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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, August 25, 1867, Image 8

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I STORY JUN OBPM.
An Episode of Life Among the
Lowly.
There appeared, quite recently, in the columns oj
the Dispatch, an account of a midnight peregrina
tion among the •• slums” of the Sixth Ward, and the
scenes of misery, degradation and crime to be found
in that locality. In that article, in a general way, we
invited attention to the unfortunate victims of ignor
ance, crime and neglect that are so hetcrogenously
mingled in the small area of the Five Points. We
pointed out the monstrous wrongs, that even the
most superficial examination disclosed, and the moral
and physical leprosy that prevailed, almost unheeded
and quite unchecked. In our investigations we were
made acquainted with
A LIFE EPISODE
of a most harrowing character and sad interest, that,
we believe, will repay perusal, and furnish an incite
ment to reflection, and perhaps action. It is only
one of hundreds of cases, quite as revolting, that may
toe found in the same neighborhood; but we show it
up distinctly, and away from its dark surroundings,
as a type of what may be found in a pretentiously
Christian community, that boasts—and not without
reason—of its philanthropy and enlightened spirit.
Put to our story of
MAD MEGG.
Accompanied by a gentlemanly and intelligent
member of the Sixth Precinct police, we visited most
of the cheap lodging places in Baxter, Park, and adja
cent streets, an account of which has already been
given in these columns. In one of these, designated
as No. 15 Baxter street, formed by the mere excava
tion of the earth, some eight or ten feet deep, and
twelve by fit teen feet in size, the bare foundation
stones forming the walls, the floor and rafters of
the upper story the ceiling, and with no other means
of light and ventilation than the opening in front, we
found but a single occupant as wo entered, though
twelve, we were told, made that hole in the earth—it
was nothing else—their nightly resting place and
shelter, This single occupant the officer addressed
as "Mad Megg.” That she was a female was indi
cated by the rags that covered her, but whether she
was a child or an o.d woman could not be guessed.
She was, in fact, both—a child in years, and an old
woman in sad experience. Her clothing failed to
conceal her person; long red hair hung in coarse and
heavy folds about her neck and breast; she was
loathsomely dirty, and her breath was, like the whole
place, foul with the fumes of liquor.
“ How do you get on, Megg ?” asked the officer.
“They don’t pay me, and I ain’t got no money,
and Murphy says he’ll put me out, and Charley’s
been here again and licked me. I’ll cut his heart
out when I see him,” the girl answered, in a wild
and incoherent manner.
“She keeps this place,” the officer said to us.
“ Her mother died the other day. She was an awful
old hag, and hadn’t been sober lor three years, to my
certain knowledge. She used to get the money out
of the lodgers, or she wouldn’t let them in. But they
beat Megg; they come here and sleep at night, and
won’t pay her anything, and now the agent is going
to put her out. She will have to go to the hospital
pretty soon to have her baby.”
“ Has she no one belonging to her ?” we asked.
“No; and she belongs to no one. I’ve known her
ever since she came to the country—that’s between
five and six years ago; she was a pretty little girl,
then; but her father killed himself with gin, and her
mother has gone the same way; and Megg has been
a prostitute ever since she was twelve-years old; she’s
only a little more than fifteen, now. One time the
Five Pointe Mission people got hold of her, dressed
her up all nice and clean, and she looked first rate,
and could sing beautiful, and was learning to read,
and was going out West to live on a farm; but the
old folks were always trying to get her away from the
Mission, for she could make a good deal of money for
them when she had her nice clothes. At last a fellow
we call “ Singing Charley,” got hold of her, and with
him she came here to Eve with her parents, or rather
with her mother, for her father had been dead some
time, then, and she has been here ever since. Char
ley, however, has got tired of her, and never comes
here now only when he’s drunk, and then he abuses
her, and then she gets drunk and goes out after him,
. and they fight in the street, and often get locked up.
The Mission folks have given her up, and don’t do
anything for her any more.”
While we stood listening to the officer, the girl had
■thrown herself upon a heap of old rags, by courtesy
called a bod, and three or four of the lodgers came
in, and without taking any notice of us, or saying a
word, went and hid themselves away among rags and
.filth, and became invisible by the dim light of a tal
low candle that flickered and sputtered, and burned
dimly on a projecting ledgb of the stone wall. We
made our way into the street again, and on the way
to the station house, were made acquainted with the
brie!, sad, sinful history of the wretched orphan we
bad just left. It may be summed up in a few sen
tences,
THE IRISH EMIGRANTS.
“ It is about six years ago,” said our guide, “ since
Barney Berrell, with his wife and little daughter
Margaret, came to this country. The child was then
about ten years old, and as pretty, plump and prom-
$ little girl, with curly, auburn hair, rosy cheeks
and b^? ht W? ? yes as 4 Dd Wwhere; and ,
a rare treasure ?l ie WQUId nave £*** “ ‘‘nZ
could take care of Her. You what she is ’
Ci-rived in New York,
rbr- tnJo- 8 81UR 5 e ?'-jw gnlnfca and a few shillings,
•-r- U P thSir fe&idence in an upper room of that
house over there (pointing to an immense six-story
barracks in Baxter street, and directly opposite to
where we then stood), and ho picked up a living by
shoveling coal and doing odd chores, and when he
bad been here a few months, he voted the Demo
cratic ticket, and that got him a job to clean the
streets. But nearly all the money he received was
epent for rum, and in this respect his wife was nearly
as bad as himself. Between them the poor child was
neglected and micared for. She was allowed to run
the streets half naked, and most of the time more
than half starved.
“ When these people had been in this country about
a year and a hah, they hired the cellar from which we
have just come, and took boarders. What kind of
people those boarders were you can judge by what
you saw. To Berrell it made little difference where
or how he lived. He was generally drunk; and if he
made his appearance in the cellar at all, it was gene
rally to beg money from his wife, or to extort, by fair
means or foul, from his child the wages of her sin
and degradation. He was frequently arrested, and
passed the best part of the last two years of his life
on the Island, where he died, about nine months ago,
of delirium tremens. He wasn’t missed, and no
tears were shed over his grave. The widow was
probably a little better off after her bereavement, for
she then had all her earnings to herself; but what
ever she got she spent for gin, and laid around drunk
day in and day out.
“ Well, in the early part of last week she, too,
died, died drunk, as her husband had. A coroner
came, and held an inquest upon the body, which oc
cupied about five minutes, and in the afternoon of
■the same day a man went there with a pine- wood
coffin, and just as she had died, the body was placed
in it and carried to Potter’s Field, and buried in a
pauper’s grave. There were few women, a few old
hags, had sat by the body during the night, and
bowled dismally over the corpse, and the neighbors
said it was a wake. They saw the body taken away,
and then they went back to their rags and filth, and
procured some liquor, and drank themselves into in
sensibility. But the orphaned girl, what of her?
Nobody seemed to know or care. But she was really
grief-stricken for the loss of her parent, and some
glimmering of her forlorn and friendless condition
seemed to dawn upon her. As long as the body re
mained, in the cellar, she sat by it and wept, and
when the man came and took it away she got upon
the wagon, and went with it to the grave. How she
sustained life, whether she eat, or drank, or even
slept for days and nights, nobody knew. But two
days after the funeral she returned to the celler, her
only home. She asserted her right to its possession
and all it contained. Those who occupied it as
lodgers, and had paid her mother from ten to fifteen
cents per night, refused to recognize the daughter,
and turned her out. But an appeal to the police set
tled her rights and placed her in possession. But
still the lodgers, though they remained, refused to
pay her, and on the night we met with her she had
just had a row with her lover, who had beaten and
then left her.”
“And now, sir,” said the policeman, “you have
the whole story oi that girl. It’s a hard case. In a
few days, if she don’t pay the rent, sho will be driven
from that celt er into the street, and then the authori
ties will pick her up and send her to the Penitentiary.
Though only fifteen years of age, a mere child, in
fact, she is too low in. the scale of humanity even to
ply the vocation of a prostitute. Diseased in body
and mind, sowing the seeds of pollution wherever she
goes, she is indeed one of the lost ones of earth.
There is no prospect for her but the prison and the
grave. If she lives, she will in a tew weeks become a
mother. But such cases are common in this neigh
borhood, ond don’t attract much attention.”
By this time we had reached the station-house,
and parted with our who had exposed to
our view a sad phase of life in this city of striking
contrasts. We knew, as most people do, in a gen
eral way, that such vice; and misery, and degrada
tion existed, and was in fact quite common, but we
had never been before brought into its actual pres
ence. We do not propose to trouble the reader with
any of the speculations which the night’s experience
Inspired. We have accomplished our task by re
lating the facts as we found them. The story we
have told, or rather the story related to us by the
policeman, and the scenes described in connection
therewith, is the result of actual and personal ob
servation, and it is told in the hope that it will at
tract the attention of those who have the power to
prevent, or at least, to mitigate the evils which it de
picts. Individual effort, however zealous, earnest,
or well directed, is powerless to meet such cases as
we have herein described. This is shown by the fact
that beneath the very shadow of those twin temples
of charity, the Five Points Mission and the House
of such a condition of things as is illus
trated by our story of an orphan, can continue to ex
ist, yet such is the case, and philanthropy fails to
reach them. But the power of the great body poli
tic, as represented by our Commissioners of Chari
ties and Corrections, the police, and Board of Health
officers, could root out such iniquities at will. The
case of the girl Margaret Berrell, is paralleled by
hundreds of others. Such girls may be daily and
nightly found in the streets m scores and hundreds,
and such parents as Mr. and Mrs. Berrell, are found
in aU the slums of the Metropolis. And such a con
dition of things is indefensible because preventable.
