OCR Interpretation


New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, April 25, 1869, Image 7

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85026214/1869-04-25/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

Sunday Edition. April 25.
ASPIRE!
Aspire to greater things,
With heaven-exalted eye—
With steadfast tread, and bearing high,
£nd hope on joyful wings,
There’s not a victory won below
But points to other work undone;
And ever as Time’s currents flow,
Wo find now shores still to be won.
Press on, with purpose pure.
Nor cast one look behind;
Ambitious still to store thy mind
With truthful love that shall endure.
There’s not a bight by man yet gain d
But shows another bight to win:
There’s not a truth by man maintain d,
But bears some greater truth within*
oh, seek the good and great!
Man’s mission on the earth
Is progress, ever, from his birth;
Nor should he e’er in zeal abate.
Oh, who would, tamely lingering, see
Such boundless prospects for the mind,
And, clinging to mortality,
In guilty sloth be left behind ?
Aspire to better deeds!
With hope and love entwined,
Let emulation fill thy mind,
And ever haste when duty leads.
Man’s holy mind, if trained aright,
To such a bight of good would grow,
That spirits pure and angels bright
Might with us linger here below.
[Original.]
HUM®.
BY SY SLOKVIL
William Tell, many years ago, was unani
mously elected Hero of Switzerland, and held
the position till death, never once demanding
an increase of foes, though these were nothing
in comparison to those of the Shrievalty of Go
tham. The office expired with William, and
Bince Switzerland has had no “ hero but this
doesn’t argue that wo could got along without
ii sheriff.
William has been called the Washington of
Switzerland, but the latter personage was never
called (to our knowledge) the William Tell of
America; which goes to show that there’s a
difference between tweedledum andtweedledee.
IGeorge never shot an apple from the head of
Sns. son (we’il bet William never did) for the
simple reason that he, George, never had a
eon." William never said “ I cannot tell a lie,”
for the simple reason that he could without dif
ficulty. For, and on account of these differ
ences, we fail to see why William should be
called the Washington of Switzerland. But
JVC won’t discuss this point.
When William got big enough he was sent to
school, and his schoolboy days passed much in
the same manner as those of other boys ; that
is, ho studied when he couldn’t help it; made
faces at the master—behind Ins back, of course
—blotted his writing book; stood small tacks
on their heads on tho seats of other boys ;
threw spit balls; “booked Jack,” and other
wise progressed in tho various accomplish
ments incidental to the life of a schoolboy.
.Out of doors he was invariably accompanied
I>y a bow and arrow—shooting with the bow
was the only sport he indulged in, and this
preference was easily accounted for by a bow
and arrow mark born upon his arm, and it was
■natural ho should take to this thing, you know.
Base ball, kites, marbles, or velocipedes had
no charms for him—only tho bow and arrow,
find he would shoot for hours on a stretch,
without taking a rest. By this constant prac
tice he acquired such skill as to be acknowl
edged the crack shot of the country, at sixteen
years of age, which only goes to show what un
remitting attention to business will do for the
youth of any period.
Eagle shooting on the wing was his favorite
amusement, and whenever he took his aim the
gray bird with a bending beak” retired
from high life and paid a visit to earth, to rise
no more among the clouds. Not the most ex
perienced eagle could dodge his feather-tipped
and fatal shafts, which were as unerring and
deadly as bedbug poison to the delicate organi
zations of the reptiles for which it is com
pounded ; and he was feared and dreaded, as
well he might be, by every eagle, hon-hawk,
and buzzard that hovered above his native
land. Occasionally he would give exhibitions
Of his skill, such as firing off his arrows in the
direction from whence came a bird’s song,
bringing down the bird at every fire; and in
the night he could snuff a candle as far as he
could see the light; in fact he was the Napo
leon oi bow-and-arrowists.
For several years after leaving school, his
Only occupation was shooting for a living.
Switzerland was a great place for target ex
cursions, scarcely a day passing without the
parade of several target companies, and with
one of those young William was sure to be
found, he always returning with the first prize.
No castor ever fell to Ins lot, and not unfte
quently would he bring home two first prizes,
lie shooting in two companies. This sort of
thing paid him very well for several years ; but
»t length his skill and fame as a shootist be
came so well known and feared that ho was
jarred out from all future target excursions,
lie, however, got one more crack at it by offer
ing to shoot blindfolded; but winning in this
instance, as usual, the first prize, he never
figain was allowed to shoot.
His occupation was now gone, as was Othel
lo’s before him, and, disappointed, vexed, sick
at heart, he went and got married—which act
Bhows that the poor fellow must have suffered
terribly in his isolation from target companies,
or he never would have taken so desperate a
Btep—the most desperate mortal man can take.
Ten years elapse. One morning William—
perhaps we had ought now to call him Mr. Tell
—was going through Washington Market place
with Ins son, a lad about nine years of age, in
search of some sausages for breakfast, when he
espied on a telegraph pole a fool’s-cap, which
people were bowing before, with uncovered
Beads, at the command of one Gessler, a tyran
nical old rooster, then supervisor of tho can
teen in which William resided, . Bill went along,
condemning in his mind the abjectness of the
people, and with not the slightest intention of
Bowing or taking off his hat, you bet, to that
pap on the pole. '
“Take off your hat, there, you beetle-head,”
yells out old Gessler, furiously, to Bill.
“I guess not, if I know myself” answered
tho latter, quite unconcernedly.
“You won’t, eh?”roars out the old fraud.
Take that, then,” and lie hits Bill over the
Back with a stuffed club.
The latter squares off and gets in his right
fluke on Gesslor’s left eye, and follows this up
with a sledge hammer upper cut on tho old
rooster’s snuff-horn, drawing claret freely, and
sending the tyrant to earth. Bill is seized by
the police and hurried off to the Tombs, where
sentence of death is pronounced against him;
but Gessler, who has heard of his prowess with'
the bow, agrees to give him a chance for his
life if ho will shoot a russet apple from his
tson’s head, at three hundred paces. Bill to fur
nish tho apple—that was mean. The tyran
nical old cuss thinks it will afford him some
amusement in seeing the boy shot through the
head, as, of course, ne hasn’t the slightest idea
that the feat can be performed in a successful
manner, else he wouldn’t have been so liberal
in his offer.
Bill and his boy were brought out, the dis
lanee measured, and the apple placed on the
youth’s head, for which Bill was forced to pay
live cents—for the apple, not the head.
He offered Gessler two dollars, rather than
lake the chances of shooting, but tho old cuss
laughed him to scorn, and felt certain now that
the boy would be shot through the head, tho
thought of which pleased him greatly. Bill
was stationed on a chalk line, and told by
Gessler to fire when he gave the word. Draw
ing the arrow to the head, the agonized father
took the most careful aim just above his son’s
head —ho couldn’t see tho apple at the great
distance—and awaited the word, which was at
length given, after the bloodthirsty old wretch
had enjoyed the scene to his entire satisfaction.
A loud twang, a whizzing whir-r-r told that
the arrow had left on its message of death, or 1
deliverance..
A loud shout went up in a moment—the ap
ple had been pierced from stem to stern,
through tho centre, and Bill was free ! It was
100 much for him, and he fainted away on the
spot. While engaged in resuscitating him,
another arrow was found stowed away under
his vest; and when he revived, Gessler asked
him what that second arrow was for, as he was
to have only one shot.
Bill, light-headed, probably, indiscreetly re
plied :
“ To shoot you with, you fraud, if I bad hurt
the boy?’
This was “ rats” for Gessler, who felt sore
headed at the success of Bill, and was only too
glad to get him once more in his power; so he
ordered him bound, gagged, and to be taken
to his castle on the Jersey shore; and, not to
lose a moment’s gratification of beholding his
victim, whom he now meant to hang for mak
ing a diabolical threat against his life, he took
passage in his yacht, with his prisoner.
On tho way across the North River, a furious
Storm arose, the sea running mountains high,
snd they all thought they were bound for Davy
Jones’s locker, as no one of the party knew
anything about handling a yacht in a trying
lime like that. The only one who knew any
thing about yachting, in all weathers, was Bill
(how ho acquired tho knowledge, we don’t
know), and he was bound hand and foot.
Gossler, getting frightened, told his prisoner if
iio would, take them safe to land, he should
have his freedom again, which Bill promised to
co, he not caring about going to the bottom of
Xue roaring tide, all tied up as he was.
