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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, August 18, 1867, Image 8

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i ■
TEE EVENT OF THE WEEK
festive circles has been the annual grand Summer
nights festival of the Arion Singing Society, which
took place on Friday last at Lion Park. The Arion is
well known as the leading German organization, “on
pleasure bent” in this cit y. It numbers among its
members many of our most prominent Germans. It is
famous for its balls and concerts, the brilliancy with
which, they are presented, excellence of arrangement
and richness of appointment. The recent festival
fully sustained the high reputation of the
cf the society. The dancing platform, the
walks in the park, and all points of congregation
were handsomely illuminated, causing the garden to
present a brilliant appearance.
A grand concert opened the evening’s entertain
ment, in which a full orchestra performed a number
of choice operatic selections from different standard
musical works. A procession was formed late in the
evening, giving a correct and faithful representation
of the ehief royal and imperial characters who figured
at the Grand Paris Exposition, or World’s Fair. Bis
marck and his quondam friend Napoleon were there,
With Her Imperial Majesty Eugenie attired in a ridic
ulous manner, and Franz Joseph, after the battle of
©ustozza, laughing at his opponent, the King of
Italy; and last, but not least, the Autocrat of the
Russias, waltzing merrily with the Pope of Borne,
who seemed dreadfully affected with the rheumatism.
The carnivalistic procession was very successful, and
was the grand feature of the evening. In every sense
the Arione enjoyed themselves well and happily.
THE “INVINCIBLES”
showed their invincibility a second time this season
by giving, on Wednesday evening last, a soiree dan
tante on the Hudson river. The spacious barge pro
vided for the occasion was crowded, the ladies pre
ponderating. The band was a fine one, and the bill
of fare, the wines, fruits and ices unexceptionably
good. Dancing was kept up from dusk until day
break on the following morning. We do not know
when we have seen a more thoroughly happy com
pany nor found more evidences on the part of all of
a desire to please and to contribute to the general
hilarity. Personally, we were delighted with the
excursion. We took some few lessons in type set
ting from a fair teacher who took a world of pains to
teach us. We set one em very satisfactorily, though
the head cf a Hour barrel is an awkward thing to set
types upon or to sit upon yourself. There was a
good deal of quiet love making carried on in various
parts of th targe, where wines were being drunk and
ices ate. The moon had promised to shine, but she
did so only fitfully; peeping down through a cloud
upon the gay scene, like Fernando Wood with his
**Bingle eye,” or the man in the church when the ac
cident happened, and then quickly withdrawing her
gaze. Those who danced paid the piper, and nearly
all danced, but the piper was barred out or barred
in; no love-making for him; no poaching on other
peoples’ manors as was previously his custom. The
genial President, Andrew Johnson, was present with
all his staff. He did not appear to be dissatisfied
with any of his Cabinet (wine), but enjoyed himself
while they did their duty. The amiable Stewart and
courteous Walcot, brought their fishing tackle with
them, but we don’t believe they had a bite. Every
body was gay, and many were festive. Thirty sets
had to bo danced, and people went io the work with
the determination of the man who swore that he
would drown himself or perish in the attempt. Twen
ty-six sets were danced all to pieces just as the barge
reached the out-squirts of the city, and the other four,
♦Deluding a nine-pin, just lasted until we came down
to the barge’s birth; not where she was born, but
where she usually lays, Seeing her come in, the
roosters crowed, the first rays of the sun peered over
the horizon, “good night” was said in hundreds of
different tones, the party dispersed, or, more prop
erly melted away, and thus was finished one of the
most pleasant excursions of the reason. Encore!
Bis! Bits
The excursion of the
ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS,
■on Wednesday last, was a pleasant and well managed
affair, and afforded a day of real enjoyment to all who
attended.
The annual excursion of the
THOMAS KIVLIN CHOWDER CLUB.
The innumerable crowds which daily wend their
way down town, either for business or pleasure,
were greatly amazed at the immense display of open
barouches, with gaily decorated teams, band of
music and other fixings, which nearly blockaded the
whole of Chambers street on the morning of the 13th
©f August, extending far down Centre street and City
Hall place.
Many were the inquiries about such unusual dis
play, some surmising it was a fashionable wedding,
till reaching the corner of Chambers and Centre
streets, we were informed by Mr. Francis Canning
that the headquarters of the Thomas Kivlin Chowder
Club, of which he was chairman, was at Mr. Wm. T.
Powers’; that this was merely a chowder club excur
sion, gotten up by the members of the Thomas Kivlin
Chowder Club, in honor of the judge whose name they
bear. As we are acquainted with the greater part of
the gentlemen composing said association, our aston
ishment ceased at once, for we know very well that if
they take it in their heads to do a thing they will do
ft, and that they know how to do it well, too.
EXCURSIONS THIS WEEK
Arrangements have been made for a grand moon
light and cotillion excursion, to-morrow night, up
the North River, under the auspices of the L. 8, U.
Association. A fine steamer and capacious barge
have been provided. Particulars will be found in an
other column.
TECUMSEH LODGE,
No. 487, F. and A. M., propose a pic-nic and cotillion
excursion to Alderny Park, on Wednesday next.
The boat will leave foot of Broome street, at A. M.,
Peck Slip at 8; and Christopher street, at 9 o’clock.
H. U. 8.
The festive organization designation by these ini
tials, are to have a festival at Union’Park, foot of
f.Sd street, E. R., on Friday the 23d inst., commen
cing at 2 o’clock P. M.
A PIC-NIC AT ELM PARK,
to be engineered by Harry Hill, of No. 25 East Hous
ton street, a rather famous caterer, is announced to
take place on the 22d inst., and the fun promised
ler the occasion is to be extensive and diversified. The
“manly art” will be illustrated by these distin
guished European devotees of the fistic arena. From
the published announcement of the promised affair
we make the following extract, as foreshadowing
what the festival is to be:
“ In addition to the full observance of all the ordinary
festivities of the pic-nic, designed to be demarcated by
the rigid exaction of genteel personal demeanor of con
duct, the introduction and combination of the concert,
charactized by vocal and instrumental music, and diver
sified with sentimental, comic and negro melodies, and
fancy costume dancing, will lend a hew and pleasing
feature to the popular demonstration.”
If that announcement fails to draw out a crowd,
persuasive rhetoric has lost its power.
ARCHITECT LODGE,
No. 519, F. and A. M., in the sweet name of charity,
a spell ever potent with Masons, propose on Wednes
day the 28th inst., to hold a picnic at Crossett’s
Greve, for the benefit of the Widow and Orphan
Fund of the Lodge. "We can vouch for the com
pleteness and excellence cf the arrangements, and
recommend our readers, who would eijoy a day of
real pleasure, to acquaint themselves with the par
ticulars of this excursion, to be found in another
column,
FIRE DEPARTMENT.
i
FIRES DURING THE PAST WEEK.
Date. Time. Signal. Location..
, Aug. 11, 2:20 A.M. 5 35 Pearl st,
11, 1:07 P.M. 252 False alarm.
“ 12, 2:08 A.M. 72 130 Worth st.
“ 12, 1:20 P. M. still 134 Fulton st.
“ 13, 12:13 A.M. 275 444 W. Thirty-fifth St.
* 13, 5:30 P.M. still 64 E. Eighty-fifth st.
* 14, 2:45 A.M. 63 Rear 21 &23 Bethune st.
* 14, 7:50 “ still 160 Spring st.
“ 14, 5:55 P.M. 164 71 Bleecker st.
’* 15, 11:25 “ still 36 Centre st.
16, 3:34 “ 64 False alarm.
Run Over and Killed. —Yesterday
while car No. 60 of the Bleecker street line was pas
sing through the New Bowery, when near Oak street,
it ran over and killed a boy named Henry Johnson,
aged 3 years. The body was taken to the residence
of his parents, No. 10 Oak street, and a Coroner noti
fied to hold an inquest. The driver, Joseph Vunk,
was arrested by the Fourth Precinct Police, and is
the action of the Coroner,
v Asouthful drug clerk committed
at St. Louis, last Sunday, because he
■“ had nobody to care for him.” His father was
shot and killed ten years ago, while resisting
an officer, and his mother committed suicide a
couple of years later, leaving this child, who
ended his own career at the age of fifteen.
Some would-be wit in Montana,
who wants to be severe on the Lieutenant-
General, has posted the following notice in the
-streets of Virginia City: “ Wanted, 30,000
grasshoppers to enter the service of the United
States, under Gen. Sherman.”
The Louisville City Council has re
fused to fnrnish a glass case to the Clay statue.
The committee having the matter under con
sideration concluded that dust would not inj ure
clay.
A Milwaukee loafer recently spat
tobacco-juice on a lady’s dress. He was sen
tenced to thirty days’ imprisonment, and do
med the use vt
(By anti MuM
..a..
