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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, June 18, 1871, Image 8

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SINGULAR CASE UP FOR TRIAL—A LADY OF
THE BON TON CHARGED WITH CRUELTY IO
HER ADOPTED CHILD—FOUND GUILTY, AND
SENTENCE SUSPENDED—MR. H. BERGH IN
COURT.
There was a ehort calendar yesterday, but there
was one case of some interest. It was that of Mrs.
Mary Anna Larkins, a lady who inhabits one of those
brown stone fronts in West Twenty-second street,
near Fifth avenue, who was charged with having
MALTREATED, IN A MOST CRUEL MANNER,
her adopted child, Emily Johnson, a pretty, bright,
sharp, intelligent girl of twelve years. The com
plainant in the case was Mrs. Caroline F. Choat, wife
of that witty and genial lawyer, the Hon. Joseph H.
Choat. Mrs. Choat resides at No. 137 West Twenty
first street, and the rear of her and that of Mrs. Lar
kins’ residence face each other. Justice Shandley
presided, and Algernon S. Sullivan, Assistant Dis
trict Attorney, appeared for the defense. Several
. LADIES AND GENTLEMEN OF THE UPPER TEN
stripe were in court. The first witness called was
Miss Rose Wright, a round, ruddy-faced young lady
. ©f twenty or so.
She stated that she was a seamstress, in the em
, ploy of Mrs. Choat, and from the window where she
was in the habit of sitting, had seen Mrs. Larkins
beat little Emily with a strap, and catch her by the
bead and lift her a distance from the ground, and on
, one occasion heard her exclaim, “ Oh, mamma,
-icammal my bones are broken I You’ll kill me!"
, The testimony of thia witness produced quite
A SENSATION IN COURT.
• Mrs. Choat was next called. She is a polished, re
fined, amiable and intelligent lady, and was elegant-
Jy dressed. The witness testified positively that she
fiaw Mrs. Larkins whipping the girl Emily with a
..fitrftp, and treating her in a generally rough and
cruel manner.
Mary McDermott, a stqut, hearty-looking Irish
girl,, was called. Her testimony was that she lived
with a family next door to Mrs. Larkins’, and had
frequently heard Emily cry, and seen bruise# and
marks of violence on her person.
Mrs.. Larkins then took the witness stand. She
was fashionably, almost jauntily, dressed, wore her
hair in curls, and looked about sixty Summers.
There.was something severe in the expression of
her face, but her manner and general deportment
were quite ladylike. Mrs. Larkin denied in toto the
testimony of the preceding witnesses. She admit
ted haying
. CHASTISED THE CHILD,
but never.crp.elly, but as a mother might punish one
of her unruly offspring. She was down at Capo May
in August last, and had adopted the child from her
grandmother; she had always treated her kindly.
Justice—Have you used a whip in chastising this
girl?
Mrs. Larkins-r-Jfea; I have used a little stick with
a few threads attached.
Justice—Were th<?re any leather strings ?
Mrs. Larkins—l believe there were.
Justice—that will do ma’am.
Little Emily was then put on the stand. look
ed fresh and fair as a jose, and was very niceiy
dressed.
To the surprise of every one she stated that Mrs.
Larkins had always treated her wall—like a good
mother, in fact, and that it was only when she went
into the garden and played with the monkey, and
the impudent puppy tore her hair that Mrs. Larkins
chastised her, and that th© little philosophical crea
ture thought was perfectly right.
Justice Shandley said in deciding the case that ho
would find the defendant guilty, but that out of re
gard for the interest and welfare of the child he
would .suspend sentence.
Mrs. parkins took the result of the ease with cold
and dignified composure, and walked grandly out oi
the court.
HEGIRA OF POLITICIANS
{SENATORS NORTON AND CREAMER OFF FOR
EUROPE—PRESENTATION TO SENATOR NOR
TON.
Among the passengers by the Inman steamship
City of Brooklyn, yesterday, were State Senators
Thomas J. Creamer and Michael Norton, the repre
sentative men of the Eighth and Seventeen th Wards.
There was an immense concourse of politicians on
the steamer before she sailed, to say good-by to the
departing Senators. Among these wore Health Of
ficer Caruochar, Owen W. Brennan, Justices Cox
and Shandley, ex-Judges Connolly and Dodge, Cap
tain < Walsh, McDonnell, Washburne, and McClary,
Charley Goldey, Hon. Alex. Ward, Frank Hotaling,
and others. Aiderman Mitchell presented to Sen
ator Norton
A HANDSOME AMERICUS CLUB PIN,
set with diamonds, valued at $4,000, the gift of his
many friends in the district. The Aiderman said:
Mr. Senator, your many friends of the Americus
C ub could not let you go from among them, even
for a short time, without testifying the great respect
and admiration which they entertain toward you.
On their behalf, I hope you will accept the accom
panying jiresent as a mark of their esteem, not to
consider its valuo intrinsically, but to accept it as
an appropriate emblem of that association of which
you are so respected a member. We hope that you
may have a pleasant and prosperous voyage, and a
speedy return to your many admirers.
Senator Norton responded briefly, thanking his
friends for their handsome gift, and adding that “he
wou’d ever remember this hour, and always pre
serve as his dearest treasure on earth so beautiful
and expressive a token of his friends’ regard.’’
The steamer Andrew Fletcher, the Health Officer's
boat, carried down the bay the members of the
Norton Association, and many others. The polioe
boat Senacca had a large party on board, and the
Virginia Seymour carried
THE LINWOOD CLUB
and their friends. These steamers accompanied the
City of Brooklyn to Sandy Hook. Among those
on board beside Senators Creamer and Norton,
wore Clarence Seward, nephew of William H.
Seward, Aaron J. Vanderpoel, of the firm of BiOwn,
Hall & Vanderpoel, Bishop Mcllvaine and daughter.
The steamboat Seth Low, containing the
SEVENTEENTH WARD CREAMER ASSOCIATION
and other friends of Senator Creamer, accompanied
the flotilla down the bay, occasionally firing salutes.
THE EDWARD CUDDY CLUB
chartered the steamboat Seth Low, and accompanied
the City of Brooklyn for the purpose of seeing James
Barclay, one of ite members, and City Librarian.
Among those on the Low were Alderman Edward
Cuddy, Aiderman Edward Walsh, Henry McClosky,
Redmond McManus, Jacob Shipsey, Wm. Barclay,
Tim Golden, P. A. Vandcrwerken, and three hun
dred others.
The steamer Manhattan, of the Guion line, took
out, among others, Thurlow Weed and family, also
Dr. Lewis Sayre. The Abyssinia, of the Cunard line,
had City Chamberlain Bradley and family on board.
ROW IN AJSYNAGOGUE.
THE FEMALE MEMBERS EXCITED—FOUR AR
RESTED AND DISCHARGED.
There was a war of words yesterday afternoon in
the Synagogue in Chrystie street, near Canal. For
some time past there has been an ill feeling between
certain members of the congregation, and the de
bates held from time to time have not tended to im
prove it in any way.
SOME OF THE WO lEN
have from time to time acted in a very unseemly
manner during prayers and the remainder of the re
ligious services. Threats have been made to expel
them, and their male re atives have declared that
they would erect ornamental appendages on the
heads of whoever dared attempt to carry out these
threats. Yesterday afternoon, after prayers, an ex
cited discussion arose among the congregation rela
tive to two of the members who are now in prison,
suffering for want of money to pay off small debts.
