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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, May 02, 1869, Image 7

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Sunday Edition. May 2.
A TWILIGHT PICTURE.
JTia a sweet Sabbath eve in Summer-time,
And lovers twain, with hand enclasped in hand,
Upon a flower-hemmed meadow-pathway stand,
Reside a stile they care not yet to climb,
before them spread fair uplands crowned with pine,
jThat, sharply on the amber sky defined,
Stand up black-green against it; while behind,
A wood's dark edge with strongly penciled line
round a hill. Fair is the sylvan scene,
And, oh 1 so sweet the tender twilight hour—
so sweet, and yet so sad. A silvery sheen
3?alls like an after-thought on leaf and flower;
And such deep calm abounds, the very air
<Breath.es low and faint, like one engaged in prayer.
[Original.]
1 PURSER'S ADVENTURE.
B’S E. C. G.
U’lie ocean-going steamship Uno had just
fflftiled in the Summer of 18—, from one of the
ioorts of France, and was bound to Now York,
when Purser Malrin, who had got through
Wth such duties as appertained to his posi
tion, closed the door ot his room, raised the
Window, lit a cigar, and throwing himself upon
a lounge which ho had placed bo as best to en
joy the breeze, was industriously puffing
®way, when the door noiselessly opened and
ijffio entrance was immediately darkened by the
form of a man about forty years of age, of a
short figure and compact build, whose well
Knit frame and erect carriage, gave him, not
withstanding his short stature, the appear
ance of a much larger man than he in reality
Jyas.
His face was round and full; his features
"tegular and not ruddy, as is usually the case
With persons of his full habit, but were, on the
contrary, of a clayey leaden hue. This pecu
liarity of complexion did not, however, pro
ceed from sickness, as the most casual obser
ver could perceive that (at least to all out
ward appearances) he was in perfect health,
jiis pale skin was made still more striking by
a fiery red mustache which completely covered
his mouth, and strongly contrasted with his
coal black eyes and hair. He thus seemed to
act at defiance all ordinary rules of facial fit
ness.
Melvin was at first naturally surprised at the
intrusion, which his visitor evidently observed.
Surveying the purser's room and its occupant
yyith a,single glance, he, influent French, said :
“ Pardon, monsieur I I desire to ask you a
ttuestion regarding my berth. I now occupy a
state-room in company with another gentle
anan. Can you give me one for myself alone 1
I will cheerfully pay any additional charge.”
There being but few passengers on board
that trip, and consequently a number of unoc
cupied rooms, the purser at once complied
"pith the request, and speaking also in French,
declined the proffered pay.
Expressing his thanks in a few words, the
intruder drew from his pocket a small moroc
co case containing various trinkets and other
email articles, and placing one of them on the
purser's desk, said:
“ Accept this from me for your kindness. It
is a seal, boaringluponjits face the Latm words,
sSgo Persevero. It is a good motto.”
With that he retired.
“Weill that’s the most unaccountable in
aividual I over knew, heard of, or saw in my
life. Persistency is one of my traits. I hard
ly need a Latin motto to remind me of it.”
So musing, Melvin referred to the passenger
list, and found that the person who had just
left him was entered thereon as M. Masiin.
He had hurried away so quickly that the
purser was unable to thank him for the seal,
which was curiously wrought and very valu
able. Observing him on deck the following
(morning he bid him the time of day
and expressed his acknowledgments, which
were politely but coldly returned. Finding
that his remarkable visitor was very reserved,
lie gave nn bis attempts at conversation, and
interested himself no further in the uncom
municative passenger, except to observe that
during the entire trip he seldom appeared on
fleck, had his meals sent to his room, and ap
peared to studiously avoid all communication
With his fellow-passengers.
After a voyage not marked by any unusual
Occurrences, the steamer arrived off Sandy
Hook. It was late at night. All hands, ex
teept those on the watch, had turned in, and
yet the purser was up busily engaged, by the
eid of the flickering light from an almost
jburnod out lamp, in making out the ship’s
inanifest and other papers which would be re
apired on her arrival in port. He had just
concluded to leave his unfinished task until
tnorning, when, to his surprise and indigna
tion, the door of his room was again quietly
Opened, and as noiselessly closed after M,
Masiin, whose intensely black eyes now fixedly
.gazed upon him.
Arthur Melvin was thirty years of age, brave
and courageous, but smaller in every respect
than the man who now stood at his side, and to
kvliom he was the exact opposite, being slim
find tall, with light hair and side whiskers,
put ho possessed the most remarkable blue
Byes I ever saw in a human being—sharp, pen
etrating eyes, that looked, as it were, right
through the object which they steadily exam
ined. So that when Maslin’s eyes met those of
the purser, he immediately perceived that they
Joelongod to one who could, notwithstanding
their milder color, direct their gaze as stead
fastly as ho could with his intensely black ones.
With surprise depicted in his face—not fear
'.—Melvin, much displeased with the unwar
ranted intrusion, and at a loss to understand
jts object, said, rather testily:
“ My midnight friend, may I have permission
to ask.to what lam indebted for your visit at
Jhis unroasonablo hour ?”
“ Keep your temper, and I will explain. I
Simply want a few moments’ private conversa
tion with you. As it is not desirable to have it
overheard, I took the liberty of closing the
floor.”
“ Well,” sarcastically rejoined Melvin, “as
you seem to be the commanding officer of this
toatt of the ship, if you have no positive objec
tions, I will light a Cigar while I listen to what
you have to say. Be pleased to be brief, as it
is late.”
. “ I will,” said Masiin.
1 “ Smoke ?” asked the purser, passing cigars.
; “ No, I thank you.”
“Drink?” Drawing a decanter from under
neath the desk.
* “ No, monsieur; I never drink or smoke when
I have business to attend to.”
Opening a drawer, the parser took therefrom
ft small silver box. Tapping the lid with his
forefinger, with the greatest coolness, and
meeting again Maslin’s glistening eyes un
flinchingly, he mildly ejaculated:
, “If you don’t drink or smoke, perhaps a lit
tle snuff might agree with you. Or perhaps, if
your brevity of speech is not satisfactory, a
iick on deck, eh?”
“Just the man I took you for 1” suddenly
broke in Masiin, without in the least noticing
the parser’s last intimation; and to that indi
vidual’s still greater surprise, ho now spoke in
the most perfect English, and continued :
“I have watched you with much interest
Since I came on board this vessel, and I have
formed the opinion that you are a young man
Bf unflinching determination, and one whom I
believe I could trust with a secret. My object
jn visiting Now York is a most important ono.
That object attained, I will bo rich enough to
Retire into private life, after a long and adven
turous career of great activity.”
“ What’s all this'to me ?” said Molvin.
“Bogging pardon for my intrusion—l did it
4o try you—and asking your attention a few
.minutes longer, I will tell you. I require a lit
tle aid from you. If you will give mo your
Word as a gentleman not to divulge what I say,
I will relieve any suspicions you may entertain
as regards myself, and state to you my busi
ness without reserve. I will handsomely re
ward you for whatever you may do to aid me in
the attainment of my object.”
Melvin, who had now become quite interested
in his strange guest, readily gave him the re
quired assurance that ha would remain silent
as far as regarded his statements, and his vis
itor resumed:
“Masiin is not my name; it is merely a nom
Re guerre, and assumed for this voyage only.
I am Philippe Disrney, a mouchard, or detec
tive officer, attached to the force in the city of
Paris. lam after an escaped convict, a man
Whose presence is required in that city, and
that too without delay; not only from the fact
of his having committed a murder while mak
ing his escape, but also as it has been discov
ered that he is cognizant of the whereabouts of
Certain parties of high position who are guilty
of immense forgeries against the French Gov
ernment. Without entering into further de
tails regarding this part of what I have to tell
you, suffice it to ss»y, I have obtained inform
ation of the man I want through the captain of
KiFrench bark, to whom he is known. The
captain is in my pay and confidence, but as he
is unacquainted with the English language,
and but little with New York, I should like your
assistance. The bark is now at our destined
port, awaiting my arrival. As soon as I am
iishoro I will sec her captain, obtain from him
Ench further information as I require, and
then act. I shall not make myself known to
the police or other authorities. I have in my
•experience found out that too many engaged
in such expeditions reduces one’s share of tho
rewards wonderfully. Beside, I would bo de
layed a long time awaiting due process of law.