He was then cut adrift, and soon, by his
masterly seamanship, got the smack in at the
flock, when, leaping ashore, ho sped with the
speed of a race-horse up the pier, having no
confidence in the promises of bis enemy. Get
ting on to the street, he secreted himself in an
alley, w.inch he know Gessler must pass, and
when he cud pass, Bill let fly an arrow after
him, taking him in the small of the back, cook
ing his goose for him forever, as far as this
world w?.3 concerned.
Vfißiam then goes home 'via a Hoboken ferry
boat, , starts a revolution immediately, is ap
pointed lien tenant-general, and in course of
time, frees Switzerland from tyrants, and be
comes the '‘father of his country,”'dying at an
advanced age, respected by all. »
is tho story of William Tell;'but, as
was any such person, probably, it
nor 1A 1 w!lile ponder over it too deeply,
tho fanw tr sympathies carry you away during
10 ,axnoUi ’ apple-shooting scene.
If any of you are courting ladies of Swiss
extraction, with a view to matrimony, we would
advise you not to express a doubt concerning
the’authenticity of the Swiss hero, or you may
not marry in the direction your desires gravi
tate.
[Original.].
KEEPING UP APPEARANCES.
BY MRS. C. C. BIESTAING.
It will not be denied that customs, however
good in their nature, can be so perverted by
excess, and corrupted by abuse, that their once
healthy influence becomes injurious and de
moralizing. The human passions are no more
wrong than the virtues, and may be as safely
indulged in if moderation is practiced; it is
only tho unnatural excess and morbid desire
which gives birth to all the mischief—the
abuse, and not the use.
Whosoever permits feeling to supersede judg
ment, will be forever falling intp the mire.
Unevenness of temper and instability of char
acter, are prone to overleap the bounds of
reason, pervert the laws of life, and finally
crash out the better elements of our being.
Pride and vanity are dangerous and baneful
in their excess, but not in their rational exer
cise ; for, without them, where would be all
our enterprise and the great incentive to pro
gress and advancement? What is ambition
but pride ? And this trait of human nature
presents the greatest diversity in its manifes
tations. There are many grades of pride, and
and yet the principle involved is tho same in
all. It is circumstances which tend to evolve
the different aspects of human character.
Moral philosophers have often asserted, and
are fond of proving that this striving to keep
up appearances, is the crying evil of society,
and has been the ruin of thousands ; and there
is no doubt that much evil has been wrought
by the morbid desire to emulate the unworthy.
Tho evil, however, consists only in tho unnatu
ral excess.
Is it not a duty we owe to ourselves and to
each other, to make the best possible appear
ance we can before the world ? to cultivate the
amenities and refinements of civilized life, even
at the risk of overdoing, occasionally?
The grand centre and motive power of civil
ization after all, is activity and industry; and
where these qualities exist, ambition and pride
are certain to dwell. These elements of charac
ter inspire the desire to be thought well of, to
hold a position in tho community, and maintain
a character before men; and this same self
respect and wish for superiority, affects all
classes in a greater or less degree, from the
peasant to the king.
The success of any business depends mainly
upon the amount of worth, ability and energy
invested at the commencement, and we emu
late each other to place our affairs before the
public in the best possible light—“ to put,” as
they say, “the host foot foremost,” becomes a
duty to those who desire to succeed in any new
enterprise. The result and intent may be
swindling and fraud, where virtue and honest
gain are represented; but still, ambition is, in
either case, the application of the same princi
ple of action, which, if properly carried out,
from good motives, produces a wholesome in
fluence, and, if perverted, the very opposite.
The practice of presenting to the world the
“fair side of tho picture,” as it is termed, has
existed from time immemorial, individually
and collectively, in all ages, and among all peo
ple. The ancients, as far back as Solomon’s
time, prided themselves upon the elegance and
prosperity of their country. Then, as now, the
great rulers strove to enhance the advantages
of their own condition, and exalt the worth of
their subjects. Defects were carefully con
cealed or denied, and often simple deeds of
valor were eloquently eulogized and exagger
ated, from a mere spirit of pride, to maintain
the idea of superiority over tho rest of man
kind.
Poetry and history have been chiefly engaged
in extolling this or that age or people.
Keeping up appearances of greatness in
power, valor and high standing of nations, has
pervaded the whole human race ; the same
sentiment that actuates pride and self-esteem
in the hearts of those who sit in high places,
penetrates into the abodes of those who occupy
less lofty positions.
Take a passing glance at the moral incentives
that humanity exhibits m the great struggle of
life—will you not find that every existence has
its double sphere of action ? The innate de
sires and hopes of each individual are cherished
in secret, and only those qualities and efforts
which afford a self-satisfactory examination are
exposed to the view of the world.
Every city, town and hamlet grows into no
tice by its prosperity, just in proportion to the
vigor and enterprise of its inhabitants. Indus
try and ambition sweep away all unsightly and
disagreeable objects.
Prido and the love of one’s own birthplace
are motives which impel every citizen to the
sense of duty he owes to himself and neigh
bors in sustaining and presenting before the
world the best elements that exist in the sphere
of his immediate action. And when we find
this pride of character and love of good opin
ion lacking, wo then mdbt with a want of self
respect, and ignorance and vice are certain
consequences.
The man or woman who has lost self-respect,
who is utterly regardless of what society thinks
of them, are lost indeed to shame, and are al
most beyond social, or, in fact, any other kind
of redemption.
We should have no need of prisons and
houses of correction so long as people pre
served pride and self-esteem, and daily studied
to make tho best appearance in the sphere of
life to which they are born.
True pride ever keeps us out of the mire. It
enables us to avoid the baneful effects of reck
lessness ; it elevates us individually, and the
race collectively.. And because people abuse
this quality, and run into silly ostentation,
foolish vanity, and ridiculous pretensions, a
too great ambition is cried down ; this abuse of
pride is bad, but not so great an evil as the
want of self-respect and dignity entailed by its
absence.
Let us use all wisely therefore. It is the
prudent exercise of all our faculties and pas
sions which make us essentially human. Be
nevolence is good, but foolish liberality is not.
Prudence and economy are easily perverted
• into avarice; love and lust are not the same ;
firmness, unguarded by reason, is Bullishness.
Man is most perfect when all his faculties are
fully and harmoniously developed, and to keep
up appearances is a duty he owes to society to
promote the growth of intellectual and moral
culture.
KASPAR HAUSER.
Like the “ Man in tho Iron Mask,” the iden
tity of the unfortunate Kaspar Hauser, the
foundling of Nuremburg, has formed the sub
ject of much speculation. To the present, the
mystery hanging over his origin remains undis
pelled, and the whole affair is beset with such
anomalies and contradictions, that it is almost
impossible to form even a well-grounded con
jecture on the subject. The following are the
ascertained facts of tho case.
Between four and five o’clock in the after
noon of the 26th May, 1828, a young lad, ap
parently of about sixteen or seventeen years of
age, was found in a helpless and forlorn condi
tion in tho market-place of Nuremburg, by a
citizen of that town. He was dressed like a
peasant-boy, and had with him a letter ad
dressed to the captain of the sixth regiment of
horse at Nuremberg. Being conducted to this
officer and interrogated, it soon became evi
dent that be could speak very little, and was
almost totally ignorant. To ali questions he
replied, “Von Regensburg” (from Regensburg),
or “Ich woas nit” (I don't know). On tho
other hand, he wrote his name in firm, legible
characters on a sheet of paper, but without
adding the place of his birth, or anything else,
though requested to do so. Though short and
broad shouldered, his figure was perfectly well
proportioned. His skin was very white; his
limbs delicately formed, the hands and feet
small and beautiful—the latter, however, show
ing no marks of his having ever worn shoes.
With tho exception of dry bread and water, he
showed a violent dislike to all kinds of meat
and drink. His lanzuage was confined to a
few words or sentences in the old Bavarian
dialect. He showed entire ignorance of the
most ordinary objects, and great indifference
to the conveniences and necessaries of life.
Among his scanty articles of clothing was a
handkerchief marked K. H.; he had likewise
about him some written Catholic prayers. In
the letter which he carried, dated “From the
confines of Bavaria, place unknown, 1828,” the
writer stated himself to be a poor day-laborer,
thq father, of ten children, and said that the
boy had been deposited before his door by his
mother, a person unknown to the writer. He
stated further, that he had brought up the boy
secretly, without allowing him to leave the
house, and had instructed him in reading,
writing; and the doctrines of Christianity padd
ing that it was the boy’s wish to become a
horse-soldier. 1 The letter enclosed a line, ap
parently from the mother, stating that she, a
poor girl had given birth to the boy on the 30th
April, 1812, that his name was Kaspar, and
that his father, who had formerly served in the
sixth regiment, was dead.