Charged with Robbing a Safe.—
James France was yesterday arraigned before Justice
Hogan, at the Tombs, on the complaint of George
Farmer, the owner of a stand at No. 77 Broad avenue,
West Washington Market. The evidence went to
show that on the night of the 14th inst, Mr. Farmer
left his stand about 10 o’clock, France at the time be
ing in the place, he being in the habit of sleeping
there. At a later hour Peter Herbert, a night watch
man, saw France in the office rummaging among
some papers in a desk in which the key of the safe
was kept. A light was burning in the office at the
time. About an hour later, having occasion again to
pass the place, Herbert saw the light was still burn
ing, and vzent in to extinguish it, no one being in the
office. On entering, he found the doors of the safe
open and the books and papers scattered around.
Mr. Farmer was notified, and on making an investi
gation, discovered that $l,lOO-in Treasury Notes and
postal currency had been stolen. On Friday morn
ing, France was arrested in a semi-intoxicated condi
tion by detectives Tilley and Downing of the Third
Precinct, and in his possession was found $422, a
portion of which was identified by Mr. Farmer as his
property. The accused was accordingly committed
to the Tombs for trial. He is a native of Ireland,
aged 24 years, and a laborer.
An Old Man Charged with an Out
rage Upon a Little Girl.—Yesterday, George Mil
ler, aged 67 years, was brought before Mr. Justice
Mansfield, at the Essex Market Police Court, charged
with having committed an indecent assault upon
Louisa Meyers, aged 10 yoars, residing with her par
ents at No. 129 Second street. The girl states that on
Friday evening she was playing with her sister, Ma
tilda, aged 8 years, and Ellen Miller, aged 10 years, in
Avenue B, when the accused camo up and asked them
to accompany him to his room, on the second floor of
No. 170 Delancey street. They did so, and on reach
ing the room, the complainant charges that the ac
cused placed the girl Miller upon the bed, but before
he could get on himself the girl eluded his grasp and
sprang from the bed. Ho then seized the complain
ant, placed her upon the bed, and, she charges, com
mitted an indecent assault upon her. She screamed,
and he finally released her. The other girls were in
the room at the time, and witnessed the assault. Be
fore leaving Miller gave them ten cents apiece, and
threatened them with future punishment if they said
anything of the matter. On reaching home the com
plainant told her mother what had occurred, and she
caused the arrest of Miller by Officer Broadhead, of
the 13th Precinct. Miller denied his guilt, but the
evidence against him was so direct, that the magis
trate committed him for trial in default of SI,OOO
bail. It is stated that he has once before been ar
rested for a similar offense.
A Good Wssk’s Record for One
Steamship.—On Tuesday last, the steamship Virgil
arrived at this port from New Orleans and anchored
off Pier No. 44, N. R. On tho following evening Capt.
Petty received information that the cargo was being
stolen by river thieves, aided, it was supposed, by
the crew. Officers were sent on board, and they
found that about $2,000 worth of the cargo had been
stolen. Some Custom House officers came on board
soon after, and the vessel was turned over to them.
On Thursday one of the mates ot the steamer was
arrested for attempting to dispose of one-of the haw
sers belonging to the vessel, and on Friday night
Capt. Dickson, of the Twenty-eighth Precinct, noti
fied Inspector Dilks,, at Police Headquarters, that the
vessel was deserted by the crew on account of a dead
man being on board, And that the vessel was leaking,
and would sink unless assistance was soon sent. The
police boat was sent to aid the sinking vessel, and by
pumping managed to keep her afloat. Yesterday
Coroner Schirmer visited the Virgil, and there found
that Health Officer Swinburne had caused the re
moval of the corpse. It is undestood that the de
ceased was one of the crew, and that he had died
from a pulmonic disease.
A Female Hotel Thief. —On Fri
day, a well-dressed, genteel appearing German wo
man, giving her name as Mrs. Johanna Neiman,
called at Schwartz’s Hotel, in Washington street, Ho
boken, and asked to be with a room
until Saturday noon, at which time she was to sail in
the steamship for Europe, at the same time repre
senting that her husband, a wealthy man, was de
tained in New York on business, and would not join
her until yesterday morning. Mrs. Neiman was ac
commodated with the best the house afforded.
Yesterday, after breakfast, Mrs. N. came down with
her hat and shawl ou, and thought she would go out
for a walk. Schwartz, the hotel-keeper, thought she
had better pay her bill first; but Mrs. N. was unable
to comply, in consequence of a total absence of the
needful. Schwartz suspected something wrong, and
called in Officer Kaiser, who went to work in a busi
ness-like manner to take an inventory of Mrs. N.’s
effects. In addition to the usual apparel worn by
females, the officer discovered two linen sheets
wrapped around next to the woman’s body, and
which were the property of Schwartz. Mrs. N. was
thereupon taken into custody", and conveyed before
Justices Pope and Conklin, where she was convicted
by her own admission, and is now serving out a three
months term in the county jail.
The Fourth Ward Case. —Officer
Joseph Matthias of the Fourth Precinct, who was
complained of on Thursday by John Organ, a liquor
dealer at No. 238 Pearl street, for having attempted
on Sunday last to enter his dwelling through a rear
window, and who it is alleged broke the window and
beat the proprietor of the place with his club, when
he attempted to prevent his ingress, yesterday ap
peared before Justice Hogan at the Tombs to make
answer to the complaint. The officer stated that he
had detected Organ and his bartender in a willful
violation of the Excise Law, and in order to discover
who were in the bar-room he had climbed up by a
back window. Organ attempted to eject him, and to
save himself from falling a distance of 15 feet into
the area he had used his club to enable him to retain
his footing. In this manner two or three panes of
glass were broken. He denied that he had struck
Mr. Organ, and said the charge of assault was
trumped up to offset a complaint he had made
against Organ before the Excise Board. He waived a
further examination and was allowed by the magis
trate to go on his own recognizance to appear before
the Court of Special Sessions.
An Impostor. —The police of Hobo
ken were notified yesterday that a well-dressed, gen
teel-appearing young man, about twenty-two years of
age, had been engaged for three or four days past
swindling the residents, by means of bogus gas bills.
His plan of operation was as follows: On Friday the
young man called at the residence of Mrs. Dormitzer,
in Washington Terrace, and presented a bill of $3 50,
for one month’s gas, at the same time explaining that
in consequence of so many losses by collecting quar
terly, Mr. fchippen had decided hereafter to collect
every month. Mrs. D., supposing that it was all
right, told the young man to call in the evening and
she would settle the bill. Meantime, she learned that
the fellow was an impostor, and made arrangements
to cause his arrest, but he failed to make his appear
ance. Quite a number of people are reported to have
been victimized for small sums.
Death of a Policeman. —We are
sorry to have to announce the death of Police Officer
John Grogan, of the Twenty-sixth Precinct Police
which took place at his residence, No. 311 East Twen
ty-third street, yesterday, at IP. M. He was taken
suddenly ill on Friday morning after preparing him
self for his day’s duty. Mr. Grogan has been a mem
ber of the force for 20 years, during which time he
has filled several important positions, and as a man
and an officer he gained the respect and. esteem of
the public, his associates and. superior officers. His
funeral will take place on Monday at 1 P. M.
Theft of a Watch. —Yesterday
Ada Riley, an inmate of No. 121 Greene street, was
brought before Justice Ledwith, at the Jefferson
Market Police Court, charged on the complaint of
Louisa Wallace, also an inmate of the above house,
with having stolen her gold watch, valued at sl6l.
The complainant says she gave the accused the key
of her room to get an article of clothing, and that at
that time the watch was in the room. Immediately
after Ada’s visit the watch was missing. The accused
was committed for trial.
Deserters From a U. S. School
Ship.— On Saturday a week ago, two youths, fifteen
and seventeen years of age, named Frank Ploss and
Robert Gibbons, whose parents reside in Hoboken,
managed to make their escape from the U. S. School
Ship Sabine, while lying in the Harbor of New Lon
don. Notice was sent to the police. authorities, and
yesterday morning Captain Donevan arrested the lads
in Hoboken, and they were subsequently returned to
the ship now lying off the battery.
Sent Up. —Yesterday the Police of
the Eighth, Fifteenth and Twenty-ninth Precincts,
arrested no less than fifty-nine mendicants, com
prising men, women and children, in all stages of
poverty. Justice Ledwith committed them to the
care of the Commissioners of Charities and Correc
tions.
Explosion. —At 11 o’clock, A. M.,
yesterday, an explosion occurred in the building No.
8 Gold street, caused by an iron cylinder being over
charged with oxygen gas. The building wag slightly
(lawgett, Nv one rawed,
NEW YORK DISPATCH.
