped Pabor and Walker home by sending a ball 1
straight into Patterson’s fingers; Goldie secured his first, ?
sending Pike to third; H. C. Kelly was disposed of at <
first by Ferguson and Start; Pike home on a passed ball; 1
Devyr, by a good hit to left field, secured his first and
helped Goldie in; Birdsall was lucky in making his first,
Patterson muffing Lis ball; W. J. Kelly was put out at
first by Crane and Start, Devyr getting home; and Hat
field closed the inning by giving Crane a chance, which
was, of course, taken, Birdsall being left on second.
Second Inning—Brooklyn.—This inning proved to be a g
repetition of the first, as far as runs were concerned. £
I Start reached first, but was caught at second by W. J.
Kelly and Hatfield; Klein was caught out on a foul by
W. J. Kelly; Worth secured his first, and Ferguson got
to second on a hit to left field, Birdsall dropping the ball; .
Worth, however, was unable to get in, as the ball was
splendidly thrown in by Birdsall; Swandell now proved ,
himself unequal to the task of bringing Worth and Fer
guson in, going out at first at the hands of Hatfield and 1
Goldie. Game—New York, 8; Brooklyn, 0.
Third Inning— New York.—Pabor opened by giving out ,
an a foul neatly taken by Macdiamed; Walker secured
his base on a fine hit to right field: Pike was disposed of
at first by Crane and Start; Walker in; Goldie popping a
ball up, it was captured by Swandell.
Third Inning —Brooklyn.—Macdiarmed led off in fine ‘
style, securing his base and finally his run; the first for j
Brooklyn; Crane and Patterson both made their bases* ]
but Patterson, not minding the fact that Crane was upon
second,tried to run there, but discovered his error too late* •
Pike sending the ball to Goldie who exhibited some reg
ular Caledonian running in, catching Patterson; Rogers
got to first and was quickly followed by Start, who sent
a ball to Pike who put out Crane at third, Crane being
forced to leave second by Rogers; Klein closed the in
ning by being caught out on the fly by H. C. Kelly
Score —New York, 9; Brooklyn, 1.
Fourth Inning— New York.—H. C. Kelly and Devyr led
off and both scored, Birdsall hitting a foul, fell a victim
to|Macdiarmed; W. J. Kelly secured his first and was fol
lowed by Hatfield, Pabor tipping the ball, had to retire, 1
and Walker put one up, which was taken by Start.
Fourth Inning— Brooklyn.—This proved to be the best
inning for Brooklyn, three runs being secured, the lucky
individuals being Worth, Swandell, and Macdiarmed; 1
Ferguson was caught out on a foul by W. J. Kelly, Crane ,
■was disposed of at first by Hatfield and Goldie, and Pat- ,
terson fell into H. C. Kelly’s hands. Score—New York,
11; Brooklyn, 4. 1
Fifth Inning—New York.—Runs were now scarce and ,
hard to get. Pike sent a ball against the house at right (
field and reached second. Goldie popped one up, which j
Ferguson held. H. C. Kelly secured his first and ]
brought Pike home by a handsome hit to right field. 1
Devyr fell a victim to Crane and Start, who played to- j
gether in regular Atlantic style. Birdsall again was ]
caught out on a foul by Macdiarmed, Kelly being left. E
Fifth Inning— Brooklyn.—Another round 0 for Brooklyn.
Rogers led off and was captured at first by DeVyr and
Goldie. Start was caught out on a foul by W. J. Kelly. 1
Klein barely reached first, and was sent to second by
- who took his place at first. Ferguson, however,
mixed things by knocking a ball to Devyr, who passed it
to Hatfield, and Worth retired, Klein being left. Score-
New York, 12; Brooklyn, 4.
Sixth Inning— New York.—Fine play on the Brooklyn (
side prevented the New Yorkers from getting a run in (
this inning. W. J. Kelly was disposed of at first by
Crane and Start. Pike sent a long, high ball to Worth, '
which was well taken, and Pabor was served in the same 1
manner by Crane—Hatfield and Walker left.
Sixth Inning— Brooklyn.—Ferguson led off and made his (
base nicely, and afterward his run, but his good example
was not followed. Swandell gave Pabor a chance, who 1
went in for the gold medal strong, catching a ball from J
Macdiarmed’s bat in style, and nearly disposing of Crane.
Patterson unluckily sent a ball to Hatfield, who caught
Crane running to second—the inning closing for a single
run. Score—New York, 12; Brooklyn, 5.
Seventh Inning— New York.—Goldie got his first on three
balls. H. <5. Kelly was caught on the fly by Crane,
Devyr reached his first and helped Goldie in just in
as Birdsall, with his bad luck, was caught out on the fly
by Ferguson and W. J. Kelly was disposed of at first by
Swandell and Start—Devyr left.
Seventh Inning— The Brooklyn boys, however, were una
ble to do better, although they certainly did as well.
Patterson securing his first strike, a high throw by Pike,
to Goldie. Rogers quickly followed, but Start was cap
tured at first base by Hatfield and Goldie, and Klein
-out on a fly catch by Pabor, Patterson in, and Worth for
a wonder, struck out. Score: New York, 13; Brooklyn, 6.
Eighth and Ninth Innings— New York.—ln the two last in
nings the Brooklyn nine played very sharply and white
washed the New Yorkers in fine style. The three un
lucky ones in the eighth inning were Hatfield, Pabor and
Pike, whose halls were all taken on the fly, the first by
Patterson, the second by Klein, and Pike’s ball by Rog
ers; the last being tre finest fly-catch of the game. In
the last inning, Goldie fell a victem to Start.’and Fergu
son at first base; H. C. Kelly out on a fly taken by Fer
guson, and Birdsall as usual on a foul-bound splendidly
catched by Ferguson, after a good run.
Eighth and Ninth Inning— Brooklyn.— In the eighth in
ning Ferguson led off and by a good hit secured his base.
Swandell followed his example, but Macdiarmed passing
his ball up.it fell into Pike’s clutches. Crane hit a ball to
Pike who put Ferguson out running to third, but over
thr w to Goldie agkin, thus losing a chance for a double
play. Swandell in; Patterson closed! the inning by giving
Pabor another chance for the gold medal, which ho of
course accepted.
In the ninth inning, the first striker, Rogers, was
caught out on afoul-fly by W. J. Kelly. Start secured
his first, and Klein passing one up, Pike and Kelly both
ran for it, and between the two it fell to the ground,
Klein standing by an interested spectator. The ball be
ing a fair one Hatfield, as quick as a flash, comprehended
she situation and called to Pika u» uom uie LaU to Luu.
and receiving it he sent it in to first, thus r . .
who had remained at first, out at second ’ * , T ., . ’
at first, a fine termination to a very pr f
The contest throughout was of the ' 11* .
actor, for although the New Yorkr - °, har -
.... , , . yrs had the lead from
beginning to end, yet a few runs? 4 „
, .. ... , . 4 any time on the Brook
lyn side would have sent them , , ,
. „ . . . .. .ahead. The play was es
pecially good m view of the * . x
nines had not practiced to- '*<* that the me ” bere » f ««
ly unaccustomed to each 1! "
On the New York si . J .
self by his fine pla- * W - J - Ke!ls, him
that position, an-- , «
Walker’s pitch, 4 but 0M ball t 0 pass him -
nlay could not Was also firsfc °^ ass * an( * his general
at second t ' exce hed. Goldie at first and Hatfield
Devyr and everything they could get hold of, while
cortaint 4 P*°ked up the grounders with ease and
g Pike, however, made some bad throws to
t • Of Pabor’s centre fielding, we need say nothing, as
"a iW ' S medal to testify to his ability as a catcher
0 fly balls. On the Brooklyn side, Macdiarmed played
‘Well behind, Start, Crane and Ferguson kept up regular
communication with each other, while Rogers and Worth
attended to the field in style. The umpire, Mr. John A.
Lowell, of the Lowell Club, of Boston, gave his decisions
in a prompt and able manner, and evidently labored as
hard as any man upon the field. The following is the
score:
» i
Pike, 3 b 3 3 Crane, 2b4 0
Goldie, 1b 4 2 Patterson, e. s 4 1
H. C. Kelly, r. f 4 1 Rogers, 1. f 3 0
g. ev 7 r ’,?-, 8 i I 2 Start, lb 4 0
BirdsalLl. f 5 0 Klein, r. f 4 0
K ell 7* c 3 1 Worth, c. f 2 1
Hatfield, 2b2 1 Ferguson, 3 b 2 1
Pabor, c. f 4 1 Swandell, p 2 2
Walker, p1 2 McDiarmed.c2 2
Total 27 13 Total... 27 *7
INNINGS.
I 1 [ 2 | 3 1 4 | 51 6| 7 | 8 | 91 Total.
New Yorkl II 71 1| 21 1 01 II 0 0 —l3
Brooklyn| 0| o| 1| 3| 0| 1| 1| 1| 01 —7
Fly-catches—York, H. C. Kelly, 1; Pabor 4: Pike, 1;
*W. J. Kelly, 3—9. Brooklyn—Roegers, 1; Patterson, 2;
Crane, 3: Swandell, 1; Sta.rtl; Ferguscn, 3; Worth, 1;
Klein, 1; Macdiarmed. 3—16.
Fly misses—Birdsdall, 2; Patterson, 1.
Foul fly catches—W. J. Kelly, 3; Macdiarmid, 3.
Foul bound catches—Ferguson, 1; Macdiarmid, 2; W.
J. Kelly, 3.
Passed balls—New York, 1; Brooklyn, 7.
Balls called—Swandell, 1; Klein, 5.
Left on bases—Devyr. 3; Hatfield, 1; W. J. Kelly; Wel
len, 2—7. Worth, 1; Ferguson, 1; Swandell, 1: Start, 1;
Crane, 1; Brooklyn, 5.