The poor boy having been taken before and
attended to by the magistrates, his story was
soon made known to the public, and he himself
became the object of general 5 sympathy.
Binder, a burgomaster, exerted himself, in par
ticular, to throw some light on the obscurity in
which the origin of the young man was in
volved. In the course of many conversations
with him, it came out that Hauser, from his
childhood, had worn only a shirt and trousers ;
that he had lived in a dark place underground,
whore be was unable to stretch himself at full
length; that he had been fed on bread and
water, by a man who did not show himself, but
who cleaned and dressed him, and provided
him with food and drink while he was in a state
of natural or artificial sleep. His sole occupa
tion was playing with two wooden horses. For
some time before he was conveyed to Nurem
burg, the man had come oftener to his dungeon,
and had taught him to write, by guiding his
hand, and to lilt his feet and walk.
The narrative gave rise to various supposi
tions and rumors. According to some, this
mysterious foundling was of princely origin, or
the victim of some dark plot respecting an in
heritance. Some incredulous persons believed
tho whole affair to bo an imposition. On tho
18th July, 1828, Hauser was banded over to the
care of Professor Daumer, yHo afterward acted
the part oi his biographer The history of his
education is remarkable in. a pedagogic point
of view, as his original desire for knowledge,
his extraordinary memory, and acute un
derstanding, decreased in proportion as the
sphere of ins knowledge extended. His in
tellectual progress was, on the whole, small.
On the 17th October, 1829, he was found
bleeding from a slight wound on the brow,
which he said had been inflicted by a man with
a black head. All efforts made to discover the
perpetrator were ineffectual. The incident ex
cited a great sensation ; Hauser was conveyed
to the house of one of the magistrates, and
constantly guarded by two soldiers. Among
the many strangers who came to see him was
Lord Stanhope, who became interested in him,
and sent him to be educated at Anspach. Here
ho was employed in an office of the court of ap
peal, but he by no means distinguished himself
either by industry or talent, and was gradually
forgotten, till bis death again made him the
subject of attention. This event took place
under the following singular circumstances :
A stranger, under the pretext of bringing
him a message from Lord Stanhope, and in
forming him of tho circumstances of his birth,
engaged to meet Hauser in the palace garden
at three o’clock on the. afternoon of the 14th
December, 1833. The hapless young man was
faithful to the rendezvous, but ho had scarcely
commenced to converse with the unknown
emissary, when the latter stabbed him in tho
loft side, and he fell mortally wounded. He
had, however, sufficient strength left to return
home and relate the circumstances of his as
sassination, and three days afterward, on the
17th December, 1833, he died. Among the
many surmises current regarding the unfortu
nate Hauser, the latest is that ho was the scion
of a noble family in England, and that his dark
and mysterious history, with its atrocious
termination, had its origin in that country. But
nothing beyond mere conjecture have ever
been adduced in reference to the subject.
w*. * * w w W 0 0 —* 4T*
Vice la Bagatelle,
JOKING
has been compared to sherry, a beverage that
it is good to quaff with our “ quirks and
cranks,” and their concomitants of “wreathed
smiles.” A joke, even though it boa broad
one, may he redeemed from censure if it bo
hearty, and impart breadth and force to the
laughter it creates. There'should be no snig
gling or whiffling about merriment, but when
we unbend, all should be open, clear and full,
and a laugh should bo from the throat up
ward, like that early proclamation of the
dawn at whose cheering notes the most drow
sy never grumble. Let us disdain restraint’
and from our lips lose the puckerings ac
quired in the every day world, that all our
features may beam with satisfaction. Our
humor should partake of our character as
a people, and the practical combine with all
our employments. We may not, as some do >
apply tho line and rule to our national wit, but
let it flow in such unmeasured quantities, as
will relax the most stubborn features, and
give heart’s ease to the most wearied spirit-
The extravagant and ridiculous so abound as
to furnish food for the most waggish disposi.
tion to exist upon. But in all our gratifica
tion of the propensity, there should be blend -
ed true feeling and unaffected good nature >
that our extravagances may not offend. We
feel happy in the belief that these elements are
largely characteristic of the members of the
Gossip Club. The boys are warm, light
hearted, jolly fellows, animated by a give-and
take feeling. Jokes,like wine,, were made to
bo passed round, and he who neglects his turn
[S rather, to be pitied than reproved. “A
lean and yellow melancholy” finds no place at
our revels; and wo aim to be both merry and
wise. As an earnest of our intentions, we
offer some rhymes on
FASHION’S SWAY.
'Tis curious tlie mind of man
Rejects a thing because
Us not within the fashion bound.
Or fashion’s changing laws.
’Tis fashion governs all the world,
’Tis fashion Illis the church,
I really think if fashionable
Man’s pockets we would search.
Should your endeavor introduce
A science fair and true,
The world would laugh, and jeer, and scoff.
And call hard names at you.
But let the fashions for a day
Take it auto her breast,
Then all the world will follow soon.
Your hobby to caress.
Omnipotent is fashion then.l
She rules the day and hour,
Tears to the ground and reconstructs,
The world is in her power.
But should a being tear himself
Away from her great sway,
How soon he iiads his friends depart.
To curse him day by day.'
A new correspondent, who signs himself J,
G. E., and from whom we shall be glad to hear
early and often, sends us a chapter of his
VELOCIPEDE EXPERIENCE.
Jolly Boss : I have been there too. Yes.fsir; lam a
velocipeder. Might as well be out of the world as
out of the fashion. Nobody puts their shoulders to
tho wheel now. It’s feet. Nobody paddles their own
canoe now. It’s velocipedes. So, wheel or whoa, I
was bound to tackle the machine, or mash in my
nose in the attempt. The hall was formerly a church.
“To what base uses, &c.” I took my girl and some
other lady friends along to behold my Dexter-ity upon
the untamed steed. I knew it was easy enough to
ride. Any one could see that by looking at those
chaps chasing each other around. I procured the
ladies some front seats and left them. I hired a ma
chine. I got astraddle, began to paddle, and you
should have seen the folks skedaddle. I think I must
have gone over two feet, when I dropped something.
It was the. machine. I brushed the dust off my
clothes, and heard the young ladies remark to each
other, “ Te he!” I cast a look of infinite scorn upon
an individual who asked me if I could ride.
“ Yes,” I said.
“ It’s a fall, I see,” says he.
I told him it was no fallacy, and began to try, try
again. I got one foot on the crank, and in trying to
place the other jammed it awfully.
“ Get out of tho way, old beeswax,” shouted an ur
chin, coming around full tilt.
“You be jammed,” I answered, as I led my cour
ser to a corner to remount.
Perseverance conquers all things, they say. I per
severed. I tackled it again, got both feet working,
put my helm hard a starboard, and ran into a craft
on the other tack. Both down—considerably mixed.
Three other fellers coming full split piled up on top
of us. I extricated myself from the debris after much
difficulty. I knew it was me by a left mole upon my
right arm. Took a survey of damages. Coat split
down the back like a shad, hole in knee of best pants,
watch crystal smashed, and a bloody nose. Young
ladies remarked, “Hu! ha!” Renovated and re
freshed myself at the hydrant, and went in. Gent
behind observed that 1 was sitting upon my handker
chief. Made an examination; it was no handker
chief. It was—well, there was another rent in my
pants. Young ladies in religious conversation about
sowing tares, &c.
I was gettting desperate. I had been an hour al
most, sweating, swearing, trembling, tumbling, rip
ping, tearing, and yet couldn’t budge more than two
feet. So i made a tremendous push, and struck out
bravely. There was one of those horrid pillars di
rectly in front of me. I would port my helm and
pass to starboard. No, I would starboard my helm
and pass to port. Concluded I would go both sides.
Done so. I don’t think the post was hurt much. At
any rate, I could not see very well upon regaining
my perpendicular, for one eye was swelling so fast
that I could go but one on it. Young ladies remarked
that my steed ought to go fast, as it was evidently a
post horse. I grimly replied that it seemed to have
decided objections to carrying the male.