Many, especially of the female portion of the audi
ence, wanted to know why an appropriation was not
made to aid those
UNFORTUNATE BROTHERS,
and restore them to their . families. The male por
tion joined in the discussion; assertions were made;
those who made them were branded as liars; and
threatening demonstrations were made. It looked
very much as though the Synagogue were to be
turned into
A GLADIATORIAL ARENA,
and, as usual, the woman made the most noise, and
took the most active part in the scenes of violence
that were progressing. The officers of the society
endeavored to quell the disturbance, but without
to eject the more noisy, a general row would ba tho
jresult. About a dozen of the more nervous rushed
io the Eldridge street police station, and alarmed the
sergeant on duty by declaring that
SEVERAL PERSONS WERE BEING MURDERED
in the Synagogue. Sergeant Allen, with the reserve
{section of police, was at once dispatched to the scene.
D. H. Coppcrman, of No. 192 Canal street, an officer
Of the society, pointed out Mrs. Guillaume, of No. 29
Ludlow streat, and Jane Hartt, Betsey Harris, and
Jlachel Losee, all of No. 56 Hester street, as the incit
ers of the disturbance. When placed under arrest,
<he women
BECAME VERY PENITENT,
and declared that they did not commence the row.
They merely asked a few questions—the disorderly
conduct ruust be attributed to others. They had
fio hand in it. In the meantime, the most of the
congregation had left the building, and poured into
the street. The prisoners were taken to the station
conge, ahd from thence to Essex Market Police
after bearing the leeVmoßy,
cqaerUded to dismiss the women. And so ended the
“.tempest in a teapot," to ba recommenced at flie
next meeting in the Synagogue.
WAS HE A SOMNAMBULIST?
A ST. LOUIS COMMERCIAL AGENT’S WANDER
INGS AMONG BEDROOMS.
(From the Kansas City Daily News.)
■Quite a lively scene was enacted in one of our prin
cipal hotels, an evening or two since. About one
o’clock in the morning, the night-clerk saw a guest
of the house—a runner for a St. Louis house—cotne
down the stairs, and enter one of the halls. The
man was ia his stocking feet, made no noise while
walking, and was soon forgo ties. A short time after
ward. however, the clerk was startled by hearing a
shri'ek, followed by a great commotion in that part of
tne house assigned to the servants, and, hurrying to
the place, he learned that the runner, probably while
in a.somnambulistic state, had, in his nocturnal
wanderings, rambled into a room occupied by two
chambermaids of the hotel, their door being left
open fpr better ventilation; that the girls Lad been
awakened by the intrus on, and uttered a loud
scream in their fright, and that one ot them, a large
and buxom lass, had jumped out of the bed, grabbed
the intruder, and had thrown him head.ong out of
the room into tjio hall, he receiving some pretty se
vere bruises by the rough handling. The clerk took
in the situation at a glance, and, taking the sleep
walker by the collar, escorted him along the hall to
the stairway, administering a not very gentle kick at
almost every step as they walked along, as a sort of
resuscitative to bring him back Io a consciousness of
the fact that his feet, as well as his mind, had been
wandering jn forbidden paths. As he was going
down the stairs, one of the girls, whose dreams he
had disturbed,,showered a pitcher of water upon
him, which, if the cierk’s punishment was not suffi
cient, made him fully realize that he was.,..or rather
had been, in the “ wrong pow," and he bolted down
stairs, and out of the door, closely followed by the
clerk. Early next morning, he sent for his baggage
from anotner hotel.
St. Louis houses should.be careful how they send
out agents afflicted with a tendency to ’‘Bleep
walking."
“ WANTED—CORRESPONDENCE.”
A MARRIED VAGRANT AND HIS YOUNG LADY
FRIENDS.
[From tliSiCincinnafi Enquirer, June 6 ]
Probably the richest uncontested case that han
been tried for soma time was that of Ellen M. Dob
ney against John Pat Dobney. The appearance of
Mrs. Dobney was prepossessing, and denoted a lady
not without culture and refinement, while the photo
graph of her husband, at.ached to one of the depo
sitions in the case, along with a list of letters written
by him to a young lady in Connersville, Ind., offered
as an exhibit in the case, gave evidence of his being
a sharp business man of the world, with ability to
hold his own among the best.
The plaintiff alleges that in 1867 and 1868 her hus
band advertised for correspondence with young la
dies, and in pursuance of such advertisement ho nad
corresponded, under the assumed names of J. D.
Platt and F. M. Werkes, with young girls in various
parts of the country, and finally enteied into an en
gagement of marriage with one young lady in Con
nersville, Ind., and committed adultery with an
other. She also charges that he has been grossly
abusive of her; that for several years she has left him
at all times when his conduct was unbearable, but
upon promise of amendment she went back to him,
oalv to be treated worse than before.
One ot the witnesses testified that he knew the de
fendant, and that he was kicked out of a boarding
house in this city for non-payment of .board ; that his
trunk was left in tne house, which, on being opened,
disclosed an envelcp?-box filled with the letters and
photographs of a number of young ladies with whom
ho had been corresponding.
The deposition of th3 young lady in Connersville,
with whom the defendant had been corresponding,
was aso offered in evidence. She stated that she
hid answered Dobney’s advertisement in the T7a
verly Magazine for correspondence “ with young la
dies between seventeen and twenty years of age, by
a gentleman of thirty, with ample fortune, with a
view to matrimony." 'rhe advertisement directed
parties to address F. M. Werkes, Rochester, N. Y.
ihe result of this witness’s correspondence was an
engagement of marriage, which was broken off by
defendant on the ground that he had lost his for
tune.
The box of letters and photographs were offered as
evidence. The pictures were, many of them, appar
ently those of respectable and intelligent young wo
men of the ages indicated above. Some of the let
ters, of which taere were probably 150, wore evi
dently written as a pastime, but the most were not.
On th© contrary, they gave evidence of sincerity, and
evinced an utter disregard of propriety in taking up
with any smooth-tongued swmdler who should hap
pen to come along, that was painful to see. These
lines may come to the eyes of many of the dupes of
this defendant in their quiet homes, and when they
see how utterly deluded they have been, and reflect
upon what dangerous grounds they lhemsolves may
have stood, they cannot but have learned a lesson
which, it is to be hoped, they may impart to others
whose love of the novelty and excitement, if it bo
nothing more, may lead them to disagreeable re
sults.
HbQH-HEELED shoes.
A FRUITFUL CAU*E OF DISTRESSING DEFORM
ITIES.
[From the Louisville Ledger.]
The Ledger has, upon divers and sundry occasions,
animadverted upon this most criminally absurd oi
fashion’s freaks. Wo had almost concluded to let
the female Ephraim alone, because she was joined to
her idols; but there is a horrible fascination about
the subject which irresistibly attracts us. And wc
could not ignore the subjected if wo wanted to. Not
with the hope of influencing any woman to abandon
high-heeled shoes—for we are painfully cognizant of
the obstinacy of the sex in all matters pertaining to
fashion—we continue our remarks.
What is known as the “ Arab arch," is one of the
beauties of the female foot. According to the recog
nized test the arch should be sufficient to allow a
s ream of water to pass beneath the foot, even when
the weight of the body is thrown on it. Nothing has
so great a tendency to break down the aristocratic
arch as the practice of wearing high-heeled shoes.
If the practice is continued for a term of years, not
not only will the feet ot American women be distort
ed, shapeless aggregations of bunions, corns, in
growing foc-naiis—the toes straddling each other—
but the “ hollow of the foot will make a hole in the
ground."
Tile unnatural and constrained position of the
foot, wiili the small heel, in-avitably breaks down the
shoe, and twists the ankle out of shape. In a short
time the ankle becomes enlarged and clumsy. This
breaking down of the shoe is something that may be
seen every day on the street. Frequently one heel,
like a leaning tower of Pisa, slants out to the south,
while the other slants to the north, the unfortunate
woman walking on her ankles, which, in a short
time, will begin to wear a thick, rheumatic look,
which is anything but graceful. “Down at the heel”
is an expressive phrase, signifying general and slov
enly dilapidation; yet, since the advent of high
heeled shoes, to be down at the heel is to be in
fashion.