The Tradesmen’s Bank Defalcation
—Statement of One of the Defaulters. —Mr.
Arnold, second teller of the Tradesmen’s Bank, says
that there was no collusion between himself and the
first teller, Mr. Baker, in defrauding that institution.
It is said that the deficiency in Mr. Arnold’s account
is thirty-four thousand dollars, but he does not think
it is so great. He was at the bank Saturday morn
ing, and placed all of the stocks and other property
possessed by him in the hands of Mr. Berry, the
President. These stocks are worth about $5,000.
The bank will receive $5,000 from Mr. Arnold’s
sureties, and he will also place life insurance policies,
amounting to $20,000, in possession of the bank. Mr.
Arnold says the bank will not lose more than $5,000
through his operations, and this amount he intends
to pay, if possible.
His story is a suggestive one to persons fond of
stock speculations. He says that his acquaintances
urged him to operate in stocks by buying and selling
on “margins.” He was Introduced to two brokers,
who, although not first-class, were considered re
sponsible men. Mr. Arnold says that these brokers
took his money to use as margins, and afterward ap.
plied it to their own use, and then failed. Of course
he has no redress against them, as they are not re
sponsible. Mr. Arnold thinks he has been greatly
wronged, and deeply regrets the exposure which has
been made. It was his intention, when using the
money of the bank, to have returned it, and he says
he could have done so if he had not been cheated.
Mr. Arnold says he was engaged in only four or five
operations.
The defalcation of Mr. Baker is more serious than
that of Mr. Arnold, and from what is at present
known of his affairs it was from the same cause. Mr.
Arnold says that when his own deficiency was made
known, he had no idea that there was any serious
error in the accounts of Mr. Baker. It appears that
the latter was indebted to the former on the books
of the bank about SB,OOO, but Baker gave Arnold to
understand that he held bonds to offset this amount.
During the examination of Mr. Arnold’s accounts
on Tuesday by the officers of the bank this discrep
ancy became known, but Mr. Eakcr retained his
place during that day and Wednesday. Previous to
that time his character had been so lair, and the er
ror appeared to be so small, that he was not imme
diately removed. • On Wednesday afternoon the Pres
ident resolved to examine Mr. Baker also, but before
ho had called him into his private office for that pur
pose, Baker had closed his aecounts and gone to Long
Branch, where his family v/ere stopping.
The president then went to bis safe and found
Mariposa and other almost worthless stocks to the
amount of SB,OOO. Mr. Berry did not proceed any
further with his investigation at that time. He felt
certain, however, that the bank had suffered greater
loss, but he had not the heart to proseeute an inves
tigation.
On Thursday morning, when Mr. Baker appeared
and asked for his they were refused, and Mr.
Berry called him into his private office. The defici
ency of SB,OOO was made known to him, and the
president asked him if he was a defaulter to any other
amount. Baker made no answer when he was asked
if his accounts were wrong to’the amount of SIO,OOO.
Still no answer* “ Are they wrong to the amount of
$20j000?” No answer. “Are they wrong to the
amount of $50,000?” Mr. Baker then said: “For
God’s sake, Mr. Berry, don’t ask me; I don’t know;
I wish I were dead 1”
An examination was then made of tho books, and
it was learned that there was a deficiency in Baker’s
account of $62,000. The manner in which his books
were kept partly justify tho assertion of Arnold that
he did not know of Bakears defalcation. Instead of .
writing up his books each night, Baker would wait
until the next morning, so that if a man deposited
$50,000 in the afternoon, the defaulter could use that
money, and place a deposit of the next day to the de
positor’s account. This second deposit would not
be credited until the succeeding day.
It is probable that he began by making a email de
falcation at first, and gradually increased the amount
as his stock operations enlarged. Each day Baker
would be a debtor to the bank, but as his books were
not written up at night the amount could not be
known Before writing up his accounts in the morning,
he would wait until the deposits were sufficient to
coverhis deficiencies, and they would be credited to
the depositors of the previous day.
It is probable that the bank will not lose more
than $65,000 or $70,000. Its surplus is $150,000, and
the premium on the United States bonds held by the
bank amounts to $90,000 more.
The officers of the bank naturally feel that their
confidence has been grossly abused, but it is not
probable that either of the defaulters will be prose
cuted.
Early in the history of the Tradesmen’s Bank it
became noted by an attempt of conspirators to get
possession of it. It was alleged that Jacob Barker,
the celebrated banker of New Orleans, and some of
his friends entered into a conspiracy to obtain pos
session of the bank. It was Barker’s intention to se
cure control of the bank and place his friends in
office. The result was that Barker and several other
men, some of whom have since been prominent citi
zens, were indicted for conspiracy.
The affair was finally hushed up, after a trial which
created much excitement. Since that time (about
1828) the affairs of the bank have been in the most
prosperous condition.
Theft of Iron.— Cornelius ‘Corley
and Timothy O’Brien were, yesterday, arrested by
Officer Mayland, of the Seventh Precinct, they having
stolen from Pier 43, East river, a tun of scrap iron,
the property of Harvey Barnes, of No. 397 Water st.
When arrested, the prisoners were in tho act of
shipping the stolen iron on a schooner at Pier 51, E.
R. Justice Mansfield committed them to await an
ezamination.
A Dishonest Domestic. —Ellen. Do
lan, one of the large army of dishonest servants that
infest this city, was brought beforo Justice Mansfield,
at the Essex Market Police Court, she having stolen
from the residence of Harvey Barnes, No. 397 Second
avenue, bed-clothing and other articles, valued at
$47. Part of the stolen property was found at the
residence of the prisoner, No. 644 East Thirteenth
street. She was committed for trial.
gaF We, t!sc undersigned, respectfully in
vite all those who aro engaged in the billiard saloon busi
ness to attend a meeting, to be bo held at Phelan & Col
lender’s factory, in Crosby street, on WEDNESDAY,
August 21, at 2 P. M., for the purpose of taking into con
sideration the propriety of charging for games by the
hour This system is now in successful operation in all
the principal cities in this country, with the exception of
New York, and we learn it is the fairest and best for all
engaged, proprietors and players also.
KILDUFF & GILMORE, No. 918 Broadway.
PETER MITCHELL, No. 202 Broadway.
P. A. FITZGERALD, Broadway and Barclay street.
LAWTOM MURPHY, Broadway, near John street.
Dr. Bell, No. 39 St. Mark’s Place,
near Second avenue—SPECIALTY.—CANCERS and
TUMORS extracted and positively cured without the
knife. Also, all WARTS, WENS, BIRTH-MARKS on
the Face, Neck. &c., leaving an even, natural surface,
without scar. PIMPLED, SPOTTED FACES positively
and permanently cured. CANCER AND TUMOR
SPECIMENS seen at the office. Also, Names and
Residences of patients cured. Offices horn's from 9 to
lujo in the morning—12 to l)a, and 7 to 9 in the evening.
ggT Hili, tiie hsimUable, lias resumed hair
cutting, studio for the artistic manipulation of hair, whis
kers, suampooing, and dying, No. 95 Duane street, near
Broadway. The styles of hair in every conceivable varia
tion, neat, judicious, and appropriate.
gg” Hill’s Hair Dye, 50 Cents—Biaeß or
Brown. Instantaneous, Natural, Durable, Reliable. Best
and Cheapest in use. Quantity equals any dollar size.
Depot No. 95 Duane street. Sold by all druggists.
g®" Hill’s Arctic Ointment, Instant Pain
Reliever, cures Weak Eyes, Burns, Chilblains, Salt
Rheum, Boils, Bunions. Piles, Chapps, all Skin and Flesh
Diseases. Every family’s friend; warranted. Depot, No.
95 Duane street. Sold by all drug and grocery stores.
LADIES’ HATS AND BONNETS, NEW
Styles, this week, at
L. BINNS’ MILLINERY, No. 577 BROADWAY.
Black Lace Bonnets, Real Lace Bonnets, and Children’s
Hats .Save this.
Madame secor, no. 907 broadl
WAY, (up stairs,) is now selling,
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES,
THE LATEST SPRING AND SUMMER STYLES OF
FRENCH BONNETS. FLOWERS,
and other novelties of the latest importation.
F& B. F. YATES, MUSICIANS, No.
• 94 Chrvstie street.
VIOLIN AND HARP, OR FULL BAND, for Pic
nics or Excursions.
P. S.—A fine old Violin, also a pedal Harp, for
sale. - ■
CENTRAL NORMAL MUSICAL COIL
SERVATORY, No. 242 West Twenty-sixth street,
between Seventh and Eighth avenues. Private Lessons
(no classes) on Piano, Violin, Guitar, Singing, &c. J. J.
WATSON, Agent and Musical Director. Circulars ready.