Around the room I was bound to go before I gave
up. The eyes of the girls —laughing eyes—were upon
me. Now for one giand effort to retrieve all past
blunders. Away I wont, as graceful as a lobster, and
as swift as a snail up a steep hill with a big of sand
on his back and his feet greased. Gathering speed
and courage as I went, I progressed finely, until a
small boy crossed my path. In trying to steer clear
of him I ran plnmp into the cashier at his desk near
the door, upsetting him, desk, money, kerosene lamp,
ladies, children, &c«, and going clean out on the side
walk. The house was afire, the people hollered mur
der and stop thief, and leaving the cussed machine
in the street, I made tracks for home at a faster gait
than ever bycicle went. I saw by the papers that the
fire was extinguished without damage. But I haven’t
been there since. And worst of all, the next Sunday
evening, when I called as usual upon my charmer, I ‘
was met at the door by the servant, who politely in
formed me that if *1 ever showed my taco around
there again she was to set tho dog on me.
Yours, in wheel and whoa, J. G. E.
A friend who professes (sincerely wo havo no
doubt) to have derived great good from “Our
Weekly Gossip,” sends us as a contribution
thereto, the following dialogue between paler
and mater familias and their little Tommy?
which is pleasantly suggestive of
TEA-TABLE SEANCE.
Tommy—Do birch-brooms grow in China, papa ?
Papa—No, my dear. But why do you ask that sin
gular question ?
Tommy—Because the other day you told us tea
grew in China, and I’ve got in my cup a piece of the
most unquestionable birch I ever saw.
Mamma—Or ever felt, eh, Tommy ?
Papa—Nay, let us not check the young mind in its
search for truth. Tommy is right; he has twigged
the twig, which is decidedly birch.
Jenny—But how did it get into the teas? Ah’
papa, that is a teaser ?
Papa—No, my love, it is not a teaser, if you knew
all; and I will tell it you. The tea-plant grows in
China
Tommy—Yes, papa; but the birch-brooms, do they
grow in China, also ?
Papa—No, Tommy, they do not; but the cultivat
ors of the tea-plant are often beaten by their masters
with a rod
Jonny—l thought you told us they were ruled with
a rod of iron—and this is birch.
Pa>a—So it is, Jenny; but they may be ruled with
one thing and beaten with another. The tea-culti
vators are so unmercifully thrashed with birch rods,
that the bits get into the tea, and find their way to
the English market.
Mamma—But I saw Mr. Twankay, the grocer, cut
ting up a birch-broom yesterday, in his back parlor,
over a tea-chest, which his wife was stirring round,
with a rolling-pin.
Papa—There you puzzle me. I can only say with
reference to the birch they were using, that if it does
not beat the tsa-cultivators, it beats anything I ever
heard; and so there’s an end of it.
NEW YORK DISPATCH.
To the more serious and philosophic of read
ers we now address ourself, and submit for
their delectation the following strange narra
tive from the Jolly White Boy:
SHARK STORY.
Ob. never be so blind as mo
bo blind as to run away to see;
And if you do, don’t go on a bark,
To tumble off and. feed a shark.
About ten minutes of seven, one P. M. in the year
1866,1 felt very conun drumy. My ma was talking
about old Matthews, the dry goods feller, selling his
goods dreadful cheap, when I startled the old gal by
exclaiming, “ When Matthew Marks his goods cheap
enough JbAn will Luke in.” There was a kind of chili
between me and the old cuss, because only the night
before dad was sitting on the bed, when I told him I
thought he owned that bedstead, but now I saw he
only had a lien upon it; and things got nearly to a
focus when I said Neighbor Barker must be a puppy,
because he was a bark-cur.
The evening passed away, and the cold wind whis
tled down the chimney so it fooled our dog into com
ing in the house, when suddenly I shot a bolt that
divided our family.
. “ Dad,” says I, “ why is eating iysters on the half
shell like six punks from a 4 th of July cannon ?”
He gived it up.
Then I said, “ Because it is half a dozen roars.”
“ Well,” said he, rolling up his sleeves, “ I*ll take a
whole dozen roars out of you!” And he did; and
that night I was “blind enough to run away to see.”
I shipped aboard the good ship Castor Oil. The
owner believed in castor-ing oil on troubled waters.
This ship wag a bark. I went on a bark be
cause when ths winds howled I knew a bark would
be as good as a howl any time. I got out of sight of
land by crawling down through a hole in the. front
piazza. The mate ordered me to grease a big wheel
out aft, as he called it. I said I wouldn’t do it—that
I shipped before the mast, aud. d—d if I was go mg
behind ’em. The mate had his little way of quelling
slight misunderstandings of this nature that might
arise from time to time. He broke a switch off tho
cross-trees, and he tied me to the spanker boom and
spanked me until I saw spars, and I quailed so much
I liked to died game. I felt so sore I thought we
must be off the Azores. I didn’t mutiny any more.
We got down into the Bahama channel, when, one
night, the mate told me it was my watch.
“Of course it is,” says I. “ Dad give it to me.”
“No,” said ho; “it is your watch on deck to
night.”
Then I understood him. I set upon the hatch-way
looking at tho moon, and wondering why somebody
didn’t get some freckle medicine and remove those
black blotches on its face, when a wild shriek came
up through the scuttle. At first I thought the an
chor had fell on some one’s corns. Then I looked
down cellar, and found it was one of the hoarse ma
rines had the night-mare. It got silent again. The
shrouds looked liko they were lull of ghosts. We
were going about twelve pine knots an hour, and
headed pig pig west (don’t mistake this for sow sow
west), when over the lee bow I saw a wave, and then
anotner, aud fur as as the eye could reach there was
nothing but waves. Then I thought, supposing we
should strike a fence post or a brick building—what
an awful fate it would be. The main jib topsail yard
swung around with an awful noise. I grabbed a
block and threw it at the cat-heads, and I
thought if we should strike the reef in tho main top
sail, what would become of us ?
1 got off' a conundrum.
Says I, “ Why is a ship called a she ? Because they
put a bonnet on her jib.”
Most any other feller would have “ gib” that up.
Now I knew the gale was on us. I shouted “All
hands ahoyl” when up came the captain, three
mates and the crew, in their shirt tails, just as they
got in bed. Cap seized a horn and shouted a whole
lot of stuff, then seized, a horn and drank a
whole lot of stuff, and in an instant all
tho masts, spars, and yards were taken in out of the
wet and carried down in the basement and sub-cel
lar, and the ship looked like a big canal boat. Coun
try folks who are brought up on broad and “biled ”
chewed grass strained through a cow, may think it
curious that a ship has back yards and front yards,
but such is a fact; and if they were in those yards
they’d find themselves deceased vegetables, viz.,
“ dead beets.” Country folks may think sailors put
on the gloves to “ box the compass,” but it ain’t so;
and they needn’t think they could box a compass in
half a day if they only had a saw, and hammer, and
nails; and when they read of a ship plowing through
the waves, they mustn’t think it is hitched to a
couple of mules in front, and a fellow behind holding
onto two bandies; because it it ain’t a bit like plow
ing up a side hill. The state of the ocean was fear
ful to a frightful degree. The captain was afraid of
striking a calm; he was like an old coat, nearly worn
out. He politely iniormed mo what to do in this im
mergency" by singing out, “ You d—d lazy lubber
‘hist* that anchor, or I’ll knock wind enough out of
your lubberly belly to start a new trade wind and
blow a ship from Canton to New York, shiver my
timbers if I don’t.” The mate was out on the anchor
holding it up so the bows might risq, when his foot
slipped, a splash, and he was gone. Then every
darned fool shouted “ Man overboard!” just as if he
didn’t know it. I said it wasn’t one of the men, it
was the mate, and tho ship kept on its course, and
we left him to buffet with the waves and not a darned
thing to buffet with.