PERFECTLY AWFUL.
STARTLING LESSON FOR BOYS ADDICTED TO
PRACTICAL JOKES.
(From the Peoria, 111., Review.)
It is surprising how much misery is caused in this
world by the thoughtless fun of some ot the
best hearted people in it. Often and often a person,
whose heart is running over with innocent merri
ment, will perpetrate a joke, in a thoughtless mo
ment, which will cause some dear friend pain, and
throw a cloud over their lives for ever. These
remarks are caused by a sad case which happened
recently in this city. The boys of the Second Ward
school had raised a subscription and bought a foot
ball. It was made of India rubber, and was inflated
with air. A small brass tube was used to inflate it,
through an aperture in the side, which closes me
chanically when the tube is withdrawn. A day
or two ago, the boys were resting from their play,
and examining their ball, when one of them, a pale,
delicate-looking, philosophical little feliow, offered
to bet that he could put the ball in his mouth.
They all laughed at the idea, as tne ball was as
b.g as his head, but he persisted, and they took
up his bet. He veiy quietly inserted the tube,
exhausted the air, and rolling tne ball tightly up in a
small compass, easily placed it in bis mouth, to the
great astonishment of his companions. While they
gazed, one of them, filled with mischief, inserted
the tube in the aperture of the ball, which was thus
visible, and inflated the foot-ball to its fullest extent !
The boys screamed with laughter at the odd appear
ance of their puny playfellow, and in their boister
ous appreciation of the joke, they lost the key!
And now, for that piece of thoughtless merriment,
that poor little boy must drag on tnrough his weary
life with a face the size of a peck measure, and
no place to put his bread and butter in. Boys,
you cannot be too careful about piaying, even what
may seem to be tke most innocent joke on your
playfellow.
THE FATAL “CHAW.”
A MAN SENT TO THE PENITENTIARY THROUGH
A CHEW OF TOBACCO.
A “chaw" has sent a man to the penitentiary. It
seems that a registered letter, which had been for
warded to Chicago from one of the country post
offices, was tampered with at some point on the
route, Up n arriving at the place ot destination,
five SIOO bills which ought to have been in the en
velope, were not to be found. The matter was put
into the hands of a skill; ul detective for investiga
tion. Upon soaking the envelope, he discovered
where it had been opened and re-sealed. He then
examined the mucilage with a microscope, and saw
that small particles of plug tobacco adhered to the
paper.
At once the officer resolved to track through the
various offices, and see w.. 0 of the Government em
ployees that handled letters, chewed plug. For
some time the case looked like a hopeless one. The
post-office ckrks in the rural districts nearly all
chewed the fine cut. Finally, at the very office in
which the letter was mailed, the postmaster offered
the official some plug, in response to a request for a
chew, and, as if the unfortunate official was bent up
on his own recrimination, he remarked that “he had
never chewed anything else but plug.”
Upon this statement the detective ran the risk and
arrested the surprised countryman, not for chowmg
plug tobacco, but for robbing the United States mail.
Upon searching the office, the missing bills were
found folded up in au old fashioned daguerreotype
case. The dishonest postmaster is filling an engage
ment at the Illinois Penitentiary.
WOM A N’S WIOKEDNESS.
THE STORY OF A POOR DESERTED MAN.
(From the Kansas City Bulletin, June 4.)
An old gentleman, named Dewey, called upon us
yesterday, and desired information as to how he
should proceed to regain possession of his three
children, who had all been carried away by his wife
from his home in Paola. He says he had known of
his wife’s inconstancy before her elopement with a
prominent physician of Paola, but forbore and ior
gave on account of his children. But during his ab
sence all had fled, taking with them nearly every
thing he had. He has spent what little remained in
hunting for his children, and has now discovered
them at a rendezvous of a notorious free lover, re
siding, as he says, near West Point, Mo. According
to Dewey’s statement, since her flight with her par
amour, Mrs. pewey has made trouble again, causing
the death of the wife of a storekeeper, on the Mor
mon Fork, in Cass county, five miles east of West
Point. The storekeeper’s wife, finding herself de
serted, took poifqfy but was aayed to die a plows*
NEW YORK DISPATCH.
death. The sad story of the old man is full of the
bitfcer’iess and despair of old age an i 1 ejigary. He
i j without nope, unless he can recover m s eldest
fiirl.fr >m t ie nest of corru ition where he says the
is no.w- We could only recommend the poor oid
man to the law as his remedy. His answer was a
sad and bitter smi’e as he replied:
“Law has cost me my little all, but gave me not
my lQß,t_children.”
HOOSIER TfPPLMC.
WHAT THE INDIANAPOLI CANS GUZZLE DAILY
—FOUR OR FIVE GALLONS OF WATER AND
150,000 GLASSES OF bUNx»RLES.
(From the Indianapolis Journal, June 10.)
From the best sources at our command we have
gathered some crude statistics which will show
about the amount of liquids now daily vended oyer
the bars of the city. The national drink of our citi
zens appears to be the great Teutonic beverage, and
of this Indianapolis breweries furnish an average of
525 kegs per.diom, in addition to seventy-five re
ceived from Cincinnati. An expert “jerker” will
draw from each of these kegs 130 glasses, making a
total ot 78 OQ(L—over a glass and a half for every man,
woman, and. suckling in the city, or about ten for
each voter-
Next in rank comes the “whisky straight,” and
the six hundred saloons daily dispose oi not less
tiian twenty.thousand drinks.
The mineral wftter manufactories sell eighty-four
hundred bottle-? daily.
Thirty-seven soaa fountains, on a hot day, sputter
forth about -eight thousand mugs of “sweetened
wind.”
Of ales, lemonades with the inevitable “ bug,"
light wines, smashes, juleps, and all the unnum
bered varieties .which come under the head of
“mixed drinks/’ a gentleman, well posted, calcu
lates that not less than twenty-five thousand glasses
are swallowed daily.
This makes a grand total of nearly 150,000 drinks,
beside four or five gallons of water, as the amount of
moisture required every twenty-four hours to keep
the human clay in Indianapolis properly dampened.
Of course this vast Quantity is not drank by citizens
of this city alone, as visitors from the surrounding
towns, more especially Seymour and Sullivan, are
in the habit of taking an, inordinate quantities when
ever they cone to the .capital.
From this showing it would,.appear that an unex
pected failure of both wells and waterworks would
not create a drouth to be very much fearod, but lest
something of the kind might happen, we would
suggest that the little bit of Adam’s ale now con
sumed us a beverage be saved for culinary and the
purposes of ablution entirely.
Singular Russian Superstition. —An
ancient European superstition, which was supposed
to have disappeared altogether, was recently found,
by a criminal trial in Russia, to be still in existence
there. The superstition consisted in the belief that
a candle made of the fat melted from tho body of an
infant, and placed in a dead man’s hand, would
..make the wearer invisible, and enable him .to enter
any house he chose. This talismanic candle was
nrach in use by thieves. The trial was of a thief ar
raigned for stealing the body of a child for the pur
pose of making such.
Post Office notice.—The Mails for
the week ending Saturday. June 24,1871,
will close at this office on Tuesday at 11% A. M.; on Wed
nesday at A. M.; on Thursday at 11% A. M.; and on
Saturday at A. M.
P. H. JONES, Postmaster.
TSranjd opera house.
kJT James Fisk. Jr Proprietor
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Engagement for one week longer of the
LONDON, PARIS, AND NEW YORK
PANTOMIME COMPANY.
POSITIVELY LAST WEEK,
COMMENCING MONDAY, JUNE 19.
MONDAY, thirtieth performance of the greatest pan
tomimic success ever known, the
THREE HUNCHBACKS.
WEDNESDAY—Fint Benefit of Charles Abbott. Im
mense programme.