Sty
Ladies and gentlemen desir
ing first class musical instruction at a fair price
should call at No. 242 West Twenty-sixth street, between
Seventh and Eighth avenues. Lessons private. Circu
lars ready.
■><ATTRESSESrFBXTHERS;
JUL BEDDING.
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHMENT
IN THE CITY.
WILLARD & ROGERS,
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No. 384 HUDSON STREET, CORNER OF HOUSTON
is the Best and Cheapest place to buy Hair, Husk', Moss
and Spring MATTRESSES, FEATHERS, FEATHER
BEDS, all Kinds of BEDSTEADS, both Wood and Iron,
s wted’ Me WJB». ted Se as reps-
OFFICIAL DRAWINGS.
S’ROM AUG. 12 TO AUG. 11, 1867, INCLUSIVE.
KENTUCKY— Extha Class, N0.’479, Aug. 12,1867.
7, 24, 54, 39, 55, 50, 35, 37, 74, 75, 29, 78, 26;
KENTUCKY— CIass No. 480, Aug. 12,1867.
20, 27, 24, 19, 46, 17, 23, 5, 51, 48, 72, 44.
KENTUCKY— Extra Class No. 481, Aug. 13,1867.
48, 70, 71, 39, 51, 18, 42, 28, 9, 57, 15, 61, 16, 3.
KENTUCKY— CIass No. 482 Aug. 13,1867.
45, 8, 22, 70, 35, 29, 52, 6, 61, 53, 64, 10, 2.
KENTUCKY-Extba Class No. 483, Aug. 14,1861.
55, 63, 5, 74, 49, 60, 30, 40, 1, 48, 28, 36, 6.
KENTUCKY— CIass No. 484, Aug. 14,1861.
26, 73, 19, 2, 23, 69, 32, 64, 33, 21, 7, 11, 36, 9.
KENTUCKY-Extba Class No. 485, Aug. 15,1867.
44, 15, 32, 40, 59, 24, 64, 10, 34, 12, 76, 63, 70.
KENTUCKY-Class No. 486, Aug. 15,1867.
78, 35, 73, 19, 9,1, 18, 38, 36, 44, 57, 55.
KENTUCKY— Extba Class No. 457, Aug. 16.1867.
2, 12, 19, 67, 35, 20, 57, 51, 42, 68, 37, 10.
KENTUCKY— CIass No. 488, Aug. 16,1867.
13, 45, 67, 71, 75, 22, 37, 21, 70, 74, 30, 33, 50.
KENTUCKY— Extra Class No. 489, Aug. 17.1867.
9, 77, 72, 26, 71, 28, 35, 62, 34, 32, 73, 17, 51,
KENTUCKY-CLASS No. 490, Aug. 17,1867.
49, 59, 30,,,33, 68, 40, 54, 14, 20, 55, 28, 44, 11.
SHELBY COLLEGE— Extba Class No. 403, Aug, 12, ’67.
27. 43, 61, 21, 36, 4, 59, 76, 6, 33, 34, 68, 40.
SHELBY COLLEGE-CLASS No. 404, Aug. 12,1867.
70, 26, 3,9, 41, 16, 28, 40, 17, 46, 73, 50.
SHELBY COLLEGE— Extra Class No. 405, Aug. 13, ’67.
29, 14, 78, 3, 37, 19, 68, 28, 45, 57, 61, 33, 54.
21.
SHELBY COLLEGE-CLASS No. 406, Aug. 13,1867.
23, 2, 69, 13, 35, 11, 52, 48, 24, 27. 32. 67, 74.
SHELBY COLLEGE— Extba Class No. 407, Aug. 14, ’67.
60. 29, 38, 8. 16, 30, 6‘9, 18, 75, 9, 47, 51, 40.
SHELBY COLLEGE-Class No. 408, Aug. 14,1867.
37, 12, 68, 24. 73, 55, 50, 78, 44, 62, 28, 39, 57.
19.
SHELBY OOLLEGE-Extba Class No. 409, Aug. 15, ’67.'
41, 13, 56, 9, 47, 32, 58, 20, 27, 4, 72, 39, 18.
SHELBY COLLEGE-Class No. 410, Aug. 15, 1867.
26. 42, 65, 17, 28, 1, 30, 38, 43, 57, 76, 53.
SHELBY COLLEGE— Extra Class No. 411, Aug. 16, '67.
17, 59. 30, 33, 72. 7. 43, 29, 62, 48, 31, 56.
SHELBY COLLEGE-Class No. 412, Aug. 16, 1867.
23, 56. 10, 29, 15. 67, 6, 32, 28. 74, 46, 42, 34.
SHELBY COLLEGE— Extra Class No. 413, Aug.l7, ’67.
65, 18, 44, 14, 6, 72, 78, 58, 35, 75, 3, 29, 60.
SHELBY COLLEGE— CIass No. 414, Aug. 17,1867.
29, 25, 20, 78, 19, 2, 34, 44, 66, 58, 39, 14, 47.
Circulars sent free by addressing
JOSEPH BATES,
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IZED LOTTERlES.—lnformation given.
JAMES H. STURGES, Broker,
No. 4 Division street.
Nc. 6 PARK PLACE,
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PRIZES CASHED IN ALL LEGAL
IZED LOTTERIES. Information given, and cir
culars forwarded to any part of tho count™.
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PRIZES CASHED IN THE GEORGIA,
KENTUCKY STATE AND SHELBY COLLEGE
LOTTERIES.
Office hours from 8 A. M. until 8 P. M.
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P _ IHZES " CASHED )3i Ai.i, I.3GAL-
IZED LOTTERIES, and information given, by
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Frizes cashed in all legalized
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Rooms 5 and 1.
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ple’s Line Steamers, near Spring street Market, Central
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No. 181 Fifth avenue.
All ~ prizes”cashed~ in~ legal
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_ and No. 163 Fulton street, N. Y.
Royal Havana lottery.—pri
zes paid in gold; information furnished. Highest
rates paid for doubloons and all kinds of gold and silver.
TAYLOR & CO., Bankers, No. 16 Wall street. N. Y
UMIg and
TRENOR’S NEW AND SPLENDID
BALL-ROOM, Palace Hail, Sixth ave., near pn
42d street, is rapidly approaching completion. It cKf
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ENGAGEMENT BOOK OPEN.
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s it. A liberal discount offered to the
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By a New York Physician, giving reliable information of
fjreat value to the sick of both sexes, never before pub
ished, and worth a journey to New York on foot to ob
tain it.
Sent free, in a plain sealed envelope, with the
highest testimonials, by enclosing a postage-stamp to
Dr. LAWRENCE, No. 14 Bond street. Now York,
IyrATRIMQNY.—WHY EVERY MAN
.IV should marry. Why every woman should marry.
All may marry to know. Read the Illustrated Marriage
Guide and Medical Adviser, by WM. EARL, M. D., 2po
pages. Mailed in sealed envelope, on receipt of 25 cents;
Addrets, No. 12 White street, New York.
■WTIOLIN, VIOLIN, VIOLIN LESSONS,
V by the “ American Paginini,” No. 212 West Twen
ty-sixth street, near Eighth avenue.
YOU CAN GET “THOSE BOOKS” BY"
MAIL“O. K.»” or by express “ C. O. D,. or at
No. 26 Ann street, opposite Theatre alley, New York.
Send your address on stamped envelope for a catalogue.
CUT THIS OUT. C . BL AN CHARD, Publisher.
_ &r.
A FIRST-CLASS GROCERY.
WILLIAM A. CAMP, ♦
No. 222 Third ave., cor. 20th st.
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN _ Jftzvi
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Respectfully solicits the patronage
of all who are desirous of getting the
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prices. "
Groceries ordered at the store will be sent to families in
any part of the city. ■
Tf/ffETROPOLITAN BILLIARD ROOMS.
. MORRISANIA HALL,
Railroad Avenue, near Fifth street, Morrisania.
OPEN ON SUNDAYS.
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HAVANA SEGARS.
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liard Tables. PHELAN & COLLENDER,
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J, SHARP’S IMPROVED BIL-
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ions, superior to any now in use. Patented Nov. 15,1859.
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Madame estelle,
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Can be consulted on Love, Marriage. Sickness, Losses
in Business, Lucky Numbers and Charms. Call at No.
122 Sping street, between Greene and Mercer sts.
Special notice.—madame ross,
the great Natural Medical Clairvoyant and Female
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male Weakness and Chronic Affections.
By the aid of her clairvoyant powers, she is enabled to
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220 W. Twenty-fifth st., bet. Seventh and Eighth aves.
ARKS’ PATENT ARTIFICIAL LIMBS
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Army and Navy furnished "by Government ?’ FW
thority. Illustrated Pamphlet sent/ree.