•My plan is this : On ascertaining the abiding
place or tno person I want, which will not be
difficult, as the captain (who he believes is his
triend) is already, as I was advised ere we left
France, in communication with him, I shall
Shen surprise, seize and rescue my man, con
vey him on board the bark—having a precon
certed arrangement with the captain—and set
Bail at once for la 'belle France.”
“How shall I assist you?” inquired Melvin.
By pointing out to me certain places ; and
bn a night which I will hereafter name, having
a coach, with a reliable driver, ready for a pas
senger, and then to see that passenger sate on
board the bark with me. The reward offered
by my government (and by others on their
own account) is altogether an elegant fortune.
I will handsomely reward you for your services.
It is many years since I was in Now York. You
Will be of incalculable aid to me.”
Moro from a love of adventure than for the
pecuniary reward offered, Melvin, first satisfy
>ng himself by an examination of the mou
vhard’a credentials that all was correct, en
teroa heartily into tho detective’s plans, feel
flattered by that person’s con
aaence m him. soon j lßCO vored that Dier
< now that he had done acting the charac-
ter of the mysterious “M. Masiin,” was a so
cial and high-toned gentleman.
■ The detective- further informed his new
friend that tho authorities at Paris were not
aware that he was en route to tho United
States, but supposed him to be in England, ho
having obtained leave ot absence from the
Prefect of Police to go to that country, pre
tending to transact some business for his wife
(who was an English woman) regarding a leg
acy which had been bequeathed to her.
“Thus,” said he, in conclusion, -‘if success
ful, I will secure the whole reward, when you
will find that, although Philippe Dierney’s res
olution is immovable when in tho performance
ofhis professional duties, ho is not unmindful
of any aid afforded him, and that when off duty
ho lays aside his sterner qualities, bringing
forward, I hope, somo good ones.”
The understanding between thorn became
perfect. Melvin, the more he conversed with
his new acquaintance, the better he liked him ;
so that when the Uno “ came to ” alongside
her pior at New York they were prepared to at
once commence preparations.
Making an agreement with Melvin to meet
him at a certain saloon (after tho steamer was
made fast), Diernoy soon found the captain of
the bark, and learned from him that lie had
only seen the fugitive the day before, and to
the joy of the detective, placed in his hand the
convict’s address. Informing the captain that
he might require him to be on the lookout the
next night, they proceeded together to the sa
loon whore then awaited the purser. The lo
cation of the place where the convict put up
Molvin know perfectly well. Other details be
ing duly communicated by the captain, he pro
ceeded to his vessel, while Dierney and Melvin
retired to a hotel, all agreeing to meet at the
saloon again on tho following night at nine
o’clock. Melvin was to engage a hackman who
was to have a carriage ready awaiting orders.
They were to proceed to the house where re
sided tho object of their search, when they
hoped to be successful in capturing and con
veying their prisoner in safety to tho bark.
According to agreement, all were promptly
on hand at tho appointed hour, and it was then
arranged that tho captain (whose name, by
the-by, was Jacques Hastier) should remain
on board his vessel and there await the arrival
of Dierney and Melvin with their prisoner.
Toward a house situated on the North river
side of the city, Dierney now directed his anx
ious way, his footsteps being guided by tho
purser. On their way they stopped at a stable
in Hudson street, and, on being introduced to
the coachman—a trusty man who had been en
gaged by Melvin—Dierney gave him a scruti
nizing glance, a gold coin, and a word of cau
tion, all at tho same time. Melvin now direct
ed him to drive to, and await their coming at a
point notfar from the foot of Gansevoort street.
Receiving a final order from tho detective of
“be prompt in your movements,” the driver
jumped upon his box with “All right, sirl”
and rapidly wheeled away. In Greenwich
street, not very far from tho place just named,
they now halted, while Melvin cautiously point
ed out a house in their immediate vicinity, re
marking, in a low tone, “That’s the domicile
our written directions describe.” But ho made
doubly sure by again consulting the paper be
neath a street lamp, and found that it was so.
As they were about to cross the street in the
direction indicated, tho detective stopped sud.
denly; placing his right hand upon the hand
cuffs in his pocket, and his loft waruingly upon
Melvin’s arm, he whispered :
“Do you see that man now entering tho
store on the corner over there ? Look quick 1
He is going in 1”
“ Yes,” responded the purser.
“He is the man I want. I’d know him
among a thousand. There is no mistaking
him.”
Placing a small iron bar about two feet in
length, which he drew from his coat sleeve, in
the hands ot Melvin, the detective said :
“Go for the coabh; I will await you here.
Everything favors us 1 We will take him as he
stands at the bar 1 Bee 1 he is drinking with
some companions 1 lie is the man, no mis
take 1 Go I Tho iron I will show you how to
use on your return 1 Be quick 1”
Without difficulty Melvin found tho coach,
which was but two blocks off; and, returning
in a few minutes, alighted from it and rejoined
Dierney.
“Stand by the door of tho coach,” now said
Dierney to the driver. “As soon as wo pass
in the man, close the door and drive off at
once to Pier No. —, North river.”
The coachman opened tho door, and waited.
“Come with mol” now said the hopeful
officer to the purser.
Palling from his pocket a full gray false
beard, Dierney placed it carefully, but hurried
ly, upon the face of his aid, and secured it;
and then adjusting one of a Bandy color upon
his own, with the final caution, “Be firm 1” he
entered the groggery, closely followed by Mel
vin.
To the form of the convict they now directed
their careful glances. He was a medium-sized,
bronzod-complcxioned man, whose firm-set,
hard features, were indicative of a desperate
character. He was neatly clothed in light
Summer garments, suitable, to the season.
Advancing, as directed by Dierney, to the
bar, Molvin ordered drinks ; while the unsus
pecting convict (who, to tho intense satisfac
tion of his pursuers, had apparently drank
deeply) bid good-by to his companions, who
retired from the house as he dropped into a
chair hard by.
Dierney whispered to the purser :
“ Ask the man behind the bar to drink; also
inevite the convict. As he advances, slip
behind him; aud when! seize his arms (which
I will bond and force back to receive it), pass
between his body and elbows the iron. Don’t
fail. Leave tho rest to me.”
The critical moment had arrived. The bar
keeper, the convict, Dierney and Melvin now
composed all in the bar-room.
“Will you drink with us?” said Melvin, to
the barkeeper.
“ I’ll take a sup er gin,” he sleepily re
sponded.
“ What will your friend take ?”
“He drinks gin, too,” said the grog-server ;
and then, calling the convict, he said: “ Come,
drink with the gentleman, Rudolph.”
As he unsteadily approached the bar, Dier
ney, with lightning rapidity, grasped his wrists
firmly, drawing them up, and forced his bent
elbows backward. At the same moment, Mel
vin passed the bar between them and his back.
He had no sooner done so, than the export de
tective had the handcuffs upon the amazed
captive. So quickly and successfully had the
whole affair been managed, that the bewil
dered prisoner Was bound by the elbows with a
cord, at tho hands of tho provident Dierney,
ere he could comprehend his. position.
Lifting the beard from his face, Dierney
joyfully shouted in French, as ho drew a pis-
“It is all over with you, Eugene Gasparde 1
Do you knoW mo ?”
Recognizing Dierney, he gave him a look of
mingled hatred and dismay, then one of des
pair ; but before ho could speak a gag from the
detective’s hand was forced in his mouth, and
he was dragged toward the coach. The bar
keeper, as ho sprang forward to the rescue,
was felled to the floor by a blow from the
clenched fist of tho purser. When ho recovered
his scattered senses, the carriage had rolled
away with the trio.
Details of the carriage ride are unnecessary.
Eugene Gasparde, with but little resistance,
was safely place in irons on board the bark,
which sailed next day for France, where she
safely arrived. Dierney delivered up his pris
oner, and received tho promised rewards.