Three years elapsed. One cold, mild, sultry Win
ter’s day, I visited the sea-side to haul up my lobster
pots, because I wanted some biled lobster for my
little boy, who was sick with tho dysentery. When I
got there I seed a shark coming straight ashore, and
first I knew he was high and dry on the sand. I
thought this must be a “land shark,” and wont to
make him a call, when I heard a voice saying, “ Hal
loo, Johnny, run your knife down the shark’s belly,
and lot me out. Be careful and not cut deep, or
you’ll‘spile’ me.” To act with me, was to do. I
ripped him open, when out sprang the mate. His
clothes were tho old style of cut, and in his coat
pocket was a New York Dispatch, dated 1866, in his
hands he had a “gill” of red ink that he had made
from the sharks “gills.” We set down on the lob
ster pot, and he told his tale. When he Sell over
board he saw his only course to pursue was to sink;
and he shut his mouth so as not to make bubbles,
and be sank so fast that he left a hole in the water
behind him through which he could see tho azure
vault above, and get some breath to breathe. He
touched bottom; then the hole filled up; aud so he
ris again; and ho kept sinking and rising all night,
flirting with mermaids, and looking at the pretty
“ water colors” until the cussed shark crossed his
path and swallowed him. At first he found it un
comfortable in there; but he arranged the inwards a
little differently from what nature did; then he felt
better. He didn’t have as roomy apartments as
Jonah did, but it was the best he could do. He be
gan to think that life was a rather desirable thing to
have; he thought how good hot roast peanuts tasted,
and how glad his folks would be to hear he was well,
and he resolved to escape. He took a couple of bones
and run one down each side of the shark’s tail, so it
couldn’t flop; then he put a rudder ourt behind to
steer with; then he bored two holes connecting with
the nostrils, so he could peep through and see where
he was going; he made them so small that the rain
couldn’t beat in; he put his hand out doors and got
a scale and made a compass; the fish wasn’t long
enough for a long-itude, and for a latter-tude
he used the rudder. Then commenced his long race
of 7,000 miles; his life was at steak, or rather at fish.
He amused himself days by reading such light litera
ture as could obtain from the of the fish, and
nights he lit up with fish oil, and imagining that the
fish scales were old fashioned sixpences he flipped
them up, “ Heads I win, tails you lose.” He hung
his clothes up on the pegs on its back bone, and lived
on tho fish tho shark swallowed. He could have got
plenty of liver, but fearing it might make the shark
uneasy, he didn’t touch it. He translated the whole
of Day’s Algebra into Irish, and ho said the last three
months wasn’t very tedious, as the shark was desi
rous of getting ashore to spawn, and all he had to do
was to steer him right. He was exceedingly pleased
to see me, and said that he was such an old “ tar*
prevented the water from soaking in and giving him
a cold. Take it all in all, this is one oi the most
wonderful escapes I ever heard of, and is another
proof that “fact is stranger than fiction.” This hardy
tar is one of those kind of men who wear the stamp
of truth upon his brow, and a single glance would
dispel any doubt that might arise in regard to his
veracity. I send you a bottle of the red ink he made
from the sharks gills, also a piece of hair from the
waterfall of a mermaid’s head. She was arranging
her toilet by the aid of a “ shiners” belly when he
grabbed it. I hope, Mr. Editor, you know my repu
tation for veracity well enough to insert this in your
valuable sheet without a doubt as to its reliability. As
to the sailor’s voracity, I can swear to that, as I had
him in to dinher just once.” Ha saw a woman pass
ing with a new style of frigaseed dress on. Says he,
“ What’s that ?” SaysJl, “ That’s a gal,” and the cuss
was going to knock me down for trying J-olly W-hite
B-oy to fool him.
Miss Tilly Burton writes us an interrogative
screed, more in sorrow than in anger, we hop e?
and demands to know
WHAT ARE WE COMING TO?
Oh, Lord! oh, Lord!
“Nerves a thousand times stronger could bear it no
longer,”
and if we can’t indulge in “free utterance,” right
here, we’ll burst with indignation. Since the days
of “ Black Crook” and “White Fawn,” the devil
has had a high old fight with tho goddess of chasti
ty, and at last the poor lady is compelled to “ give
in” and beat a hasty retreat, crying:
“ O, tempera I O, mores r*
Well she may. Look at the blushing (?) fair ones
in flesh-colored tights, who “ do” the velocipede be
fore the fascinated gaze of thousands. They look
nice ;?) and cool, don’t they? We shouldn’t won
der if young ladies adopted their style—for coolness,
you know—next Summer. Look at the “gushing”
nymphs of the ballet—
“ £an Fancy’s fairy hands no vail create”
to wrap around their shivering limbs? Their cov
ering has “grown short by degrees and beautifully
less,” till nothing remains on ’em but a wisp of sil
ver spotted tulle, or a shred of satin. These, too,
will shortly disappear, and lovers of novelty will be
hold Eve as she was before she partook of the fruit
that disagreed with her.
When the nymphs of the ballet trip upon the
stage, with nothing on ’em but paint, powder and
false tresses, New York will call their latest style
“perfectly splendid;” theatrical managers will glory
in it—so will the devil. Pious folks may feel some
thing akin to shame when thoy first pee pat ’em be
tween their fingers, but not enough to call up a
blush. -Ladies of fashion will be afflicted with a
mania
For long, yellow hair,
And nothing to wear!
Dress goo Is will “come down,” and dry good
men “burstup.” Gotham will swarm with coun
ter-jumpers out of situations; and dress-makers and
milliners, wild with rage and disappointment, will
commit suicide.
Fashions and fools.
Are the devil’s tools;
and while he handles ’em as cleverly as he does now,
he wiU model things as he likes. Under his manage
ment bhre-legged ballet gals will continue to dance
the can can to the great delight of fast men and fast
er women. Madame Efir onto in flesh-colored tights
will favor the “rink” with volocifaedal (and other)
exhibitions. Artists (to please the wicked public)
will get up “louder” pictures of highly colored
Graces with little on ’em; and gals oi the period will
grow bolder in dress and manners than ever; see if
they don’t. Those who don’t want to unsex them
selves and play the duse in pants, will undress, and
make Venuses of themselves.
Verily, verily, this is a “light, fantastic” age ! and
“ divil a ha’ porth” of decency has it got in it.
What are we coming to ?
Belle Z. Bub sent ua the following several
weeks ago, which has inadvertently escaped
attention until now. Wo give it, however?
without further explanation as one of the good
things from
TOPHET.
Dear Boss: I see Si iSlokum is on the fight yet.
And what a b»ave man he is, to be sure. -‘After
spiling for a fight for a fortnight,” he says, “ I have
come to the conclusion that there is do fight in any
of ’om.” In who? Why his “female brethren,” of
course. “ Bravo 1” says the ass. Why don’t you flap
your wings and crow? Make a noise to show your
joy over a oloodless victory. Do something to show
, forth to the public that you pulled off your coat, and
rolled up your under shirt sleeves to lick a lot of wlm
•men.
I like to hear a rooster crow,
Or e’en a jackass bray,
And of course wo all have heard,
“A dog will have his day.
I guess you must boa “ Knight of the Garter,**
And I furthermore guess that you’ve “caught a Tartar.
Talk about my kicking—you deserve a dused good
kicking, and if I had your fourteen inches attached
to my right nether extremity, I would kick you. And
as for your speechifying about our “petite ears,’’and
telling us “ they are as long as the moral law,” makes
me think you must judge other folks by yourself.
Give you a pen full of ink, and you are a brave man
on paper. Oh, yes, you threw down the gage of bat
tle. You’re mistaken, sir: it was an empty whisky
bottle. And were it a proper challenge even, we still
would prefer “ a foeman worthy of our steel,” and
not one that steals bourbon, either.
But then I feel kindly toward you, sir. I see you
take good-naturedly to the girls; and as lam a girl
—rather old, to be sure—but a girl still, why I for
give you, inasmuch as you have promised to behave
in decency after this. I think you are rather hard
on poor Caudle, though. Of course if she wants a
match from Tophet, I can supply her. By the way,
now that I think of it, there is a chap I don’t like
severely; and I would like to be revenged on him for
intimating that lam a “she devil.’’ And if it would
be any very great misery to bestow the “ little white
hand” of our friend and “fellow-clubber” on him,
why I’ll try all my powers; and then revenge would
taste good. Perhaps you are anxious to know who
the “feller” or “sperrit” is. Well, it is the concen
trated conglomeration of bourbon sour and Si Slo
kum. Don’t sigh. Keep your seat my dear “fel
lah,” and your temper, too. Here, take this Croton
with a thimble full of “forty rod;” or if youthink
the Croton will make you “ tight,” then take this
whole bottle, undulated. Now, Tilly, a word with
you. “ Bend your pe-tight ears.” Si is done for—-
he’s ashamed when he comes to think it was only a
bevy of light-hearted girls he was going to “lick.”
What made him mad first, was, you and the rest uf
us was going to drink all those nice liquors and not
give him any, and when at last you happened to see
his amiable “frow,” his rage know no bounds; so he
“ bounds” at us because he was afraid to “bound”
at her. I’ll be bound—but not to him. Yours, ‘ ‘fel
ah icitoueiy,” Belle Z. Bub.
SCINTILLATIONS.