A. A. MARKS, No. Broadway, N. Y. City.
Leaky roofs curetTwith elle-
KEY’S INDIA RUBBER PAINT, to 2 cents a
foot, according to condition, and warranted. Principal
offices, Nos. 596 Grand street, 101 Nassau street, 153 Bow
ery, 375 Ninth avenue, 508 Sixth avenue, 11 South Sev
enth street, Williamsburgh, and corner of Oxford street
and Eultoa avenue, Brooklyn.
.ELLERY &
rpHE FRENCH THEATRE.
T. B. PUGH Lessee and Manager.
MRS. F. W. LANDER,
FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THIS CITY,
IN HER GREAT CLASSIC AND HISTORIC ROLE’
(Fac-simile of Queen Elizabeth’s signature to the death
warrant of Mary Stuart),
which has been invariably pronounced by the press and
the public, •
WHEREVER SHE HAS YET APPEARED
in this character, to be the
MOST DECIDED TRAGIC SUCCESS.
ON MONDAY EVENING, AUGUST 19, 1867,
MRS. F. W. LANDER,
(Formerly Miss Davenport,)
will make
HER FIRST APPEARANCE IN NEW YORK,
as
ELIZABETH,
QUEEfi OF ENGLAND,
in an adaptation made
ESPECIALLY FOR HER,
and under her own supervision, from the
GRAND ITALIAN TRAGEDY
of the same name, originally written by the great Italian
dramatist, Signor Giacometti.
The Drama, which is peculiarly novel and original in
its construction, will necessarily be remembered by a
large portion of the public as having afforded
THE EMINENT TRAGEDIENNE,
MADAME RISTORI,
the means of making her
MOST DECIDED AND UNEQUIVOCAL SUCCESS!
with the American public.
It was consequently with the view of rendering this
Tragedy more generally, as well as more readily, appre
ciable by the large number of
AMERICAN LOVERS OF THE DRAMA,
and for the purpose of adding another
POWERFUL AND DISTINCTIVE CHARACTER
to her already large repertoire, that Mrs. F. W. LAN-
1 DER first conceived the idea, which has recently beei>
carried out, of adapting the character of
QUEEN ELIZABETH
i TO TEPE AMERICAN STAGE.
MONDAY EVENING, AUGUST 19,
the Grand Historical Tragedy, in five acts,
ELIZABETH,
QUEEN OF ENGLAND.
MRS. F. W. LANDER
as
ELIZABETH.
The remainder of the cast will be composed of the fol
lowing artists:
Mr. JAS. H. TAYLOR Earl of Essex
Mr. GEO. BECKS Sir. Francis Bacon
Mr. J. W. COGSWELL King James the Sixth
Mr. EDWIN VARNEY Lord Burleigh
Mr. AUG. \V. FENNO Sir Francis Drake
Mr. CHARLES FYFFE Lord Howard
Mr. C. 11. ROCKWELL : Marquis Mendoza
Mr. W. D. SHIELDS. Lord Keeper of the Seal
Mr. NELSON DEKKER Lord Hudson
Miss MINNIE MONK Lady Burleigh
Miss JENNIE GOURLAY Lady Sarah Howard
Miss ADAH MONK Margaret Lamburn
POPULAR SCALE OF PRICES.
Price of admission 79 cents.
Reserved Orchestra Seats $1 50.
Seats in Private Boxes 1 59.
Private Boxes, holding four 6 00.
Proscenium Boxes 10 00.
Seats in Dress C'rcle 75 cents.
Seats in Family Circle 50 cents.
The sale of reserved seats will commence at 9 o’clock
A. M., on Monday, August 19, at Cbickering’s Piano
Warerooms, No. 652 Broadway, and at the French The
atre.
Doors open at 7 o’clock.
The curtain will rise precisely at 6 o’clock.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
In order to accommodate the patrcm bf the French
Theatre during Mrs. Lander’s engagement, arrange
ments have been made for omnibusses to run every five
minutes from the corner of Union Square and Broad
way to the Theatre, from 7 to 8 o’clock P. M., free of
charge.
PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT.—
-EL THE SIX DAYS’ FESTIVAL
In aid of the
AMERICAN DRAMATIC FUND,
under the most distinguished patronage, will take place
at
THE ACADEMY OE MUSIC,
commencing MONDAY, Dec. 9, combining extraordi
nary and unprecedented attractions. On MONDAY,
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY,
A FANCY FAIR.
to be nres.ded over by the elite of New York society and
the celebrities of the dramatic profession, who have most
generously volunteered, and at which
RARE AND COSTLY PRIZES '
will be distributed to those ticket holders who may be
fortunate enough to win them.
On TUESDAY EVENING,
A GRAND CARNIVAL BALL.
The week’s festival will culminate on SATURDAY in
A SUPERB MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT,
at which Hie most celebrated exponents of harmonic art
will appear.
Donations of articles for the Fancy Fair are earnestly
and respectfully solicited, whicti mav bo transmitted to
L. F. HARRISON,
Irving Hall, New York.
Sensational particulars in future advertisements.
Financial Manager, THEO. MOSS.
Wallack’s Theatre.
Brooklyn atheneum.
HAWTHORNE,
DAVIS, AND MESTAYER COMBINATION,
Previous to their tour through the Eastern States will,
by request, give one performance on
MONDAY EVENING, Aug. 19, 1867.
The beautiful Comedy of the
L.ITTLE TREASURE,
in which Miss L. Hawthorne, Mrs. Chas. Henri, and oth
ers will appear.
A GRAND OLIO,
in which Carlotta Pozzoni, Miss Julia Queen, Messrs.
Stein, Lockwood, and Arthur Mathison will assist.
Mr. EDWIN THORNE will recite Shamus O’Brien.
Dancing and a favorite Farce. See programme.
rpHE BARNUM AND VAN AM-
X BURGH MUSEUM AND MENAGERIE CO.,
Broadway, between Snring and Prince streets.
ANOTHER NOVELTY.
MR. G. L. FOX,
supported by the
TALENTED PANTOMIME COMPANY,
EVERY AFTERNOON at 2>«-EVENING at 8.
in the Comic Fairy Pantomime of
MOTHER GOOSE AND HER GOLDEN EGG.
REPLETE WITH LAUGHABLE TRICKS AND
SIDE-SPLITTING COMICALITIES.
To be seen at all hours.
THE CONTENTS OF THE UTICA MUSEUM.
GORDON CUMMING, the Lion Slayer’s COLLECTION.
PROF. HUTCHINGS, LIGHTNING CALCULATOR,
A MAMMOTH FAT INFANT.
A GIANTESS, DWARF. CIRCASSIAN GIRL.
TEN LIVING SEALS,
LIVING SNAKES. MONKEYS, LEARNED SEAL,
HAPPY FAMILY. GRAND AQUARIA, Etc.
OVER 800,000 CURIOSITIES.
Admission. 30cents: Children under ten. 15 cents.
rgIHEATRE COMIQUE,
X No. 514 Broadway, opposite St. Nicholas Hotel,
WILL OPEN FOR THE SEASON,
MONDAY, AUG. 26th,
Redecorated, painted, and furnished in the most Gor
geous Style.
THREE DISTINCT AND ENTIRELY DIFFERENT
ENTERTAINMENTS COMBINED.
Forming the most Pleasing and Elegant performance
known to the stage.
Mr. W. LEFEINGWELL,
Miss MILLIE SACKETT,
and full Burlesque Company of well-known New York
varieties. BEN COTTON & SAM SHARPLEY’S Min
strels, CHARLEY WHITE, Miss EVA BRENT, Mlle.
AUGUSTA. Miss ELLA LA. RUE,
AND OTHER ARTISTS OF CELEBRITY.
See future Advertisements.
CHAS. WHITE, ) Lessees and
SAME. SHARP'LEY, 5 Managers.
BANV ARD’S OPERA HOUSE AND
MUSEUM, corner BROADWAY and THIR-
TIETH STREET.
Second and last week of the brilliant engagement of
MISS KATE REIGN OLDS
in Fulton and Maeder’s Sensational Drama of
DIAVOLA.
NOBODY’S DAUGHTER,
OB
THE BALLAD SINGER OF WAPPING,
presented in a very fine st.' b.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 23. FAREWELL BENEFIT OF
MISS KATE REIGNOLDS.
Nobody’s Daughter Matinee Wednesdays and Satur
days.
F IFTH AVENUE OPERA HOUSE, AD-
JOINING FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL.
THIRD AND LAST WEEK OF
BEN COTTON AND SAM SHARPLEY’S MIN
STRELS,
AT THIS ESTABLISHMENT,
As they appear at No. 514 Broadway. ?
ON MONDAY, AUGUST 26th.
ANOTHER NEW BILL,
MORE NEW ARTISTS,
First appearance of FRANK KRITTA,
And Mr. JOS. MORRIE.