He retired (as he said ho would) from the
detective force, and is now living in affluence
at a villa near the city of Paris. Melvin was
handsomely rewarded, being paid one thou
sand francs in gold by Dierney, before tho sail
ing ot the bark, and receiving an order for four
thousand more on a well-known house in Ha
vre, which was duly honored on presentation.
Gasparde, in consequence of the information
which he gave the government, had his sen
tence of death commuted to imprisonment for
twenty years. He died in the galleys.
Jacques Hastier now commands a steamer
on tho French coast.
The seal that Dierney gave the purser when
he was enacting the role of M. Masiin, was
prsented to me by my friend Arthur Melvin, a
short time since. I wear it on my watch-chain.
FAIRIES.
Among the various talcs connected with the
lore of Welsh fairies is the following :
A young man had just quitted an adjacent
farm-house early one fine Hummer’s morning,
when he hoard a little bird singing in the most
enchanting strain on a tree close by. Allured
by the melody, he sat down under it until the
music ceased, when he arose, supposing a few
minutes only had elapsed, but his surprise
may well be imagined when he saw the tree
withered and barkless. Returning full of as
tonishment to the house, he found that changed
too, and no ono within but an old man whom
he had never seen before. He asked him what
he was doing there ? upon which the old man
abruptly inquired who was he that dared in
sult him in his own house? “In your own
house I where’s my father and mother,” said hq,
“ whom I left here a few minutes since, while
I listened to the most charming music under
yon troe, which when I arose, was withered
and leafless, and all things, too, seemed
changed.” “Under the tree! music I What
is your name?” “John,” said ho. “Poor
John!” cried out the old man; “I heard my
grandfather, who was your father, often speak
of you, and long did ho bewail your absence ;
fruitless, inquiries were made after you ; but
old Catti Macilen, of Brechfa, said that you were
under the power of fairies, and would not be
released until the last sap of that sycamore
tree was dried up.” “Embrace, embrace, my
dear unole, your nephew 1” The old man was
about to embrace him, but he suddenly crum
bled to dust I
In ancient times, a door in a rock near the
lake was found upon a certain day every year—
we thina it was May Day: those who had the
curiosity and resolution to enter, wero con
ducted by a secret passage, which terminated
in a small island in the centre of the lake; here
tho visitors were surprised with the prospect
of a most enchanting garden, stored with
choicest fruits and flowers, and inhabited by
tbe Tylwyth Teg, or Fair Family, a kind of
fairies, whose beauties could bo equaled only
by tho courtesy and affability which they ex
hibited to those who pleased them ; they gath
ered fruits and flowers for each of their guests,
entertained them with the most exquisite
music, disclosed|to them many secrets of fu
turity, and invited them to stay as long as they
should find their attention agreeable ; but the
island was secret, and nothing of the produce
must be carried away. The whole of this scene
was invisible to those who stood without the
margin of the lake; only an indistinct mass
was seen in the middle, and it was observed
that no bird would fly over the water, and that
a soft strain of music at times breathed with
rapturous sweetness in the breeze of the morn
ing. It happened upon one of these annual
visits that a sacrilegious wretch, when about to
leave the garden, put a flower, with which he
had been presented, in his pocket; but the
theft boded him no good. As soon as he had
touched unhallowed ground, tho flower van
ished, and he lost his senses. Of this injury
the fairy family took no notice at the time;
they dismissed their guests with tiieir ac
customed courtesy, and tne door was closed as
usual, but their resentment ran high; for
though the Tylwyth Teg and their garden un
doubtedly occupy the spot to this day, though
the birds etUl keep at a respectable distance
from the lake, and somo broken strains of
musio are still heard at times, yet the door
which led to tho island was never reopened.
Some timo after this, an adventurous person
attempted to draw off the water, in order to
dicover its contents, when a terrific form arose
from the midst of the lake, commanded him to
desist, or otherwise he would drown the country.
[Original.]
A REMEMBRANCE.
By F. A.. Albee.
The last timo we met together was a fairy eve in
May,
And the moonlight and tho starlight shod forth a
genially.
Oh ! that mellow moonlit evening ! ’twill in memory
ne’er decay.
And I told her on that evening how my thoughts
were sad and drear,
And I told her on that evening how I thought that
we should ne’er
Meet again beneath those lindens, in the Spring time
of tho year.
Sad it seemed to think that fortune, fortune stern
should so decree,
But no power on earth can alter what high Heaven
ordains to be—
And ’twas Heaven that separated this fair hand, La
Vere and me.
On her head her auburn ringlets soft I laid my hand
upon,
Pressing them as I was often wont to do in days
agone,
And her sweet lips, raised toward mine, long I pressed
a kiss upon.
Sad and sweetly sighed the zephyrs in this Spring
time of the year,
Though the trees were in their verdure, and all Na
ture beckoned cheer—
Thougn all Nature looked her sweetest, still my
thoughts were sad and drear.
On that eve I badc the maiden fore-thce-woll in
breathings low,
And her naluc I have endeavored to forget forever
more;
But, despite it, oft I fancy, when the even zephyrs
blow,
In dreams I see the maiden, as in happy days of
yore.
“ Merrie ” May has come again. We confess
that wo like it. It is the month of mild merri
ment, and it is gentle as it is constant and fair.
In this month tho heavens seem to smile, and
the soft air woos tho world with sweetest breath.
The earth lifts up her bosom to the sun, and
decks herself with tender green buds and mod
est flowers. Hail merry Mayl At your ap
proach the birds awake, the flowers unfold
their petals and open their hearts to tho sun’s
rays, and the earth decks herself with dew
drops sparkling like diamonds upon every blade
of grass. There is something very joyous in
May, and under its benign influence wo “ pour
the thoughts that burst their channels into
song ” with that of the
VELOCIPEDIOULOUS-A DREAM OF 1870.
One idle day, with sloth opprest,
I sought my couch’s balmy rest;
It might have been that on my chest
Too much green-turtle rested,
Or that the sparkling Mumm had sped
Too quickly to my throbbing head.
And made me loqg for night and bed,
So oft its strength I’d tested;
When, ere I’d fairly closed my eyes,
Without I heard a shout arise,
So fierce and shrill one might surmise
Disaster had befallen.
The casement seeking, thence I gazed.
When, in the street, L saw, amazed,
The thing that all this din had raised
And caused this hideous bawlin’.
There met I then a novel sight.
For, rushing paijt Wit]) flags bedight.
Ana loaded with a precious freight
Of pleased and laughing human,
A singular machine I saw,
That had, ’gainst gravitation’s law,
One wheel behind ajjd one before,
And yet, at that, went boomin’.
I sought the air ? intent to see
What might tins curious object be,
When something rushed impetuously
Against me with a vigor
"That took me briskly off my feet,
And sent me spinning ’cross the street.
Where several more 1 chanc’d to meet—
I must have cut a “Agger.
I looked again: the pave was throng’d
With smaller craft, on which, two-prong’d.
Sat those to whom ti e things belonged,
Tbeir course both hands directing,
While, further on, a Crowd surveyed
A sign which mystic words displayed—
•’ PedocurriculVm,” it said—
A word there’s no dissecting.
The novel sjght my head perplexed,
And sore With bruises. )amo and vexed
With such a silly child’s pretext
For getting recreation,
1 hailed a stranger: “ Might I ask
Where all the cars have gone?” “You task
My wits,” he said. “Perhaps Alask-
A’s soil may bear a station
Where bideth still a railway train;
But now velocipedes ta’en
The place of horses, dhc. in vain
iSteam tries to beat the rotor;
For, know some Witty brain has found
A means of getting o’er the ground
Suns horse or steam, and all around
You’ll meet the patent motor. •
“ The animals that Mr. Bergh
Took s o much pains to save, men urge
No longer at the utmost verge
Of speed—their day is over;
The last were sold the other day
To be made into soup. They say
A creature will no longer pay
That needs to feed on oats and hay,
Or ev&a rustic clover.”
But now the number so increased.
That to preserve my limbs, ahd ftjast
My eyes on things that bore at least
No harm to any mortal,
In Wood’s Museum I refuge sought;
But even he some bones had bought;
“ This was a Horse,” my vision Caught,
Inscribed upon the portal.