Double fly—Pike, Hatfield and Goldie.
Struck out—Worth, I.
Bases given on called ball—Goldie, 1.
Umpire—John A. Lowell, of Boston.
Scorers—Messrs. Ebbetts and Macdiarmid.
Bases on hits—Mutual, Pike, 5; Devyr, 5; Hatfield, 3;
total, 13. Union. Goldie, 1; Birdsall, 1: Pal or. 1: total,
3. Active—Walker, 4; W. J. Kelly, 2; H. C. Kelly, 2; to
tal, 8. New York—24. Atlantic—Cri>ne, 3; Stait, 2; Fer
guson, 4; total, 9. State—Rogers, 3; Worth, 3; Ma< di
arm id, 4: total, 10. Patterson, 2; Klein, 1; Swandell, 3;
total, Eckford, 6; Brooklyn, 24.
Time of«game—One hour and forty-five minutes.
The prizes were awarded as follows: For the best bat
ting in the New York side, two splendid rosewood bats
decorated with silver to the Mutual club. For the best
batting on the Brooklyn side, two bats as described above
to the Star club.
For the greatest number of fly catches, a splendid
gold medal, valued at SSO, to Charles Pabor, of the
Unions. For the best individual batting, a handsome
pair of base ball shoes with patent spikes, to Thomas
Devyr, of the Mutuals. The second prizes for best
scoring was decided by the committee to be between
Messrs. Walker and Pike, who drew lots for it, Pike be
ing the lucky man.
A return match between the same nines on the Capi
toline grounds is talked about, but nothing definite has
been arranged.
THE MUTUALS.
On Friday the Eurekas sent a telegram to Mr. Dongan,
Secretary of the Mutual Club, stating that on account of
the rain the game set for that afternoon would have to
be postponed. No other day has as yet been fixed upon
for play. The Mutuals have laid out a vast amount of
work for the next two or three weeks, and as their con
testants will all be first-class the New Yorkers will be
kept up to their best work all the time. From what we
have seen of their play so far this season, they won’t
loose many if any balls on Monday. They play the At
lantics on the Union Grounds, Brooklyn, on Wednesday,
the Unions of Morrisania at the same place, and on the
20th the Athletics. The members of the Club leave
New York on the evening of August 24th, for Washing
ton where on the 26ththey will play the celebrated Na
tionals, returning to Baltimore they play the Pastimes
on the 27th, the Athletics in Philadelphia on the 28th,
the Quaker City Club on the 29th, the Keystones on the
30th and the West Philadelphia Club on the 31st—a
splendid list of engagements, and w r e shall watch the
games with much interest.
MUTUAL vs. CHAMPIONS, of Jersey City.
According to programme, the Mutuals visited Jersey
City on Monday last, and played a game with the Nation
als, of that place. The contest, as the score below shows,
was a very one-sided affair, and the champions will have
to do better if they mean to contest with a hope of suc
cess with first-class clubs. P eters, the new Mutual pitch
er, was on hand, and the Jerseymen experienced tfie
same difficulty that all other players have done in batting
his swift balls. Pike’s thirty days having expired, he
played in his position at third base, Waterman going to
left field. Bearman for the first time this season led the
score, making eight runs, and being put out but once.
The following is the score:
INNINGS.
MUTUALS. O. R. CHAMPIONS. O. R
Hatfield, 2 b 2 7 Lawler, c.f4 0
Waterman, 1. f 3 7 Snowden, 1. f 3 2
Devyr, s. s 4 5 Willis, p 2 2
Peters, p 3 6 Delaney, 2bl 2
Pike, 3bl 6 | Edwards, Ib. 3 2
Jewett, c 5 3 | Johnson, 3 b 2 2
C. Hunt, r. f 5 4 Bennett, r. f 3 0
R. Hunt, c. f 3 6 Liver, c 3 1
Bearman, 1 b1 8 McMahon, 6. s 4 2
Total'.27 52 Total 27 13
Umpire—Mr. Connell, of tbe Gothams.
Scorers—Messrs. Dongan and Cooke.
IRVINGTON vs. ATLANTIC.
The Champions suffered their second defeat this sea
son at Irvington, on Monday last, and nothing else was
anticipated after their terrible drubbing at the hands of
the Unions. They made a very good fight of it, how
ever, and led the score at the end of the fourth and
eighth innings, but the Jerseymen, by careful play and
heavy batting, turned the tide in the last inning, scoring
six runs to their opponents’ three, and winning the game
by but two runs. The raid of the Atlantics in the eighth
inning, when they batted for eleven runs, reminded one
of old times, and at the close of the inning every one ex
pected to see them come out ahead, but their proverbial
luck failed them for once, and as a consequence the
score stood as iollows:
IRVINGTON. O. R. ATLANTIC. O. B.
Bailey, r. f 3 4 Pearce, s. s1 6
Walters, p 2 4 Start, lb 4 3
Stockman, s. s 2 4 Crane, 2 b 6 1
Sweezy. 2 b v ...4 3 Galvin, c. f 5 3
Lewis, 1. f. 5 3 Ferguson, 3b3 4
H. Campbell, c. f 4 4 McDonald, r. f 3 4
Buckley, c 4 3 Kenny, 1. f 2 3
Leonard, 3 b 2 4 Mills, c1 5
M. Campbell, Ibl 5 Zettlein, p 2 3
Total 27 34 Total 27 32
INNINGS.
121 1 12121 5 | 6 | 7 I 81 9 | TotaL
Irvingtonl 81 01 01 21 8 5 5 0 6 —34
Atlantic| 1| 5| 6| 3| 1| 1| I|ll| 3| —32
Fly-catches—Atlantic, 7; Irvington, 12.
Foul-bound catches—Atlantic, 3; Irvington, 3.
Foul fly-catches—Atlantic, 2; Irvington, 5.
Struck out—Lewis, Kenny, Galvin.
Passed balls—Mills, 17, Buckley, 22.
Mr. Macdiarmid, of the Stars.
Scorers—Messrs. Monck and Seymour.
Time of Game—Three hours and eighteen minutes.
UNION vs. ATLANTA.
On Tuesday, the Unions visited Tremont, and played
their return game with the Atlantas. The contest was
very much in favor of the Unions up to the fourth in
ning, from which point the Atlantas scored nine runs to
their opponents’ six, both nines playing m fine style; but
the ball having become wet and slippery, the batting was
very poor, and in no way comparable with the brilliant
display made by the Unions in the second and third in
nings. We append the runs made in the several innings,
but have been unable to obtain a correct score. One of
the daily papers and a well-known weekly journal have
published scores, but they are incorrect, both as to the
positions of the men and the runs made on the Union
side:
INNINGS.
12121212121212121 9 | Totol -
Union I 5 110 1101 II 01 II II 3 1 01 —3l
Atlantal 4| 1| 2| 5| 4| 0| 01 o| 01 —l6
Umpire—Mr. Hughes, of the Harlem Club.
UNION (of Lansingburgh) vs. EUREKA (of Newark).
The Jerseymen played the haymakers at Lansingburgh,
on Tuesday last, the result being the decided success of
the Unions, by the score; of 42 to 21. The Eurekas were
short-handed. Burrows and Beans, two of their best
players, being unavoidably absent. The grounds upon
which the game was played is a very peculiar one, and
told very unfavorably upon the play of the visitors, and
we predict that when the Unions visit New York in Sep
tember, and play upon our level fields, they will not get
away with the trophies of victory quite so easily. The
game of Tuesday was played in the presence of several
thousand spectators, many ladies being present, and was
a very one-sided affair for the reasons stated above. The
Unions took the lead in the second inning, and kept it to
the end, winning by the following score:
UNION. O. R. EUREKA. O. R.
McAtee, s. s 3 5 Calloway, 1. f 4 3
McKeon, r. f 4 5 Mills, 1b 5 1
Abrams, p 2 5 Dockney, c 3 3
Craver, c 2 6 Brientuall, 3b3 3
Leavenworth, Ib3 5 Thomas, s.s 3 2
M. King, c. f 0 7 Osborne, r. t 3 3
Ward, 2b3 4 Littlewood, c. f 0 4
S. King, 1. f 3 4 Terrell, 2b 2 1
Penfield, 3b7 1 Lex, p .4 1
Total 27 42 Total 27 21
INNINGS. •
1 1 1 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 8 | 9 | T ° ial ‘
Unionl 1I 10 01 2 17 1 3 17 1 5 7 —42
Eureka.... | 4 1 1| 1| o| 6| 1| o| 2| 6-21
Jbly-catches—Union, 10; Eureka, 10.
Outs on fouls—Union, 5; Eureka, 6.
Passed balls—Craver, 7; Dockney, 15.
Bases on called balls—Union. 7: Eureka, 6.
Umpire—Mr. Brown, of the Powhattan Club, of Brook?
lyn.
Scorers—Messrs. McDonald and Currier.
Time of game—3 hours and 50 minutes.
ECLECTIC, of N. Y., vs. AMERICUS, of Newark, N. J.
The regular game between these clubs was played
on the Red House grounds August 7th, the result being
a victory for the Newark boys. The Eclectics were short
some of their best men, and consequently played under a
considerable disadvantage. The following is the score:
ECLECTIC. O. R. AMERICUS. O. R.
Bell, p 3 3 Joyce, c 4 4
Watson, c 6 0 Farley, t>2 6
Glover, lb 4 3 McGrath, c. f 3 3
Stillwagon, 3b2 4 Leonard, r. f 4 4
Stevenson, 1. f1 3 W. Greathead, 5.5....4 2
T. Dalton, s. s 4 2 Charles, 1. i.. 4 3
Saltz,2b4 2 Ke11y,2b '.'..'..2 5
Byrnes, r.f3 3 A. Groat head, 3 b... .3 3|
Gillett, c.fo 5 Devine, lb’1 6 1
Total 27 25 Total 27 36 ■
INNING'.
il SI 11 i| II l|
Umpire—Mr. De Forest, of t’ e Harlem Club.