See the programme.
The best ever presented in this city.
Eighth avenue opera house,
corner of Thirty-fourth street and Eighth avenue,
THE NEW BURLESQUE, entitled
SOMEBODY’S DAUGHTER,
SOMEBODY’S DAUGHTER,
SOMEBODY’S DAUGHTER.
FIRST WEEK OE GEORGE STURGES,
FIRST WEEK OF THOMAS CASEDY.
FIRST WEEK OF THE BROADWAY BOYS.
Josh Hart, Frank Kerns, W. B. Cavanagh, Dick
Ralph, etc., in a new programme.
Change of Programme every Monday and Thursday.
Mattinee every Saturday at hall prices.
SAN FRANCISCO MINSTRELS, No. 585
Broadway. Trouble commences at 8 o’clock.
Immense success of the Head and Front of Minstrelsy,
BIRCH, WAMBOLD, BERNARD AND BACKUS.
SAN FRANCISCO MINSTRELS,
whose success for the past three years is positive evi
dence of superiority over all similar organizations. First
week of
CASTE FROM MEMORY. •
ITALIAN OPERA WITH GERMAN ACCENT.
YALLER GAL THAT WINKED AT ME.
The Screaming Burlesque on the
BASE BALL MATCH. ATLANTICS VS. MUTUALS.
Tony pastor’s opera house,
No. 201 BOWERY, opposite Spring st.
AN ENTIRELY NEW SENSATION DRAMA,
founded on the recent war,
THE FEMALE SHARPSHOOTERS.
New Scenery. Music, Appointments, etc., and GRAND
MARCH and DRILL by 20 YOUNG LADIES.
TONY PASTOR in a new budget of Songs: Miss SA
SAH E. SWIFT, in graceful Athletics; the great Ballet
Troupe in a NEW BALLET. The Entire Company in a
NEW AND NOVEL OLIO.
.MATINEE 4JSD SATURDAY.
ORRELL SISTERS’ NEW YORK
THEATRE, No. 728 Broadway.
IMMEDIATE AND EXCESSIVE SUCCESS
OF
Mr. AUGUSTIN DALY’S new picturesque drama in 5
acts of Life and Love in these timee and this vicinity,
entitled
t'
nightly witnessed by fashionable and crowded audiences,
who applaud to the echo and redemand
THE GREAT SENSATIONAL SCENES AND INCI
DENTS.
THE TOMBS POLICE COURT!
THE BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF
• A FIFTH AVENUE RESIDENCE.
THE PIERS OF THE CITY AND RIVER BY
STARLIGHT!
HOW THE LOST TRIBES SPEND THEIR
EVENINGS.
THE GREAT RAILROAD SCENE.
THE TERRIFIC RAILROAD SCENE.
THE DOWN EXPRESS TRAIN.
THE 10:20 EXPRESS TRAIN.
THE SENSATION OF THE SEASON.
Declared by the universal voice to be the most surprising
thrilling dramatic effect ever seen upon the New York
stage, and nightly witnessed by amazed auditors with
bated breath and suspended animation.
This new and original drama is produced with a cast
and by a
STAR COMPANY
m STAR COMPANY
That is unequalled in any theatre at this time.
MISS ROSE EYTINGE as “ Laura Cortlandt.”
(The Belle of the Tuesday Sociable).
MISS BLANCHE GREY as “Pearl,”
the Beauty.”
MRS. SKERRETT as " The Girl who
was never brought up.”
MRS. WRIGHT as The Mother Thief.
MR. J. K. MORTIMER as Snorkey,
(The Soldier Messenger).
MR. A. H. DAVENPORT as A New
York “ Blood.”
MR. J. B. STUDLEY as “One of the Men
whom the law never reaches.”
MR. C. T. PARSLOE, Jr., as “A Sidewalk
Merchant Prince.”
MR. JAMES DUNN as “ A Tombs Lawyer.”
/ MR. H. RYNER as The Signal Man at the
Bend.”
The Press join the Public voice in praising this thrill
ing and dramatic panorama of Life m a Great City.
Seats secured six days in advance.
MATINEE ON SATURDAY.
Broadway theatre.
ADMISSION-FIFTY CENTS.
Business Manager W. A. Moore
The Lessee respectfully informs the public that, not
withstanding the unparalleled success of the
GREAT ENGLISH COMEDY OF
CAST E,
WITH MR. AND MRS. W. J. FLORENCE
and the unrivaled distribution of characters, prior en
gagemonts will limit its performance to TWELVE
NIGHTS AND TWO MATINEES MORE ONLY.
ON MONDAY, DURING THE WEEK, AND
SATURDAY MATINEE.
THE FLORENCES AND CASTE,
CASTE AND THE FLORENCES,
Supported by Mrs. F. 8. Chanfrau, Mrs. G. H. Gilbert,
Messrs. W. Davidge, Owen Marlow and E. Lamb.
ELEGANT SCENERY AND APPOINTMENTS.
Seats secured from 8 to 6, six days in advance.
_ Carriages may be ordered at 10%. ___
OLYMPIC THEATRE.
MONDAY EVENING, August 19th.
JOHN BROUGHAM
In his own Capital Dramitization of
DOMBEY AND SON,
Supported by
MISS EMILY THORNE,
And the following
ADMIRABLE CAST:
Capt. EDWARD CUTTLE..Mr. JOHN BROUGHAM.
Mr. Dombey Mr. C. Foster.
.J os Bagstock (for this , v v Q h „
Jackßunsby occasion only).. J '*• Sheridan.
Mr. Toots Mr. H. S. Murdock.
Garber (Especially engaged) Mr. Harry Wall.
Walter Gay (First appearance) Mr. Crosson.
Brogley Mr. E. T. Stelain.
S©l Gill Mr. Bland.
Bob the Grinder Mr. Peck.
Native Mr. G. Lewis.
Withers Mr. Willins.
Mrs. Skewton.. Mrs. E. Eldridge.
Edith Granger Mrs. Fred Meek.
Susan Nipper (For this occasion only) Miss Emily Thorne.
Florence Dombey -.MissLilly Eldridge.
Flowers Mrs. E. J. Parker.
In preparation.
O’DONNELL’S MISSION.
WALL ACK’S.
MONDAY EVENlNG—Commencing at 8.
ANOTHER TRIUMPH FOR LOTTA.
Brilliant artistic hit of
THE INCOMPARABLE LOTTA
in her personation of the two characters,
LITTLE NELL AND THE MARCHIONESS.
In a new four-act dramatization of
DICKENS’S “OLD CURIOSITY SHOP.”
By JOHN BROUGHAM, Esq.
EVERY EVENING. TILL FURTHER NOTICE,
LITTLE NELL
AND THE MARCHIONESS.
DICKENS’S STORY,
BROUGHAM’S DRAMA,
LOTTA’S IMPERSONATIONS.
Incidental to the Drama, a graphic representation of
AN ENGLISH FAIR.
jgOWERY THEATRE.
Engagement of the world-renowned equestrienne and
sensation actress,
MISS LEO HUDSON,
With her magnificent trained horse,
BLACK BESS.
. MAZEPPA. MAZEPPA.
Mazeppa Mias Leo Hudson
MISS LEO HUDSON AS MAZEPPA.
Mr. GEORGE CLARE has been engaged by Mr.
Freligh to sustain Miss Hudson.
SLASHER AND CRASHER-
rBVERRACE GARDEN.-SUNDAX'.
X Third avenue, bet. Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth sts
PHILLIP BERNET Proprietor.
THEODORE THOMAS’S
POPULAR GARDEN CONCERTS,
ON SUNDAY EVENING, AUG. 18, at
TENTH GRAND SUNDAY CONCERT.
THE CELEBRATED SOLOISTS,
Together with the GBAND ORCHESTRA, in a varied
and interesting programme.
admission; 25 cents.
MONDAY EVENING, Aug. 19, at 8,
SIXTY-THJRD POPULAR GARDEN CONCERT.
NIBLO’S garden.
Lessee and Manager WM. WHEATLEY.
THE BLACK CROOK.
RENEWED AND RECONSTRUCTED.
MONDAY EVENING. AUG. 19th,
THREE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-EIGHTH
performance of the Great Spectacle, when it will ba pre
sented with
JARRETT & PALMER’S
GRAND PARISIENNE BALLET,
strongly reinforced by new Artistes,
NEW BALLETS, COSTUMES AND MUSIC.
Marston’s exeat new scene,
AN ILLUMINATED BALL-ROOM.
in which will be given a
GRAND CARNIVAL AND MASQUERADE.
SEATS SECURED SIX DAYS IN ADVANCE.
THE SEPTEMBER NO. OF NICK MAX,
X is heavy on Watering Place doings.