A lady sat in silk attire,
Quaffing a cup of wine;
And she sang a song with tongue of fire
In tones that seemed divine.
There was a cruel meaning in her words,
Though her voice was melody,
And charmed as though it were a bird’s
That sings in the Summer tree.
The burden of her strange ditty ran,
“I’m wickeder than the wickedest man!”
The industrious old lady who walked
all over town with a can in her hand, to procure a
quart of the “ milk of human kindness,” has been
more successful in getting a little jam out of the door.
She got the jam on her fingers.
A strong-minded woman was heard
to remark, the other day, that she would marry a
man who had plenty of money, though he was so ugly
she had to scream every time she looked at him.
A widow once said to her daughter,
“ When you are at my age it will be time enough to
dream of a husband.” “ Yes, mamma,” replied the
thoughtless beauty, “for a second time.”
£@*BeatiQ(nl Continuous Guin
SETS OF TEETH.
RUBBER PUTE, WITH PLEMPERS, $lO.
Extracting ruder fias Without Charge,
When Others are Inserted.
DR. BODINE, No. 190 Grand st.
g®” Found at East—ss,ooo Reward for a
FAILURE.—A safe, sure, never failing and harmless
preventive without medicine, or in any way interfering
with nature. Call on or address with stamp enclosed,
MME. VAN BUSKIRK, Physician and Midwife, No. 42
St. Mark’s Place, Eighth street, near Second Avenue,
New York City.
Jt®" Office of the Commissioners of Taxes
AND ASSESSMENTS, No. 32 Chambers street, Kew
York, January 4, 1869.
NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS.—Notice is hereby given
that the Assessment Rolls of the Real and Personal Es
tate of the City and County of New York, for the year
1869, will be open for inspection and revision on and after
Monday, January 11, 1869, and will remain open till the
30th day of April, 1869, for the correction of errors and
the equalization of the asssessments of the aforesaid
real and personal estate of the City and County of New
York. All persons believing themselves to be aggrieved
must make application to the Commissioners during the
period above mentioned, in order to obtain the relief
provided by law. The act of 1859 provides that “ during
the time the books shall be open to public inspection,
as hereinbefo-ie provided, application may be made by
any person considering himself aggrieved by the as
sessed valuation of his real or personal estate, to have
the same corrected. If such application be made in re
lation to the assessed valuation of real estate, it must be
made in writing, stating the ground of objection thereto,
and thereupon the Commissioners shall- oxamine into
the complaint, and if, in their judgment, the assessment
is erroneous, they shall cause the same to be corrected.
If such application be made in relation to the assessed
valuation of personal estate, the applicant shall be ex
amined under oath by the said Commissioners, who shall
be authorized to administer such oaths, or any of them;
and if, in his or their judgment, the assessment is erro
neous, they shall cause the same to be corrected, and fix
the amount of such assessment as they may believe to
be just, and declare their decision thereon within thirty
days after such application shall have been made to
them. No reduction shall be made by the Board of Su
pervisors of any assessment on real or personal estate
Imposed under this act, unless it shall appear, under
oath or affirmation, that the party aggrieved was unable
to attend within the period prescribed for the correction
of taxes, by reason of sickness or absence from the city.”
J. W. ALLEN, ) Commissioners of
J. W. BROWN, J Taxes and
C. M. DEPEW, ) Assessments.
QB AND BILLIARD TOURNAMENT
FOR THE
Championship of America
AND
1,400 DOLLARS IN PURSES.
IRVING HALL, APRIL 26th TO MAY 10th.
Contests between all the great players
JOSEPH DION, of Montreal,
A. P. RUDOLPHE, of Chicago,
HENRY RHINES, of Chicago,
PETER SNYDER, Chicago.
EDWARD DANIELS, of Boston,
WILLIAM GOLDTHWAITE, of New York.
JOHN DEERY, of New York,
MELVIN FOSTER, of New York.
AMERICAN CAROM GAME, 1,300 POINTS UP, ON
. A FOUR-POCKET TABLE, PUSHING
STROKES DEBARRED.
PLAYING AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
SINGLE ADMISSION. FIFTY CENTS..
SEASON TICKETS (admitting to all the seances) $5 00
Ilf ETROPOLITAN BILLIARD BOOMS,
lyjl MOBRISANIA HALL,
Railroad Avenue, near Fifth street, Morrisania.
t CONCERT HALL ATTACHED.
ALES, WINES, LIQUORS AND SEGARS.
_> LEWIS ,H. COMBES, Proprietor.
JMLLIABDS!
UNION SQUARE BILLIARD ROOMS,
THE HANDSOMEST AND MOST COMPLETE
ROOMS IN THIS CITY,
CONTAINING:
TWENTY-TWO O.F PHELAN’S TABLE’S.
No. 60 and 62 East 14th st., Union Square.
» CHRIS. O'CdNNOB,
Billiard table for sale-
FOR SALE CHEAP A
SECOND HAND BILLIARD TABLE IN
PERFECT ORDER.
APLLY AT THE GOTHAM,
MATTHEWS & GEOGHAN. W °’ 3 °° OWEEY -
£0
SAFETY GAS.
NO MORE KEROSENE EXPLOSIONS.
NO MORE SACRIFICING OF LIMB OR LIFE.
GO TO
NO. 40 EAST BROADWAY,
and get the Liquid Safety Gas for your lamps. It is the
CHEAPEST, SAFEST, MOST ECONOMICAL AND
BRILLIANT LIGHT IN THE COUNTRY.
Principal Office, No. 120 MAIDEN LANE,
GEORGE L. SMITH & CO.,
Only Manufacturers of the American Liquid Safety Gas.
3iSP ro ‘ w ’ E^Yr
OPPOSITE BLEECKER STREET,
EXTENSION
SPRING BED BOTTOMS,
BARNES’ PATENT.
Will ill any size Bedstead witli
out measuring.
IS NOISELESS, LIGHT, AND DUBABLE.
CALL AND EXAMINE.
G. W. BARNES & SON.
and
FOR
GRECIAN B&lk
BENDS,
At HUNT’S, IX.
430 BROADWAY.
Largest, cheapest and best assortment of Custom
made Gaiters in the city; also fine Dress French Calf
and Double-sole Boot, for bpring and Summer wear.
Prices reduced from $1 to $3 a pair.
J. HUNT, No. 430 BROADWAY.
OBTAINED IN
different States. Desertion, &c., sufficient cause.
No publicity. No charge until divorce obtained. A•! vice
ircu. M. HOUSE, Attorney, No. 7s Nassau sUeei,.
gTETSON HOUSE,
LONG BRANCH, N. J.
This Hotel will open on or about the Ist of June. Ap
plications for rooms received at the Astor House, New
York, or by letter to the Hotel at Long Branch, on and
after May Ist, and during the season. The R. and D. B.
R. R. will run a steamer at 9 A. M., returning at night,
enabling parties wishing rooms to spend the day at
Long Branch. C. A. STETSON, Jr.,
Proprietor.
(1 SCHEIG & CO.
WILD SELL, AT REDUCED PRICES,
PARLOR, DINING-ROOM, and CHAMBER SUITS,
at their Furniture Manufactory and Warerooms,
No. 33 FIRST STREET,
Between First and Second avenues.
JjWRNITURE.
$500,000 WORTH OF FTMITBIIE AT
RETAIL FOR 60 DAYS.
Frank Rhone? & Co.,
WHOLESALE
FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS,
Have taken the extensive Warerooms in the NEW
STONE BUILDINGS Nos. 185 and 187 CANAL ST.,
cor. of MOTT ST., where they offer their entire Whole
sale Stock of Furniture at Retail, at their trade-list
prices.
SOLID WALNUT PARLOR SUITS in HAIR CLOTH
OR REPS, from §65 upward.
SOLID WALNUT ANTIQUE SUITS (7 pieces), from
§125 upward.
solid Walnut marble top chamber suits
(10 pieces), from §75 upward.
DINING-ROOM. LIBRARY, and HALL FURNI
TURE, AT FACTORY PRICES.
Parties in want of Furniture, will see by examining
this stock, that it is ono of the best made and lowest
priced of any of the kind now offering.
EVERY ARTICLE WARRANTED.
Furniture i
MANUFACTURERS’ STOCK AT RETAIL.
WM. H. SCHAFFER,
No. 6 SECOND AVE.,
Between Houston and First streets,
offers his entire stock of
PARLOR,
CHAMBER,
DINING-ROOM.