Tuuv uX gaxuo—’lwu auu uhirU' mrnutaa, j
NEW YORK DISPATCH.
ECKFORD vs. MOHAWK.
Unexpectedly, the game between these clubs, played
on the Union grounds on Tuesday last, proved to be a
very one-sided affair. The display of “fattery” by the
Mohawks was not up to their usual mark, and the u ma: y-
• mouthed field” was disappointed. On the Mohawk side, J.
■ and A. Steiner played in the usual good style, while the
! catching of Weeks was very fine. Cf the Eckfords little
• need be said, for all played in first class style. We ap
pend the score:
. ECKFORD. o. R. MOHAWK. O. R.
Klein, 3 b 17 Davenport, p 4 0
Swandell, c1 8 A. Steiner, 1. f1 2
■ Ryan, c f 2 5 Si deck, Ib3 2
I Kesler. 1. f 17 Janes. 2b4 1
, Nelson, s.s4 5 O’Connor, 3b3 I
Malone, p 4 3 J. Steiner, c. f 5 0
> Patterson, 2b3 2 Dean. s. s1 3
1 Allison, lbs 3 Weeks, 3 2
> Southworth, r. f 6 2 “Smith,” r.f3 1
1 TotaL27 42 Total 27 12
INNINGS.
j 1| 2 | 3 | 4 j 5 | 6| 7 | 8 | 9 | Total.
Mohawkl 2| 21 0| 01 21 II 0| 41 II —l2
Kokford 113 | 4| >| 5| ■: I 3| 2, 21 2 I —42
Umpire—Mr. C. Mills, of the Atlantics.
Scorers—Messrs. Falleon and Grum.
Fly catches—A. Steiner, 4; biileck,l; O’Connor, 1; J.
Steiner, 4; Weeks, 3; “ Smith,” I—Mohawk, 14. Klein,
1; Ryan, 4; Patterson, 1; Allison, I—Eckford, 7.
Out on fouls—Mohawk, 8; Eckford, 7.
ORIENTAL vs. ORCHASD.
On Thursday, the Bth inst., notwithstanding the “ Big
Match” on the Union grounds, about fivo hundred persons
assembled on the grounds at Green; O.nt for the purpose
of witnessing the first game of a series between these
clubs. A somewhat bitter feeling of rivalry existed on
the part of the Orchards, and if the expressed opinion of
the latter club could be taken for aught, little chance
was left for the Orientals to win. The following decided
score, however, shows on which side the playing was
done, and how the game was won and lost:
ORIENTAL. O. h ORCHARD. O. R.
Ostrander, 1. f 4 3 Dunnigan, c 2 3
Pinkham, p 1 6 Andrews, c. f 2 2
Bhss, lbl 6 Randall, lb 4 1
Butler, s. s 2 6 Croft, s. s 3 1
Vandernof, c. f 4 4 Evans, 1. f 3 1
E. Holmes, r. f 4 4 Troy, r. f 3 1
Thomas, 3b6 2 White, 2b4 'fl
Ed. Holmes, c 3 2 Shannon, 3b3 1
Dunham, 2b2 3 Whitlock, p 3 1
Total 27 36 Total 27 11
INNINGS.
| II 21 3|. 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | Total.
Oriental | 5 7 4 1 017 5 1 2 1 2 4 1 —36
Orchard| 2| 2| 0| 1| 3| 0| 2| 0| 1 | —ll
Umpire—Mr. Deegan, of the Jefferson Club.
Scorers—M essrs. Free and Smith.
Fly catches—Omental, 11; Orchard, 2.
Passed balls—Oriental, 9; Orchard, 15.
Out on fouls—Oriental, 5; Orchard, 3.
Struck cut—Oriental, 1; Orchard, 3.
Homs runs—Oriental, 1; Orchard, 0.
Time of game—Two hours and thirty-five minutes.
SCORERS vs. REPORTERS.
The return match between these famous nines will
come off on Friday next, on the Capitoline grounds, and
a very pleasant and enjoyable game will undoubtedly be
the result. Messrs. Peck, Horsman, Swift and Henrich
will again offer some handsome prizes, and as the Re
porters will play with a stronger nine than before, the
contest will probably be more interesting.
THE UNIONS (of Lansingburgh).
The Haymakers will leave Troy on Monday, for the
East, and intend playing the strong clubs in Boston and
Springfield, as a sort of preparatory practice to their
games in this vicinity, next month.
WYNKOOP & HALLENBECK vs. BRAE STREET.
These clubs commenced a match-game yesterday, on
the Montauk grounds, but the rain interfered, and only
three innings were played. "When the game stopped, the
Wynkoop & Hallenbeck had made 12, to their opponents’
nothing.
JUNIOR CLUBS.
JEROME vs. WAVERLY.
The Jeromes played the Waverlys at Greenpoint on
the sth inst., and defeated them by the score of 55 to 10.
Clendenen led the sccra on the winning side. Cornell’s
catching and Simpson’s first base play were very good.
FRANKLIN (of Brooklyn) vs. RESOLUTE (of Newark).
These clubs played the first of their series of games on
Tuesday, August 6th, on the Capitoline grounds. The
following is the score:
RESOLUTE. O. R. FRANKLIN. O. R.
Sheridan, 3b5 0 Tracy, r. f 0 12
Stevens, c 4 0 Noonan, s. s 4 8
Baird, p 2 3 Lennon, c 3 9
Harrison, 2b2 1 Johnson, 1. f 4 8
LandeH, r. f 4 1 Firker, 1 b 3 10
P. Sheridan, lb 3 2 Murphy, p 3 9
Carson, 1. f1 3 McCrea, 3b4 8
Valentine, s. s 5 0 Graham, 2b4 9
McDevitt, c. f1 0 Wiggins, c. f 2 10
Total 27 10 Total 27 83
INNINGS.
| 1| 2 | 31 4 | 5 | 6| 71 81 9| Total.
Resolutel II 21 41 II 01 01 1 01 1 —lO
Franklin| 5|16 | 211 111 111 1 [ 8 | 6 | 4 | —B3
Umpire—Mr. Flanley, of the Excelsiors.
Scorers—Messrs. Dean and Perine.
Fiy catches—Resolute, 10; Franklin, 13.
Time of game—Three hours and thirty minutes.
YOUNG AMERICA vs. PACIFIC.
These junior clubs played a game on the Central Park
grounds last week, resulting in the success of the Young
Americas by the score of 44 to 4. Challenges to the
Young Americas should be sent to Wm. Hedden, No.
140 West Tenth st.
HENRIETTA VS. RESOLUTE.
On the 3d of August these clubs played a game on fhe
Central Park grounds, the Henriettas winning by the
BOMO of 23 t O 20.
OCEANICA v». KOSEDax-p*.
An interesting game was played at the Elysian
Fields, August 6, between the above named clubs which
resulted in a victory for the Oceanioas by the score of
41 to 17.
STARLIGHT vs. CATARACT.
A very exciting game came off on the grounds at Hun
ters Point, on Thursday, Aug. 8, between above named
New York clubs, resultingin the success of the Starlights
by the score of 18 to, 13.
JEFFERSON, of Greenpoint, vs. BURNSIDE.
The home-and-home game between these clubs was
played on the Union grounds on Monday last. Both
clubs played well, but the Jefferson’s were too much for
their opponents, and defeated them by the score of 39 to
12. The game was witnessed by over a thousand persons.
MINERVA (of Newark) vs. STAR (of Bloomfield.)
The game between these clubs, which was played at
Irvington, Wednesday, July 31, resulted in the defeat of
the Stars. The latter tcok a decided lead on the start,
but were unable to maintain it, finally losing the game
by the score of 59 to 49. Of the playing on this occasion,
Weber, Crane and Seely carried off the honors. On the
Star side, praise is due Van Grieson, Freeman and Wil
liamson.
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS.
E. Klein— Will you have the kindness to inform me
how many games the Union Club of E. N. Y. has played
and the number they have won ? The club you refer to
has played some ten games on paper, winning them all by
terrific scores. The offices of President, Vice-President,
Secretary, Treasurer, and chief correspondent are all
filled by a Mr. S. B. Squires. He also constitutes the
first nine of the club.
Inquirer.— Will you please inform me as to whether the
Atlantics played the Irvington Club in Brooklyn last
season? The Atlantics played the Irvingtons at Irving
ton on the 14th of June, 1866, and were defeated by the
score of 23 to 17. The second game was played on the
Capitoline grounds, Brooklyn, September 24, 1866, the
Atlantics winning by the score of 28 to 11.
&B. Squires.— Perhaps it would be as well for you to
amuse yourself in some other way, and save time, pen,
ink and paper.
PEDESTRBANiSLAS.
A FOOT RACE.
Bill Tovee, the master of ceremonies of sparring exhi
bitions, aged 66, runs seven miles against time on Mon
day afternoon, at Finley’s Track, on the Bloomingdale
road. The old fellow is to run the seven miles inside of
an hour.
AMWMirORIWffIYI
WHAT IS IT?
In a recent issue of the Dispatch, we alluded to
the case of Dickerson against Dickerson, in which the
wife, or alleged wife, claimed that she had been
abandoned. An examination was granted by Justice
Mansfield, and on the last examination, Mr. Henry B.
Davis, the counsel for Mr. Dickerson, after waiting
nearly an hour for the appearance of complainant,
moved that the case should be dismissed. His client,
he said, was there ready and willing to meet the
charge preferred against him, that of abandonment.
“ We were here,” said counsel, “ on the sth of July,
and the evidence of the complainant was taken by the
court, aud her cross-examination but barely com
menced, when this case was adjourned until to-day.
Then, to our suprise, we found that complainant was
not in court, and that she is not represented hore.