SATURDAY— Positively last night of the season, and
Benefit of the Managers, Charles Abbott, the great
Clown. Moe and Goodrich in their celebrated Skating
Scene. Winter Ravel as Harlequin, and the Dearden
Sisters as Columbine and character Danseuse.
La Petite Benson, the Child Wonder, two and a half
years old, in inimitable Song and Dance.
The French Twin Sisters in their Cancan Dance.
SATURDAY, June 24— Positively last night of the
season, and COMPLIMENTARY BENEFIT, tendered
by the Company to the Management.
THEATRK
ANOTHER GREAT SENSATION!
First night of the celebrated Irish Comedian,
MR. JAMES MAGUIRE,
who will make his first appearance in an entirely new
sensation drama, written by Mr. WILLIAM VERSHAY
expressly for this occasion, entitled
OVER THE FALLS;
Or, A LEAP FOR LIFE.
, MB., ( ) JERRY MAGEE,
JAMBJ AS £ NORAH MAGEE,
MAGUIRE ( \ JOLLY JACK. ’
ENTIRELY NEW SCENERY AND MACHINERY.
Beautiful Gardens of Rsimond Mansion.
A STUPENDOUS RAILROAD BRIDGE
OVER THE FALLS,
35 FEET HIGH!
From which Mr. MAGUIRE, as JERRY, leans with
Ruld in his arms to the stage, through an
IMMENSE WATERFALL!
Commences with the drama of
ROBERT MaCAIRE.
Friday Evening, Benefit of Mr. JAMES MAGUIRE.
00B ’ s museum.
GREAT SUCCESS.
THIRD WEEK OF :
THREE I EVERY AFTERNOON I
BLIND AT 2.
MICE. 1
FOX ANO
DENIER I EVERY EVENING I
PANTO vl IME AT 8.
TROUPE.
TONY DENIER’S CELEBRATED
WOODEN HEADED ACROBATS.
TIIE WONDER OF THE WORLD.
WOOD’S MUSEUM.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
SUNDAY EVENING, JUNE 18, 1871.
LAST LECTURE but one, prior to the early de
parture for Europe of the celebrated
ORATOR AND TRAVELER,
GEORGE FRANCIS TRAIN.
Subjcet: POLITICAL ISSUES OF THE DAY.
yy A L L A C K ’ s.
SUMMER SEASON.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY,
LAST NIGHTS
OF
ROSEDALE,
WHICH MUST BE V/LTADRAWN,
NOTWITHSTANDING ITS
UNPARALLELED SUCCESS.
WEDNESDAY EVENING.
THE ADMIRABLE PLAY.
THE LONG STRIKE,
produced with
NEW SCENERY,
NEW APPOINTMENTS,
and a
NEW AND POWERFUL CAST,
including MANY of the ORIGINAL representatives of
character offered upon the first production here.
rnONY PASTOR’S OPEEA-HOUSBi
JL Tony Pastor Lessee and Proprietor.
Fanny Herring Directress.
Second week of the ever-popu’ar
MISS FANNY HERRING,
in a new sensation drama written expressly for herby
D. R. Young, Esq., entitled
“GRIT:"
Or, Out on The Plains.
MISS FANNY HERRING
in the leading character, supported by a first-class com
pany.
Family matinees every WEDNESDAY and SATUR
DAY afternoon at 2%.
The coolest theatre in the city.
OLYMPIC
Lessee and ManagerJAS. E. HAYES
Acting Manager JOHN H. BELWYN
LAST NIGHTS
of the great Emotional Actress,
LUCILLE WESTERN,
who will appear in the powerful drama entitled
'/HE CHILi) STEALER.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
AT 2 O’CLOCK. *
JUNE 26,
Engagemeat of
ROSE AND HARRY WATKINS.
THEATRE.
LAST WEEK but ONE of the SUMMER SEASON
and of
MR. LAWRENCE BARRETT,
james harebell,
the Poet-Hero of Mr. W. G. Wills’ beautiful HEART
STORY, in four acts, entitled
THE MAN O’ AIRLIE,
which was performed at the Princess’ Theatre, London,
for more than ONE HUNDRED NIGHTS—and consti
tuted the dramatic event of that city in 1£67.
SATURDAY MATINEE at 1%.
joUFTH AVENUE THEATRE.
? MONDAY, JUNE 19th,
LAST NIGHT OF “ NO-NAME.”
TUESDAY EVENING, JUNE 20th,
will be produced for the first time a
comedy, in thr-e acts, of UNIQUE
DELMONICO’S. LOCAL INTEREST, entitled
DELMONICO’S;
Or, LARKS UP THE HUDSON.
New Scenery. All the strength of the Company.
Globe theatre. 728 Broadway.
Engagement extraordinary, MONDAY, JUNE 26,
First appearance of New York’s FAVORITE TRAGE
DIAN, MR. E. EDDY
JJUBSELS restaurant;
No. 88 FRANKLIN STREET,
Between Broadway and Church street.
The Upright Patent Trunk
Does not have
’■ ‘from the wall to
fee open it. Instead
V V^ s2 a : '-'- c ’of trays to lift
cu t. it is ar
• ■-Ji ranged with
Drawers, made
J very light and
i 6 “ n 8 “'><*
# STRONGER, as
r, fj only a small
-r .11 portion opens,
whereas in the
B old style the
■ roVnf
bottom of the
trunk for dress-
■ es an<l heavy
clothing, as in the old style.
THE UPRIGHT PATENT TRUNK CO.,
Next door to Astor House. No. 6 BARCLAY ST., N. Y.
Prizes cashed in all the lot-
TERIES by DE LAN BROTHERS, Brokers,
No. 150 Bio .dway, corner oi Liberty street. Room No.
13. Entrances on Broadway and Liberty street.
£4141'
Vr ticket; half, 50c; quarter, 23c.
Royal Havana Lottery, Supplementary. For information
addre-s LUTIiY CO., No. 240 Greenwich street, N. Y.
Royal ~ Havana lottery.—pri
zes pain in gold; information furnished. Highest
rates paid for doubloons and all kinds of gold and silver.
A co, Bankara, $ WaU ftfreeK N. Y»
BROADAVAY and ELEVENTH ST.,
WILL OFFER
Oia MONDAY, JUNE 19th,
A CHOICE ASSORTMENT OF
SUMMER SILKS,
IN CHECKS AND STRIPES, AT VERY ATTRACT
IVE PRICES.
COLORED GROS GRAIN SILKS, IN ALL THE
DESIRABLE SHADES.
BLACK AND COLORED TRIMAJING SILKS TO
MATCH. FROM $1 25.
ALSO, EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS IN BLACK
GROS GRAIN SILKS OF THE CELEBRATED
MAKES OF PONSON? BONNETT, GOURD,
CROIZAT, AND JAMES McCREERY A
CO.’S “FAMILY SILK.”
JAPANESE SILKS, IN CHECKS AND STRIPES,
FROM 75 CTS. UPWARD.
GAUZE DE CHAMBERY, IN BRILLIANT COLORS,
ALSO, A FULL LINE OF FOULARD SILKS IN
ALL THE FASHIONABLE SHADES,
_ AT REDUCED PRICES,
JAMES MTftEERY & CO.,
BROADWAY and ELEVENTH ST.,
WILL OFFEH
On MONDAY, JUNE 10,
EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS
IN
SDHHEB DRESS GOODS.
A NEW LINE OF PRINTED PERCALES, AT 12%
cts., 15 cts., 20 cts., and 25 cts. per yard.
4-4 HOYLE’S ENGLISH CHINTZES, 250t3.; RE
DUCED FROM 30 cts.
4-4 SEERSUCKER STRIPES, 20 cts.; REDUCED
FROM 25 cts.
3 CASES OF NEW AMERICAN PRINTS, FROM
6% to 12% cts.