The police can arrest, and the Commissioners of
Charities care for such children, and the Health
Board, are empowered in the most summary man
ner to close out aU such filthy abiding-places as that
in which we found the young orphan. But
A SEQUEL TO THE POLICEMAN’S STORY,
strangely revealed to us on the same night, of an
other experience, deserves to be related, as it rounds
off the strange sad history, and points the inevitable
climax of an unholy life. After parting with our
guide of the evening, and, while deeply ruminating
over what we had seen and heard, and wending our
way in the direction of Fulton Ferry, we were roused
from our musings by a commotion in front of one of
the Baxter street cellars we had recently visited. A
small crowd was gathered round two persons en
gaged in an altercation. A woman’s voice rent the
air with frantic screams, above which could be heard
deep oaths and imprecations of a man. “ Let me go
you b b, curse you, let me go,” was heard from
tbc man, “ you have killed me, you have killed me.”
He loosened her grasp from his throat, and then with
a terrible blow with his clenched fist he struck her
in the face, and the woman fell with a heavy thug on
the hard pavement, the crowd attempted to stop him;
but maddened with fear and phrensy, he dashed
aside those who attempted to stop him, and ran with
desperation in the direction oi Pearl street. A stern
loud voice commanded ijim to stop, he djd UQt heed
At, and the next moment he was tawgbt to X&9
blowjof a policeman’s club feUed him where he stood.
He was picked up and conveyed, bleeding, to the
Station House. Soon after the senseless form of a
woman was dragged there in a hand cart. It was
Wild Megg, the orphan of the Baxter street lodging,
we had met a few hours earlier in the evening. The
man was her lover, “ singing Charley,” and the sup
posed father of the child. The police reports in the
papers of the next day recorded the arrest of Charley
Ryan, a young man, 22 years of age, charged with a
felonious assault upon Margaret Berrell. Ho was
sent to the Penitentiary for six months. Wild Megg,
died about a week ago, at Bellevue Hospital, in giv
ing birth to an illegitimate child.
WHAT IS IT?
To the Editor of the New York Dispatch :
I feel myself called upon to depart from a rule by
me heretofore inflexibly observed, to wit: Never to
answer or reply to a newspaper article, or engage in
a newspaper controversy; but an article having ap
peared under the above heading over the signature
of Levein & Ham, counsel for a woman styling her
self Kate Dickerson, in your issue of the 18th inst.,
and the said article being from beginning to end,
simply a tissue of fabrications and misrepresenta
tions made for the sole object of further adding in
sult to injury, and not even sparing counsel or per
son s who have never by word, act or deed, done
aught to injure the plaintiff, I could not consistently,
with the duty which I not only owe to my client, my
professional associate and myself, but to a lady whose
name has most unwarrantably been dragged and
paraded before the public, and to the public itself,
allow the base coinage of the writers of that article
to go uncontradicted and unrebuked before the pub-
Ec.
In the first place your correspondents send forth a
great whine because the tidings of their client’s
wrong doings have obtained such publicity as to
have reached the “county of her birth,” where her
“respectable and worthy,” and to use her own lan
guage, “ wealthy parents reside.”
Since when, 1 may ask, has she or her counsel been
seized with the desire to keep this matter from the
public gaze? Is it since she went to the “county of
the birth” of Mr. Dickerson, among all his friends,
relatives and acquaintances, and there trumpeted
abroad, not only to his, but to her own discredit the
unenviable relation existing between them ?
Is it since her sensitive counsel so watchful lost the
feelings of any of the relatives of their chent should
be wounded themselves, resorted to the monstrous
and unparalleled course of writing to the father and
family of the defendant, letters teeming to over
flowing with abuse of him? Is it since the plaintiff
herself spared no means to make it knojvn wherever
the defendant had a friend, that he had been guilty
of shocking enormities toward her ? It must be that
these extraordinarily delicate and sensitive people,
having abused Mr. Dickerson and his wife in overy
possible manner from open slander , and libel to the
meanest latent inuendo for over three months, and at
every opportunity forgot that “as ,ye sow so shall ye
reap.”
Second. As to the proceedings before Justice Mans
field, I knew nothing of them until about the 2d of
July, some three days before the hearing, when I
was requested by Mr. Dickerson to appear for the de
fence. Upon arriving tit the court-room, which was
about five minutes after 9 o’clock (where I found the
plaintiff’s counsel threatening the defendant with all
sorts of actions and punishments) I at once signified
my readiness to proceed, some minutes after which
Joseph R. Dickerson, Esq., (who up to that time had
not spoken .to, or held communication with, his
brother tor upward of two years, in consequence of
his disgraceful connection with the plaintiff) also came
into court, and we together walked into the examina
tion room, where sat the complainant together with a
misguided sister of the defendant (who has since re
pented of her rash and ill-advised action and of the
confidence too hastily reposed in the plaintiff by her)
together with several other persons. Mr. Sevein
then made some remark concerning Mr. J. R. Dick
erson, when that gentleman stated tha tas he was a
witness in the case, on behalf of the defendant, he
could not properly act as bis counsel.
As to the statement that “ Mr. Dickerson publicly
refused to have anything to do with the case,” I pro
claim it to be false, as Mr. Dickerson not only takes a
great interest in the case but manifests it whenever
occasion offers.
The complaint for abandonment as first drawn by
the counsel for the prosecution, being full cf such
errors as a school-boy would detect at the first glance,
I simply suggested that the said errors be corrected
in oraer that the record should be perfect and correct,
and upon counsel declining to consent, I moved the
court to correct the errors which was at once done.
This was the only objection raised by me to the
proceeding and the examination was then proceeded i
with. The complainant was placed on the stand as a
witness on her own behalf, and after exhausting his
witness on the direct, her counsel evidently
not expecting that she would be cross-exam- i
ined, toid her to leave the stand, and seemed
quite surprised when informed by me that a :
cross-examination of the witness was also pari
of the performance. The cross examination was 1
then proceeded with, and the counsel for the prose
cutrix perceiving that if a full cross examination '
were allowed, she would be convicted out of her own 1
mouth of wilful and deliberate perjury, for the pur
pose of delay, threw all manner of obstacles in the ’
way of counsel for the defence by objecting to each 1
and every question asked in cross examination, the I
evidence of the frivolousness of the objections being ]
that not a* single one was sustained by court. J
soon *xe reasonamy cornu, ior an ad- '
jOumment, on the ground that he had a pressing en
gagement down town, which, notwithstanding, that
we declared ourselves ready to sit all day and all ■
night to take testimony, was granted.
On the adjourned day neithdl* the complainant nor’
her counsel appearing, a motion was made by me for
an attachment to compel her attendance, instead of
which, a notice specifying the day and hour to which
the cause stood adjourned was served upon Levein
& Ham, the attorneys for the prosecutrix, and by
them pigeon-holed, as to use his own language, he
“ did not see fit to send for his client,” although she
was within one-half-hour’s walk of their office.
The next deliberate falsehood contained in said
article is, “ Mrs. Dickerson subsequently ascertained
that her husband was living at Powers Hotel, in this
city, with a woman named Eleanor C. Acret,” &c.,
&c.
In the first place the lady spoken of as Eleanor C.
Acret, is Mrs. Dickerson, the wife of the defendant,
a lady who was married in such a manner, and with
such proper ceremonies that she will find no difficul
ty whatever in proving her marriage by testimony
other than her own whenever it may become necessary
go to do. Her marriage with Mr. Dickerson, having
been published in the daily papers of New York,
Brooklyn, and Philadelphia, and was not only fully
known to the complainant, but was the subject of
correspondence and conversation for weeks before
tho suit for abandonment was commenced, (and be
fore the prosecutrix ever knew that such a law-firm
as Levein & Ham ever existed,) between the prose- |
cutrix and Mr. Dickerson’s family, in proof of
which I would state that the prosecutrix,
before commencing the proceeding for aban
donment consulted (before waiting upon her present
distinguished counsel) several eminent lawyers, both
in this State and Pennsylvania, all of whom, accord
ing to her own statement, refused to have anything
to do with her. One, however—William R. Dicker
son, Esq., an eminent Pennsylvania lawyer, now re
tired from practice, and who is also a brother of the
defendant—after having visited the defendant and
his wife at Powers’ Hotel, met the complainant at the
residence of a relative, and after she had made a full
statement to him, embracing the fact that he had
married Miss Acret, and was Eving with her at Pow
ers’ Hotel, advised her “that if her statement was
true, Lewis” (the defendant) “ deserved to be pun
ished, and the most proper punishment would be to
commence an action for divorce and alimony against
him, and thereby compel him to support her for the bal
ance of her existence,” all of which occurred at least
two weeks previous to the action for abandonment
being cemmenced.
Now, sir, as to concluding falsehood, to wit: “In
the suit for divorce, Mr. Dickerson, who defends the
action in person, has manifested thus far tho same
eager desire, &c., &c.,” I would say, that in that ac
tion Mr. Dickerson has never yet appeared in court
without counsel, and that in the several motions al
ready made in the actioq he has not appeared except
by counsel; that as such counsel I have, ever since
the litigation between the parties first began, endea
vored, by every means within my power, to bring the
entire matter to an early conclusion upon the merits.
If this had been the object of the plaintiff or her
counsel, they would certainly have taken advantage
of the opportunities already afforded them, and would
not have vainly endeavored to obtain, by decidedly
sharp practice, some petty advantage over the de
fendant.
Had they pursued tho former course, and met us
anywhere “ fairly and squarely” upon the merits, the
material issues in this case would have been disposed
of long ago; this woman would have be«n "returned
to the oblivion whence she sprang, and this action,
founded in fraud, bolstered up by perjury, and at
tempted to be galvanized into existence by effrontery,
would already have ceased to be of this world.
In how far the actions of the plaintiff have been
those of a “ deeply wronged and injured woman,” I
will, without a word of comment, leave to an un- ;
prejudiced and unbiassed public to decide, and, with- i
out encroaching further upon your space,
I remain, your obedient servant,
H. B. Davis,
Counsel for Louis H. Dickerson, defendant.