We have attended here for the purpose of meeting
this charge fairly upon the merits, and desire that
the litigation which this complainant has threatened
us may be fully disposed of in this court, and that
the question whether this woman is the wife of this
defendant or not be settled fully and fairly. There
were numerous objections that counsel could raise to
these proceedings, but they wished to meet this mat
ter squarely upon the merits.
Justice Mansfield—" Vie will wait tt a while longer, and
if the complainant does not come, I will dismiss the
case.
Mr. Davis— That is exactly what we do not wish;
they have brought us here, her testimony has been
made public, and we want her here for further cross
examination, and will prove by her own testimony
that she has committed willful and deliberate perjury,
and has only used this court as a means of carrying
out her nefarious schemes to that end. If the court
please, I move for an attachment against her.
Justice Mansfield— All I can do is to adjourn this
case until the 2d day of August, and I will notify the
complainant.
Mr. Davis— And if she does not appear on that day
I ask that an attachment may be issued.
Justice Mansfield—l will adjourn this case until the
2d day of August, and if the complainant docs not ap- '
pear I will dismiss the case. It may be a great hard
ship to your client, but I cannot move an attachment
if she does not appear on that day, all I can do is dis
miss the complaint.
On the adjournment day the complainant bavin®
been notified and failing to appear to prosecute,
the complaint was dismissed * and Mr. Dickerson
was discharged. We understand that Mr. Dickerson’s
defence is that he denies that he was ever married to
the plaintiff, but says that she was living with him as
his mistress for some time, that they separated, and
that he gave her a large amount of property upon
their separation which she still has in’her possession.
[ H.s friends say that she succeeded in getting ac
i quainted with his family by intrigue, and that she
I now desires, by harassing and annoying and perplex
ing him, and by commencing groundless actions
against him, to extort money from him byway of I
compromise. To avoid disgrace and exposure, which :
Mr. Dickerson says he is determined to suffer rather I
than to be imposed upon by his would-be Vfifc. Jp !
I mu stave uio inane*' new Stanau al present, j
4 Extensive House Robbery. Re
a cently, Ben Halliday, for many years President of the
e Overland Mail Route to California, on returning from
'- the country, bund that in his absence his residence,
No. 233 Fifth ivenue, had been robbed of jewelry and
® plate valued at $2,000. Two of the servants, named
Thomas Stewirt and Henry Wood, were arrested on
suspicion. Ii the meantime, a portion of the stolen
u property, vahed at SSOO, was found buried in the
0 yard of the Esidence. Yesterday the prisoners were
2 committed tc await an examination.
1
o A Solemn High Mass of Requiem
2 for the late flen. T. F. Meagher will be offered at the
1 Church of ft. Francis Xavier, in Sixteenth street
i 2 near Fifth kvenue, on Wednesday, the 14th inst., at
9 : 30 A. M.,and on the evening of the same day, at
I. 8 o’clock, a nemorial oration will bo delivered at
Cooper Instihte by Richard O’Gorman.
r .
I.
PRIZES CASHED IN ALL LEGALIZED
LOTTEIIES. Information given and circulars
sent by addressing
? PARKES Co.,
Nos. 14 and 16 WALL ST.,
Rooms 5 and 7.
B — ■
e "PRIZES CASHED IN ALL LEGAL-
JL IZED LOTTERlES.—lnformation given.
JAMES H. STURGES, Broker,
i No. 4 Division street.
f No. 5 PARK PLACE,
Front Room, Up-stairs.
a —— —
1 PRIZES CASHED IN ALL LEGAL
IZED LOTTERIES. Information given, and cir-
“ culars forwarded to any part of the country.
P. GAIGE, Broker,
No. 681 Broadway, (corner Amity street.)
3 JIRIZES CASHED IN THE GEORGIA,
[ KENTUCKY STATE AND SHELBY COLLEGE
1 LOTTERIES.
J Office hours from BA. M. until BP. M.
j C. C. COTTE, Broker,
No. Broadway, and No. 351 Bowery.
; ‘PRIZES CASHED IN ALL LEGAL
_Q_ IZED LOTTERIES, and information given, by
D. W. DAVIS, No. FULTON STREET,
A few doors from Broadway.
’ A MERICAN LOTTERIES OFFICE, NO?
,/A 101 Watt street, corner West street, opposite Peo
ples Line Steamers, near Spring street Market, Central
Pia e Homeland Jersey City Ferry. Prizes paid in Green
backs. M. F. COLBY, Licensed Lottery Broker, late of
No. 181 Fifth avenue.
A- “LL - ]PRIZES CASHED IN LEGAL
LOTTERlES.—Circulars and drawings sent.
J. CLUTE, Broker, Nq. 176 Broadway,
and No. 153 Fulton street, N. Y.
Royal Havana lottery.—pri-
ZES paid in gold; information furnished. Highest
i rates paid for doubloons and all kinds of gold and silver.
[ TAYLOR & GO., Bankers, Mo. 16 Wall street. N. Y
ftST Dr. Bell, No. 39 St. ®arft.’s Place,
near Second avenue.-SPECIALTY.-CANCERS and
TUMORS extracted and positively cured without the
knife. Also, all WARTS, WENS, BIRTH-MARKS on
s the Face, Neck. &c., leaving an even, natural surface,
1 without scar. PIMPLED, SPOTTED FACES positively
and permanently cured. CANCER AND TUMOR
r SPECIMENS seen at the office. Also, Names and
Residences of patients cured. Offices hours from 9to
in the morning—l 2 to and 7t09 in the evening.
i Inimitable, has resumed hair
cutting, studio for the artistic manipulation of hair,whis-
1 kers, snampooing, and dying, No. 95 Duane street, near
j Broadway. The styles of hair in every conceivable vaxia
, tion, neat, judicious, and appropriate.
Hill’s Hair Dye, 59 Cents—Black or
Brown. Instantaneous, Natural, Durable, Reliable. Best
and Cheapest in use. Quantity equals any dollar size.
Depot No. 95 Duane street. Sold by all druggists.
gg” Hill’s Arctic Ointment, Instant Fain
Reliever, cures Weak Eyes, Burns, Chilblains, Salt
s Rheum, Boils, Bunions. Piles, Chapps, all Skin and Flesh
Diseases. Every family’s friend; warranted. Depot, No.
95 Duane street. Sold by ail drug and grocery stores.
l :
> galfe ami gaadag.
; A NNUAL AFTERNOON AND EVEN
j JA. ING FESTIVAL of the APOLLO CLUB
will take place at
> UINON PARK, 65th st. and Second avenue,
) FRIDAY, AUG. 16th. 1867.
j Dancing will commence at 2P. M. Tickets, 50 cents
3 each, to be obtained at the Club Room, House of Lords.
> No. 19 East Houston Street, and at the gate on the even
j ing of the festival. W. KEATING, President,
. M. Kerigas, Secretary.
TRENOR’S NEW AND ~SPLENDID
BALL-ROOM, Palace Hall, Sixth ave., near
, 42d street, is rapidly approaching completion. It
is 80x100 feet, and by far the most beautiful and /
complete BALL AND CONCERT ROOM ever
erected in this city.
ENGAGEMENT BOOK OPEN.
F& B. F. YATES, MUSICIANS, No.
o 94 Chrrstie street.
VIOLIN AND HARP, OR FULL BAND, for Pic-
i nics or Excursions.
P. S.—A fine old Violin, also a pedal Harp, for
sale.
CENTRAL NORMAL MUSICAL CON
SERVATORY, No. 242 West Twenty-sixth street,
between Seventh and Eighth avenues. Private Lessons
(no classes) on Piano, Violin, Guitar, Singing, &c. J. J.
1 WATSON, Agent and Musical Director. Circulars ready.
J" ADIES’ HATS AND BONNETS, NEW
styles for August and September. L. BINNS’ Milli
nery, No. 557 BROADWAY, opposite Niblo’s Theatre.
Save this. CHILDREN’S HATS, SUN HATS, and
TRAVELING BONNETS, FEATHERS, FLOWERS.
Madame secor, No. 907 broail
WAY, (un stairs.) is now selling,
AT GREATLY REDUCED
THE LATEST SPRING AND SUMMER STYLES OF
FRENCH BONNETS, FLOWERS,
and other novelties of the latest importation.
giving WcMw.
empire
SEWING-MACHINE
Esurpasses all others in simplicity, dura-
H gWbV?/, beautiful stitch and easy worhing. It
m ? creates n ° noise when in operation, and
all persons fond of an excellent Sew
ing-Machine, should call and examine
it. A liberal discount offered to the
trade. Salesrooms, No. 616 BROADWAY N. Y No. 103
Avenue A, corner of Seventh street; No. 685 Sixth
avenue; No. 233 Grand street, Williamsburgh.
gu&liafitmsi.
lODICIFWIDEr
By a New York Physician, giving reliable information of
great value to the sick of both sexes, never before pub
lished, and worth a journey to New York on foot to ob
tain it.
Sent free, in a plain sealed envelope, with the
highest testimonials, by enclosing a postage-stamp to
Dr. LAWRENCE, No. 14 Bond street. Now York.
IyTATRIMONY.—WHY EVERY MAN
-LvjL should marry. Why every woman should marry.
All may marry to know. Read the Illustrated Marriage
Guide and Medical Adviser, by WM. EARL, M. D., 200
pages. Mailed in sealed envelope, on receipt of 25 cents;
Address, No. 12 White street. New York.
VIOLIN, VIOLIN, VIOLIN LESSONS,
by the ** American Paginini,” No. 212 West Twen
ty-sixth stree:, near Eighth avenue.-
VOU CAN GET “THOSE BOOKS” BY
JL MAIL“O. K.,” or by express “C. O. D,,orat
No. 26 Ann street, opposite Theatre alley, New York.
, Send your add cess on stamped envelope for a catalogue.