AN IMMENSE STOCK OF CHINESE GRASS
CLOTH, FOR SUITS, IN ALL SHADES, FROM
20 cts. UPWARD.
MIKADO POPLINS, IN NEW SHADES, AT 20 ets.
BLACK AND WHITE PLAIDS, FROM 20ots. UP’D.
GOAT’S HAIR POPLINS. VERY FINE TEXTURE,
AT 50 cts.; REDUCED FRO.M 75 cts.
ALSO, FRENCH GRENADINES, ENGLISH BA
REGES, FRENCH ORGANDIES, &c., Ac., IN
GREAT VARIETY.
GREAT REDUCTION IN MOURNING GOODS.
BLACK IRON GRENADINES, AT 25 cts., 35 cts.,
and 50 cts.; REDUCED FROM 37, 50, and 86 cts.
ALSO, OTHER STYLES OF FASHIONABLE FA
BRICS, AT EQUALLY LOW PRICES.
CDS'!OMERS AND STRANGERS PLEASE EXAM
INE.
JffISMWRI&.CO.,
BROADWAY and ELEVENTH ST.,
Will offer on MONDAY, June 19th, a splendid as
sortment of LLAMA LACE SHAWLS and SACQUES,
in new and beautiful designs, and at a great reduction
in prices.. Also, a great variety of OTTOMAN STRIPED
and WOOL SHAWLS, suitable for Carriage and Sea
side Wrap-*. New styles of GRENADINE, BAREGE,
and CH ALLIE SHAWLS, at equally low prices.
NEW YORK.
MANTLEDEPARTMENT.
WILL OFFER THE BALANCE OF THEIR
PARIS AND CITY-MADE
SILK MANTLES,
OF THE LATEST DESIGNS,
At a still FURTHER REDUCTION, previous to taking
their half-yearly inventory.
ALSO,
TRAVELING SUITS, DUSTERS, SEA-SIDE WRAP
PERS, AND WALKING SUITS,
in every variety of material.
EMBROIDERED HOUSE-JACKETS, THREAD
LACE AND LLAMA LACE SHAWLS,
JACKETS, Ao., Ac.,
At Equally Low Prices.
HOWLNINOmRTMENT.
Have just received, and will offer
ON MONDAY, JUNE 19,
100 ps. BLACK IRON GRENADINES,
coarse, medium, and fine meeh, pure silk and wool, best
Paris make and finish, making, in connection with their
present large stock, the finest assortment to be found in
the city. AT PRICES FROM 60c. PER YARD AND
UPWARD.
ALSO, SILK GRENADINES, BYZANTINES, AND
FLORENTINES,
AT VERY LOW PRICES.
■Y iFwfflm
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN & CHILDREN.
FANCY TRAVELING SHIRTS, READY-MADE
SHIRTS, COLLARS, AND CUFF 3,
FANCY SCARFS, TIES, CRAVATS, SUSPENDERS,
PLAIN AND FANCY BORDERED
HANDKERCHIEFS,
EMBROIDERED SHIRT FRONTS,
LISLE THREAD, SILK, KID AND DOG SKIN
GLOVES.
AT VERY LOW PRICES*
Ladies’, Misses’, and Infants’
FURNISHING DEPARTMENT,
Complete with’every requisite, ready-made, and to order
at short notice, and at
MODERATE PRICES.
N. B.—Bridal Outfits a Speciality.
DRBSS GOODS,
OF THE LATEST SYLES AND FABRICS,
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES,
PRIOR TO TAKING OUR SEMI-ANNUAL
INVENTORY.
AN INSPECTION OF OUR STOCK WILL BE
FOUND WELL WORTHY THE ATTENTION OF
PURCHASERS.
ip R Q A P W
NEW YORK.
LADIES’ BONNETS AND TURBAN
HATS.—THIS WEEK. MUST BE SOLD, TO
REDUCE OUR IMMENSE STOCK.
DRESS BONNETS. HALF-PRICE.
STRAW HATS, MOURNING BONNETS.
BINNS’ MILLINERY, No. 647 BROADWAY.
Please eave this, and avoid mistake.
6~t i c eT~
KELLY & CO.,
Cob. TWENTY-EIFTH ST. and SIXTH AVE.,
Offer a large and excellent assortment of
CARPETS, FURNITURE,
BEDDING, OIL CLOTHS, ETC.,
Selected expressly for the Spring trade, at very low
prices. WEEKLY and MONTHLY PAYMENTS
TAKEN. CALL AND EXAMINE.
raegracaßugiMgJitfßtw.wicmi th.’ zgrjuhauwaMiimTuaawawyuiipMgßni
So
Henry brookeK
(Late with James M. Shaw & Co.),
DEALER IN
CROCKERY, CHINA, AND GLASSWARE,
CUTLERY AND PLATED WARE,
No. 441 PEARL STREET.
NEW YORK,
Where he will be happy to flee his old friends and cus
tomers.
Hotels and Restaurants supplied.
AGNIFICENT™7~OCTAVE ROSE-
WOOD PI Ax'-OS, from SIOO. Elegant overstrung
bass, carved kgs, witn agraffe. Grea<- Bargains.
JAMES GORDON, No. 196 Bleecker st.,
near MacdougaJ.
A GREAT OFFER I!
HORACE WATERS, No. 481 BROADWAY, N.
Y., will dispose of ONE HUNDRED PIANOS, MELO
DEONS, and ORGANS of first-class makers, at ex
tremely LOW PRICES, FOR CASH, DURING THIS MONTH,
or will take from $4 to S2O monthly until paid; the same
to let, and rent money applied if purchased. Cocker
ing pianos are included in the above offer.
glwtcgrnphsi.
Beautiful and rare photo-
GRAPHS FROM PARIS. Sample and Catalogues
sent for 20 cents, by CAMERON & CO., Ko. 146 Bleeck
er street, New York.
Divorces legally obtained in
different States. Desertion, etc., sufficient cause.
No publicity. No charge until divorce obtained. Advice
free. M, HOUbE. Attorney, No, Uy
gry @(W(b.
“gre w rewctioS 7-
IN
Straw & Millinery Goods.
JOHNSON, BURNS & CO.
WILL OFFER
On MONDAY, June 19th,
THE BALANCE OF THEIR SPRING AND SUM
MER IMPORTATIONS OF
ffIHffIWMOWMOS,
AT A
Reduction of 25 to 50 Per Cent.
ENGLISH MILAN STRAW HATS,
MILAN, CHIP, AND LEGHORN
HIGH-CROWNED TURBANS,
FINE FRENCH CHIP BONNETS,
EXTRA FINE LEGHORN FLATS,
STRAW AND CHIP SUNDOWNS,
WHITE LAWN AND SWISS SHIRRED HATS,
TRIMMED HATS AND BONNETS,
IN GREAT VARIETY.
I 33 33 o 3XT S.
SASH RIBBONS IN COLORED GROS GRAIN.
TAFFETAS, PLAIDS, AND BLACK
TRIMMING RIBBONS,
OF ALL KINDS.
FRENCH FLOWERS IN GREAT VARIETY.
OSTRICH TIPS AND FANCY FEATHERS,
Dress Trimmings, Silk Fringes,
JET ORNAMENTS, &c., &c.,
At a Reduction of 25 to SO Per Cent.
JOHNSON, BURNS & CO.,
Nos. 34 and 36 East (4th street,
COR. UNIVERSITY PLACE, UNION SQUARE.
GREAT BARGAINS
IN
HOSIERY.
JOHNSON, BURNS & CO.
WILL OFFER
On MONDAY, June 19th,
50 DOZEN
Ladies’ Gauze Merino Vests,
28 TO 32 INCHES.
AT 75 CENTS EACH.
100 DOZEN
LADIES’ GOSSAMER MERINO VESTS
26 TO 34 INCHES,
AT $1 EACH.