To keep my perpendicular
1 bought a steed bicycular—
’Twon’t do to be particular
When folly’s all the fashion—
And for the race track mado with speed
I thought, no longer men will'*'bleed”
By betting on the trotting steed,
Nor jockeys get a mashin’.
I peered across the fence; but lo 1
where I had thought the grass must grow,
Some forty bicycles or so
Were racing helter-skelter,
And scores of betting books were out,
And everywhere arose the shout
Of triumph and defiance, doubt;
And freely blew the K spelter.”
The circuses full soon I learned
Had bought bicycle studs and earned
Fair fortunes; riding masters turned
To concrete sawdust courses,
And all the groups that on the road
One met velocipede bestrode;
It clearly had become the mode
To use them ’stead of horses.
Now faster still my steed I drove,
And to excel my townsmen strove,
Yot found where e’er my wheels might move,
Tho whirling throng increasing,
Till all at once a bright idea
Usurp’d my mind, why, plainly, here’s
A tireless steed that one may rear
By just a little greasing.
No cit can break to be surpass'd,
And here and there were darting fast
The merchant, clerk, priest, porter, last.
The post and early newsman,
And butchers’ boys kimmed o’er the stones,
At hazard of their precious bones,
And e’en policemen, unbeknowns,
Dropped down on pilfering screwsmen.
And, faster now and faster fraught,
My wheels sped round, one only thought
My whizzing brain disturbing, naught
Should pass my racer, never 1
And now, with speed of lightning, on!
Past stores and dwellings, on, still on!
Past gaping crowds, on, on, still on 1
(J util I met the river.
But vainly now to stop I tried,
The rushing fiend my strength defied,
It would not heed the roaring tide,
And, shooting like a comet,
It bounded crashing through the gate.
It leaped tho string-piece—fate, O fate!
I landed—in my bed, where late
I’d barely risen from it 1
To the reader of the foregoing high pres,
sure “pome,” a less exciting pabulum will be
found in the following
MEDITATIONS OF SI SLOKUM.
Well, Boss, it would appear that Bub, Belle Z.,
clearing her throat at last from brimstone has let
herself out—showed fight. I wonder if she ‘ intends
to “ fight it out on that line if it takes all Summer ?”
She went into the fight bravely; massed her forces,
and without any preliminary skirmishing, feil upon
me unawares, and had she continued to deliver tho
crushing blows that fell fast and furious upon me at
her first onslaught, she would have routed mo, (with
shame I confess it) ‘‘horse, foot and dragoons.” But
she “letup” (probably to“ hist in suthin ”), when
victory was within her grasp, as did Early’s forces
in tho Valley, and Phil at “ Winchester, twenty miles
away.”
While raining her red hot blows upon me (a few
more and I should have been placed hon du combat),
she says, “Let us have peace,” or words to that ef
fect, only spelt different—“ I feel kindly toward you,
sir,” and says I “ take kindly to the girls” (of course
I do). That was a fatal mistake on her part. It gave
me a rest and time to rally. But for that “ let up,”
and I had been “ down among the dead men;” but as
she gave way, I live to fight another day. It is the
old story of war—failure to “ push things” when the
enemy is at disadvantage. She made ope or two des
perate but futile attempts to regain the advantage
that her furious onslaught won for her, but the red
field was lost, and not oven brimstone could save it.
Remember, Bub, the next time you go in, “ all
saddled, all bridlod, (not bridaled), all fit for a fight,”
to “push things,” as Qfant said to Sheridan.
Conquer the enemy first, Bub, and then show your
magnanimity, but don’t be too lavish of tbe latter
until the former is at your mercy, otherwise you get
no credit for magnanimity, the foe lookfrig upon it
as a mistake on your part in not seizing victory when
you could have done so easily. But that [hUi
NEW YORK DISPATCH.
lull of yours, and I had beau at your mercy, and you
could have dictated whatever terms you saw fit; as
matters stand now; I nra in good order and condi
tion for a free fight, provided I was so inclined; but
being one of tho most peaceable individuals afloat,
or “high” and dry, I am at a groat loss to know
what this fighting is all about.
Can you tell me anything about it. Boss ? Who
said “fight ?”
Bub says, “ I see Si Slokum is on the fight yet.”
Yet—what does that mean ? Have I ever been “on
the fight ?” Who says this ? Who’ll prove it, at his
or her peril, on his or her head ? Fight—l never men
tioned fight, to the best of my knowledge and be
lief. “ Let us have peace,” is my motto, now and
forever, ono and indivisible, E pluribus unum, and
always has been.
It is a “put up job,” Boss. Bub must have been
dreaming, or else sho burned her throat with an
overheated dose of brimstone and molasses, and
wishing to “ let out” on some one of the clubbers,
chose me, the meekest clubber of thorn all. “ Why
I, in this weak, piping time of peace,” should have
been singled out by Belle Z. Bub, surpasses my poor
comprehension. I have no desire to fight; all 1 wish
is to be “let alone.” Why, lam the “mildest man
nered man that over scuttled ship or cut a throat,”
Bub, and if you expect to get up a fight with me, you
will be cruelly disappointed.
Your cousin Moloch once proclaimed in congress
of devils assembled as follows: “My voice is still for
war.” I boldly proclaim that my voice is still (not a
whisky still) for peace, and any man who disputes it,
or woman either, I’ll fight at short notice, and wher
ever found. lam so fond of peace that lam willing
to fight for it at any time and place; but what sort of
a show has a mortal being pitted against Belle Z.
Bub, chief of the brimstone “ ring ?”
No, Bub, you are mistaken in the person. I’m not
on the fight, and most emphatically deny that I ever
said fight. I should think you would get enough
“ fight” down below, without coming up here and
attempting to kick up a row with angelic mortals
like myself. Back, Bub, back! Avaunt! quit my
sight! “Down, down to , and tell them I sent
you 1” Si Slokum.
P. B.—Where is Tharah, Boss, with that th week
lithp of herth ?
Fortunately we have no difficulty in answer
ing Si’s query, for below we give
A LETTER FROM THARAH THAND.
Dear Both: It ith a long time thin th I have been to
the club; but I’ve been tho bi thy with the Thpring
fathionth, you don’t know. But I didn’t go with
Belle to her Aunt Prothpervine, ath Tilly thaid I did.
Tilly thaith Caudle and Thlokum are going to be
married. The idea ! I declare I I thould ath thoon
think of—l don’t know what; thouldn’i you, Mr.
Both ? It would be a good thing for Caudle, though,
but how Thi would have to thuffer! Ath my brother
Tham would thay, “It would be rough on Thi, and
no mithtako.” Brother Tham read “Billon a Ben
der,” by Thi, and thaid when he had finithod, “I
guess Ihi hath been there and thtaid over night.”
When I alliked him what he meant he thaid, “Oh,
you athk the Both.”
I thuthpect he mean th that Thi hath been “ tight”
before now. Ith that it, Mr. Both ? I wonder if he
doth get tight? Do you ever get tight, Both?
Brother Tham doeth now and then, and acths tho
queer, you don’t know. Excuth me for athking you,
Both, but the otherth athk all thorths of queth
tionth, you know. Ath Tham, who ith a lawyer,
would thay, “Youneed not criminateyourthelf by
telling the truth.”
Tham hath got an appointment to go to Europe ath
thomething or other, I don’t know what, only I
know he feelth pretty big about it; and when he geth
off I’ll tell you how queer he acted one night when he
wath tight. He liked to lotht hilh girl—but I don’t
dare to thay anything about it till he goeth away, for
he would be awful mad, you know.
Where ith Pert ? Hath thee become an ex-Pert ?
The quethtion ith pert-inent, ithn’t it? I hope thee
ith not pert-urbed in mind.
Give my love to all the boyth and “galth,”ath
Tilly alway th calle th uth, and acthept a large thare
for yourthelt No more at prethent from
Thabah Thaud.
P. Th.—Can you ride a velothipede, Both?
Now, having opened the way for the Gossip
“gals,” we may as well let them all have a say,
and we therefore make room for some strange
revelations by
MRS. CAUDLE’S NIECE.