CUT THIS OUT. O BLANCHARD. Publisher.
i ■
(Coffee,
A FIRST-CLASS GROCERY.
WILLIAM A. CAMP, ♦
No. 222 Third ave., cor. 20th st.
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN . XaT
TEAS, COFFEES,
WINES.
LIQUORS AND CIG ARS,
SPICES, ALMONDS AND NUTS,
PICkLES AND SAUCES,
And, in fact, everything which goes E 3
i to make up a
FIRST-CLASS GHOCEIIY,
Respectfully solicits the patronage
of all who are desirous of getting the
, best of everything at moderate
prices.
Groceries ordered at the store will be sent to'families in
any part of the city.
BILLIARD ROOMS?
IvJS. . MORRISANIA HALL,
Railroad Avenue, near Fifth street, Morrisania.
OPEk ON SUNDAYS.
ALES, WINES. LIQUORS AND SEGARS.
LEWIS H. COMBES, Proprietor.
WTUYVESANT BILLIARD ROOMS?
No. 279 Tliird Ave., New York.
NEAR TWENTY-THIRD STREET.
HAVANA SEGARS.
CHOICEST BOTTLED LIQUORS, &c.
I. CONOVER.
A BARGE NUMBER OF NEW AND
second-hand Billiard Tables, with our improved
combination cushions, which have been proved to be the
most correct and durable cushions ever made. Speci
i mens of out tables that have been in constant use for
] many years may be seen in the principal hotels and sa
loons in this city. Parties intending to purchase will
find it to their interest to call and examine our stock,
which is the largest and finest in the world. Boys’ Bil
liard Tables. PHELAN <fc COLLFNDER,
Nos. 63 to 69 Crosby street, New York.
W.L SHARP’S IMPROVED EIL-
• LT ARD TABLES, with Sharp’s Patent Cush
ions, superior to any now in use. Patented Nov. 15,1859.
None but first-class tables made. Manufactory No. 43
Mercer st. Wareroom cor. Broome and Mercer st., N. Y.
SPECTACLES.—BRAZILIAN PEBBLES
and Double-Vision Glasses, in gold, silver, and other
frames. Also, the celebrated Eye-Preservers, so highly
appreciated at the Eye Hospital and the Eye Infirmary,
j being superior to any other article, giving ease and vigor
■ and preserving the perfect sight for many
| years. Professor FRANKS, Oculist and Optician, Lec
i turer on the Human Eye and Optics, accurately and scien
. tifically adjusts far-iamua spentacles to defective vi»-
J at his office. No, W Girod at., corner di Eldridge,. * ,
YORK THEATRE.
MONDAY, Aug. 12th, and EVERY EVENING,
a to ally original and dramatic arrangement of pictur
esque probabilities, with a cotemporary love story, in five
acts, by AUGUSTIN DALY, author of ‘’Leah, the For
saken/ “ Griffith Gaunt,” <fec., entitled
tW U AIDER
• b?' THE
for the production of which, in addition to the regular
company, engagements have been effected with
MISS ROSE EYTINGE,
MISS BLANCHE GT?RY,
t rr „ MRS. SK ER RETT,
MR. J. K. MORTIMER,
MR. A. H. DAVENPORT,
(the universal favorite, his first appearance in three rears),
MR. J. B. STUDLEY,
, MR. 0. T. PARSLOE.
_ new Effects and elaborate Scenery, by Mr. J. S.
SHELL and Messrs. FARREN & SEAREY, include:
A VIEW OF BASEMENT LIFE IN NEW YORK I
DELMONICO’S!
THE TOMBS POLICE COURT !
THE PIERS OF THE CITY AND HUDSON RIVER
BY STARLIGHT I
A VILLA AT LONG BRANCH 1
THE SHREWSBURY R. R. STATION!
and THE 10:30 EXPRESS TRAIN!
The p is given under Mr. B. A. BAKER’S direc
tion, w ta surprising mechanical effects by J. DENHAM,
and new songs, dances and music by Mr. TISSINGTON.
MISS KATE REIGNOLDS OPENS AT
BANVARD’S MUSEUM on Monday, in her great
triple role in NOBODY’S DAUGHTER.
Mrs. f. w. lander,
(formerly Miss JEAN M. DAVENPORT,)
well known as the most accomplished artist and elegant
lady upon the American stage, will appear at
THE FRENCH THEATRE,
on the 19th inst., in her magnificent impersonation of
ELIZABETH,
QUEEN OF ENGLAND,
pronounced by the Press and the public at Washington,
Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, to be the most impassioned
and beautiful interpretation of the character
EVER WITNESS J) IN THIS COUNTRY,
and being an English rendition most highly interesting
and pleading to an American audience.
This great artist will be supported by a carefully selected
COMPANY OF HER OWN,
with new and elegant wardrobes and other aj p rintments
worthy of the character.
Due announcement will be made of the cast and when
the sale of reserved seats will commence.
Broadway theatre.
ADMISSION-FIFTY CENTS.
Business Manager W. A. Moore
HOUSES CROWDED NIGHTLY WITH THE
FASHION AND INTELLIGENCE OF NEW YORK.
ON MONDAY, DURING THE WEEK, AND
SATURDAY MATINEE,
MR. AND MRS. W. J. FLORENCE
in the new London Comedy of
CASTE,
Supported by Mrs. F. S. Chranfau, Mrs. G. H. Gilbert,
Messrs. W. Davidge, Owen Marlow,E. Lamb and G. Jor
dan.
THE BEAUTIFUL SCENERY, SUPERB APPOINT
MENTS.
FRIDAY—BEFEFIT OF MRS. W. J. FLORENCE.
SATURDAY SECOND CASTE MATINEE
AND SECOND FLORENCE MATINEE.
NOBODY’S DAUGHTER ,
EVERY NIGHT.
• BANVARD’S MUSEUM.
WALLAC K ’ S .
Proprietor and Manager, Mr. Lusted. Wallack
Doors open at 7)4; curtain rises at 8 o’clock.
CONTINUED TRIUMPH
of the incomparable
, ... , LOTTA.
who will repeat, on
MONDAY AND TUESDAY. AUGUST 12 AND 13,
POSITIVELY FOR THE LAST TIME,
the delightful bill in which she achieved her great “ hit”
he v >,
THE PET OF THE PETTICOATS.
AND
FAMILY JARS,
interspersed with
SONGS, DANCES, AND BANJO SOLOS.
ON WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14,
First performance in New York of a new four-act
Drama, expressly adapted for Lotta, from Dickens’
popular story of
“THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP,”
ENTITLED
LITTLE NELL AND THE MARCHIONESS,
By John Broughan, Esq.
LITTLE NELL, > rnTT .
THE MARCHIONESS, I LOTTA
Box Sheet now open.
OLYMPIC THEATRE.
FLIES IN AN ENTIRE CHANGE WHO KILLED
THE WEB. JOHN BROUGHAM COOK ROBIN?
FLIES IN JOHN BROUGHAM WHO KILLED
THE WEB. AND MISS COCK ROBIN?
FLIES IN EMILY THORNE, WHO KILLED
THE WEB. Supported by the COCK ROBIN?
FLIES IN Excellent Company. WHO KILLED
THE WEB Two Fine Pieces. COCK ROBIN?
The Most Brilliant COMEDY NIGHT of the Season!
In preparation, Mr. Brougham’s Fine Comedy of
PLAYING WITH FIRE.
KfTBLO’S garden.
11 Lessee and Manager WM. WHEATLEY.
THE BLACK CROOK.
RENEWED AND RECONSTRUCTED.
MONDAY EVENING. AUG. 12th,
THREE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SECOND
performance of the Great Spectacle, when it will be pre
sented with
JARRETT & PALMER’S
GRAND PARISIENNE BALLET,
strongly reinforced by now Artistes,
NEW BALLETS, COSTUMES AND MUSIC
Marston’s great new scene,
AN ILLUMINATED BALL-ROOM.
in which will be given a
GRAND CARNIVAL AND MASQUERADE.
SEATS SECURED SIX DAYS IN ADVANCE.
Bowery theatre.
Manager Mr. W. B. Freligh
FRIDAY EVENING, August 16, 1867.
COMPLIMENTARY BENEFIT
TO
MR. P. CONNELLY
On which occasion the following array of talented ar
tists have generously volunteered their services:
MLLE. MARIETTA RAVEL.
Mr. W. H. WHALLEY,
Mr. J. B. STUDLEY,
Mr. T. W. KEENE, J. W. MORTON.
Mr. H. C. CUNNINGHAM, FRANK KERNS,
Mr. J. WHEELER, Mr. C. FOSTER.
Mr. J. DAVIS, Mr. W. STANTON,
Mr. J. DOUGLAS, G. MAXWELL,
MASTER SAM,
AND
THE INFANT PRODIGY,
LA FAIRIE,
years old) has kindly consented to dance her inimi
table “ Pas Seul” and “ Cachuca.”
All of the above will appear in an entertainment of
surpassing attractions.
Box-Sheet now open, where seats maybe secured.
Bowery theatre.
Manager Mr. W. B. FRELIGH.
MONDAY EVENING, AUG. 12. FOR THE WEEK.
A GREAT COMBINATION OF TALENT.
The beautiful moral drama of
TEN NIGHTS IN A BAR-ROOM.
MR. W. H. WHALLEY....as JOE MORGAN.
Mrs. W. G. Jones as Mrs. Morgan; Mr. E. W. Marston
as Sampson Switchel.
Singing and Jig Dancing; by Mr. G. 0. Davenport and
Mlle. Devre, concluding with
RORY O’MORE —Rory, Mr. G. C. Davenport;
Shan Dhu, Mr. J. Nunan; De Welskin, P. Connelly.
Terrace garden.—Sunday.
Third avenue, bet. Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth sts
PHILLIP BERNET Proprietor.