Alleged Disorderly House and
House of Assignation.—Mrs. Caroline Mitche 11, a
woman not unknown in the purlieus of New York, and
at present proprietress of a public house at Union
Hill, was taken before Justice Pope, of Hoboken, yes
terday, charged with keeping a disorderly house and
house of assignation. The complainant, a respecta
ble citizen, deposed that Mrs. CaroEne Mitchell has
kept a house at Union Hill for the purpose of prosti
tution and assignation, and now keeps and boards in
said house about six prostitutes during the week,
and on Sundays entertains six extra women in said
house tor the'accommodation of male visitors, and
the purpose of prostitution; and deponent believes
said CaroEne Mitchell sells liquor in the said house
without Ecense so to do; that the said house is a dis
orderly house and a nuisance to the neighborhood.
The accused, upon being taken before Justice Pope,
gave bail in the sum of SI,OOO, to answer at the Oc
tober term of Court, Adam Wahl, of Hoboken, be
coming her surety.
It will be recollected that about two months since
the accused caused the arrest in New York of the
notorious rogue and burglar, Grenthal, for burglar
ously entering her sleeping-room and taking about
SSOO worth of jewelry and wearing apparel, in default
of finding a casket of jewelry valued at $2,000, which
he was supposed to have been after. Mr. Mitchell
had a severe struggle with Grenthal, but he suc
ceeded in getting away with the booty, but was ar
rested in New York and taken before a justice of the
peace the next day, when he was discharged for want
of jurisdiction, and has since kept out of the way.
About twelve years since Mrs. Mitchell’s name was
before the public in connection with the murder of
Tompkins, of Hoboken, which created a good deal of
excitement at .the time.
Mrs. Mitchell, as is alleged, was keeping a fashion
■ able brothel in Muffierry street, New York, and one
night during a disturbance young Tompkins received
• a blow from a slung-shot or handy billy, which frac
tured his skull. He walked to the Hoboken ferry
where he became ill and being conveyed home in an
insensible condition where he died without ever
being able to give an account of the affair, and conse
( quently the crime could not be fastened upon any
one, although at the time, it was believed that the
fatal blow was dealt by the hand of the woman who
i is the subject of the above paragraph.
i During the performance of Robinson’s Circus
; at Norfolk on Thursday night, a portion of the seats
. gave way, precipitating two hundred persons to the
ground and mixing them indiscriminately. Intense
i confusion prevailed, three ladies were seriously in
i jured, and a number of children QQBtlJetyae,
NEW YORK DISPATCH.
cghuumal ami
Saturday, Aug. 24,1867.
From the West we have the first reports of a de
cided awakening in business. One of the three elec
tric cities—Chicago—is now receiving into its capa
cious warehouses a hundred car-loads of grain daily
—ten times as much as was coming in two weeks ago
—and this amount is still on the increase. A large
portion of tho money to pay for this grain has gone
on from New York, and the farmers and country
population among whom it is distributed, will not be
long in sending it oack through the channels of
trade. The effect of large crops has been discounted
in New York for so many weeks, and the increase in
trade has been so moderate, that our merchants have,
many of them, began to look quite gloomy, and this
revival of activity at the West is looked upon as the
commencement of the realization of. their expecta
tions.
From the South the reports are not quite so encour
aging, fears being entertained that the cotton crop
wiU come considerably short of last year. Two bales
of new crop cotton were received in this city from
Alabama, on Monday, both grown near Montgomery,
selling at thirty-three cents per pound for good mid
dling. Tho New Orleans Commercial Bulletin says the
first consignment of new cotton was received August
13; last year, tho first bale arrived August 7. Tho
corn crop, however, has been unprecedentedly large,
as also the yield of fruits of nearly every kind, and
tho railroads leading from Baltimore, north, and the
steamboats from Norfolk, Wilmington, and Charles
ton, are all actively employed in its transportation to
market. The speculation in cotton in New York, at
present is very slight, and the stock on hand in this
country now, is loss than one hundred thousand
bales, against about two hundred and fifty thousand
bales at this time last year. It is difficult to see how
the price of cotton will bo much lower than.it now is,
in the face of the steadily diminishing stock and a
very moderate crop for 1867, and without lower prices
for cotton, cotton goods will not decline materially.
Those who expect the prosperous trade of old times
just at present—and there are many who have antici
pated and predicted such a business this Fall—are
sure to be grievously disappointed. The present pre
mium on gold is about the measure of the relatively
higher prices now as compared with those before the
war, and the heavy taxes retard the downward ten
dency of prices. The “times” will yet be severe for
many of our business men—merchants and manu
facturers—as tho progress toward specie payments is
inevitable. The working classes will be the gainers,
however, as they had to pay dearly for tho advance in
goods at the commencement of tho war, it is quite
proper now that the property men should take thoir
turn.
The rates of interest for money have advanced
somewhat during the week, though brokers readily
obtain all they can uso at 4@5 per cent, on Govern
ment securities. Tho demands from city merchants
are quite limited, and all good commercial paper
finds ready accommodation at 7 per cont. The
abundant supply of money, and the low rates of In
terest, offer tempting chances for our merchants to
push a credit business, but the general feeling
throughout the country does not favor it.
In Government Bonds, and the various State, Rail
way and MisceUaneous stocks, the speculation for tho
week has not been of particular importance, and the
changes are few. The aggregate of our securities
held in Europe is constantly increasing; the Southern
State Bonds are unfavorably affected by tho efforts to
impede Congressional reconstruction legislation, and
railway property is improving, as well on account of
increased earnings as from approaching Fall elec
tions. We make the following quotations: U. S.
Seven-Thirties, U. S. Sixes, gold (5-20 s 1862),
113^2;.U. S. Fives, gold (10-40), 103; Erie Railway,
69>£; New York Central, 105 X; Hudson River, 121;
Reading, 10 1%; Michigan Southern, 81; Atlantic
Mail, 112; and Pacific Mail, 149.
The fight between the Express Companies is grow
ing more bitter, but we have no new indications as to
where the contest will end. Adams is quoted at 73’X >
United States, 75, and Merchant’s Union, 17, for 30
per coat, paid up.
The gold premium has been a trifle higher, on the
average, than last week, the highest price being 141 %
on Tuesday, and from that down to 140’i. The de
mand for gold to pay customs duties has been large,
amounting for tho week to nearly three millions.
Thus far this month the range has been ;
for August, 1866, August, 1865, 148>£@
145%; August, 1864, 231 >£@262; August, 1863, 122%
@129%; August, 1862, 112>£@116>£. Tho ruling rate
to-day has been 141.
The politicians are working vigorously and talking
loudly against Secretary McCulloch. The offices in
his control are among the most profitable in the
country, and it is not strange that a change should
seem desirable to many who consider themselves eli
gible candidates. And then every one can criticise
something that the Secretary has done, and it is easy
to appeal to the popular clamor for a reduction of
taxes, claiming that a different administration will
lighten the public burdens. A highly respectable
“ conservative ” paper of this city says that “ There
WiU come a time when the present management of
the Treasury funds and public securities will be re
garded as one of the most disgraceful chapters in
history.” The public will need no further comment
upon this high sounding dogmatism than to be in
formed that the author has not even allowed the
grave to cover his personal animosity to Abraham
Lincoln, whom he has since denounced as “one of
he worst men that ever lived.”
The National Banks arc taxed as follows: “A li
cense tax of SSO for sso,ooocapital, and $2 a thousand
upon excess of capital over $50,000; a semi-annual
tax of % of 1 per cent, upon the average amount of
circulation; a semi-annual tax of X of 1 percent,
upon the average amount of deposits; a semi-annual
tax of M of 1 per cent, upon the average amount of
capital stock, less the amount invested in United
States bonds. A National bank iq required *3
pay 5 por and ; urplus Sfided .
ln tLto 01 neglect to pay dividends, a tax of 5 per
cent, on profits.”
The greenback and fractional currency has been
reduced over two hundred and forty millions sfhee
November 1, 1865. It is thought that, during this
period, the withdrawals of old State bank bills have
been about equal to the issues of National currency,
so that the amount of money of all kinds in public
uso is thus reduced to the extent of nearly one quar
ter—a very material contraction, which has aidea in
bringing down prices, and will secure, when pushed
a little further, a return to specie payments.
Dr. Bell, No. 39 St. Mart’s Place,
near Second avenue.—SPECIALTY.—CANCERS and
TUMORS extracted and positively cured without the
knife. Also, all WARTS, WENS. BIRTH-MARKS on
the Face, Neck. &c., leaving an even, natural surface,
without scar. PIMPLED, SPOTTED FACES positively
and permanently cured. CANCER AND TUMOR.
SPECIMENS seen at the office. Also. Names and
Residences of patients cured. Offices hours from 9 to
10>£ in the morning—l 2to IJz, and 7t09 in the evening.
g®” Hill, the Inimitable, has resumed hair
cutting, studio for the artistic manipulation of hair,whis
kers, suampooing, and dying, No. 95 Duane street, near
Broadway. The styles of hair in every conceivable varia
tion, neat, judicious, and appropriate.
y" Hill’s Hair Dye, 50 Cents—Black or
Brown. Instantaneous, Natural, Durable, Reliable. Best
and Cheapest in use. Quantity equals any dollar size.
Depot No. 95 Duane street. Sold by all druggists.
JIT Hill’s Arctic Ointment, Inst ant Pain
Reliever, cures Eyes, Burns, Chilblains, Salt
Rheum, Boils, BuhiOni?. Flies, Cnapps, al! Skin and Flesh
Diseases. Every family’s friend; warranted. Depot, No.
95 Duane street. Sold by all drug and grocery stores.
LADIES’ HATS AND BONNETS EOR
September month.
L. BINNS’ Millinery, No. 577 Broadway.
E*Jockey Hats, new styles, this week. Vails and stylish
new style Bonnets. Save this.
Madame secor, no. 907 broad
way. (uii stairs,) is now selling,
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
THE LATEST SPRING A ND SUMMER STYLES OF
FRENCH BONNETS, FLOWERS,
and other novelties of the latest importation.
ADIES AND GENTLEMEN DESIR
ing first class musical instruction at a fair price
should call at No. 242 W est Twenty-sixth street, between
Se r enth and Eighth avenues. Lessons private. Circu
lars ready.