No, lam not dead—l am not silenced, Boss; it is
all a false report. I have not broken my neck—l
have not committed murder, nor suicide either; but
I have done worse than all combined—l’ve got mar
ried ! Oh, dear me I what a fool I’ve been ! and all
on account of that villain, Si Slokum I
I did not intend to have him; but he made such
terrific threats about bowiQ-knives, pistols, poison,
and risers, that 1 was afraid, if I refused him, the
Humane Society would pqnish me for cruelty to
animals. He had made a great number of remarks,
beforehand, about his wealth—pot that they influ
enced me m the least, for I am above marrying for
filthy lucre. But hjs wealth 1 it makes me smile
now when I think of it His business, also, was so
pressing, that he would prefer going Immediately
to houcekeepina, instead of going away. His
ideas of life, too, were very aristocratic—very I As
he liked pure air, he obtained the sky parlor of a
seven-story tenement-house—an enchanting place.
Six long, tumble-down flights of stairs to travel up be
fore you reach it—a fine prospect of making an escape
in time of a fire ? Then he observed that he must
bring his wardrobe home, Two hours later I heard
uncertain stefjs, and in a few moments the door
was opened, and ho appeared with a parcel in his
hand. It was his wardrobe, and consisted of an Qld
white tall hat, which you all remember of seeing him
wear last year, a rival of the one Horace Greely lost,
a few old, half-worn handkerchiefs, a paper collar, an
empty cologne bottle, a fine-tooth comb, a piece of
cosmetic to black his mustache, and an empty cham
pagne bottle, 'ffiat wag Mr. SLpkum’s wealth. He
drinks, be swears, he scolds, he’s a tyrant; and I,
poor, aoused angel that I am, dare not open my
mouth lo speak. I cannot my own part, I can
not answer that contemptible wretch as he deserves.
Oh.it I could but scold like other women, I would
make the hair on his head stand straight! I would
break his neck, and would have done it before this if
the broom-handle had not broke in two when I gave
him a gentle tap with it. He is a scoundrel—a deep
dyed, base-hearted scoundrel, and my fingers itch to
scratch his eyes out. I urn not going to support him,
and 1 expoct the next nows yofi will hear from him
will be that he is in the poor house—if a poorer one
can be found than the one he is now in. I would
have written this before, but he was too stingy to buy
a sheet of yaper. Come and see us, one and all of
the club. Si, no doiibt, will be delighted to welcome
you to his palace, Sorrowfully,
Mbs. Si Sj-okum,
(late Caudle’s Niece.)
Tilly Burton, who has heretofore) had her
say about girls, this week furnishes some
funny lucubrations about
BOYS.
We’ve had our share of ’em
Lots, and to spare of ’em—
nephews, we mean—and though boysjare often as bad
as old maids and pious grandmothers think 'em, we
can't help liking the Impish little rascals.
When a very little gal we wanted to be a boy so
much that wfc prayed the Lord to make one of us,
but he wouldn’t, and we ain’t sorry for it now, for
boys are desperately wicked. They are never so
gloriously delighted as when they are tormenting
helpless cats, stoning superannuated horses, tying
tin kettles to the fails of unoffending dogs, terrify
ing their little sisters, etc., etc.
Old maids and fidgety fogies call boys “ good-for
nothing,” but we never saw thp boy yet that Was
good-for-nothing; they always want something to make
’em good, tops, balls, pea-shooters, putty,
string, and “sich” like juvenile necessities.
Boys are never as good as gals, and. what’s more,
they don’t want to be. While a gal sits at home
knitting socks fpr some apple woman’s baby, or
singing sweet lullaby to a sick kitten, her brother is
out in the woods, pelting frogs, or robbing birds’
nests.
Boys would die, every one of ’em, if Sunday came
twice a week. Some of ’em like to go to Sunday
school because they have shell a jolly time on their
way there; but few of 'em like to stay in school.
While there, they keep in continual motion, their
hands rapidly traveling from pbekots to mouths,
and from mouths to pockets, till their stock of
“bull's eyes” and peanuts are exhausted. And
while the gals are sweetly singing,
44 1 want to be an angel,”
and looking as if they wanted to fly right up to Heav
en then, the/boys are turning to the right and left,
and behind ’em and before 'em, in search of fun and
mischief.
But we like boys; wo like the good-natured way
they have of upsetting the dignity of stiff-starched
aunts and uncles; and we admire their pluck and
perseverance. When gals are pinched, kicked, or
otherwise ill-used by haughty p'aymates, they yell
and make as great an ado as if they had been half
killed; while boys will it out” with offending
companions, “if it takes all bummer;” and notwith
standing the tumbles and bumps they get, they al
ways “come off” all right
When little boys are noisy, don't spank'em; that
makes ’em noisier. The best Way to keep boys quiet
—we never knew this to fail—is to put within their
reach plenty of candy, sweet-meat pudding, sugar
cake, preserves, in short, anything sweet. While
these goodies last, they’ll stick to ’em as fondly as
flies to an empty sugar barrel, and you will be sure
to enjoy a Sabbath-like peace. With this bit of ad
vice to mothers, aunts, old maids, and others, and to
the Jolly White Boy’s female relatives in particular,
we'll let the boys alone for the present.
Tilly Bubton.
We like to encourage adolescent intellectual
aspiration and give an impetus to talent when
ever we can, either in the old or young, and
having been addressed on the genial and em
inently original theme of Spring, we cheerful
ly give place to
A SCHOOL GIRL'S COMPOSITION.
This is Spring. The grass is green—what there
is of it—but it’s a kind of invisible green just now;
the snow isn't. The days are longer than they was
when they were shorter, and they’ll be a good deal
longer yet if they keep on stretching at both ends.
The nights ain't so long as they used to be. Ma said
it was cold yesterday, and I thought so, too. It was
scold, scold, scold, all day; it was washing day. Car
rie and me is going to have a May-day party next
June. Won’t that be jolly? We’ll have such iun,
and shall invite all the rest of the boys. Spring is
one of the four seasons—the /almost one. I like
Spring; iris such a nice time to go a skating. The
buds have commenced to sprout on the potatoes
down cellar. Last Christmas ma said when Spring
come she would give me a lamb. I haven't got the
lamb yet, but ma gave me a lamming because I cried
for it That was more’n ma had promised, and it
made me mourn, too. Our old cat has got 2 young
kittens, and such a tail! Sometimes she licks ’em
when they try to help her lick some milk. She is
the biggest. Cats are full of spring. Tne end.
Sabah Ann.
After many days we have at last heard from
our old time>nd cherished correspondent Pert*
We have regretted her absence, and do most
warmly welcome her return. The pleasant
screed she furnishes is unavoidably deferred,
but a front seat shall be reserved for her in
our next. And now we close up with a few
SCINTILLATIONS.
Upon the argument of a case of
breach of marriage promise, at Lebanon, N. Y., when
it was alleged the defendant wanted to marry his de
ceased wife’s Bister in unseemly haste, one ol the
counsel said, “ The cold baked potatoes of the fune
ral wore fried for the marriage feast” And tfie man
who thus improved upon Hamlet got a verdict of
SI,BOO for his client.
D’Orsay, in remarking on the beau
ty-speck on the cheek of Lady Southampton, com
pared it to a gem on the rose leaf. “ The compli
ment is far-fetohed,” observed her ladyship. “ How
can that be,” rejoined the count “ when it is made
on the spot f**
A Boston poet says :
I have a lingering love, I own,
For an old doctrine held by some,
That woman’s truest sphere is found
Within the hallowed walis of home;
But when the babe alarmed the house
By rolling headlong down the stair—
•‘Where’s Mrs. Jones?” I cried to Ann,
With hands upraised in blank despair.
“ She’s at the rink.” replied the maid,
“A ridiu’ the velocypade!”