C'IUITAB, PIANO, VIOLIN, SINGING.—
JI No. 242 West Twenty-sixth st., between Seventh
and Eighth aves. Call or send for a circular. Private
lessons. No classes. Terms favorable to all.
NEW ' YORK ASSEMBLY ROOMS,
BROADWAY, between 28th and 29th streets.
To let for Balls, Weddings, Sociables, Lectures, Con
certs, Meetings, Public Dinners, and first-class enter
tainments day or evening. Apply on the premises.
The books are also open for the coming Fail season.
E. FERRERO.

'OURNITURE ’ FURNITURE I
.fi? At G. W. SNBDEN & CAMPBELL’S,
No. 263 BOWERY, bet. Stanton and Houston streets.
Second Furniture Store from the Corner.
All kinds of Furniture, Mattresses, Bedding, Looking
Glasses, etc., Wholesale and Retail, below Auction
Prices. Goods warranted and delivered free. PATENT
SECRETARY BEDSTEADS, superior to anything of
the kind in the market. Furniture in Suits. Goods
boxed for Shipping. Note the Number.
Orprtiwip?, Or.
NEW CARPETS FOR FALL TRADE,
Comprising AXMINSTERS, ROYAL WILTONS,
VELVETS, BODY BRUSSELS,
TAPESTRY BRUSSELS,
EXTRA AND IMPERIAL THREE-PLYS AND
INGRAINS, OIL-CLOTHS,
DRUGGETS.
RUGS. MATTINGS,
MATS, ETC.,
FOR SALE AT RETAIL,
FOR CASH ONLY,
AND AT PRICES TO CORRESPOND.
GEO. E. L, HYATT,
No. 273 Canal street.
Bet. Broadway and Elm street.
rpilE CHEAP CARPET STORE.
ROCK &. KELLEHER,
No. 354 BOWERY,
Between Fourth and Great Jones street.
GREAT REDUCTION
IN
CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, &c.
ENGLISH BRUSSELS at 60 per yard.
DO. THREE-PLY at 1 50
TAPESTRY INGRAIN at 125
EXCELLENT DO at 100 “
BEAUTIFUL NEW PATTERNS... .at 60 cents.
100 rolls of OIL CLOTH, slingtly damaged,
at 40 cents per yard.
ROCK & KELLEHER, No. 354 Bowery.
US. STEAM CARPET CLEANING
• WORKS, Nos. 157 to 163 WEST THIRTY-SEC-
OND STREET, between 6th and 7th avenues, Naw York.
Our machines and facilities are the very best, and we
can warrant perfect satisfaction, as everything is done
under our personal supervision. No injury to the finest
fabric. Thoroughly frees the Carpets from dust, beating
and brushing all parts uniformly. Effectually expels all
vermin. Hundreds of references may be seen at our
office. STEWART & ADLISON.
IANO, PIANO,"PIANO LESSONS, BY
a pupil of LISZT, No. 242 West Twenty-sixth street,
near Eighth avenue.
CORKER OF
CANAL 4
BEDDING, j< EW York,
FURNITURE, '
Of every description,
Housekeepers or Persons I.
Going to Housekeeping will a
be supplied and can Pay by
Weekly or Monthly
If I’referre/iitiS
Sunday Edition, August 18 t
ORAND MOONLIGHT EXCURSION
JJT L S. U. ASSOCIATION.
.Eighth Annual Excursion up the North
River and return Monday evening,
August 19th.
STEAMER AARON WILBUR,
Barge Wm. Meyers, a fine brass and quadrille Band.
iiCKets one dollar each, admitting a gentleman and lady„
O T> . ttutz*. CAN BE PROCURED OF
£ ,P kPAX MOND » No. 244 South street; J. H. CREED.,
84 ,Pjke stro et; J- CORNEY, foot of Broome street 5;
ana at the Landings on the evening of the excursion-
of all kinds on board. The boat will landt
th 4th street, Williamshurgh, at 7J4P.M.; Peck
at sLpAI ’ Brooni ,e street, 8%, and Christopher street
A™ CONCERT, AT ELM
PARK, STATBN ISLAND,
On THURSDAY, AUGUST 22d,18C7.
HARRY HILL, accompanied by KENNEDY’S ad
.QUADRILLE BAND and CAMP
BELL S unrivalled NEGRO MINSTREL TROUPE,
purposes a PUBLIC PIC-NIC and CONCERT, at ELM
PARK, STATEN ISLAND, on THURSDAY, Aug. 22,
186<. The introduction and combination of the Concert
characterized by Vocal and Instrumental Music, anti
diversified with Sentimental, Comic and Negro Melo
dies and Fancy Costumes Dancing, will lend anew
and pleasing feature to the popular demonstration. To
constitute the occasion a purely pleasurable novelty, the
Science of Self-Defense will likewise be artistically
and amicab’y illustrated by the three distinguished Eng
lish devotees now on a visit to this city, and the three
equaJy-renowned American Champions of the Manly
* 4 e y will appear in appropriate costume. Thei
uance, in all its gay, alluring and bewitching fascina-'
tions and endearments, under the direction of a polite
a?d well-versed instructor, a* the designated intervals,
wi'i conserve and consummate the general pleasure ana
enjoyment.
fojc o will be in attendance to keep erder.
THE STEAMER FOR FLM PARK will leave Pier 191
feints? tpA°^ ndt a ? d De y streets, at 10:15 A. M. (a
BRASS BAND goes down at this hour) and at 1:50 P. M '
Return trip 7 P. M.
TICKETS, 25 Cents. Children under 12 years, free.
SCOTT I S H GAM ES~ ’
THE ELEVENTH ANNUAL GAMES
OF THE
NEW YORK CALEDONIAN CLUB
WILL BE HELD AT
JONES’ WOOD,
ON THURSDAY, SEPT. sth, 186?.
ROBERTSON’S CELEBRATED BANDS and Pipers
or the Club will furnish the music on the occasion.
m , , , TICKETS, FIFTY CENTS.
Io be bad only at the gate on the day of the games,
Programme of games in future notice.
rf-'IONEY ISLAND. CONEY ISLAND?
-O The splendid Steamer NORWALK, free,.
C«pt. G. W. Wilson, makes-regular trips j*
t° Island and Fort Hamilton, from
NORTHRIVER, as follows; Christopher street, 9:20?
12:20; 3:20. Jay street, 9:40; 12:40; 3:10. Pier No. 4 (Mor
nrfl AA^ d 4, connecting with East river boat.
EAbr RIVER.—The splendid steamer NAUSHOJi
runs every day, including Sunday, as follows: North.
Eighth street, E. D., at 10 and 2; Broome street, N„ Y..
10:15 and 2:15: Peck Slip, 10:30 and 2:30; Fulton Ferry-
Brooklyn 10:45 and 2:45; and Sackett street. Brooklyn!
at 11 and 3, connecting with North river boat.
As Coney Island has not been, and will not be, used foi?
Quarantine purposes, the inducements are greater than,
ever to visit it. The steamboat and other accommo-*
dations are Better than those of any previous season.
Tne PAVILION HOTEL has been thoroughly reno-*
improved, and the BATHING AR-»
RANGEMENTS surpass those of any Watering Place in,
the country.
QUNDAY BO ATS FOR NE WARIUiHIf
splendid steamboats MAGEN TA,
and THOMAS P. WAF, will leave New F
V ork and Newark on SUNDAY next,
w WT Af, G UST Ih.h, AS FOLLOWS:
Leave N. xfoot Barclay Leave Newark foot Centra
street. street-
10:39 o’clock A. M., 8 o’clock. A. M..
4:30 P. M., 2 o’clock, P. M.,
. 9.30 P. M., 7:30 P. M.,
Stopping at Bergen Point each way. W. GASTON, Supt,
New route between
NEW YORK AND BOSTON,
via r
BRISTOL, R. I.
THE NARRAGANSETT STEAMSHIP COMPANY’S
r>T>TGm^r W A]SD MAGNIFICENT STEAMERS,
.Captain Ben Brayton*
PROVIDENCE Captain B. M. Simmons.-
ARE NOW RUNNING ON LONG ISLAND SOUND*
No - 40 ’ NORTH RIVER,
FOOT OF CANAL STREET (ADJOINING ALBANY
PIER), EVERY AFTERNOON (Sundays excepted), at?
fr o clock, connecting at Bristol with the Boston and.
Providence railroad, reaching Boston with shorter rail
road-ride than by any other route. Distance by rail, 54
miles—time, 1 hour and 30 minutes.
These steamers are the largest, staunchest, and mosfi;
elegant ever placed upon American waters; of 3,000 tona.
burthen, engine of 2.800 horse power, thoroughly sea
going in all respects; fitted in the most substantial man
ner. with water-tight compartments, narrow guards.,
boilers below decks, and with every arrangement foe
comfort and safety.