Mattresses, feathers, ‘
BEDDING.
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHMENT
• IN THE CITY.
WILLARD & ROGERS,
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33333 33333 888888 888888 444 44444
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33333 33333 888888 888888 44444
33333 33333 888888 888838 44444
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No. 38-4 HUDSON STREET, CORNER OF HOUSTON
is the Best and Cneapest place to buy Hair, Husk. Moss
end Spring MATTRESSES, FEATHERS, FEATHER
i BEDS, all kinds of BEDSTEADS, both Wood and Iron,
i COTS, &c. All Goods sold are warranted’to be as repre
i sented.
etropolitan billiard rooms.
MORRISANIA HALL,
Railroad Avenue, near Fifth street, Morrisania.
OPEN ON SUNDAYS.
ALES, WINES, LIQUORS AND SEGARS.
LEWIS H. COMBES, Proprietor.
BILLIARD ROOMS.
No. 279 Third Ave., New York.
NEAR TWENTY-THIRD STREET.
HAVANA SEGARS.
CHOICEST BOTTLED LIQUORS, &c.
I. CONOVER.
A LARGE NUMBER OF NEW AND
second-hand Billiard Tables, with our improved
combination cushions, which have been proved to be the
most correct and durable cushions ever made. Speci
mens of our tables that have been in constant use for
many years may be seen in the principal hotels and sa
loons in this city. Parties intending to purchase will
find it to their interest to call and examine our stock,
which is the largest and finest in the world. Boys’ Bil
liard Tables. PHELAN & COLLENDER,
Nos. 63 to 69 Crosby street, New York.
W.L SHARP’S - fMPROVED
• LIARD TABLES, with Sharp’s Patent Cush
ions, superior to any now in use. Patented Nov. 15,1859.
None but first-class tables made. Manufactory No. 43
Mercer st. Wareroom cor. Broome and Mercer st., N. Y.
giving
rn h e
mm
’ SEWING-MACHINE
(surpasses all others in simplidly, dura-
JragS gW/ih/, beautiful stitch and easy working. It
’ (creates no noise when in operation, and
' V er£ oas fond of an excellent Sew-
> ing-Machine, should call and examine
it. A liberal discount offered to the
trade. Salesrooms, No. 616 BROADWAY N. Y No. 103
Avenue A, corber oi Seventh street; No. 685 Siltb
.v&nV; No. Gntaditre.LWiia.wburgb.
OFFICIAL DRAWINOB.
'FROM AUG. 19 TO AUG. 24, 1861, INCLUSIVE.
Extra Class, No. 491, Aug. 19,1867.
50, 42, 63, 40, 54, 1,3, li, 26, 52, 36, 46, 38.
, - KENTUOKY-Class NO. 492, Aug. 19, 1867.
15, 75, 52, 57, 22, 55, 10, 12, 67, 53, 63, 17.
Extra Class No. 493, Aug. 20,1867.
57, 63, 58. 7, 47, 60, 15, 54, 34, 68, 28, 19, 49, 69.
to „ NO. 494 Aug. 2'1,1867.
52, 39, 23, 44, 10, '7B, 60, 68, 56, 24, 9, 42, 4.
KENTUCKY— Extba Class No. 495, Aug. 21,1867.
55, 2, 69, 4. 23, 17, 46, 14, 53, 66, 41, 20, 12.
„„ KENTUCKY—CIass No. 496, Aug. 21, 1867.
2 ?. I?. 43, 53, 25, 61, 49, 19, 3, 67, 55, 4, 41, 37.
KENTUCKY— Extra Class No. 497, Aug. 22. 1867.
65, 49, 34, 56, 9, 48, 14, 3, 22, 38, 23, 61, 32.
„ . KENTUCKY-Class No. 498, Aug. 22,1867.
34, 21, 4, 75, 68, 28, 24, 51, 26, 27, 66, 60.
KENTUCKY—Extra Class No. 499, Aug, 23,1867.
36, 75, 11, 2, 18, 28, 1, 57, 17, 37, 44, 16.
„ KENTUCKY—CIass No. 500, Aug. 23, 1867.
49, 23, 73, 64, 2, 51, 60, 38, '47, 46, 67, 15, 27.
~ KENTUCKY— Extra Class No. 501, Aug. 24.1667.
44, 18, 78, 25, 52, 6, 28, 23, 31, 77, 39, 8, 67.
„„ KENTUCKY-CLASS No. 602, Aug. 24. 1867.
23, 64, 77, 51, 38, 5, 50, 54, 34, 67, 17, 49, 57.
SHELBY COLLEGE—Extra Class No. 415, Aug, 19, ’67.
56, 17, 68, 72. 2, 21, 16, 5, 37, 3%, 58, 26, 42.
3HELBY COLLEGE—CIass No. 416, Aug. 19, 1867.
19, 43, 75, 27, 14, 74, 72, 67, 28, 37. 48, 59.
SHELBY COLLEGE—Extra Class No. 417, Aug. 20. '67.
47, 22, 78 4. 15, 67, 11, 25, 43, 77. 40, 26, 39. 58,
SHELBY COLLEGE—CIass No. 418, Aug. 20,1867.
71, 16, 2.3, 42. 28, 39, 45, 19, 2, 57, 50, 5, 34.
SHELBY COLLEGE—Extra Class No. 419, Aug. 21, ’67.
24. 29, 34 15. 47, 69, 75, 53, 31. 5, 42, 19, 70.
SHELBY COLLEGE—CIass No. 420, Aug. 21,1567.
18 67. 46, 27, 32, 41, 78, 3,8, 36, 53, 55, 62, 20.
SHELBY COLLEGE—Extra Class No. 421, Aug. 22, ’67.
32, 27, 7. 45, 16, 6, 73, 66, 58, 61, 31, 42, 48.
SHELBY COLLEGE-CLASS No. 422. Aug. 22,1867.
73, 20, 5. 46, 47, 52, 19, 8, 37, 69, 72, 75.
SHELBY COLLEGE—Extra Class No. 423, Aug. 23, ’67.
26, 47. 15, 13, 27, 38, 49, 63, 70, 67, 7, 35.
AKELEY COLLEGE—CIass No. 424, Aug. 23, 1867.
61, 72, 8, 16, 28, 37, 33, 40, 57, 69, 2,4, 41.
SHELBY COLLEGE—Extra Class No. 425, Aug. 24, ’67.
48, 61, 18, 17, 25, 28, 65, 9, 35, 77, 54, 58, 20.
SHELBY COLLEGE—CIass No. 426, Aug. 24,1867.
52, 60, 6, 19, 22, 37, 55, 29, 46, 71, 1, 53, 32.
Circulars eent free by addressing
JOSEPH BATES,
No, 78 BROADWAY
PRIZES CASHED IN ALL LEGAL
IZED LOTTERlES.—lnformation given.
JAMES H. STURGES, Broker,
No, 4 Division street.
No. 5 PABK PLACE,
Front Room, Up-stairs.
PRIZES CASHED IN ALL LEGAL-
IZED LOTTERIES. Information given, and cir
culars forwarded to any part of tho country.
P. GAIGE, Broker, >
No. 681 Broadway, <corner Amity street.)
PRIZES CASHED IN THE GEORGIA,
KENTUCKY STATE AND SHELBY COLLEGE
LOTTERIES.
Office hours from 8 A. M. until 8 P. M.
C. C. COTTE, Broker,
No. Broadway, and No. 351 Bowery.
RIZES~CASHED~IN ALL LEGAI7
IZED LOTTERIES, and information given, by
D. W. DAVIS, No. 154!$ FULTON STREET,
A few doors from Broadway.
PRIZES CASHED IN ALL LEG ALIZED
LOTTERIES. Information given and circulars
sent by addressing
PARKES & Co.,
Nos. 14 and 16 WALL ST.,
Rooms 5 and 7.
A MERICAN LOTTERIES OFFICE, NO?
J_3L 101 Watt street, corner West street, opposite Peo
ples Line Steamers, near Spring street Market, Central
Pa e Hotel and Jersey City Ferry. Pnzespaid in Green
backs. M. F. COLB x, Licensed Lottery Broker,-late of
No. 181 Fifth avenue.
All prizes CASHED in legal
LOTTERlES.—Circulars and drawings sent.
J. CLUTE, Broker, No. 176 Broadway,
1 and No. 153 b ulton street, N. Y.
Royal Havana lottery.—pri-
ZES paid in gold; information furnished. Highest
rates paid for doubloons and all kinds of gold and silver.
TAYLOR &. CO., Bankers, No. 16 Wall street. N. Y
The phrenologicatYjournad
FOR SEPTEMEBER, contains Portraits and
Characters of Hon. R. B. Connolly, Rev. Newman
Hall, Rev. Thomas Binney, distinguished Orators and
Authors; Mrs. Husband and Mrs. Hoge; Studies in
Physiognomy, for gentlemen, by Mrs. Wyllys; True and
False Marriages; Memory; Conscientiousness, its Func
tions; Our Religion; Gradations of Intellect; Races of
Man, their Origin; Queen Elizabeth Toggery; A New
Steamer, Spirit of the Age; Central Park and the New
Boulevard—illustrated. 30 cents, or $3 a year. Newsmen
have it. S. R. WELLS, No. 389 BROADWAY, New York.
WEEKLY,
AN ILLUSTRATED JOURNAL
y°*...
THE PEOPLE.
Wo will commence Saturday, September 7, 1867, the
publication of our handsome Weekly—a paper of sixteen
pages of the same size and torm of Harper’s Weekly. No
expense will be spared in making it the best Literary
Paper published in the world. Our illustrations will be
original, and will glow with the skill of our best artists.
Some of the most distinguished writers of America and
Europe have been engaged to contribute to it* columns.
ON SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1868, WE WILL
DISTRIBUTE HALF A MILLION DOLLARS OK THE
PROFITS IN SHARES TO OUR PATRONS, FROM
A SUBSCRIPTION AMOUNTING TO $2,009,000.