LIBRARY,
and HALL
FURNITURE AT RETAIL,
Al MANUFACTURERS’ PRICES.
Solid Walnut and Manogany Parlor Suites, in reps,
seven pieces, from §BS CO upward.
Solid Walnut Chamber Suites, marble top, ten pieces,
from §IOO 00 upward.
ANTIQUE PARLOR FURNITURE.
In Reps, Brocatelle, and Plush, at prices correspond
ingly low.
MATTRESSES, BEDDING, Ac..
OF FIRST QUALITY.
ALL GOODS MADE FROM THE BEST SEASONED
MATERIAL, AND WARRANTED.
FROST BLACK & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN, AND
MANUFACTURERS OF
FURNITURE
OF EVEBY VABIETY,
Ko, 69 Bowery, near Canal street,
NEW YORK.
Steamboals, Hotels, and Public Buildings furnished at
ths shorumt notice.
A/l goods purchased of outhouse guaranteed as Repre
sented.
R. W FROST. JAMES BLACK. GEO. SNYDER.
JQ EGRAAF & TAYLOR,
FURNITURE, CARPETS
AND MATTRESSES,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
MANUFACTORY AND WARDROOMS,
Sos. 87 and 89 BOWERY?
So. 65 CHRISTIE STREET,
Eos. 130 and 132 HESTER ST.,
NEW YORK.
(CONNECTED UNDER ONE ROOF.)
We have now on hand the largest stock of entirely new
patterns and designs for furnishing houses throughout
ever offered by one house in the city, and at a great de
duction in price.
Our CARPET DEPARTMENT is under the superin
tendence of H. S. BARNES, who is well and favorably
known to the public, having been a long time with
Sloane & Co., in Broadway, and for the ?last four years
with Lord & Taylor. Our stock of Carpets is entirely
new and well selected, this branch having been just added
to our business.
The MATTRESS DEPARTMENT is entirely under
our supervision, all being made on the premises. Every
Mattress guaranteed.
Steamboats, Hotels, Churches, Public Halls and Pri
vate Houses furnished throughout at wholesale prices.
The Floating Palaces—the eteamers of the People’s
Line on the Hudson River—were furnished by us.
PRICES DEFY COMPETITION.
SECOND AND THIRD AVE. CARS PASS OUR
STORES. ENTRANCE, Nos. 87 and 89 BOWERY,
NEWYORK.
JjWRNITURE AT REDUCED PRICES,
CONSISTING OF
PARLOR, DINING-ROOM and CHAMBER SUITES.
RETAILING AT MANUFACTURERS’ PRICES.
F. KRUTINA,
MANUFACTORY AND WARE-ROOMS,
Kos. 96 and 98 EAST HOUSTON STREET,
. Bet. Bowery and Second avenue,
ALL GOODS WARRANTED.
Furniture i furniture i—at g.
W, SWEDEN’S, No. 263 BOWERY, between Stan
ton and Houston streets.
ALL KINDS OF FURNITURE,
„ LOOKING GLASSES, BEDDING, Ac., i-c.,
RETAILED AT MANUFACTURERS PRICES.
Goods warranted and delivered free. Call, and you
will save money, and be served honorably and promptly.
Note the number.
FURjyTURE IN SUITS, AND MADE TO ORDER.
for FURNITURE, TRUNKS,
kJ Baggage, -or other property. Separate compartments,
all sizes. Goods taken up on elevators. Porters, truck
men, Ac., on hand. H. G. HAEGER, No. 300 West
Thirty-fourth street, cor. Eighth avenue.
1 Weekly f
Z; R ' j e 32
3 11 PAYMENTS
g
!J' TAKES. j Q
p? Hi a
S M ’Us w
f J J
mHOMAS KELLY, Na, 35 BOWERY,
JI. Manufactures all kinds of LOOKING-GLASSES. '
Round, Square, Oval, Mantel and Pier Glasses of every
description, etc , made to Order. Looking-Glass Plato's
putin old’ frames. On a suitable recommend weekly
payments will be taken.
WTATTRESSES, FEATHERS,
THEOLDESTESTABLISHMENT^' 01 ’ 110, ’ 0,
„ IN THE CITY.
VILLARD A KOGERS,
33333333 . 88888888 44444
533333333333 88SS88S88888 4414444
3393333 3333333 8838883 8888883 44 M 444
53333 33333 888888 88S838 444 44444
33333 33333 BEBSBB 888888 4-144 44144
33333 8888838 8886838 4444444444444441444
33333 8834=83883 4414444444414444444
33333 8888838 8888838 4MM44444441444444
33333 33333 888888 888888 44444
33333 33333 888888 883888 44444
3333333 3333333 BSBSB3B 888888 44444
333333333333 8888=3388888 41444444
33333333 88888888 44444444
No. 384 HUDSON STREET, CORNER OF HOUSTON
isthe Best and Cheapest place to buy Hair, Husk, Moss
Mid Spring MATTRESSES. FEATHERS, FEATHER
BEDkinds of BEDSTEADS, both Wood and Iron,
COTS. Ac. AU Goods sold are warranted to be as repre
sented.
CURED ' "J -IK
with Rubber Paint, one and a half to two cents a foot
according to condition and warranted. Branch office*
J. E. HATCH & CO., No. 375 Ninth avenue; GEO. W.
COGER, No. 89 Broadway, Williamsburgh. Principal
office, No. 5'J6 Grand street, N. Y. 1
ELLERY & McCARTIN.
A DAY TO MALE AND Ffi-
MALE AGENTS to introduce the
TbUuKEYE §2O SHUTTLE SEWING MACHINE.
Stitch alike on both sides, and is the only
LICENSED SHUTTLE MACHINE
in the market sold for loss than §4O. All others are in
fringements. and the seller and user are liable to prose
cution and imprisonment. Full particulars free.
Address W. A. HENDERSON & CO.,
Cleveland, Ohio.
YEARLY INCOME »
TO ALL WHO POSSESS
THE MINE OF WEALTH.
All may, therefore— why not?— possess the latest and
greatest mystery in the world. Desirable for those who
wish to retire from active, laborious business, and all
others who would like to walk about with a pocketful of
the “ needful,” and make from §3 to §lO for every hour’s
service.
The business is inexhaustible, and thousands are now
engaged in it, while to their most intimate friends the
cause of their great success and prosperity remains a
and further than this the business is ail to yourself, as
the article can be carried in the vest pocket, except when
wanted for use. It needs your attention but one or two
days in a week, or a couple of hours daily, which can be
after other business is over. No additional rent, taxes,
or help of any kind. We do not wish to scatter our mu
nificence broadcast over the. country to meet the wanton
gaze of every upstart, who has neither brains nor money,
and would prostrate any business, no matter how good or
profitable. Therefore, in justice to ourselves, we prefer
not to enter into further details here. Suffice to say that
we will send you particulars of the “Mine of Wealth”
for 25 cents, and one prepaid directed envelope for re
turn, and supply you on terms that cannot fail to give
satisfaction, providing that, in making application, you
consider yourself under oath not to. divulge tho nature of
the business under any cirtumstunces or through any.
cause. Actpropintly, stri'ie whveyou hate the opporluniti;,
and a FORTUNE is yours. Av\ ord to the wise is suffi
| cient.
Enclose, with your address, one prepaid directed en
velope and Ji cents. Au< for "I’ne '-f Wealth.’ 1
‘ (. Ihdßxt !Lu r- A GO., No. 43 Wall st., N. Y,
©totkiug.
N ( L I
t'C®'! Th
uow Ware house
Nos. 121,123, and 125
FULTON STBEET,
(CORNEB NASSAU,)
Suits of Every Variety
RICH IN FABrIcT
NEAT IN STYLE,
CHEAP IN PRICE.
THE STOCK
is all new, and comprises everything for
MEN AND BOY’S WEAR.
O* Every Garment is well made, and rivals competk
tion.
Patcafsd February IJ, 8899,
Pateatcd Kovcmbar 29,1856,
Patented Hareh 16,1§6&
The subscriber, having opened the large warerooms z
No. 634 BROADWAY,
in connection with his immense carriage warerooms,
No. 639 BROADWAY,
having several manufactories of his own, and daily re<
oeiving consignments from the most prominent Veloci
pede Manufacturers in the United states, is prepared to
fill Orders with dispatch.
PRICES, FROM §SO TO §l5O.
A liberal discount to purchasers of six or more.
NOTICE.