Old Mrs. Harris was never regarded
as a paragon of neatness; and if ‘* cleanliness is next
to godliness,’* it is to be feared, that the old lady
never attained to the latter state. Not only was she
anything but neat herself, but showed a contempt for
it in others. Speaking of neat people, ono day, she
remarked that her son Josiah was one of the most
particular men in the world. “ Why,” she said, “he
threw away a whole cup of coffee, the other morning,
because it had a black beetle in itl”
A joker was taken ill with some cu
taneous eruption, which was first thought to be
small-pox, but afterward decided to be varioloid.
Whereupon ho remarked : ‘‘lf that was the very
alloyed, he should prefer theun-alloyed.” He recov
ered from his sickness in three days, and from the
joke in six months—a striking instance of the tenaci
ty of life.
A recently-married gentleman was
heard to declare that he was then as happy as the
day was long. Bather unfortunately, however, he
happened to be speaking on the twenty-first of De
cember.
Coleridge, the poet and philoso
pher, once arriving at an inn, called out, “ Waiter,
do you dine here collectively or individually ?”
“ Sir,” replied the knight of the napkin, “ we dines
at six.’*
Blacksmiths, it is said, forge and
steel nearly every day; but we think that people speak
iron-ically of them.
Mr. Phillips’ lecture about the
“Lost Arts” does not concern the ladies. They
haven’t lost any.
It is conjectured that professional
thieves lead a comfortable life, because th.y take
things easy.
Continuous Gum
SETS OF TEETH.
RUBBER PLATE, WITH PJ.UMTERS, sl9.
Extracting Ender Gas Without Charge,
When Others are Inserted.
DR. BODINE, No. 190 Grand st.
OF Found at Last—ss,ooo Reward far a
FAILURE.—A safe, sure, never failing and harmless
preventive without medicine, or in any way interfering
with nature. (Jail on or address with stamp enclosed,
MME. VAN BUSKIRK, Physician and Midwife, No. 42
St. Mark’s Place, Eighth street, near Second Avenue,
New York City.
SAFETY GAS.
NO MORE KEROSENE EXPLOSIONS.
NO MORE SACRIFICING OF LIMB OR LIFE.
GO TO
No. 40 EAST BROADWAY,
and get the Liquid Safety Gas for your lamps. It is the
CHEAPEST, SAFEST. MOST ECONOMICAL AND
BRILLIANT LIGHT IN THE COUNTRY.
Principal Office, No. 120 MAIDEN LANE,
GEORGE L. SMITH & CO.,
Only Manufacturers of the American Liquid Safety Gas.
»EK®EIPOOOEBEI
HOW TO LIVE CHEAP!
In order to effect a great saving in your household ex
penses. buy your Teas, Coffees. Flour. Butter, Cheese,
Hams, Syrups, Molasses, Mackerel, Raisins, Currants,
Prunes, Citron, Soap, Starch, Pepper, Mustard, Barley,
Meal, Hominv, Dried and Foreign Fruits, and all kinds
ox Groceries and Previsions, at the
GREAT CHEAP CASH STORE.
SUGABS »t BEFIBEHS’ PBICES.
TH OS. R. AGNEW.
No. 2CO GREENWICH St., CQR. MURRAY, N. Y.
OPPOSITE BLEECKER STREET.
EXTENSION
SPRING BED BOTTOMS,
BARNES’ PATENT.
Will fit any size Bedstead with
out measuring.
IS NOISELESS, LIGHT, AND DUBABLE.
CALL AND EXAMINE.
G. W. BARNES & SON.
FEATHERS,
THE OLDEST KSTABLISHMENT EDI>ING '
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38 w U 5 JD, ? ( S£ STREET, CORNER OF HOUSTON
is the Bost and Cheapest place to buy Hair, Husk, Mow
and Sprms MATTRESSES, FEATHERS, FEATHER
An 3 r f ® BD ?TkADS, both Wood and Iron,
sentecL °* sold are warranted to be as repre-
f EAKY ROOFS CURED
JLJ with Rubber Paint, one and a half to two cents a foot
pria<ai ’“ i
ELLERY & McOARTIN.
Open daily from Mi to A. M. to 3 P. M., and on Mon
daysand Thursdays from 5 to 7 P. M.
SIX PER CENT INTEREST ALLOWED.
DEPOSITS mads during ANY MONTH will com-
FOLLOWING UltereStOntlle 131 ° f th ° MONTH
’ WILI.IAM VAN NAME, Pre.ldent
Calvin L. Goddard, > -rr-
Fbteu VooitHM, j Vice Pres ts.
Henry It. Conklin, Secretary.
for r«- \
GRECIAN g&'l'X
BENDS,
At HUNT’S.
430 BROADWAY. :
Largest, cheapest and best assortment of Custom
made Gaiters in the city; also fine Dress French Calf
and Doable-sole Boot, for Spring and Summer wear.
Prices reduced from $1 to $3 a pair.
J. HUNT, No. 430 BROADWAY.
sjipw* ls
rv w cured
DR. J. A. SHERMAN.
ARTISTIC SURGEON,
of his
at his office, ’
Ao. 697 Eroadway, corner Fonrth Street.
The mat expertence or Dr. SHERMAN, resulting
a ,i‘ d oonstsnl devotion to tae treatment
Ej.TJ’ £t& ls ?‘ ,aas !l f ss .T re ' l him ° f his abi!it V «-
k°- u « ros^ rd to th - e age of ti3e Patient or du
ration of the infirmity, or the difficulties which they
may have heretofore encountered in seeking refief. Dr.
rmcipalof.the Rupture Curative Institute, New
Orleans, for a period of more than fifteen years, had un
der hiscare the worst cases in the country, aU of which
were effectually relieved, and many, to their great joy,
restored to a sound body. J ’
None of the pains and injuries resulting from the use
of other trusses are found in Dr. Sherman’s Appliances;
and, with a full knowledge of the assertion, he promises
greater security and comfort, with a daily improvement
in the disease, than can be obtained of any other person,
Prices to suit all classes. It is the only as well as the
cheapest remedy ever offered the afllicted. Photographic
likenesses of cases before and after treatment furnished
on receipt of two threa-cent stamps.
pROF. NELSON CONSULTED ON ALL
_E_ the events of Life, No. 56 South Sixth st.. Wil
hamsburgh; takes time: gives satisfaction.
jmUrTiaDkg.
A LARGE NUMBER OF NEW AND
second-hand Billiard Tables, with cur improved
combination cushions, which have been proved to be the
most correct and durable cushions ever made. Speci
mens of our tables that have bean in constant use for
naany years may be seen in the principal hotels and sa
loons. in this city. Parties intending to purchase will
find it to their interest to call And examine our stoOk,
which is the largest and finest m the world. Boys’ Bil
hard Tables. PHELAN & COLLENDER,
No. 738 Broadway, New Yoax,
„ Near Astor Place.
Divorces legally obtainedin
different States. Desertion, &c., sufficient cause.
No publicity. No charge until divorce obt.dn3-4. Advice
M. lAOUSii« t AHuxuey* ISw, to ;
(gTETSON HOUSE,
LONG BRANCH, N. J.
TBis Hotel will open on or about the Ist of June. Ap
plications for rooms received at the Astor House, New
York, or by letter to the Hotel at Long Branch, on and
after May Ist, and during the season. The R. and D. B-
R. R. will run a steamer at 9 A. M., returning at night,
enabling parties wishing rooms to spend the day at
Long Branch. O. A. STETSON, Jr.,
Proprietor.
i i,tiw,ii
A’l SCHEIG & CO.
PAKLOB, DSlNtjlfeoOM! 5 aSd E CHAMB S ER SUITS,
thoir Furniture
Between First and Second avenues.
JPURNXTURE.
$506,009 WORTH OF FURYITIWE AT
BETML FOR 69 DAYS.
Frank Rhoner & Co„
WHOLESALE
FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS,
F^ ve xTs 1 a1 * r^?v,V 1 , e w^ Gnsive Warerooms in the NEW
STONE BUILDINGS Nos. 185 and 187 CANAL ST.,
cor. of MOTT ST., where they offer their entire Whole
sale Stock of Furniture at Retail, at their trade-list
prices.
SOLID WALNUT PARLOR SUITS in HAIR CLOTH
OR REPS, from $65 upward.
SOLID WALNUT ANTIQUE SUITS (7 pieces), from
8125 upward.