ONE SHARE RETURNED TO EVERY SUBSCRIBER
Ono share cashs2o,ooo
One share cashlo,ooo
One share cash 4,090
3,477 shares cash from $1 to $5,000 each 66.000 *
Other shares amounting t 0400,000
A committee chosen by the subscribers at Irving Hall,
Naw York, September 7,1867, will be distribute the above
named shares, and their report will be published in Kel
ley’s Weekly, and sent to all agents.
TERMS TO SUBSCRIBES.
Icopy, 3 months, with numbers of sharesl 00
Icopy, 6 months, with 2 numbers of shares 2 00
1 copy, 1 year, with 4 numbers of shares 4 00
6 copies, 3 months, with 6 numbers of shares 5 50
All parties subscribing for our paper, aud sending us
money for the same, will receive by return mail a receipt
tor the time subscribed for, with number of shaie.
The committee appointed to distribute the gifts in Kel
ley’s North American Gift Concert will publish their re
port in full in Kelley’s Weekly.
Send name and address of each subscriber.
Money by order; post-office order, express, or in regis
tered letters may be sent at our risk. Address
A. A. KELLEY & CO., Publishers,
No. 691 BROADWAY. New York city.
MEDICAL GUIDE,
By a New York Physician, giving reliable information of
great value to the sick of both sexes, never before pub
lished; and worth a journey to New York on foot to ob
tain it.
Sent free, in a plain sealed envelope, with the
highest testimonials, by enclosing a postage-stamp to
Dr. LAWRENCE. No. 14 Bond street, Now York,
Matrimony.-why every man
should marry. Why every woman should marry.
All may marry to know. Read the Illustrated Marriage
Guide and Medical Adviser; by WM. EARL, M. D., 200
pages. Mailed in sealed envelope, on receipt of 25 cents;
Address, No. 12 White street, New York.
Vou CAN GET “ THOSE BOOKS” BY
B MAIL“O. K.,” or by express “C. O. D,. or at
No. 26 Ann street, opposite Theatre alley, New York.
Send your address on stamped envelope for a catalogue.
CUT THIS OUT. C BLANCHARD, Publisher.
VIOLIN, VIOLIN, VIOLIN LESSONS,
by the “ American Paginini,” No. 242 West Twen
ty-sixth street, near Eighth avenue.
(CENTRAL NORMAL MUSICAL CON-
J SERVATORY, No. 242 West Twenty-sixth street,
between Seventh and Eighth avenues. Private Lessons
(no classes) on Piano, Violin. Guitar, Singing, <fcc. J. J.
WATSON, Agent and Musical Director. Circulars ready.
(toptiuggi,
New carpets for fall trade,
Comprising AXMINSTERS, ROYAL WILTONS,
VELVETS, BODY BRUSSELS,
TAPESTRY BRUSSELS,
EXTRA AND IMPERIAL THREE-PLYS AND
INGRAINS, OIL-CLOTHS,
DRUGGETS.
RUGS. MATTINGS,
MATS, ETC.,
FOR SALE AT RETAIL,
FOR CASH ONLY,
AND AT PRICES TO CORRESPOND.
GEO. E. L, HYATT,
No. 273 Canal street.
Bet. Broadway and Elm street.
mHE CHEAP CARPET STORE.
ROCK & KELLEHER,
No. 351 BOWERY,
Between Fourth and Great Jones street.
GREAT REDUCTION
IN
CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, &c.
ENGLISH BRUSSELSat $1 60 per yard.
DO. THREE-PLYat 1 50
TAPESTRY INGRAINat 1 25
EXCELLENT DOat 100 “
BEAUTIFUL NEW PATTERNS... .at 60 cents.
100 rolls of OIL CLOTH, slingtly damaged,
at 40 cents per yard.
ROCK <fc KELLEHER, No. 354 Bowery.
PIANO, PIANO, PIANO LESSONS, BY
a pupil of LISZT, No. 242 West Twenty-sixth street,
near Eighth avenue.
BENDALL & CD‘,
CORNER OF
CANAL &
Cloths,
Car P etS ?^?A HTOSON ST ”
BEDDING, New York,
FURNITURE,
Of every description, «=?
Housekeepers or Persons <
Going to Housekeeping will a
be supplied and can Pay by
Weekly or Monthly
THE FRENCH THEATRE.
T. B. PUGHLessee and Manager.
ENGLISH TBAGEDY.
MRS. F. W. LANDER
as
(Fac-simile of Queen Elizabeth’s signature to the death
warrant of Mary Stuart),
MOST POSITIVE TRIUMPH I
MRS. F. W. LANDER,
(Fobmbbly Miss Davenport,)
■ IN HER MAGNIFICENT IMPERSONATION
Of
ELIZABETH,
QUEEN OP ENGLAND,
in the English version of Giacometo’s fine tragedy of the
same name.
TO-MORROW EVENING,
Mr. JAS. H. TAYLORasEARL OF ESSEX
and an
ADMIRABLE COMPANY.
OPINIONS OF THE DAILY PRESS.
From, the Daily Times.
Mrs. Lander’s acting is simply admirable. We can re
call few things more impressive than the scene, at the
close of the fourth act, of the signature of Essex’s death
warranl. If the true rendering of a deeply pathetic situ
tion have cower to move, there will'be few dry eyes in
the house as the drop falls on this act.
From Che Herald.
She must be a daring actress who, following so quickly
after Ristori, undertakes the great masterpiece of that
talented woman. Mrs. Lander has, however, succeeded,
and in her rendering of Elizabeth added new lustre to
tho honors which have heretofore graced her career as a
great artiste. * * We pronounce it equal to that
of Ristori, perhaps superior in many points.
From, the Tribune.
Mrs. Lander’s Queen Elizabeth is a noble impersona
tion. In that really graphic and thrilling scene w’herein
the Queen signs tho death-warrant of Essex, Mrs. Lan
der expressed—as well as such emotions could possibly be
expressed in mimic life—love illimitable, pride indomita
able, and anguish inexpressible. In the closing scenes
she completely realized a perfect ideal of the wasted,
worn, ineffably venerable, and awfully solitary sufferer.
Till the breath left her body, the Queen never ceased to
be the Queen.
From the World*
Mrs. Lander’s personation of the tittle role reveals a
very elevated order of dramatio talent. The many ex
cellencies of her performance found prompt apprecia
. tion in the form of earnest applause.
From the Evening Post.
Mrs. Lander’s natural ability, the thoroughness of her
professional studies, no less than her winning personal
qualities have placed her in so high a position no one
seems to have expected failure, in a character where to
fail would imply no disgrace. * * * The portrayal of
the real womanly feelings of was beautiful and
touching beyond description. * * * With the fideli
ty of a true artist, Mrs. Lander gives her conception of
Elizabeth's life a central consistency, which of itself should
pla?e her high among the world’s best actresses.
From the Express.
Nowhere was the aefrass untrue to her conception of
the part, or exaggerated iu her impersonation. The
charm of the woman asserted itself throughout.
POPULAR SCALE OF PRICES.
Admission7s cents
Reserved seats in Parquette and Private Boxes... .$1 50
Private Boxes-£6 00 I Proscenium Boxeslo 50
Dress Circle7s cents | Family Circleso cents
The Box office at Chickering’s, No. 652 Broadway, W.
Schirmer’s muuc-store, No. 700 Broadway; Rullman’s,
No. 112 Broadway, and at the French Theatre, open
every day at 9 o’clock a. M., where seats may be secured
FIVE DAYS IN ADVANCE.
Doors open at 7. Performance commences at 8 o’clock.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
In order to accommodate the patrens of the French
Theatre during Mrs. Lander’s engagement, arrange
ments have been made for omnibusses to run every five
minutes from the corner of Union Square and Broad
way to the Theatre, from 7 to 8 o’clock P. M., free of
charge.
UNDER THE GASLIGHT EVERY
Evening amt Saturday Matinee, at the
SEW YORK THEATRE.
NIBLO’S garden.
Lessee and ManagerWM. WHEATLEY.
THE BLACK CROOK.
RENEWED AND RECONSTRUCTED.
MONDAY EVENING. AUG. 26th,
THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FOURTH
performance of the Great Spectacle, when it will be pre
sented with
JARRETT & PALMER’S
GRAND PARISIENNE BALLET,
strongly reinforced by new Artistes,
NEW BALLETS, COSTUMES AND MUSIC.
Marston’s great new scene,
AN ILLUMINATED BALL-ROOM,
iu which will be given a
GRAND CARNIVAL AND MASQUERADE.
SEATS SECURED SIX DAYS IN ADVANCE.
Bowery theatre.
COMPLIMENTARY BENEFIT
To Messrs. JOE COBURN and ROCKY MOORE.
The following ladies and gentlemen have generously
volunteered their valuable services:
Mr. J. W. Lingard, Miss Emma Reignolds, Mr. W. K.
Linyard, Mr. H. Cunningham, Mr. G. W. Malmburg, Mr.
Crompton, Mr. James Davis, and Mlle. Devere.
And the following gentlemen of the Prize Ring, viz.:
Messrs. Bill Ryall, Rooky Moore, Peter Morris, Mike
Coburn, Jim Dunn, Dooney Harris, Joe Coburn, and
Tom Allen. Harry Hill and his two sons, Mr. Harding,
the champion runner, Thomas Nolan, A. Frank, A. Gib
bins, and W. H. Martin.
Bowery theatre.
TUESDAY EVENING. Amr. 27th, 1867,
JOINT BENEFIT
OF
J. M. WARD and FRANK EVANS.
on which occasion a host of artists htva kindly volun
teered. and will appear in the following pieces:
THE KING AND CAVALIER. JACK CADE,
CAMILLE: or, THE CRACKED HEART,
IMITATION SCENE from WIDOW’S VICTIM.
G. C. Davenport and J. M. Ward will give their imita
tions of popular actors.
RICHARD THE THIRD IN DUTCH.
SINGING and DANCING.
OUR IRISH COUSIN.
rpHE BARNUM AND VAN AM-
B BURGH MUSEUM AND MENAGERIE CO.,
Broadway, between Spring and Prince streets.