In the number and size of their state-rooms, and ex-(
tent and splendor of their accommodations, they are un-j
surpassed, and in the strength of their hulls fully equal
to ocean steamers.
State-rooms secured, tickets for sale, and freight ar-<
rangements made at the office of the Company, "on tha
Pier at New York.
CENTRAL NORMAL MUSICAL CON-?
V? SERVATORY, No. 242 West Twenty-sixth
between Seventh and Eighth avenues. J. JAY WAT-t
SON, the “American Paganini,” Agent and Musical-
Director. Lessons strictly private.
PREAT REDUCTION-LOW FARE TO
VJT THE WEST, NORTH and EAST,
via TROY LINE OF STEAMERS, from
Pier No. 44 North River,foot of Spring st.,
daily at 6 P. M.. Saturdays excepted.
LIST OF FARES FROM NEW YORK.
Albany and Troy 00 Saratoga 1 75
Schenectady 1 31 Fort ’Edward 2 45
Fonda 1 38 Whitehall 3 33,
Utica 2 45 Rutland 4 00.
Rome 2 76 Burlington 6 0(1
Syracuse 3 54 North Adams 2 001
Rochester 5 30 St. Albans 7 25*
Lockport 6 35 Ogsdenburg 10 53
Suspension Bridge.... 675 Montreal 975
Buffalo 6 75
And proportionate reduction to all intermediate pointy
and stations west from Buffalo.
Tickets sold and baggage checked at the office or on
board.
Tourists and pleasure travel
ers can obtain
COMBINATION EXCURSION TICKETS
AT REDUCED RATES, •
Embracing all the principal points of interest in
Northern Now York, the Canadas, New England and the
Lake Superior region, at the offices of the Erie Railway.
No. 241 BROADWAY,
Depot foot of Chambers street, New York, or Long?
Dock Depot, Jersey City.
PEOPLE’S LIN E-G- R E
REDUCTION. _
$1 00 TO A LBANY.
On and after MONDAY, June 17, 1867. passage to Al
bany by People’s Line Steamers will be $1 00 only.
ST. JOHN—Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
DREW—Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
I? ORT LEE, PLEASANT VALLE yYnS
1 BULL’S FERRY.
Steamboat PALISADE leaves foot of .
Spring street, Sundays included, at 10, 2,
5, and ‘iki P. M., touching at 22d street.
KTORTH SHORE
X™ Steamers POMONA and THOMAS
HUNT. Elm Park—A. M., 5:30, 7:10, r
39:15, 11:50. P. M., 3:40, 5:30.
Richmond—A. M., 5:45, 7:30, 8:39, 10:25. 32. P. M., 2J
3:59, 5.40. FACTORYVILLE—A. M., 5:55, 7:40,8:40, 10:35-
P. M., 12:10, 2:10, 4, 5:50. Snug Harbor-A. M., 6, 7:45.
8:45, 10:40. P. M., 12:15, 2:15, 4:05, 5,55. New Brighton—
A. M., 6:10, 7:55,8:55,10:50. P. M., 12:25,2:25,4:15,6. New
York—A. M., 7, 9,10:30. 12. P. M., 2,4, 5:30, 7.
SUNDAY.
Elm Park—A. M., 9:45, 11:15. P. M., 12:45 , 2:15,4:45,6!.
Port Richmond—A. M., 7, 8,9:55, 11:25. P. M., 12:55’!
2:25, 4:55, 6:10. Factoryville—A. M., 7:10,8:10,10:05,
11:35. P. M., 1:05, 2:35, 5:05, 6:20. New Brighton—A<’
M., 7:20, 8:20, 10:15. 11:45. P. M., 1:15, 2:45, 5:15, 6:302
New York—A. M., 8:30, 10,11:30. P. M., 1, 2:30, 4,
7:30. New York Pier 19, between Courtlandt and Dyef
streets. To let for Sunday School Picnics, Pomona.
Grove. ANNING SMITH, Superintendant.
CENTRAL RAILROAD OF NEW
JERSEY. Passenger and
Depot in New York, foot of Liberty
street —connecting at Hampton Junct.ion
with the Delaware, Lackawfanna and Western Railroads,,
and at Easton with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and its.
connections, forming a direct line to Pittsburgh and th©' •
West, without change of cars.
ALLENTOWN LINE TO THE WEST.
Three Express Trains daily for the West, except Sun
days, when one train in the evening.
Sixty Miles and Three Hours saved by this line to Chi
cago, Cincinnati, St. Louis, etc., with but one change of;
cars.
SPRING ARRANGEMENTS.
Commencing April 29, 1867, leave New York as follows?
6:30 A. M.—For fi’lemington, Easton, Bethlehem/
Mauch Chunck, Williamsport, Wilkesbarre, Mahonw
City, &c.
9 a. m.—Western Express for Easton. Allentown, Har-<
risburg, Pittsburgh, and the West, with but one change*
of cars to Cincinnati or Chicago, and but two changes tai
St. Louis: connects at Harrisburg with Northern Central
and Philadelphia and Erie Roads, for Erie and the Oil
Regions. Connects at Junction with Delaware, Lacka
wana and Western R. R. for Stroudsburg, Water Gap*.
Scranton, Pittston, Kingston, Great Bend &c.
12 M. Train.—For Easton, Allentown, Mauch Chunck,
Wilkesbarre, Reading, Pottsville, Harrisburg, &c.
3:30 p. M.—For Plainfield.
4:00 p. M.—For Easton.
5:00 P. M.—For Somerville and Flemington.
5:00 p.m.—Cincinnati Express—For Easton, Bethle-*
hem, Mauch Chunck, Reading. Harrisburg, Pittsburg/
Chicago and Cincinnati—connects at Harrisburg witb>;
train for Williamsport, Erie, &c. Sleeping cars ta
Pittsburg.
6:15 p. m.—For Junction and intermediate stations.
7:30 p. M.—For Somerville.
8:00p. m.—Western Express Train.—For Easton,,
Allentown, Reading, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh and .thei
West. Sleeping cars through from Jersey City to Pitts—"
burgh every evening.
Additional trains are run to Bergen Point, Elizabeth,.
&e. p
Tickets for the West can be obtained at the office of tha
Central Railroad of New Jersey foot of Liberty street, .
North River, at No. 1 Astor House, at Nos. 254, 27E
and 526 Broadway, and No. 10 Greenwich street.
JOSIAH O. STEARNS Superintendent.
Divorces legally procured*
without publicity. Other good cases prosecutecf
without fee in advance. Consultation free. M. HOWES,
Attorney and Counselor, No. 78 Nassau street.
B. DECKER,
PIANO-FORTE
WAREROOMS, No. 4 BLEECKER ST., I J 2 I S I
Near Bowery, N. Y.S
N. B.—NO PATENT HUMBUGS NOR CONNEC
TION WITH A HOUSE OF THE SAME NAME IS
THE SAME STREET.
IMPORTANT FOR BUYERS AND HIR-
i ERS OF PIANOS.
■ FOR SALE.
2-OCT. ROSEWOOD PIANOS, LOUIS
XIV. STYLE, WORTH $450, WILL It X 3
BE SOLD BY MONTHLY PAYMENT OF $4 50.
The Brooklyn Musical Insrument Saving and Loan!
Society, chartered by the State, is now three years in
successful operation, and distributes Pianos among its
members at the above rates.
The Society have so far distributed over one hundred
Pianos, and they have given universal satisfaction. Tha
Pianos are to be seen, and further information will b©
given, at the office of the Society, No. 367 Fulton street,
under the Park Theatre. Letters to be directed to tha
Secretary, H. GOLDSMITH, at the office.
BOARD OF MANAGERS.
D. S. S. GUY, CH. FIELD,
Dr F. BOND, Dr. H. MEDtER,
A. KURTH. FR. DEPFUHL,
N. H. DAVIS. GERARD WILLETT, President.
RUDOLPH FULLGRAFF, Vice; President.
H. GOLDSMITH, Sec. WM. KRAFT, Treas.
Guitar, guitar, guitar lessons,
by a pupil of MARTINI, No. 242 West Twenty"
sixth street, near Eighth avenue.
HE HORACE WATERS GRAND
Square and Upright PIANOS, ME-
LODEONS and CABINET ORGANS, gggßigW
wholesale and retail. To let, and rent al- ” ®
lowed if purchased. Monthly payments J j x * .♦ *•
received for the same. Second-hand Pianos at bargains*
from S6O to $225. Factory and warerooms, No. 481 Broad- \
way. Cash paid for second-hand Pianos. Pianos tuned
and repaired. Sheet Music, ft little soiled, at centft
perpage. HORACE WAIJwp.

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