SOLID WALNUT MARBLE TOP CHAMBER SUITS
(10 pieces), from $75 upward.
DINING-ROOM. LIBRARY, and HALL FURNI
TURE, AT FACTORY PRICES.
Parties in want of Furniture, will see by examining
this stock, that it is one of the best made and lowest
priced of any of the kind now offering.
EVERY ARTICLE WARRANTED.
Furniture i
MANUFACTURERS’ STOCK AT RETAIL.
WM. H. SOHAFFER,
No. 6 SECOND AVE.,
Between Houston and First streets,
offers his entire stock of
PARLOR,
CHAMBER,
DINING-ROOM.
LIBRARY,
and HALL
FURNITURE AT RETASL,
At Manufacturers’ Prices.
Solid Walnut and Manogany Parlor Suites, in reps,
seven pieces, from SBS 00 upward.
Solid Walnut chamber Suites, marble too, ten pieces,
from §IOO 00 uuward.
ANTIQUE PARLOR FURNITURE.
In Reps, Brocatelle, and Plush, at prices correspond
ingly low.
MATTRESSES, BEDDING, &c..
OF FIRST QUALITY.
FROST BLACK & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN, AND
MANUFACTURERS OF
FURNITURE
OF EVEBY VARIETY,
Mo. 69 Bowery, near Canal street,
HEW YORK.
Steamboats, Hotels, and Public Buildings furnished at
the shortest notice.
All goods purchased of outhouse guaranteed as Repre
sented.
B. W. FROST. BLACK. GEO. SNYDER.
jQEGRAAF sTtAYLOR,
FONITUREj CARPETS
AND MATTREBSJEB,
WHOLESALE AND BETAIL.
MANUFACTORY AND WAREBOOMS,
Mos. 87 and 89 BOWERY,
Mo. 65 CERISTffi STREET,
Nos. 130 and 132 HESTER ST.,
HEW YORK.
(CONNECTED UN£ER ONE EOOF.)
We have now on hand the largest stock of entirely new
patterns and designs for furnishing houses throughout
Sver offered by one house in thp city, and at a great da
uotion in price.
Our CARPET DEPARTMENT is under the superin
tendence of H. S. BARNES, who is well and favorably
known to the publio, having been a long time with
Sloane & Oa., in Broadway, and for the Jask four years
with Lord & Taylor. Our sto?k of Carpets is entirely
new and well selected, this branch having noen just added
to our business.
The MATTRESS DEPARTMENT is entirely under
our supervision, njl being made oh the premises. Every
Mattress guaranteed.
Steamboats, Hotels, Churches, Public Halls and Pri
vate Houses furnished throughout at wholesale prices.
The Floating Pajaces—the steamers of the People’s
Line on the Hudson Rjver—were furnished by us.
PRICES DEFV COMPETITION.
SECOND AND THIpD AV®. CABS PASS OUR
SCORES. ESiBANOE, Nos. and 89 BOWERY,
NEW YQBK.
JpURNITdRE AT REDUCED PRICES,
„ , „ CONSISTING OF
PARLOR, DINING-IiOOM and CHAMBER SUITES,
RETAILING AT MANUFACTURERS’ TRICES.
F. KRUTINA,
v MANUFACTORY AND WARE-ROOMS,
Nos. 96 and 98 EAST HOUSTON STREET,
, T T Bet. Bowery and Second avenue.
ALL GOODS WAR RANTED.
YjIURNITURE ! FURNITURE !— at g.
K W. SNBDEN’S, No. 263 BOWERY, between Stan
ton and Houston streets.
ALL KINDS OS' FURNITURE,
LOOKING-GLASSES, BEDDING, &0„ Ac.,
RETAILED AT MANUFACTURERS PRICES.
Goods Warranted and delivered fred. Call, and you
will save money, and be served honorably and promptly.
Note the number,
FURNITURE IN SUITS, AND MADE TO ORDER.
QTORAGE for FURNITURE, TRUNKS,
K_> Baggage, or other property. Separate compartments,
all sizes. Goods taken up on elevators. Porters, truck
men, &c., on hand. H. G. HAEGER, No. 300 West
Thirtyrfourth street, cor. Eighth avenue.
D 3 /c/ fa
1 Weekly f
s ■ PAYMENTS! -"t
§ p tel
J XA&EM. jf 2
h ll d
S L< MW
THOMAS KELLY, No. 35 BOWERY,
Jl. Manufacturesail kinds of LOOKING-GLASSES.
Round, Square, Oval, Mantel and Pier Glasses of uvery
description, etc , made to Order. Looking-Glass Plates
put in old frames. On a suitable recommend weekly
payments will be taken.
T. KELLY, No. 35 Bowery.
A DAY T O MALE AND FE
''O' MALE AGENTS to introduce the
JBUCKEYE S2O SHUTTLE SEWING MACHINE.
Stitch alike on both sides, and is the only
LICENSED SHUTTLE MACHINE
in the market sold for less than S4O. All others are in
fringements. and the seller and user are liable to prose
cution and imprisonment. Full particulars free.
Address W. A. HENDERSON & CO.,
Cleveland, Ohio.
IHTTSIWI
SPRING- WATER,
FOB SALE BY PRINCIPAL DRUGGISTS,
CURES CANCER,
Curas CUTANEOUS AFECTIONS, Cures SCROFULA
and all the IMPURITIES OF THE BLOOD,
AND THE SOVEREIGN BEMEDT FOR
BRIGHT’S DISEASE,
AND OTHER DISEASES OF THE KIDNEYS.
This is the original Spring Water from Vermont which
has wrought so many wonderful cures, and is advertised
only to distinguish it from tho many imitations that are
now attempted to be palmed upon the public as being
equal to the virtues of ths Missisquoi.
PAMPHLETS CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF
MANY WONDERFUL CURES ATTESTED BY
EMINENT PHYSICIANS AND OTHERS
CAN BE HAD GRATIS, BY CALL-
ING AT OR ADDRESSING A
NOTE TO
MISSISQUOI SPRINGS,
No. 8 COTTAGE PLACE, NEW YORK CITY.
N”o MORE I—ZOEGEBJS P
ENTED PILE REMEDY, sure cure for Piles.
Relief guaranteed immediately for every case. Consult
ation free. Office hours from 7A.M. to 7 o’clock P. M.;
Sundays open till 12 o’clock. Price per bottle, EOc.; $1 and
$1 50. Office, No. 3 2 Broome st«/bet. Mott and -Mulberry.
FOR THE UPHAM’S
ELECT UAIiY end OINTMEN P are a certain cure
tor Pilec, Costiveness, Inver Complaint, and Dyspepsia;
also, for all cutaneous dicoasesaad affoctioas of the skin.
These medicine.? can - be obtained and the Doctor con
sulted at-his ACedical Office, No. 39 East Fourth street,
third door from the Bowery, and between Bowery and
Rf-ad v-‘Mr!** hours from 7 o’clock in the morning
U-U V -ix U ti , Cl*.
©lnthiug.
v< I' i,
I 5<
Mr "wifcw i
raft /Al ~g
Clol® toAREHOUsf
Nos. 121.123, and 125
FULTON STREET,
(CORNER NASSAU,)
3XTJE3U7V_YOnEKL
Suits of Every Variety.
RICH IN FABrTcT
NEAT IN STYLE,
CHEAP IN PRICE.
THE STOCK
is all now, and comprises everything for
MEN AND BOY’S WEAR.
O* Every Garment is well made, and rivals compete
tion.
Erie railwayT-T trains leave
Depot foot of Chambers street, Pavo-
MO '2'Vl' Daily Ex,yre<«, for
Buffalo. Dunkirk, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and all points
West and South.
8.30 A M Way Train, Daily, for Greycourt and intermedi
ate Stations.
10.00 A M Express Mail, for Buffalo. Dunkirk, Cleveland,.
Cincinnati and all points Wesb and South.
11.30 A. M. Way Train, daily, tor Port Jervis and inter
mediate stations.
3.30 P M Way Train, for Middletown and intermediate
Stations.