LAST WEBK BUT ONE.
MR. G. L. FOX,
supported by the
TALENTED PANTOMIME COMPANY,
EVERY AFTERNOON at 2L—EVENING at 8.
in the Comic Fairy Pantomime of
♦ MOTHER GOOSE AND HER GOLDEN EGG.
REPLETE WITH LAUGHABLE TRICKS AND
SIDE-SPLITTING COMICALITIES.
To be seen at all hours.
THE CONTENTS OF THE UTICA MUSEUM.
GORDON CUMMING, the Lion Slayer’s COLLECTION.
PROF. HUTCHINGS, LIGHTNING CALCULATOR,
A MAMMOTH FAT INFANT,
A GIANTESS, DWARF. CIRCASSIAN GIRL.
TEN LIVING SEALS,
THREE ROCKY MOUNTAIN MOOSE.
LIVING SNAKES. MONKEYS, LEARNED SEAL,
HAPPY FAMILY. GRAND AQUARIA, Etc.
OVER 300,000 CURIOSITIES.
Admission. 30cents: Children under ten. 15 cants.
BANVARD’S opera house and
MUSEUM, corner BROADWAY and THIR
TIETH STREET.
ANOTHER WEEK.
Fifth and positively last week in New York of Fulton
and Maeder’s Great Sensational Drama of
NOBODY’S DAUGHTER!
NOBODY’S DAUGHTER!
A most exciting, interesting and powerful drama.
NOBODY’S DAUGHTER!
Nightly witnessed by large and delighted audiences.
NOBODY’S DAUGHTER!
The greatest success of the season.
NOBODY’S DAUGHTER!
Ruins of Yarborough Tower by moonlight.
NOBODY’S DAUGHTER!
Every night, and Wednesday and Saturday Matinees,
FARO, ROULETTE AND KENO!
UNDER THE GASLIGHT—The Great
Railroad Scene—a wondrous stage effect—every
night and Saturday Matinee.
NEW YOBK THEATRE.
SAN FRANCISCO MINSTRELS, No. 585
Broadway. Trouble commences at 8 o’clock.
Brilliant success of the Vanguards of Fun!
Immense success of the Head ana Front of Minstrelsy,
BIRCH, WAMBOLD, BERNARD AND BACKUS.
SAN FRANCISCO MINSTKELS,
whose success for the past three years is positive evi
dence of superiority over all similar organizations. The
latest productions in minstrelsy. Troubles at the Metro
politan Hotel, Recollections of Dramatic Celebrities.
George the Charmer. Babes in the Wood. Shouts of
Laughter rdthe BASE BALL MATCH. ATLANTICS
ETgHTH AVENUE OPERA HOUSE,
corner of Thirty-fourth street and Eighth avenue,
First appearance of
THE WONDERFUL FIRE KING.
SIG. BEOUNO CARE,
He will appear in coniuncton with
JOSH HART, FRANK KERNS,
W. B. CAVANAGH, DICK RALPH,
GEO. WARREN STURGES.
BROADWAY BOYS.
LAURA LE CAIRE, HELEN SMITH,
VIRO FARRAND, FLORENCE WELLS,
DAVE BRAHAN, <fcc., &c., &c.
We present the
BEST VARIETY PROGRAMME IN THE CITY.
rgIONY PASTOR’S OPERA HOUSE,
I No. 201 BOWERY, opposite Spring st.
ENGAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY !
First appeal a nee of the great European celebrity, Prof.
LOGRENIA and his wonderful troupe of
TRAINED CANARY BIRDS;
Also, his most marvelous corps of performing
CATS AND WHITE MICE.
Whose really astonishing performances have stamped
them as
THE WONDERS OF THE 19TH CENTURY.
First time of a new Local Drama, entitled
THE EAST RIVER BOATMAN,
THE EAST RIVER BOATMAN,
Produced with New Scenery, etc. TONY PASTOR and
the entire company in the cast.
Grand Effects! Thrilling Tableaux! Comic Situations !
A NEW BALLET—FIower Girls of Rochelle.
A SPARKLING VARIETY ENTERTAINMENT.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
Fifth avenue opera house
will open
On MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2d,
with
A FULL, EFFICIENT AND TALENTED
BURLESQUE AND VAUDEVILLE COMPANY
of established
NEW YORK FAVORITES.
See future announcements in daily papers and posters.
C. H. GARLAND, Manager.
UNDER THE GASLIGHT—THE PIERS
of the City and Hudson river by starlight. Dance
““ Tribee.”
ORRELL SISTERS’ NEW YORK
THEATRE, No. 728 Broadway.
THIRD WEEk AND MOST IMMEDIATE
SUCCESS
OF
Mr. AUGUSTIN DALY’S new picturesque drama of
Life and Love in these timee called
tUOER
THS
GAS'LIGIHT
Played every night, to crowded and fashionable au
diences which re-demand with enthusiasm the
GREAT SENSATIONAL SCENES
THE TOMBS POLICE COURT!
HOW THE POOR LIVE!
THE PIERS OF THE CITY BY STARLIGHT!
HOW THE LOST TRIBES SPEND THEIR
EVENINGS!
THE BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF A HOME OF
LUXURY!
THE GREAT RAILROAD SCENE!
THE DOWN EXPRESS TRAIN!
These varied and romantic incidents further enlivened
by beautiful new scenery, and a cast of characters by the
star combination, including, MISS ROSE EYTINGE,
MISS BLANCHE GREY, MRS. SKERRETT, MRS.
WRIGHT. MR. J. K. MORTIMER, MR. A. H. DA
VENPORT, MR. C. T. PARSLOE, Jr., in the leading
part*.
THE GASLIGHT MATINEE on
SATURDAY, at 2 o’clock. Seats secured in advance*
QLYMPIC THEATRE.
LAST WEEK POSITIVELY of the ENGAGEMENT of
MR. JOHN BROUGHAM,
v MR. JOHN BROUGHAM,
who will appear on
. . MONDAY EVENING, August 26th,
m his original and highly successful character of
. CAPTAIN RODERICK O’DONNELL,
m his great romantic and historical military drama, en
titled
O’DONNELL’S MISSION.
O’DONNELL’S MISSION.
THE ANECDOTE UPON WHICH THIS STORY
WAS FOUNDED.
One Roderick O’Donnell, an officer of the Irish Brig
ade, in tho service of France, expatriated with, many
others for his adhesion to the cause of the last of the
Stuart*, the exiled King James the Second, being sent
u ,p on . a Becret mission to Cardinal Alberoni, it chanced
that he was enabled to do a signal service to the daugh
ter of a noble Spanish house, who, notwithstanding the
objections of her haughty kindred, bestowed upon him
her hand.”—Extract from Spanish History.
From the above-mentioned romantic union sprang the
influential family of the O’Donnells of Spain. Its pres
ent representative was the Governor-General of Cuba,
ar lm? s now Minister to Isabella the Second.
"-hei drama is presented, after thorough preparation,
and Mr. Brcughamwill be supported by
MISS EMILY THORITE,
MR. T. E. MORRIS (especially engaged),
AND A CAST OF GREAT BRILLIANCY AND
„ ROWER,
carefully selected from the abundant material available
in the city at this season.
FRIDAY—BENEFIT OF MR. BROUGHAM,
AND HIS LAST APPEARANCE BUT ONE.
DOWERY THEATRE.
GRAND COMPLIMENTARY TESTIMONIAL
tendered by the citizens of New York to
Mr. HARRY PEARSON,
WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 28, 1867.
First appearance in America of the celebrated English
tragedian,
Mr. J. MORTIMER MURDOCH,
who will appear in the great London sensational drama
of
JANET PRIDE;
On, THE CHILD OF THE FOUNDLING HOSPITAL,
never before acted in this country.
RICHARD PRIDE..Mr. J. MORTIMER MURDOCH
DICKYHARRY PEARSON
Other characters by an entire-new company.
Mr. FRANK GERARD, the only professional survi
vor of the Evening Star, in some of his plaintive ballads.
Mr. FRANK O’DONNELL, the favorite singer, will,
by particular request, sing the MACS AND THE O’S,
with other characteristic songs.
Mr. RICHARD HO OLEY, the celebrated Ethiopian
manager, will perform a grand solo on the violin.
HOLDEN’S Popular Quartet and Glee Club.
Mlle. DE ULIN, the favorite danseuse.
First appearance for years of the popular Bowery favor
ite,
Mr. E. L. TILTON,
who, upon this occasion, will present one of his startling
and exciting dramas.
TOGETHER WITH A HOST OF VOLUNTEER
TALENT.
rgIHEATRE COMIQUE,
JL No. 514 Broadway, opposite St. Nicholas Hotel,
GRAND INAUGURATION.
MONDAY. AUG. 26th,
NEW AND ELEGANT TEMPLE OF THE MUSES.
LARGE AND POWERFUL COMPANY.
BEN COTTON AND SAM SRARPLEY’S
MINSTRELS.
THE GREAT GYMNASTS—THE BUISLAYS.
CHARLEY WHITE—EVA BRENT.
. THE CARON FAMILY.
Mlle Devere—Premiere Danseuse. Full Corps of French
and Spanish Dancers and Pantomime Company.
Everything New, Fresh, and Original.
Nothing Objectionable.
Admission 25, 60, and 75 cents.
Popular Artists and Popular Prices suits the People
AT THE PEOPLE’S THEATRE,
MATINEE EVERY SATURDAY.
UNDER THE GASLIGHT HAS BEEN
witnessed and pronounced by thousands to be the
most interesting, exciting and truthful drama of the
times. Will be played every night and Saturday Matinee.
NEW YORK THEATRE.
Bowery theatre,
BENEFIT OF
MR. FRED HAGADORN.
ON
THURSDAY EVENING,
August 29th, 1867,
ON
which occasion a grand
ENTERTAINMENT WILL BE PRESENTED,
and a
NUMEROUS COMPANY OF
DISTINGUISED ARTISTS
will appear,
WHO HAVE KINDLY VOLUNTEERED.