THEODORE THOMAS’S
POPULAR GARDEN CONCERTS,
THIS (SUNDAY) EVENING, AUG. 11, at 7&,
NINTH GRAND SUNDAY CONCERT.
THE CELEBRATED SOLOISTS,
Together with the GRAND ORCHESTRA, in a varied
and interesting programme.
ADMISSION, 25 CENTS.
MONDAY EVENING, Aug. 12, at &,
FIFTY-SEVENTH POPULAR-GARDEN CONCERT.
rpHE AND VAN aSI
Ji BURGH MUSEUM AND MENAGERIE CO.,
Broadway, between Spring and Prince streets.
THOROUGHLY VENTILATED.
The celebrated Pantomimist and Clown,
MR. G. L. FOX,
supported by the
TALENTED PANTOMIME COMPANY.
EVERY AFTERNOON at 2^— EVENING at 8.
LAST WEEK
of the dazzling Pantomime,
LITTLE BOY BLUE;
OR,
HUSH A-BY-BABYand PATTY and HER PITCHER
NEW AND MAGNIFICENT SCENERY, COS
TUMES, LAUGHABLE TRICKS, ETC.
To be seen at all hours.
FROM SUNRISE UNTIL 10 P. M..
LARGEST MUSEUM ON THIS CONTINENT.
Specimen curiosities purchased
FROM EVERY MUSEUM IN EUROPE.
THE CONTENTS OF THE UTICA MUSEUM.
GORDON CUMMING, the Lion Slayer’s COLLECTION.
PROF. HUTCHINGS, LIGHTNING CALCULATOR,
A MAMMOTH FAT INFANT,
A GIANTESS, DWARF. CIRCASSIAN GIRL.
TEN LIVING SEALS,
LIVING SNAKES, MONKEYS, LEARNED SEAL,
HAPPY FAMILY. GRAND AQUARIA, ETC.
OVER 300,000 CURIOSITIES.
MONDAY, 19th. ANOTHER NOVELTY, in which
the FOX PANTOMIME CO. will appear.
Admission. 30cents: Children under can. 15 oente.
Fifth avenue opera
JOINING FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL.
SUCCESS
THE INDEX OF PUBLIC OPINION.
BRILLIANT AND FASHIONABLE AUDIENCES
NIGHTLY CROWD
THE “SOIREES D’AFRIQUE” OF
BEN COTTON AND» SAM g SHARPLEY’S MIN-
The intellectual and critical evince their appreciation
by many demonstrations of approval.
ENTIRE CHANGE THIS WEEK.
First appearance of
MR. J. MURPHY,
The popular Tenor, of Boston.
NOBODY’S DAUGHTER HAS RE
moved to BANVARD’S MUSEUM, where she will
appear evening, and Wednesday and Saturday afternoons.
Tony pastor’s opera housel
No. 201 BOWERY, opposite Spring st.
A FLOOD OF ATTRACTION THIS WEEK.
An entirely new local musical burlesque, called
WILLIAM DU TELL,
produced with new scenery, costumes, music, &c.
TONY PASTOR and the entire company in the cast.
First appearance of the famous Lady Athlete, MISS
SARAH E. SWIFT, in her Indian Club Exercises.
First appearance of the popular Negro Comedian. MR.
BILLY EMMETT.
The new Ballet,
LA REVE D’ELISSE.
More new Songs by TONY PASTOR.
MATINEE WEDNESDAY’ AND SATURDAY.
SAN FRANCISCO MINSTRELS, No. 555
BROADWAY, RE-OPEN ON MONDAY, Aug. 12.
RE-DECORATED, NEW SCENERY, etc.
BIRCH, WAMBOLD, BERNARD AND BACKUS’
SAN FRANCISCO MINSTRELS,
wnose success for the past three years is positive evidence
of superiority over al! similar organizations. On this
occasion all the old favorites will appear, and new artists
for public favor. New novelties will be produced in
rauid succession.
Doors open at 7 o’clock.
Trouble commences at 8 o’clock.
I EIGHTH AVENUE OPERA
Li comer of Thirty-fourth street and Eighth avenue,
Engagement for six nights of
SAM. COLYER, SAM. COLYER. SAM, COLVER,
SAM. COLYER, SAM. COLYER, SAM. COLYER,
and his two sons. Dan andSEddy, in their Clog-Dancing
and Club E xerc ses. .First appearance of the
GARDINER SISTERS, GARDINER SISTERS,
GARDINER SISTERS, GARDINER SISTERS,
MARY and CARRIE.
MARY and CARRIE.
Change of Programme every Monday and Thursday.
Matti nee every Saturday afternoon.
Notice to jolly fellows.*—the
August Number of NICK NAX is out!
UTTAR, PIANO, VIOLIN,’ SING ING.—
No. 242 West Twenty-sixth st., between Seventh
and Eighth aves. Call or send for a circular. Private ■
lessons. No classes. Terms favorable to all.
TOT ARBY HILL’S ACADEMY OF |
LIC Amusement, No. East Houston street, is I
still ia lively operation, pigixtl/ crgy.ds ox i
iUftc«ex» and friend#, (
Fjpo BE GIVEN AWAY !
ALL THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF A
A CENTLEMAH AND HIS WIFE,
including their
MAGNIFICENT BROWN STONE MANSION!
Elegantly and completely furnished with the most costly
and superior
MODERN AND ANTIQUE FURNITURE, PAINT
INGS, PIER GLASSES, SILVERWARE,
BEDDING, &c.
ALSO
Magnificent Rosewood Piano; A Pair of Valuable
Young Horses; An Elegant Late Style Family Carriage:
Full Set Fine Silver Mounted Double Harness; Splendid
• Shifting Top two Seat Buggy Wagon: Very Fine Light,
Black Mounted Single Harness, ladies’ and Gentle
men’s Superior Saddles and Bridles; Ladies’ Full Set
Very Valuable Diamond Jewelry complete, Ladies’ Mag
nificent Enameled Diamond Watch and China; 2 La
dy’sgValuable Cluster Diamond Rings; Ladies’ Valuable
3 Stone Diamond Ring; Lady’s Superb Solitaire Dia-
, mond Ring; Beautiful Pearl Inlaid Rosewood Guitar,
Gentleman’s Valuable 17 Stone Cluster Diamond Pin;
Gentleman’s Large Cluster Diamond Ring; Gentleman’s
, Magnificent Double Cased Watch and Chain.
ALL BEING THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN
AND HIS WIFE. ABOUT LEAVING THE CITY,
WHO WILL GIVE SERIES OF
€RUD PKESENIATIO.V CONCERTS!
All the above named articles
TO BE GIVEN AWAY AT THE FIRST CONCERT
Which will take place at
’ DODWORTH HALL, ON THURSDAY, Aug. 22, 1867.
And the others will follow in rapid succession. The
, following Artists have been engaged a
Miss FANNY STOCKTON, Miss SOPHIE MOZART,
' Mdme. CARLOTTA POZZONI. Mr. A. HILL, Mr.
. CHARLES LOCKWOOD, Mr. J. R. THOMAS; Mr.
FRED. STEINS, Mr. A. SEDGWICK.
TICKETS, ONE DOLLAR EACH;
FIVE TICKETS for §4:50; TEN TICKETS FOR §8:75.
1 AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF TICKETS.
C. H. Ditson & Co., Music Store, 711 Broadway; Chas.
M. Tremaine, Music Store, 481 Broadway; Wm. E. Wil
let’s Sons, Music Store, 395 Broadway: Jordans & Mar
tens, Musical Agents, 758 Broadway; James L. Hastie,
Bookseller and Stationer. 1,235 Broadway; J. Schuberth
& Co.. Publisher and Importer of Music, 820 Broadway:
Theatre Ticket Office, 112 and 114 Broadway; Adams <fc
Co.. Jewelry and Fancy Goods, 825 Broadway; F. J.
j Swain & Co., Book Store. 276 Sixth avenue; A. T. Can
-1 field, Bookseller and Stationer, 525 Eightn avenue; R. R.
Ticket Office. Metropolitan Ho el; E. R. Ticket Office,
r Under Prescott House, 531 Broadway; T. Metcalfe, Med-
• ical Hall, 151 Grand street. Wilhamsburgh: Kashon’s
I Bazaar, £8 Montgomery st., Jersey City; Goldsmiths &
1 Co., Music Store under Park Theatre, Brooklyn.
, Principal Office for the Sale of Tickets, at DOW
’ WORTH HALL, 806 Broadway.
, Parties ordering Tickets by mail address
1 J. MITCHELL, Manager, No. 806 Broadway.
NEW YORK ASSEMBLY ROOMS,
BROADWAY, between 28th and 29th streets.
To let for Balls, Weddings, Sociables, Lectures, Con
i certs, Meetings, Public Dinners, and first-class enter
tainments day or evenin.o Apply on the premises.
The books are also open for the coming Fall season.
E. FERRERO.
gry
OSULLIVAN& GREIG.
771 BROADWAY, CORNER OF NINTH STREET,
are now offering the balance ot their stock of SILK and
CLOTH CLOAKS, BURNOUS, &c.. BLACK and
WHITE LLAMA LACE SHAWLS and CIRCLES
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
SILK BASQUINES AT GREAT BARGAINS,
At §ls, worth S3O; §lB, worth §36.
At §2O, worth §4O; §22, wor h §45.
At §25, worth §SO; §3O, worth §6O.
DRESSMAKING AT SHORTEST NOTICE.
LADIES’ OUTFITTING DEPARTMENT replete
■with every novel. y.
INFANTS’ DEPARTMENT complete in every par
ticular.
Ladies and gentlemen desir
ing first class musical instruction at a fa r price
should call at No. 242 West Twenty-sixth street, between
Seventh and Eighth avenues. Lessons private. Circu
lars ready.
attressesTfeathers,
BEDDING,
t THE OLDEST ESTABLISHMENT
’ IN THE CITY.