Ladies’ Lisle Thread, Balbriggan,
and Open Work Hose,
AT A GREAT REDUCTION.
LADIES’ FILL REGULAR. €OllO5 HOSE,
AT S 3 PER DOZEN.
SUPERFINE WHITE,
AT $3 60 PER DOZEN.
75 DOZEN
GENTLEMEN’S GAUZE MERINO VESTS,
ALL SIZES,
AT 75 CENTS EACH.
100 DOZEN
Gentlemen’s Superfine
Gauze Merino Vests, 34 to 44,
SHORT SLEEVES,
AT $1 EACH.
Jean and Linen Drawers.
150 Doz. Gentlemen’s Superfine Cotton
Half Hose, Full Regular,
AT $3 PER DOZEN.
COURVOISSIER’S FRENCH KID GLOVES.
SULTANA, BLEUE, AND GREEN SHADES,
AT $1 75 PER PAIR,
WORTH $2 50 PER PAIR.
Lupin’s French Kid Two Button
Gloves,
AT $1 PER PAIR. WARRANTED.
THE IMREJRATB.ICE GLOVE.
EXTRA FINE GLOVES,
IN ALL THE NEW AND FASHIONABLE SHADES,
AT $1 50 PER PAIR.
Ladies’, Misses’, and Gentlemen’s
LISLE THREAD GLOVES.
Johnson, Burns & Co.,
Nos. 34 and 36 East Fourteenth st.,
COR. UNIVERSITY PLACE, UNION SQUARE.
AT JACKSON’S
MOURNING STORE,
Corner of Broadway and Waverley Places
THE FOLLOWING SEASONABLE GOODS ARE
WORTHY OF SPECIAL ATTENTION, BEING
FROM 20 TO 25 PER CENT. BELOW
COST OF IMPORTATION.
BLACK IRON GRENADINES, 60c. and 600.
BLACK IRON GRENADINES, 75c. and 85c.
BLACK IKON GRENADINES, $1 and $1 10.
8-4 BLACK IRON GRENADINES, $2 TO $3.
SEWING SILK HERNANIES, FROM $1 25.
ENGLISH GRENA DINES, IN GREAT VARIETY, 25c.
5-4 CRAPE CLOTH, 45 cts., FORMER PRICE, 65 cts.
.5-4 CRAPE CLOTH, 60 cts., FORMER PRICE, 80 cts.
ENGLISH BOMBAZINES, HENRIETTA, AND
TAMISE CLOTH, FROM 75 cts. TO $1 50.
BLACK ALPACA MOHAIRS, 30c., 40c., 50c.
BLACK SILKS, STRIPED SILKS,
JAPANESE SILKS, &c., FROM 90c.
JAPANESEJAND FROU-FROU POPLINS, 25 cts.
BEST AMERICAN PRINTS, 10 cts.
liOWEIS aSb SCITS ALL REDUCED.
LADIES WILL PLEASE CALL AND EXAMINE
BEFORE DECIDING ELSEWHERE. PRICES
GUARANTEED.
CARPETING,
AT
ALXLNG SdLACVV ’S.
Best Tapestry Brussels,
SI.IO PER YARD.
ALSO, NEW STYLES OF
BODY BRUSSELS.
Sixth Ave., cor. Twelfth street
HTTOITtsT
FURNITURE,
OIL CLOTHS, BEDDING, Etc.,
At tlie Lowest Cash Prices.
WEEKLY OR MONTHLY PAYMENTS TAKEN AT
DE4LY & CUNNINGHAM’S,
384 and 386 3d ave« near 28th st.
■REGULAR SUNDAY MORNING
boat tor Newburg, Cornu all, Cold .
Spring, Meit Point, and Yonkers. The
favorite steamboat,
SLEEPY HOLLOW,
„ ' CAPTAIN JAMES SHERMAN,
Commencing SUNDAY, May 28th. Leaves Fulton Fer
rbronktyn, at 8 A. M.; Ohristopiier street. North
River. 8:30. and Thirty-fourth street, North River, at 9
o’clock. Fare forthe excursion, sl.
J£D\VARD PAYSON WESTON, THE
GREATEST PEDESTRIAN IN THE WORLD,
will be present at the picnic of the
THIRD AVENUE RAILROAD RELIEF ASSOCIA
TION,
ON
MONDAY, JUNE 19th, 1871,
AT JONES’ WOODS.
MUSIC BY FINK’S CELEBRATED BAND.
Admission Twenty-five cents.
A HOY FOR ROCKAWAY.-EVERY
SUNDAY the steamer NELLY
WHITE leaves from Peck Slio, at Bj£ and
IP.M.; Christopher street, North river,
at 9 A. M. and 1:30 P.M.; 4, N. R. at 9:15 A. M. and 2 P.
M. Returning, leaves Rookway at 11 A. M. and SP. M.
Fare, 50 cents each way.
Daily regular boat
FOR THE FISHING BANKS.
On and after TUESDAY. June 13th, 1871, PL H
the Steamer RIP VAN WINKLE, Caot.
SIMMONS, will leave Peck Slip at 7:45, Christopher
street at 8:30, and Pier 4, N. R., at 9 A. M.
Bchiebel’s Brass aud Cotillion Bait, Lines, and
Refreshments on board.
SYLVAN PARK,
FIFTH STREET and RAILROAD AVENUE,
Morrisania.
The largest and most beautiful Park in the vicinity of
New York, for Target Excursions, Picnics, &c.
H. FRIEDGEN, Proprietor.
STEAMSHIP CO.
In connection with the New Jersey
Southern Railroad Line. EaWsaaffesmini
On and after June 12,
FOUR DAILY TRIPS BETWEEN NEW YORK
AND
LONG BRANCH,
via Sandy Hook and all points on the New Jersey
Southern Railroad.
The splendid Saloon Steamers
PLYMOUTH ROCK
AND
JESSE HOYT,
will leave from
Pier No. 28, North River, foot of Murray street, daily,
Sundays excepted, as follows:
PLYMOUTH BOCK, at 6:40 A. M , arriving at Long
Branch 8:34 A. M.
JESSE HOY 1, at 9:30 A. M., arriving at Long Branch
at 11:28 A. M.
JESSE HOYT, at 3:30 P. M., arriving at Long Branch
at 5:17 P. M.
PLYMOUTH ROCK, at 4:30 P. M., arriving at Long
Branch at 6:15 P. M
RETURNING, LEAVE LONG BRANCH.
JESSE HOYT, at 7 A. M., arriving in New York at
8*45 A M
PLYMOUTH ROCK, at 7:47 A. M-, arriving in New
York at 9:39 A. M.
JESSE HOYT, at 10:35 A. M., arriving In New York
at 12:20 P. M.
PLYMOUTH ROCK, at 6:03 P. M., arriving in New
York at 7:59 P. M.
Tickets for Sandy Hook, Long Branch, and all stations
on the New Jersey Southern Railroad for sale at the fol
lowing offices: 241 Broadway, 529 Broadway, corner
Spring street, corner Broadway and Twenty-third street,
and 4 Court street, Brooklyn.
Grand Promenade Concert on the PLYMOUTH
ROCK each trip, by the celebrated Band of the Ninth
Regiment, N. G. S. N. Y.
Faro to Long Branch, sl. Commutation tickets for
sale at the office of the Narragansett Steamship Com
pany, Pier 20, North River.
Excursion Tickets to Sandy Hook amd return, sl.
JAS. FISK, Jr., President.
M. R, Simons, Managing Director.
North shore, staten island.
Elm Pnrk. A. M., 5:30, 7:30,9:30,
10:30, 11:30; P. M.. 1:30, 3:3D, 4:30, 5:30.
Port Richmond, A. M., 5:40, 6:40,
8:40, 9:40, 10:40, 11:40; P. AL, 1:40,2:40, 3:40, 4:40, 5:40.