FULL PARTICULARS IN FUTURE NOTICE.
JTELL E Y ’ S
GIFT CONCERT!
500,000 TICKETS NEARLY ALL SOLD. 500,000
presents, er one to every ticket. KELLEY’S GRAND
NORTH AMERICAN GIFT CONCERT will positively
take place
SATURDAY, SEPT. 21. 1867,
at Irving Hall, New York city. This is the greatest and
most successful enterprise of the kind ever inaugurated
in the world. Our sales have been without a parallel on
this continent. The last chance is now offered to secure
tickets.
1 Gift in Greenbackss3o,ooo
1 “ Greenbacks 10,000
1 “ Greenbacks 5,000
1 “ Greenbacks 4,000
1 “ Greenbacks 3,000
20 “ Greenbacks, SI,OOO each 20,009
1861 “ Greenbacks, from $5 to $2,000 each... 28,000
40 Pianos, SSOO each 20,000
800 Gold and Silver Watches, valued at 71,000
Together with other gifts, amounting to 309,000
A GIFT WITH EVERY TICKET.
AH who desire tickets should order st once. Tickets
sleach; 5 for $4 50; 10 for $9: 20 for sl7 50. A list of
gifts will be published in Kelley’s Weehli/, and sent to all
ticket-holders. All tickets sold for Kelley’s North Amer
ican Gift Concert at Wabash Avenue Rink, Chicago, IU.,
and Cooper Institute, N. Y., are good for this Concert.
Address A. A. KELLEY & CO..
No. 691 Broadway, N. Y.
WALLAC K ’ 8 .
DOORS OPEN PERFORMANCE
COMMENCES AT 8.
FOURTH WEEK!
Overwhelming Success of
THE INCOMPARABLE LOTTA.
A GENUINE FURORE!
CROWDED HOUSES!!
SONGS, DANCES, and
SCENES ENCORED.
ard early every night the triumphant bulletin of
“STANDING-ROOM ONLY.”
EVERY EVENING DURING THE WEEK,
John Brougham’s great dramatization of
DICKENS’ “OLD CURIOSITY SHOP.”
LITTLE NELL AND THE MARCHIONESS.
LITTLE NELL. I Lotta
THE MARCHIONESS, ) lotta.
Incidental to the piece a scene of stirring and diversi
fied interest representing
AN ENGLISH FAIR.
Patrons will greatly subserve their convenience, and
avoid the nightlv rush around the Box-office, by
SECURING SEATS IN ADVANCE.
HE SEPTEMBER NO. pF NICK NAX,
is heavy on Watering Place doings.
TINDER THE GASLIGHT—TOMBS PO
LICE COURT—one of the most novel and amus
ing trial scenes ever realized. Every night and Satur
day Matinee. NEW YORK THEATRE.
G~ UTTAR, PIANO, VIOLIN, SINGING.—
No. 242 West Twenty-sixth st., between Seventh
and Eighth aves. CaU or send for a circular. Private
lessons. No classes. Terms favorable to all.
pianos, &t.
Jg 8.. DECKER,
PUXO-FORTE
WAREROOMS, No. 4 BLEECKER ST., I X X X 1-
Near Bowery, N. Y.'J
N. 8.-NO PATENT HUMBUGS NOR CONNEC
TION WITH A HOUSE OF THE SAME NAME IN
THE SAME STREET.
IMPORTANT FOR BUYERS AND HIR
ERS OF PIANOS.
FOR SALE.
7-OCT. ROSEWOOD PIANOS, LOUIS mTm
XIV. STYLE, WORTH $450, WILL II 3? S H
BE SOLD BY MONTHLY PAYMENT OF $4 50.
The Brooklyn Musical Insrument Saving and Loan
Society, chartered by the State, is now three years in
successful operation, and distributes Pianos among its
members at the above rates.
Tire Society have so far distributed over one hundred
Pianos, rind they have given universal satisfaction. The
Pianos are to be seen, and further information will be
given, at the office of the Society, No. 367 Fulton street,
under the Park Theatre. Letters to be directed to the
Secretary, H. GOLDSMITH, at the office.
BOARD OF MANAGERS.
D. S. S. GUY, CH. FIELD,
Dr. F. BOND, Dr. H. MEDLER,
A. KURTH. FR. DEPFUHL,
N. H. DAVIS. GERARD WILLETT. President.
RUDOLPH FULLGRAKF, Vice President.
H. GOLDSMITH, Sec. WM. KRAFT, Treas.
Guitar, guitar, guitar lessons,
by a pupil of MARTINI, No. 242 West Twenty
sixth street, near Eighth avenue.
THE HORACE WATERS GRAND
Square and Upright PIANOS, ME
LODEONS and CABINET ORGANS,
wholesale and retail. To let, and rent al- jrgjS ® tv
lowed if purchased. Monthly payments J I X I 4
received for the same. Second-hand Pianos at bargains,
from S6O to $225. Factory and warerooms, No. 481 Broad
way. Cash paid for second-hand Pianos. Pianos tuned
and repaired. Sheet Music, a little soiled, at cents
perpage. HORACE WATERS.
gunnfiite.
Furniture i furniture!
At G. W. SNEDEN & CAMPBELL’S,
No. 263 BOWERY, bet. Stanton and Houston streets.
Second Furniture Store fromithe Corner.
All kinds of Furniture, Mattresses, Bedding, Looking
Glasses, etc.. Wholesale and Retail, below Auction
Price;. Goods warranted and delivered free. PATENT
SECRETARY BEDSTEADS, superior to anything of
the kind in the market. Furniture in Suits. Goods
boxed for Shipping. Note the Number.
Divorces legally procured
without publicity. Other good cases prosecuted
without fee in advance. Consultation free. M. HOWES,
Attorney and Counselor, No. 78 Nassau street.
EAKY ROOFS CURED WITH ELLE
REY’S INDIA RUBBER PAINT, to 2 cents a
foot, according to condition, and warranted. Principal
offices, Nos. 596 Grand street, 101 Nassau street, 153 Bow
ery, 375 Ninth avenue, 598 Sixth avenue, 11 South Sev
enth street, Williamsburgh, and corner of Oxford street
mw » Wtn#e , A MrCAaTlii ,
Sunday Edition. August 25,
YORK ASSEMBLY ROOM&
Xl between 28th and 29th streets.
To let for Balls, W eddings, Sociables, Lectures, Con*
certs, Meetings, Public Dinners, and hrst-class enter*
tainments day or evening. Apply on the premises.
The books are also open for the coming Fall seasoi..
. E. FERRERO.
MJ. SAUSE’S DANCING ACADEMY,
• MASONIC HALL,
*08.114 and 116 EAST THIRTEENTH ST.,
, Near Fourth avenue.
Evenings of Tuition Tuesdays and Fridays.
w form on Tuesday Evening, September jL
I™ 7 *Opening Soiree Tuesday, Sept. 3.
J T. URIS’ DANCING ACADEMY,
• Nos. 371 and 373 FULTON STHEET,
BROOKLYN,
T Opposite the City Hall,
W!LL BE RE-OPENED SEPTEMBER ,"d.
Classes for Gentlemen—Tuesday and Friday evenings,
from 8 to 10.
For Ladies, Misses and Masters—Wednesday and Sat
uraay aiternoons.
Private classes for Ladies and Gentlemen—Thursdas
evenings. •
Private lessons can be taken in the morning, or ut any
time not occupied by the regular classes. Private schools
and classes instructed. For further particulars apply at
Academy. The room can be hired by respectable parties.
mRENOR’S NEW SPLENDID
JL BALL-ROOM, Palace Hall, Sixth ave., near a®
42d street, is rapidly approaching completion. It
is 80x100 feet, and by tar the most beautiful and /Tsw
complete BALL AN’D CONCERT ROOM ever®
erected in this city.
ENGAGEMENT BOOK OPEN.
‘TTrf*i'iTTnTn~>iuiw f iifip. , ...jhirb
©xuurisiw.
QEVENTY-NINTH REGIMENT VETE
. RAN ASSOCIATION.—The Second Annual Ex
cursion of this Association has been postponed to FRI
DAY, August 30, 1867, when it will take place, “rain or
smne.
Tickets of the 16th good for the 30th.
, JOHN MORE, President.
(gCOTTISH GAMES!
THE ELEVENTH ANNUAL GAMES
OF THE
NEW YORK
CALEDONIAN CLUB,
WILL BE HELD AT
JONES’ WOOD, ON THURSDAY, SEPT. sth, 1867*
PROGRAMME.
The svorts of the day will be opened with an old-fash-
Scotch Reel after which the circle will be cleared,
and the Games commence at 10 o’clock with—
-Ist. Putting the Heavy Stone. (24 lbs.)
2d.- Putting the Light Stone. (18 lbs),
od. The Standing Jump.
rti?* Trowing the Heavy Hammer. (21 lbs.)
™ hr °jy in K the Hammer. (16 lbs.)
6th. The Running Jump.
7th. The Highland Fling.
Bth. The Running High Lean.
9th. The Short. Rice.
10th. The Boys’ Race, under 12 years. (For sons of Mem«
bers only.)
11th. Tho Three-Legged Race.
intermission Fur refresments.
12th. Vaulting with th? Pole.
13th. The Long Race.
14th. Tossing the Caber.
I£th. The Short Race, (Formembers 45 years and ever?
16th. 1 he Broad-Sword Dance.
I<th. The Sack Race.
18th. The Standing High Leap.
19th. The Hitch and Kick.
20th. The Hurdle Race.
21st. The Boys’ Hurdle Race under 15 years (For
Member’s Sons only.)
22d. Hop, Step and Jump.
2c.d. The Wheelbarrow Race.
XgF’ A Game of QUOITS will be played on the grcuntX
during the day.
For each of the above Games, Ist and 2d Prizesr
will be awarded.
ROBERTSON’S CELEBRATED BANPS AND THE
PIPERS OF THE CLUB
Will furnish Music for tho occasion.