4.30 P M Way Mryresn, stopping only at Sterling J unction.
Turner’s, and Stations west of Turner’s (except Ox
ford), to Newburgh, Warwick, Montgomery, Union
ville and Port Jervis.
5.00 PM Way Train, for Suffern and intermediate Sta
tions.
5.3) P. M. Night Express, for Rochester, Buffalo, Dunkirk,
Cleveland, Cincinnati, and all points West and South.
6.03 P M Way Train, for Suffern and intermediate Sta
tions.
6.30 P M Night Express, Daily, for all points West and
South. By this Tram Sleeping Coaches will run through,
to Buffalo, Rochester, Cleveland and Cincinnati with
out change.
8.00 P M Emigrant Train, Daily for tho West.
10.15 P. M. Way Train, Daily, for Suffern and Interme
diate Stations.
Also Way Trains for Paterson and Intermediate Sta
tions at 6.45 and 9.15 A. M., 12.00 AL, and 1.45, 4.00. 6.45.
and 11.30 P. M.
For Hackensack at 9.00 A. M., 12.00 M., and 4.00, 5.00,
6.00 and 6.45 P. M.
SUNDAY Trains.—B.3o A M, Way Train for Greycourt—
-11.30 A M for Port Jervis—l.4s P M for Paterson—6.3o
P M. Night Express, for Rochester. Buffalo, Dunkirk,
Cleveland, Cincinnati, end all points West and South—
-8.00 P M Emigrant and Way Train—lo.4s P Al for Suf
fern.
Express Trains, accompanied by new and improved
Day and Night Coaches, run through to Buffalo, Ro
chester, Dunkirk. Cleveland and Cincinnati without
change, and in direct connection with all Southern and
Western Lines.
Tickets can be obtained, and orders for the checking
and transfer of Baggage may be left at the Company’s
offices—Nos. 211, 987, (cor. 23d street,) and 233 Broadway,
Depot foot of Chambers street,New York; also at Long
Dock Depot, Jersey City.
WIL R. Baur, H. RIDDLE.
Gen’l Pass. Ag’t.Gen’l Sup’t.
/Central railroad ob’’nevvjer.
SEY.—Passengers and Freight Depot—
in New York, foot of Liberty street; con-EWjplWraCT
nects at Hampton Junction with the Dela
ware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, and at Eas
ton with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and its connections,
form : ng a direct line to Pittsburgh and the West with
out change of cars.
ALLENTOWN LINE TO THE WEST.
Three Express Trains to the West, except Sundays,
when one train in the evening.
Sixty miles and three hours saved by this line to Chi
cago, Cincinnati* St, Louis, <fcc., with bu - cne change oi
cars.
oilver Palace cars thrQtygh from New York to Chicago,
SPlif'NG ARRANGEMENT.
Commencing April 26,186.—Leave New York as fol
lows;
6:50 A.M.—For Easton, Bethlehem. Mauch Chunk,
Williamsport, Wilkesbarre, Mahanay City, Tunkhin
nock, &c.
7:15 A. AT. for Somerville.
8:: OA. M.— For Flemington Junction, Stroudsburg,
Water Gap, Scranton, Kingston, Pittston, Great Bead,
AL—Western Express for Easton, Allentown,
Harrisburg and the West without change of cars io Cin
cinnati or Chicago, and but one change to St. Louis.
Connects at Harrisburg tor Erie ana tue 04 Region '.
Connects at Junction for' Stroudsburg, Water Gap,
Scranton, &c. Connects at Phillipsburg for AlauJh
Chunk, Wilkesbarre, <tc.
12 M.—For Flemington, Easton, Al’entown, Aianch
Chunk, Wilkesbarre, Reading. Columbia, Lancaster,
Ephrata, Litiz, Pottsville, Scranton, Harrisburg, &c.
3:30 P. M. —For Somerville.
4 P. M.—For Easton, Allentown, Mauch Chunk and
Belvidere. Corp sets at Junction with Delaware, Lac- a
wanna, and Western Railroad for all stations to Scran
ton.
5:05 P. M.—Cincinnati Express.— For Easl on, Both
lehem, Allentown. Reading, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh,
Chicago, and Cincinnati, Sleeping Cars to Pittsburgh
and Chicago.
5:20 P. M.—For Somerville and Flemington.
6 P. M.—For Easton and intermediate stations.
7 P. AS.—For Somerville.
8 P. Al.—Western Express Train.—For Easton, AL
lentown, Reading, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh, and the West
—connects at Harrisburg with train for Williamsport,
Erie, <fcc
9:45 P. AL—For Somerville.
Sleeping Cars through from Jersey City to Pittsburgh,
every evening. „
Trains leave for Elizabeth at 5:45. 6:39. 6:50, 7:15.
8:15, 8:30. 9:’ 0, 9:15.10:30, 11:30 A. M., 12:00 M., 1:00, 2:00.
3:00 . 3:30,3:45, 4:00, 4:25, 4:50, 5:20, 5:3 . 5:45. 6:00, 6:30.
7:00, 7:40, 8:00. 9:00. 9:45 10:40, 11:45 P. M.
Tickets for the West can be obtained at the office of
the Central Railroad of New Jersey, foot of Liberty
street, N. R., at No. 1 Astor House, Nos. 251, 528, 681
Broadway, at No. 10 Greenwich street, and at the princi
pal hotels. R. E. RICKER, Superintendent.
H P ’ DALPvny » Ger - Pa33 * Agent.
The Highest Cash Prices
A PAID FOR
OLD NEWSPAPERS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION?
OLD PAMPHLETS of every kind;
OLD BLANK-BOOKS AND LEDGERS that aro
written full;
and all kinds of WASTE PAPER from Bankers,
Insurance Companies, Brokers, Patent-Aledi
cine Depots, Printing-Offices, Bookbind
ers, Public and. Private .Libraries*
Hotels, Steamboats, Railroad
Companies, and Express
Offices, &c.
JOHN C. STOCKWELL,
25 Ann street, N. Y. y
(pmOTON AQUEDUCT DEPARTMENT?
—To contractors—Separate sealed proposals, each
endorsed with the title of the work to which it relates
the name of the person offering the same, and the data
ef its presentation, will be received at this office (Ro*
tunda, Park), until ll’c’clock,'A. M„ of Saturday, May
8.1869, for the construction of stone block pavements in
the following streets, viz:
Spec. I—ln 50th street, between 6th and 7th avenues.
Spec. 2—ln Avenue A, between Houston and 14th
streets.
bpeo. 3—ln 54th street, between 2d avenue and East
River.
Spec. 4—ln 9th street, between 6th avenue and Broad*
wnv.
Spec. s—ln 44th street, between sth and 6th avenues.
Spec. 6—ln 55th street, between sth and 6th avenues*
Spec. 7—ln 26th street, between Cth and 8tl» avenues.
Spec. B—ln 20th streat, between 6th and 10th avenues.
Spec, 9—ln Thomas street, between Church and Hud«
son streets.
Spec. 10—In 70th street, between 3d and 4th avenues.
Spec. 11—In 60th street, between Lexington and sth
avenues.
Spec. 12.—1 n 17th street, between 6th avenue and
Broadway.
Spec. 13—In 18th street, between 6th and Bth avenues.
Plans of these works may be seen, and specifications
Snd forms for the bids obtained on application to the
lontract Clerk, at this office.
THOMAS STEPHENS,) Croton
ROBT. L. DARRaGH, / Aqueduct
. A. W. CRAVEN. ) Board.
New York, April 26, 1869.
ALL DESCRIPTIONS
OF
BTM-POWEB BEBSWOBK
DONE AT THE
“EXCELSIOR” PRESS-ROOMS,
Mo. II FRANKFORT ST.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.
THE MOST EXTENSIVE ASSORTMENT OF
PRESSES TO BE FOUND IN ANY PRESS-ROOMS
IN NEW YORK CITY.
Connected with these Press-Rooms there is a large
mailing room,
kept for the convenience of those having Presswork
done at No. 11 Frankfort street.
Forms (from any part of tho city) brought to the Press
rooms and returned without charge to oust mers.
WILLIAM B. WHITE,
U U PERIN TEN DENT
7

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