West Brighton, A. M., 5:50, 6:50, 7:50, 8:50, 9:50,10:50,
11:50: P. M„ l:50; 2:50. 3:50. 4:50. 5:50; Snug Harbor,
A. M., 5:55, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 9:55,10:55,11:55; P. M., 1:55.
2:55. 3:55, 4:55, 5:55. New Brighton, A. M., 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12; P. M., 2,3, 4,5, 6. New York, A. M., 7,8, 9,10, li,
12; P. M., 2,3, 4,5, 6,7.
SUNDAY TIME.
Elm Park, A. M.. 10:30,12:0; P. M.. 1:30, 8,5, 6. Port
Richmond. A. M., 7:10, 9:10,10:40: P. M.. 12:10,1:40,3:10,
5:10, 6:10. We st Brighton, A. M., 7:20. 9:29, 10:50: P.M ,
12:20, 1:50, 3:20, 5:20, 6:20. New Brighton, A. M.. 7:39,
9:30, 11; P. M„ 12:30, 2; 3:30, 5:30, 6:30. New York,
A. M., 8:30,10:30, 12: P. M., 1:30, 3: 4:30, 6:30, 7:30.
NEW YORK, >IFR 19, BETWEEN COKTLANDT
AND DEY STREETS.
Albany day line.
The Steamboats
C. VIBBARD
AND
DANIEL DREW
will resume their daily passages at 814 A. M., from
VESTRY STREET, and 8:45 from THIRTY-FOURTH
STREET, on WEDNESDAY, May 31.
The steamboat
MARY POWELL, r
On and after SATURDAY, May 20,
Will leave VESTRY STREET PIER DAILY,
AT 3:30 P. M.,
Making usual landings (except New Hamburg).
Returning, leave Rondout at 5:15 A. M.; Poughkeep
sie, 6:15; Mil ton, 6>30; Newburg, 7; Cornwall, 7:15;
West Point,'7:3s; Cozzens, 7:45.
ARRIVING AT NEW YORK at 10:30.
Morning line for peekskill.
The steamboat Antelope, leaves
every morning (without exception) Harri
sou street, at 8 o’clock, landing at Thirty-rayrtfovwarassMi
fourth street Yonkers, Dobbs’ Ferry, Nyack, Sing
Sing, Haverstraw, Grassy Point, and Verplanck. N. B.
The steamer Norwalk will occupy the route for a few
days.
tpOR EXCURSIONS.
1 Saloon S earner WYOMING, ele
gantly refitted. The spacious new barges
Sarah Smith and Caledonia, and tbeKSeaßSSSßasiactH
Anna. Excelsior Park and Eagleswood to let|; also
the new Oriental Grove, the finest spot up the i
EAST RIVER,
on Great Neck. Office No. 383 West street.
NEAR CHRISTOPHER.
H. B. CROSSETT.
I7OR EXCURSION AND PIC NIC
■ PARTIES.
The Steamboats FL
SLEEPY HOLLOW,
NEW CHAMPION, V. SEYMOUR AND P. C.
SCHULTZ, AND BARGES WALTER SANDS,
WM. MYERS, WM. JAY HASKETT AND
MERCHANT.
Also, Dudloy’s Grove, Spring Hill, and Myers’ Groves,
Alderney Park, Jonas Island and Raritan Beach Groves.
Apply to
J. & E. MYERS.
CORNER MORTON AND WEST STS.,
Up Stairs.
PEOPLE’S LINE FOR ALBANY.—The
LARGEST AND MOST MAG
NIFICENT RIVER STEAMERS in
the World.
The ST. JOHN,
DREW, and
DEAN RICHMOND.
One of the above steamers will leave Pier No. 41
NOR i H RIVER every afternoon (Sundays excepted), at
6 o’clock, airiving at ALBANY in time to connect with
railroad trains West, North, and East. Returning, leave
the steamboat landing at Albany at 7 o’clock P. M., or on
the arrival of connecting trains from the West and North.
Through tickets can be obtained at the OFFICE ON
THE WHARF, and baggage checked to its destination.
Freight received until the hour of.departure.
SAFETY, SPEED, AND COMFORT.
NORWICH LINE.
For Boston. Worcester, Fitchburg,
ton Junction, Lowell, Lawrence, Nashua,
Manchester, Concord, Palmer, Brattleboro, and inter
mediate points. The new and staunch steamers,
CITY OF BOS ION,
CITY OF NEW YORK,
CITY OF LAWRENCE,
and CITY OF NEW LONDON,
will leave New York daily (Sundays excepted) at 5 o’clock
P. M., from Pier No. 40 North River, foot of Canal and
Watt s, I ’'o3’ NEW LONDON AND NORWICH.
There connecting with express trains for the above
points, via. New London, Northern, Norwich, and
Woroester and Boston. Hartford and Erie Railroads.
For through tickets and rates for freignt, apply at the
Office, Pier No. 40, North River.
J. E. SHORT, Jr., Agent.
New York, February 26. 1871. ___
JJROVIDENCE AND NEW YORK
STEA NTS Hi P CO.
NEPTUNE LINE,
FOR BOSTON, PROVIDENCE,
and all other points in New England, by the New and
Splendid Steamers,
ELECTRA, Capt. Jesse Mott,
AND
GALATEA,Capt. J. W. Nye,
One of which leaves
Pier No. 27, North River,
Daily, at 5 P. M., for PROVIDENCE direct, connecting
with the 7A. M. train for BOSTON. Freight taken at
the lowest rates. For further information apply to
WILLIAM SPRAGUE, President.
ISAAC ODELL, Agent.
New York, February 13, 1871. Pier No. 27, N. R,
C CENTRAL RAILROAD OF NEW JER~
7 SEY. —Passenger and Freight PCTotp^majil. ■, n
in New Vork, r LIBERTY STREET. HRW
Connects at Somerville with South Branch Railroad;
at Hampton Junction with the Delaware, Lackawan
na and Western Railroad: at Phillipsburg with the
Lehigh and Susquehanna Division; and at Easton with
the Lehigh Valley Railroad and its connections, form
ing a direct line to Pittsburg and the West without
change of cars; also to Central Pennsylvania and New
York State.
ALLENTOWN LINE TO THE WEST.
SPRING ARRANGEMENT.
Commencing May 22, 1871.-—Leave New York as follows:
6 A. M.—For Flemington, Easton. Bethlehem, Mauch
Chunk, Wilkesbarre, Pittston. Mahanov City, ML Car
mel, Hazelton, Tunkhannock. Towanda. Waverly, Ac.
BA. M.—For Easton. Connecting at Junction with
Del., Lack., and West. R. R.
9 A. M.— Western Express, daily, (except Sundays),
for Easton, Alleniown, Harrisburg and the West. Con
nects at Somerville for Flemington; at Phillipsburg
with Lehigh and Susquehanra Division, for Mauon
Chunk. Wilkesbarre, Scranton, Williamsport, Erie, Ac.;
at Easton with Lehigh Valley Railroad, for Mauch
A. M.— Wav Train for Somerville.
12:30 P.M.—For Flemington, Easton, Allentown, Mauch
Chunk, Mahanoy City, Hazleton, Wilkesbarre, Read
ing, Columbia, Lancaster. Ephrata, Pottsville. Harris
burg, Ac. Connects at Phillipsburg for Belvidere.
2 P. M.—For Plainfield. .
2*30 P. M.—For Easton. Connects at Phillipsburg
with Lehigh and Susq. Division for Allentown, WilkeS
barre and Scranton; and at Easton with Lehigh Valley
R. R. for Allentown and Catasauqua.
4 p, M —For Easton. Allentown, and Mauch Chunk.
Connects nt Junction with D. L. and W. R. K.
4-30 P. M.—F«* Somerville and Flemington.