WILLARD & ROGERS,
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33333 33333 888888 888888 444 44444
L 33333 33333 888888 888888 4444 44444
33333 8888888 BSBBBBB 4444444444444444444
33333 8888888888 4444444444444444444
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> 333333333333 888888888888 44444444
? 33333333 88888888 44444444
> No. 384 HUDSON STREET. CORNER OF HOUSTON
? is the Best and Cheapest place to buy Hair, Husk. Moss
> and Spring MATTRESSES, FEATHERS, FEATHER
? BEDS, allkinds of BEDSTEADS, both Wood and Iron,
COTS, &c. AU Goods sold are warranted to be as repre
sented.
FURNITURE! FURNITURE!
At G. W. SNEDEN & CAMPBELL’S,
. No. 263 BOWERY, bet. Stanton and Houston streets.
Second Furniture St-ore from the Corner.
All kinds of Furniture, Mattresses, Bedding, Looking
Glasses, etc.. Wholesale and Retail, below Auction
Prices. Goods warranted and delivered free. PATENT
SECRETARY BEDSTEADS, superior to anything of
the kind in the market. Furniture in Suits. Goods
boxed for Shipping. Note the Number.
TVTEW CARPETS FOR FALL TRADE,
Comprising AXMINSTERS, ROYAL WILTONS,
VELVETS, BODY BRUSSELS,
TAPESTRY BRUSSELS,
EXTRA AND IMPERIAL THREE-PLYS AND
INGRAINS, OIL-CLOTHS,
DRUGGETS,
RUGS. MATTINGS,
MATS, ETC.,
FOR SALE AT RETAIL,
FOR CASH ONLY,
AND AT PRICES TO CORRESPOND.
GEO. E. L, HYATT,
No. 273 Canal street,
Bet. Broadway and Elm street.
fjIHE CHEAP CARPET STORE.
ROCK & KELLEHER,
No. 354 BOWERY,
Between Fourth and Great Jones street.
GREAT REDUCTION
IN
CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, &c.
ENGLISH 8RU55EL5................at $1 60 per yard.
DO. THREE-PLY; at 1 50
TAPESTRY INGRAIN at 125
EXCELLENT DO at 100
BEAUTIFUL NEW PATTERNS... .at 60 cents.
100 rolls of OIL CLOTH, slingtly damaged,
at 40 cents per yard.
ROOK & KELLEHER, No. 354 Bowery.
IT S. STEAM CARPET CLEANING
LJ o WORKS, Nos. 157 to 163 WEST THIRTY-SEC
OND STREET, between 6th and 7th avenues, New York.
Our machines and facilities are the very best, and we
can warrant perfect satisfaction, as everything is done
. under our personal supervision. No injury to the finest
fabric. Thoroughly frees the Carpets from dust, beating
and brushing all parts uniformly. Effectually expels all
vermin. Hundreds of references may be seen at our
office. STEWARD & AIAAhON.
PIANO, PIANO, PIANO LESSONS, BY
a pupil of LISZT, No. 212 West Twenty-sixth street,
near Eighth avenue.
BENDALL& GO'
CORNER OF
’ Carpets, ST.,
BEDDING, New York,
L FURNITURE,
Of every description, j. qO
Housekeepers or Persons <
Going to Housekeeping will a
be supplied and can Pay by
Weekly or Monthly
Xf 3?roforredio?
FFICE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
Metropolitan Fire Department, Firemen’s
Hall, New York, August 2d, 1867.
Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of Com
missioners, at their office, until Tuesday, August 13th,
for supplying the Department with coal and wood of the
following kindd and quantities:
750 tons Furnace Coal;
400 tons Nut Coal;
of the quality known as Locust Mountain Coal, and to be
delivered well screened and free from impurities from
yard.
250 tons of Cannell Coal, of the quality known as the
best Inchall Cannell Coal, and to be hand picked. Both
qualities of coal to weigh 2,000 pounds to the ton.
100 cords best quality Virginia Pine Wood, sawed and
split in sizes convenient for use.
The coal and wood to be delivered subject to the in
spection of a competent person to be appointed by the
Board, and to be delivered free of charge for cartage at
the several engine and truck houses, bell-towers, <fcc.,
&c., in such quantities and at such times within the next
ensuing eight months as may be required.
Bidders will state the price per ton tor coal and the
price per cord for wood, and forward their proposals,
properly endorsed. The Commissioners reserve the right
to reject any or all proposals offered, if deemed for the
nubile interest to do so. By order of the Board.
CHASL E. GIL'JERSLEVE, Secretary.
Divorces legally procured
without publicity. Other good cases prosecuted
without fee in advance. Consultation free. M. HOWES,
Attorney and Counselor, No. 78 Nassau street.
ARKS’ PATENT ARTIFICIAL LIMBS
LYjL with
INDIA RUBBER HANDS AND FEET, /
are recommended by the first surgeons in the
country, and all experienced wearers who
u’ed them.
The highest premium, A GOLD MEDAL, \
was awarded them as the BEST at the great
Fair of the American Institute, 1865. vk.
Army and Navy furnished ly Government a t
ihoriti;. Illustrated Pamphlet sent/ree.
A. A. MARKS, No. 575 Broadway, N. Y. City.
Leaky roofs cureiTwith elle-
REY’S INDIA RUBBER PAINT, 1)4 to 2 cents a
1 foot, according to condition, and warranted. Principal
, offices, Nos. 596 Grand street, 101 Nassau street, 153 Bow
ery, 375 Ninth avenue, 598 Sixth avenue, 11 South Sev-
I enth street, Williamsburgh, and corner of Oxford street
i iUidE<xltoa avenue, Bioo-uja.
I * * *McCABTffI, 1
Sunday Edition. August
(gwwumjii.
Scottis h games’ ——'
THE ELEVENTH ANNUAL GAMES
OF THE
NEW YORK CALEDONIAN CLUB
WILL BE HELP AT
•JONES’WOOD, .
ON THURSDAY, «EPT. sth,
ROBERTSON’S CELEBRATED BANDS and Pipers
of the Club will furnish the music on the occasion.
_ . r TICKETS, FIFTY CENTS.
Io be had only at the gate on the day of the games.
Programme of games in future notice.
VOCAL SOCIETY.
GRAND SUMMER NIGHT’S FESTIVAL,
TTnv August 15, at
LION PARK. 110th street and Bth avenue,
commencing at 6 o clock, P. M.-, on which occasion tfifc
GREAT PAkIS EXPOSITION. "
yjaftors and the GREAT PRIZE DIS«
TKIBUTION by Napolson HL, will be seen.
Splendid decorations and illumination.
BRILLIANT FIREWORKS,
TWO GRAND ORCHESTRAS.
Conductor—CAßL BERGMANN.
Tickets, §2 00 each, admitting one Gentleman and La<
dies ro be had at
F. SPANG ENBERG. No. 883 Broadway,
HANZT BROS.. No. 697 Broadway.
E. KROLLPZEIFFER, No. 42 Pine street, and ffOlS
the members generally.
THE COMMITTEES
R ALLY WITH THE VETERANS! **
GRAND PIC-NIO
AND
EXCURSION
OF THE
SEVENTY-NINTH REGIMENT VETERAN ASSO*
CIATION,
ON FRIDAY, AUGUST 16th, 1867,
TO DUDLEY’S GROVE.
The large steamer George Washington and barge WaW
ter Sands leaving Peck Slip, E. R., at iy 2 , 8 A. M.S
Christopher street, 8)£; and Thirty-fourth N. R.ff
at 9 A. M. >
MUSIC BY ROBERTSON’S BAN. ‘
TICKETS, §l, for Gentleman and Lady, * ;be had 0®
any of the Veterans.
The widows will be supplied with complirnentary tick*,
ets by calling or leaving thpir address at No. 157 Weafc
Twenty-ninth street. w
Special Meeting will be held at Milliman’s HalL
on TUESDAY EVENING. August 13th, at 8 P. M.
w _ JOHN MOORE, President
Walter Dale, Secretary.
TO CAPE MAY AND RETURN.—THH
Steamer ESCORT will leave Pier
21 North River for Cape May on this F Wr
Sunday, August 11th, at 2 P. M.
pßeturning, will leave the Cape on Tuesday, at <.
Fare. §2. Round trip, §3 50.
Elegant State Rooms can be procured.
(PONE? ISLAND. CONEY ISLAND."
The splendid Steamer NORWALK,
C p . G. W. Wilson, makes regular trips
io nney Island and Fort Hamilton.
NORTH RIVER, as follows; Christopher street, 9:20s
12:20; 3:20. Jay street, 9:40; 12:40; 3:10. Pier No. 4 (Mor
ris si reet), 10, 1 and 4, connecting with East river boat.
EAST RIVER.—The splendid steamer NAUSHONJ
rims every day. including Sunday, as follows: North.
Eighth street, E. D., at 10 and 2; Broome street, N., Y;i
10:15 and 2:15; Peck Slip, 10:30 and 2:30; Fulton Ferry!
Brooklyn, 10:45 and 2:45; and Sackett street. Brooklyn-*
at 11 and 3, connecting with North river boat. :
As Coney I land has not been, and will not bo / .ed foi*
Quarantine purposes, the inducements are gi< s tbafii
ever to visit it. The steamboat and other' >©.-Vnm<jfr
dat'ons are better than those of any previous £. —on.
The PAVILION HOTEL has been thoroughly pnndy
vated and greatly improved, and the BATHING .*R-»
RANGEMENTS surpass those of any Watering Place ipl
the country.
SUNDAY BOATS FOR NEWARK. THE?
splendid steamboats MAGENTA,
and THOMAS P. WAV, will leave New r
Y ork and e wark on SU ND AY n ext,
AUGUST 11 vh, AS FOLLOWS :
Leave N. Y., foot Barclay Leave Newark foot Centrflt
street-. street
10:3 ) o’clock A. M.» 8 o’clock. A.