TICKETS, 50 cents.
io be had at the gate only on the day of the games.
(CIONEY ISLAND. CONEY
yy The splendid Steamer NORWALK, ‘
Capt. G. W. Wilson, makes regular trips F
Inland and Fort Hamilton. iromKScSffissa&i
NORTH RIVER, as follows: Christopher street. 9:20r
12:20; 3:20. Jay street, 9:40; 12:40; 3:40. Pier No. 4 (Mor—
ri^ s l r orn t '- ) ’-r?9’.A. aHd J ,(| nnecting with East river boat.
EAST RIVER.—The .splendid steamer NAUSHOJI
runs every day, including Sunday, as follows: North
Eighth street, E. D., at 10 and 2; Broome street, N.. Y. ‘
10:15 and 2:15; Peck Slip, 10:30 and 2:30; Fulton Ferry.
Brooklyn, 10:45 and 2:45; and Sackett street. Brooklyn.,
a connee ting with North river boat.
As Coney Island has not been, and will not be, used for
Quarantine purposes, the inducements are greater than
ever to visit it. The steamboat and other accommo
dations arebetter than those of any previous season.
The PAVILION HOTEL has been thoroughly reno*
improved, and the BATHING AR
RANGEMENTS surpass those of any Watering Place in
the country.
QUNDAY BOATS FOR NEWARK. THE
splendid steamboats MAGENTA,
and THOMAS P. WAV "J? 'eave New r
Y ork and N ewark on SU ND AY next,
AUGUST Ihh, AS FOLLOWS ;
Leave N. Y., foot. Barclay Leave Newark foot Centra
street. street-
10:3'i o’clock A. M., 8 o’clock. A. M.»
4:30 P.M., 2 o’clock, P. M.,
n ,9.30 P.M., 7::soP.M.,
Stopping at Bergen Pointeach way. W. G A STON, Supt»
CENTRAL NORMAL MUSICAL CON
SERVATORY, No. 242 West Twenlj-sixth street,
between Seventh and Eighth avenues. J. JAY WAT
SON, the “American Paganini,” Agent and Musical
Director. Lessons strictly private.
New route between
NEW YOBK AND BOSTON,
via
BRISTOL, R. I.
THE NARRAGANBEIT STEAMSHIP CUiVIPANY’S
NEW AND MAGNIFICENT STEAMERS,
BRISTOL Captain Ben Brayton,
PROVIDENCE....Captain B. M SiMMONB, .
ARE NOW RUNNING ON LONG ISLAND SOUND*
LEAVING PIER No. 40, NORTH RIVER, EVERY*
AFTERNOON tSundays pxcepted), at 5 o’clock, connect
ing at Bristol with the Boston and Providence railroad,
reaching Boston with shorter railroad ride than by axis,-
other route. Distance by rail, 54 miles. Time, 1 hour
and 30 minutes.
These steamers are the largest, staunchest, and most
elegant ever placed upon American waters.
In the number and size of their state-rooms, and ex
tent and splendor of their accommodations, they are un
rivaled.
State-rooms secured, tickets for sale, and freight ar
rangements made at the office on tho Pier.
Also, tickets sold at the principal offices ot Westcott’s
Express Company, viz.: No. 1 Park Place, Nos. 785 and
945 Broadway, Harlem R. R. Dept, 26th st. and 4th av.,
.Hudson River R. B. Depot, 29th st. and 9th av., and in
Brooklyn, No. 269 Washington st., City Hall Square.
By purchasing tickets at any of these offices baggage
can be checked, from the residence to destination.
H. O. BRIGGS, General Manager.
GEO. W. TIERS, Agent.
Great reduction-low fare to
THE WEST, NORTH and EAST,
via TROY LINE OF STEAMERS, from
Pier No. 44 North River,foot of Spring st.,
daily at 6 P. M., Saturdays excepted.
LIST OF FARES FROM NEW YORK.
Albany and Troysl 00 Saratogal 75
Schenectady 131 Fort Edward 2 45.
Fondal 38 Whitehall 3 3ft
Utica 245 Rutland 4 0$
Rome 2 76 Burlington, 6 0(J
Syracuse 354 North Adams 2 00
Rochester 5 30 St. Albans 7 25
Lockport 635 Ogsdenburglo 53
Suspension Bridge.... 675 Montreal 9 75
Buffalo 6 75
And proportionate reduction to all intermediate points
and stations west from Buffalo.
Tickets sold and baggage checked at the office or on
board.
npoußisTS and pleasuretravel-
JL ERS can obtain
COMBINATION EXCURSION TICKETS
AT REDUCED RATES,
Embracing all the principal points of interest in
Northern New York, the Canadas, New England and the
Lake Superior region, at the offices of the Eric Railway.
Nq. 241 BROADWAY, “
Depot foot of Chambers street, New York, or Long
Dock Depot, Jersey City.
PE OPL E’ S LIN E-G R EAT
REDUCTION. r .
$1 00 TO ALBANY.
On and after MONDAY, June 17, 1867, passage to Al
bany by People’s Line Steamers will be $1 00 only.
ST. JOHN—Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
DREW —Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Fort lee, pleasant valley and
BULL’S FERRY.
Steamboat PALISADE leaves foot of
Spring street, Sundays included, at 10, 2,
5, arid 7*4 P. M„ touching at 22d stteet.
ORTH SHORE STATEN ISLAND
Steamers POMONA and THOMAS fwis.
HUNT. Elm Park—A. M., 5:30, 7:10, 3W
10:15, 11:50. P. M., 3:40, 5:30.
Richmond—A. M., 5:45, 7:39, 8:30, 10:25, 12. P. M., 2,
3:50, 5.40. Factoryville—A. M., 5:55, 7:40,8:40,10:35.
P. M., 12:10, 2:10, 4, 5:50. Snug Harbor—A. M., 6, 7:45-
8:45, 10:40. P. M., 12:15, 2:15, 4:05, 5,55. New Brighton—
A. M., 6:10, 7:55,8:55,10:50. P.M., 12:25,2:25,4:15,6. New
York—A. M., 7, 9,10:39. 12. P. M., 2,4, 5:30, 7.
SUNDAY.
Elm Park—A. M., 9:45, 11:15. P. M., 12:45, 2:15,4:45,61
Port Richmond—A. M., 7,8, 9:55, 11:25. P. M., 12:55.
2:25, 4:55, 6:10. Factoryville—A. M., 7:10,8:10,10:05.
11:35. P. M., 1:05, 2:35, 5:05, 6:20. New Brighton—A.-
M.. 7:20, 8:20, 10:15, 11:45. P. M., 1:15, 2:45, 5:15,
Kew York—A. M.. 8:39, 10,11:30. P. M., 1, 2:30, 4,6,
7:30. New York Pier 19, between Courtlandt and Dye
streets. To let for Sunday School Picnics, Pomona
Grove. ANNING SMITH, Superintendant.
C'l ENT RA L RAILROAD OF NEV?
J JERSEY. Passenger and Freight— 7 .i-n.rjrTqyw
Depot in New /York, foot of Liberty
street —connecting at Hampton .Tnncf,ion j g*«^ t ~^ttr
with the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad.
and at Easton with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and it«t
connections, forming a direct line to Pittsburgh and the
West, without change of cars.
ALLENTOWN LINE TO THE WEST. •
Three Express Trains daily for the West, except Sun«»
days, when one train in the evening.
Sixty Miles and Three Hours saved by this line to Chi
cago, Cincinnati, St. Louis, etc., with but one change ofc
cars.
SPRING ARRANGEMENTS.
Commencing April 29,1867, leave New York as followss
6:30 A. m.—For Flemington, Easton, Bethlehem-
Mauch Chunck, Williamsport, Wilkesbarre, Mahony
City, &c.
3 A. M.~Western Express for Easton. Allentown, Har«*
risburg. Pittsburgh, and the West, with but one changflf
of cars to Cincinnati or Chicago, and but two changes tq
St. Louis; connects at Harrisburg with Northern Central
and Philadelphia and Erie Roads, for Erie and the Oil
Regions. Connects at Junction with Delaware, Lacka-v
wana and Western R. R. for Stroudsburg, Water Gap.
Scranton, Pittston, Kingston, Great Bend <fcc.
12 M. Train.—For Easton, Allentown, Mauch Chunckr.
Wilkesbarre, Reading, Pottsville, Harrisburg, &c.
3:30 p. M.—For Plainfield.
4:00 P. M.—For Easton.
5:00 p. m.—For Somerville and Flemington.
5:00 p.m.—Cincinnati Express—For Easton, Bethle
hem, Mauch Chunck, Reading. Harrisburg, Pittsburg.
Chicago and Cincinnati—connects at Harrisburg with
train for Williamsport, Erie, &c. Sleeping cars t(J
Pittsburg.
6:15 p. m.—For Junction and intermediate stations.
7:30 P. M.—For Somerville.
8:00 p. m.—Western Express Train.—For Easton*
Allentown, Reading, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh and the
West. Sleeping cars through from Jersey City to Pitts
burgh every evening.
Additional trains are run to Bergen Point, Elizabeth#
&c.
Tickets for the West can be obtained at the office of tha
Central Railroad of New Jersey foot of Liberty Street-
North River, at No. 1 Astor House, at Nos. 254, 27*
and 526 Broadway, and No. 10 Greenwich street.
JOSIAH O. STEARNS Superintendent.
—■■■—wain in 1 r twowwbwmm——wa—B
Sens, ©nifee,
FIRST-CLASS GROCERY.
WILLIAM A. CAMP, 9
No. 222 Third ave., cor. 20th st.
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN ■ t
TEAS, COFFEES, P I
WINES.
LIQUORS AND CIGARS, 1
SPICES, ALMONDS AND NUTS,
PICkLES AND SAUCES,
And, in fact, everything which goes
to make up a 7
FlttST-CLASS UitOCERV,
Respectfully solicits the patronage MB
of all who are desirous of getting the
best of everything at moderate .CTjjjay
ri «t f(OreW)|l )>• (•

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