All persons are hereby cautioned against
BUYING, .SELLING, OR USING x
any Velocipedes, containing two wheels, so that the feet
give motion to the front wheel, unless the same is prop
erly stamped,
PATENTED NOVEMBER 20, 1866,
by authorized parties. Persons
MAKING, USING, SELLING, BUYING OR IM
PORTING
from Paris or elsewhere, Velocipedes in violation of my
rights under the aforesaid Letters Patent, render thera
sevles liable to prosecution and the payment of damages.
Manufacturers are
PARTICULARLY CAUTIONED
against procuring licenses to make SUCH two-wheeled
Velocipedes, from any parties who may claim to grant
them, unless such claimants possess my authority.
Information of infringements solicited.
CALVIN WITTY,
Broadway, New York.
Spectacles.— Brazilian pebbles
and Double-Vision Glasses, in gold, silver, and other
frames. Also, the celebrated Eye-Preservers, so highly
appreciated at the Eye Hospital and the Eye Infirmary,
being superior to any other article, giving ease and vigor
to the weak, and preserving the perfect sight for many
years. Professor FR ANKS, Oculist and Optician, Lec
turer on the Human Eye and Optics, accurately and scien
tifically adjuststhescfar-famedspectaclesto defective vis
ions at his office. No. 238 Grand st., corner of Eldridge.
Market savings bank, no. 82
NASSAU STREET.
Open daily from 10 to A. M. to 3 P. M., and on Mon
days and Thufsdays from 5 to 7 P. M.
SIX PER CENfc INTEREST ALLOWED.
DEPOSITS made during ANY MONTH, will com
mence to draw interest on the Ist day of the MONTH
FOLLOWING.
WILLIAM VAN NAME, President.
Calvin L. Gcddabd, i vice
Pete <i Voorhis, j Vice . res ti.
Henry It Conklin, Secretary.
The Highest Cash Prices
A’ , PAID FOR
OLD NEWSPAPERS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION;
OLD PAMPHLETS of every kind;
OLD BLANK-BOOKS AND LEDGERS that are
written full:
and all kinds of WASTE PAPER from Bankers,'
Insurance Companies, Brokers, Patent-Medi
cine Depots, Printing-Offices, Bookbind
el’s, Public and Private Libraries,
Hotels, Steamboats, Railroad
Companies, and Express
Offices, &c.
JOHN C. STOCKWELL,
25 Ann street, N. Y.
RIE RAILWAY.-TRAINS’LEAVE
Depot foot of Chambers street, Pavo--..
nia Ferry: HWWffiWgffirir
B.CO A M Daily Express, for Rochester,
Buffalo. Dunkirk, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and all points
West and South.
8.30 A M Way Train, Daily, for Otisville and intermedi
ate Stations.
10.00 A M Express Mail, for Buffalo, Dunkirk, Cleveland,
Cincinnati and all points Westrand South.'
3.30 P M Way Train, for Middletown and intermediate
Stations.
4.30 P M Way Express, stopping only at Sterling Junction,
Turner’s, and Stations west of Turner’s (except Ox
ford), to Newburgh, Warwick, Montgomery, Union
ville and Port Jervis.
5.00 P M Way Train, for Suffern and intermediate Sta
tions.
6.00 P M Way Train, for Suffern and intermediate Sta
tions.
6.30 P M Night Express, Daily, for all points West and
South. By this Tram Sleeping Coaches will run through
to Buffalo, Rochester, Cleveland and Cincicnati with
out change.
8.00 P M Emigrant Train, Daily fortlie West.
Also Way Trains for Rutherford Park, Passaic and
Paterson at 6.45 and 9.15 A M, 12.00 M., and 1.45, 4.00, 6.45
and 11.00 PM. On Wednesday nights a Theatre Train
at 12.00 o’clock for Suffern and intermediate stations.
Sunday Trains.—B.3o A M, Way Train for Otisville—
-1 45 P M for Paterson—6.3o P M Night Express, for Ro
chester, Buffalo, Dunkirk, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and all
points West and South—9.oo P M Emigrant and Way
Train—ll.oo P M for Paterson and Port Jervis.
Express Trains, accompanied by new and improved
Day and Night Coaches, run through to Buffalo, Ro
chester, Dunkirk. Cleveland and Cincinnati without
change, and in direct connection with all Southern and
Western Lilies.
Tickets can be obtained, and orders for the checking
and.transfer of Baggage may be left at the Company’*
offices—Nos. 241, 98<, (cor. 2sd street,) and 233 Broadway,
Depot foot of Chambers street,New York; also at Long
Dock Depot, Jersey City.
Wm. R. Baar, H. RIDDLE.
G.en’l Pass. Ag’t.Gen’l Sup’t,
/CENTRAL BAILROAD OF NEW JErT
V7 SEY.—Passengers and Freight Danot
in New York, foot of Liberty street; cOn
nects at Hampton Junction with tho De IA •
ware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, and at JSas
ton with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and its connections,
formmg a direct line to Pittsburgh and the West, with
uut cha sS£ ls §^ WN LIKE TO the west.
Three Express Trains to the West, except Sundays
when one train in the evening.
Sixty miles and three hours saved by this line to Chi
cago, Cincinnati. St. Louis. &c., with but one change of
cars.
bilver Palace cars through from Now York to Chicago,
SPRING ARRANGEMENT. '
Commencing April 15,186.—Leave New York as fol
lows; ■
6:59 A.M.—For Easton, Bethlehem, Mauch Chunky
Williamsport, Wilkesbarre, Mahanoy City, &c.
A. M. for Somerville.
8:C0 A.%M.—For Flemington, Junction, Stroudsburg;
Water Gap, Scranton, Kingston, Pittston, Great Bead*
9A. M.—Western Express for Easton. Allentown;
Harrisburg and the West without change of oars to Cin
cinnati or Chicago, and but one change to St. Louis.
Connects at Harrisburg for Erie and the Oil Regions.
Connects at Junction for Stroudsburg, Water Gap,
Scranton, Ac. Connects at Phillipsburg for Mauch
Chunk, Wilksbarre, Ac.
12 M.—For Flemington, Easton, Allentown, Mauch
Chunk, Wilksbarre, Reading. Columbia, Lancaster, Eph
rata, Litiz, Pottsville, Scranton, Harrisburg, &c.
3:30 P. M.—For Somerville.
<4 P. M.— For Easton, Allentown, Mauch Chuijk and
Belvidere. Connects at Junction witii Delaware, baci a
wauna, and Western Riilroad for all stations to Scran
ton.
5:10 P. M.—Cincinnati Express.—For Easton, Beth
lehem. Allentown. Reading, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh.
Chicago, and Cincinnati, Sleeping Cars to Pittsburgh
and Chicago.
s:*o P. M. —For Somerville and Flemington.
6 P. M.—For Easton and intermediate stations.
7:10 P. M.—For Somerville.
8 P. M.—Western Express Train.—For Easton, Al
lentown, Reading, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh, and tho West
—connects at Harrisburg with train for Willfamsp >rt,
Erie, Ac
9 P. M.—For Somerville.
Sleeping. Ca rs through irom Jersey City to Pittsburgh,
overv evening.
Trains leave for Elizabeth at 5:15. 6:09. 6:10. 6:56, 7:15
8:15, 8:30. 9:CO, 9:15,10:30, 11:30 A. M., 12:00 .M., J ri’xl, 2:60.
3:60 , 3:30,3:45.4:00, 4:30, 4:55. 5:20, 5:30. s:c, 6:90, 6:i5,
6:45,7:10, 1 :->O, 8:00. 9:00,10:30.11 :45 P. M.
Tickets for the West can be obtained at tr,e office of
the Central Railroad of New Jersey, fcoi ot Liberty
street, N. R., at No. 1 Astor House, .’’•os. 264, ??l. 526, *3l
Broadway, at No. 10 Greenwich street, and “ti-.* princi
pal hotels. R. E. RICKER, Snpsriutsudent.
H P. BALDWIN, Gen. Pass. Agent.
’ wiroratto IMicejs.
ON CITY STOCKS,-THE
interest ofi (ho Bands and Stocks of the City «nd
County of New York, due and payable May Ist, 1£69., will
be paid on' that day by Poter B. Sweeney, Esq., Cham
berlain of the City, at his office, tin the New Court-
Id o use.
Tho Transfer Books will bo closed Saturday, April 3d,
1869. „
Department of Finanoe, Controller’s )
Office, Kf.w York. March 27th, 1869. f
RICHARD B. CONNOLLY. Controller
7

xml | txt