- : 30 P. M., 2 o’clock, P. M.,
,9.30 P.M., 7:30 P.M.,
Stopping at Bergen Point each way. W. G ASTON, SupK,
NkTEW ROUTE BETWEEN
Xl NEW YORK AND BOSTON,
via r
BRISTOL, R. I.
THE NARRAGANSETT STEAMSHIP COMPANY’S
AND MAGNIFICENT STEAMERS, “
..Captain Ben BraytOUl
PROVIDENCE Captain B. M. SIMMONRJ
ARE NOW RUNNING ON LONG ISLAND SOUND/
LEAVING PIER No. 40, NORTH RIVER, NEAlfc
FOOT OF CANAL STREET (ADJOINING ALBANY*
PIER), EVERY AFTERNOON (Sundays excopted), ab
5 o clock, connecting at Bristol with the Boston and),
Providence railroad, reaching Boston with shorter rail*
road-ride than by any other route. Distance by rail, 54
miles—timo, 1 hour and 30 minutes.
These steamers are the largest, staunchest, and most*
elegant ever placed upon American waters; of 3,000 tone
burthen, engine of 2.800 horse power, thoroughly sea*
going in all respects; fitted in the most substantial man-;
ner, with water-tight compartments, narrow guards-,
boilers below decks, and with every arrangement foB
comfort and safety.
In the number and size of their state-rooms, and ex*
tent and splendor of their accommodations, they are un*
surpassed, and in the strength of their hulls fully equal
to ocean steamers.
State-rooms secured, tickets for sale, and freight ai>
rangements made at the office of the Company, on the
Pier at New York.
CENTRAL NORMAL MUSICAL CON 4
SERVATORY, No. 242 West Twenty-sixth street!
between Seventh and Eighth avenues. J. JAY WATj
SON, the “American Paganini,” Agent and Mubiqak
Director. Lessons strictly private.
Great reduction—loav fare Tdi
THE WEST, NORTH and EAST, '
via TROY LINE OF STEAMERS, from M
Pier No. 44 North River,foot of Spring st.,
daily at 6 P. M., Saturdays excepted.
LIST OF FARES FROM NEW YORK.
Albany and Troy §1 00 Saratoga lIS
Schenectady 131 Fort Edward 243
Fonda 138 Whitehall 33u
Utica 2 45 Rutland 4 0®
Rome 2 76 Burlington 60®
Syracuse 3 54 North Adams 2 Off
Rochester 530 St. Albans 725 f
Lockport 6 35- Ogsdenburg 10 5Si
Suspension Bridge.... 675 Montreal 9 7JI
Buffalo 6 75
And proportionate reduction to all intermediate points
and stations west from Buffalo.
Tickets sold and baggage checked at the office or QXI
board.
i
Tourists and pleasure travel*
ERS can obtain
COMBINATION EXCURSION TICKETS
AT REDUCED RATES,
Embracing all the principal points of interest in
Northern New York, the Canadas, New England and tha
Lake Superior region, at the offices of the Erie
No. 241 BROADWAY,
Depot foot of Chambers street, New York, or Long
Dock Depot, Jersey City.
PEOPLE’ S LIN E-G REA®
REDUCTION. „
§1 00 TO ALBANY.
On and after MONDAY, June 17, 1867.
bany by People’s Line Steamers will be §1 00 only.
ST. JOHN—Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
DREW—Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Fort lee, pleasant valley ani>
BULL’S FERRY.
Steamboat PALISADE leaves foot of
Spring street, Sundays included, at 10, 2,
5, and 1%. P. M., touching at 22d street. \
North shore staten island.-.
Steamers POMONA and THOMAS ’
HUNT. Elm Park—A. M., 5:30, 7:10,
10:15, 11:50. P. M., 3:40, 5:30. Port
Richmond—A. M., 5:45. 7:30, 8:30, 10:25, 12. P. M., 2<
3:50, 5.40. Factoryville—A. M., 5:55, 7:40, 8:40,10:35/'
P. M., 12:10, 2:10, 4, 5:50. Snug Harbor—A. M., 6, 7:43J
8:45,10:40. P. M., 12:15, 2:15, 4:05, 5,55. New Brighton-5
A. M., 6:10, 7:55,8:55,10:50. P. M., 12:25,2:25,4:15,6. Nev»
York-A. M., 7, 9,10:30. 12. P. M., 2, 4,5:30, 7.
SUNDAY.
Elm Park—A. M., 9:45, 11:15. P. M., 12:45 , 2:15,4:45,
Port Richmond—A. M., 7,8, 9:55, 11:25. P. M., 12:55.
2:25, 4:55, 6:10. Factoryville—A. M., 7:10,8:10,10:051
11:35. P.\M., 1:05, 2:35, 5:05, 6:20. New Brighton—A<
M., 7:20, 8:20, 10:15, 11:45. P. M., 1:15, 2:45, 5:15, 6:30*
New York—A. M., 8:30, 10, 11:30. P. M., 1, 2:30, 4, 65•
7:30. New York Pier 19, between Courtlanat ana DyQ
streets. To let for Sunday School Picnics, Pomona
Grove. ANNING SMITH, Superintondant* h?
——_—
CENTRAL RAILROAD OF NEltf
JERSEY. Passenger and Freight au<
Depot in New York, foot of Liberty
street—connecting at Hampton Junction
with the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad/
and at Easton with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and it<
connections, forming a direct line to Pittsburgh and tha?
West, without change of cars.
ALLENTOWN LINE TO THE WEST.
Three Express Trains daily for the West, except Sun*
days, when one train in the evening. -
Sixty Miles and Three Hours saved by this line to Chi*
cago, Cincinnati, St. Louis, etc., with but one change ofi
cars.
SPRING ARRANGEMENTS.
Commencing April 29, 1867, leave New York as foliowit
6:30 A. M.—For Flemington, Easton,
Mauch Chunck, Williamsport, Wilkesbarre, Mahomf 1
City, &c. p
9 a. m.—Western Express for Easton. Allentown, Har
risburg, Pittsburgh, and the West, with but one change
of cars to Cincinnati or Chicago, and but two changes to
St. Louis; connects at Harrisburg with Northern Central
and Philadelphia and Erie Roads, for Erie and the Oil
Regions. Connects at Junction with Delaware, Lack*’
wana and Western R. R. for Stroudsburg, Water Gap
Scranton, Pittston, Kingston, Great Bena &c.
12 M. Train.—For Easton, Allentown, Mauch Chunck*
Wilkesbarre, Reading, Pottsville, Harrisburg, &c.
3:30 P. M.—For Plainfield.
4:00 P. m.—For Easton.
5:00 P. M.—For Somerville and Flemington.
5:00 p.m.—Cincinnati Express—For Easton, Bethle*
hem, Mauch Chunck, Reading. Harrisburg, Pittsburg;
Chicago and Cincinnati —connects at Harrisburg witia.
train for Williamsport, Erie, <tc. Sleeping cars tar
Pittsburg.
6:15 p. m.—For J unction and intermediate stations. ,
7:30 p. m.—For Somerville.
8:00 p. m.—Western Express Train.—For Easton.
Allentown, Reading, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh and th®
West. Sleeping cars through from Jersey City to
burgh every evening.
Additional trains are run to Bergen Point, Elizabeth*.
&c.
Tickets for the West can be obtained'at the office of th«
Central Railroad of New Jersey foot of Liberty street*
North River, at No. 1 Astor House, at Nos. 254, 27*
and 526 Broadway, and No. 10 Greenwich street.
JOSIAH O. STEARNS Superintendent.
JMPOBTANT FOR BUYERS AND HIIU
ERS OF PIANOS.
FOR SALE. .
7-OCT. ROSEWOOD PIANOS,
XIV. STYLE, WORTH §450, WILL I I *2 I 1 K
BE SOLD BY MONTHLY PAYMENT OF §4 80.
The Brooklyn Musical Insrument Saving and Loan
Society, chartered by the State, is now three years in(
successful operation, and distributes Pianos among ito
members at the above rates.
The Society have so far distributed over one hundred
Pianos, and they have given universal satisfaction. Th®
Pianos are to be seen, and further information will be
given, at the office of the Society, No. 367 Fulton street,
under the Park Theatre. Letters to be directed to the
Secretary, H. GOLDSMITH, at the office.
BOARD OF MANAGERS.
D. S. S. GUY, CH. FIELD,
Dr. F. BOND, Dr. H. MEDLER.
A. KURTH. FR. DEPFUHL,
N. H. DAVIS. GERARD WILLETT, President.
RUDOLPH FULLGRAFF, Vice President.
H. GOLDSMITH, Sec. WM. KRAFT, Tress.
Guitar, guitar, guitar lessons.
by a pupil of MARTINI, No. 242 West Twenty*
sixth street, near Eighth avenue.
The decker bellagraffe, fuli\
IRON PLATE PIANO FORTE to
be found at No. 4 Bleecker street. New 4M
York; only prices from $375 to SBOO. Ev-fe—rfTw
ery instrument fully warranted for the * X S « X K
term of seven years.
N. B.—No connection with any
OTHER HOUSE
of similar name in the same street nor in the city of
New York.
HE HORACE WATERS GRAND
Square and Upright PIANOS, ME- niiini m. .
LODEONS and CABINET ORGANS,
wholesale and retail. To let, and rent al
lowed if purchased. Monthly payments J X 5k I X ♦
received for the same. Second-nand Pianos at bargainS.Wi
from §6O to $225. Factory and ware rooms, No. 481 Broad!
way. Cash paid for second-hand Pianos. Pianos tunec
and repaired. Sheet Music, a little soiled, at cent*
per page. ' WATJU&dk

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