5 P. m.—Cincinnati Express, daily, for Easton,
Bethlehem, Allentown, Reading. Harrisburg, Pitts
burg, Chicago and Cincinnati. Sleeping and Palace
Cars to Pittsburg and Chicago.
5:15 P. M.—For Somerville.
6 P. M.—For E-iston.
7 P. M.— For Somerville.
7:30 P. M.—(Emigrant) for Easton.
9:40 P. M.—For Plainfield.
12 P. M.—For Plainfield, Wednesdays and Satur
days.
For Elizabeth at 5:30, 6, 6:30, 7:15. 7:45. 8. 8:30, 9, 9:30,
10:30,11:45 A. M.; 12:30, 1,2, 2:30, 3:15, 3:45, 4, 4,30,4:45,
5:15, 5;30, 5:45, 6, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 7:45, 8;40, 9:40, 10:45,
12 P. M.
Tickets for the West can be obtained at the office of
the Central Railroad of New Jersey, foot of Liberty
street, New York; and at the principal hotels and
tiokßt offices in N.wY°i l^& KEß , Snp er,ntendent.
H. P. Baldwin, General PassoiMter Agent,
Sunday Edition, June 18
Annual regatta of the
new York yacht club.
ON THURSDAY, r
m , JUNE 22.
The BDlendid a-eamen SLEEPY HOLLOW. Captain
J. Sherman, will leave Thirty-fourth street. N. R. at 9
A. M.; Cnnstopher s'reet, 9:15; Pier No. 4. 9:30: Fulton
Ferry, Brooklyn, at 10. ’
TICKETS, ONE DOLLAR,
BRASS BAND ON BOARD.
YORK YACHT CLUB RIGA'S
ON THURSDAY* JUNE 22d.
The fast and well known steamboat MtfwfW’i liiiM'iiw
MAGENTA,
will accompany the yachts around the
LIGHT SHIP.
A splendid Band of Music is engaged.
por landings, see Tuesdays and Wednesdays paper*.
Sunday boat for newarY,
On and alter Sunday, March 28, n n-
the Steamboat p
THOMAS P. WAY
will make her regular trips,
2 P°M 9 foot ot Ceutre stree *- Newark, BA. M., and •
Barclay street, New York, 10:30 A.
ano 4:30 P.M. *
Stopping at Bergen Point each way.
grows. 3
QRAND CONTEST AT BILLIARDS
FOB THB
CHAMPION DIAMOND CUS
AND »1,000,
BETWEES
OYRILLE DION, of New York, and
(MELVIN FOSTER, of Norwich,
CAROMS, I.SOO POINTS. ON A 4-POCKET TABLE.
HJPPOTHEATRON, MONDAY EVENING, June 19.
PLAY TO BEGIN AT 8 O’CLOCK.
ADMISSION, SI; RESERVED SEATS, SI 50.
Af ETROPOLITAN BILLIARD ROOMS.’
AT-1 MORRISANIA HALL,
AUuroad Avenue, near Fifth street, Morriasnia,
OPPOSII’a! FLEETWOOD PARK.
OONCEtIT HALL ATTACHED.
ALES, WINBS, LIQUORS AND SEGABS.
LEWIS H. COMBES, Proprietor.
gILLIARDS! ———
ha S n9P ARE billiard ROOMS.
IH.L HANDSOMEST AND MOST COMPLETE ’
BOOMS IN THIS CITY, “
____ „„ coKTAtsnra:
TWENTY-TWO OF PHELAN’S TABLE’S.
No. 60 and 62 Bast 14th st.. Union Sonar A
OHBIS. O’CdNNOH,
- Proprietor.
rjIHE STOCK EXCHANGE
BILLIARD ROOMS,
EMPIRE BUILDING,
Nos. Wand 71 BROADWAY,
NEAR WALL STREET.
Seven First-Class Phelan Tables. Open from 7A.
tiil 8 P. M. JOHN GAULT.
Billiard table for saijS
FOR sale cheap a
second hand billiaßd table m
PERFECT order.
APPLY AT THB GOTHAM,
MATTHEWS A GBOGHAN. M °’ OWIiIIT ’
Rummer jiwrta.
Continental Hotel,
XiOKTG-
WILL BE OPENED ON
15TH OF JUNE.
W. B. BORROWS,
LATE OF EVERETT HOUSE, N. Y.,
Pbofbietob.
Whug and
HU S S E L ’ S
WINE, LIQUOR. ALE, AND LAGER BEER.
No. 1122 THIRD AVENUE. '
OPPOSITE RAILROAD DEPOT.
NEW YORK. ’
WINE TRADE!
Wellington, Kidder & Co.,
UKITED STATES WISE WAKEBOUSE,
No. 74 BROAD STREET,
NEW YORK.
PORT,
SHERRF,
MADEIRA,
CLAR3T,
BRANDIES,
GINS.
ST. OROIX and
JAMAICA RUMS.
IN BOND AND TO ARRIVE.
CHEAP-IN LARGE LOTS.
SAMPLES AT OFFICE.
WELLINCTON?I<IDDER & co.,
No. 74 BROAD STREET.
spinier gaUris.
—————
PULL-PUMPS FOR ALE,
ROOT AND LAGER-BEER APPARATUS.
We offer a large assoatment of Pull-pumns. in blac?i
walnut and rosewood cases, at reduced price*. Illus
trated catalogue furnished on application.
JAMES M. WHITFIELD & SON,
No. 262 Water street, Ne»v York City.
No. 562 THIRD AVENUE,
COR. THIRTY-SEVENTH STREET. M
Ask for one of CRANDALL’S IM. V
PP-OVED CHILD CARRIAGE 1
WITH OSCILLATING FRONT
x WHEEL. Its suiieriority acknow-"
lodged by practical meu and princi
pal all over the States.
yggMfo/M CRANDALL’S FOUR-
WH EEL PA TENT HAN D
’ "7'\ VELOCIPEDE, the only
A \ i 011 G ada Pted for girls as
well as boys.
V CRANDALL’S PATENT
CZ TEAM, OR SHOO FLY
'-W.—HORSE. This is an article
in great demand, as a child is free of danger. For sale
by all the principal dealers all over the States.
gutifiriiil
J’ MARKS’ PATENT
First Premiums ARTIFICIAL b|
LIMBS, with India Rubber Hands S|
and Feet, No. 575 Broadway, N. Y. M
c ty. A. A. MARKS, ■—
Spectacles.— Brazilian pebbles
and Double’Vision Glasses, in gold, silver, and other
frames. Also, the celebrated Eye-Preservers, so highly
appreciated at the Eye Hospital and the Eye Infirmary,
being superior to any other article, giving ease and vigor
to ihe weak, and preserving the perfect sight for many
years. Professor FRANKS, Oculist and Optician, Lec
turer on the Human Eye and Optics, accurately and sci
entifically adjusts these far-famed spectacles to defectiva
visions at his office. No. 288 Grand st., cor. of Eldridge.
IXPENNY SAVINGS BANK,
CLINTON HALL, ASTOR PLACE,
ESTABLISHED 1853.
OPEN DAILY FROM 10 TO 8.
WILLIAM MILES, Pres’t. J. S. SLOAN, Sec’y,
Agents, read this.’
We will pay Agents a salary of
S3O PER WEEK.
and expenses, or allow a- large commission, to sell ouy
new and wonderful mventiosn.
Address, M. WAGNER & CO., Marshal. Mich,
Bowling green savings bank, z
No. 33 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. '
OPEN EVERY DAY, FROM 10 A. M. to 3 P. M.
Deposits of any sum. from Ten Cents to Ten Thousand
Dollars, will be received.
Six per cent. Interest, free of Government Tax
Interest on New Deposits commences on the first
every month.
J HENRY SMITH, President
REEVES E. SELMES, Secretary,
EPW™ ItolS I V ’
driving
f~~~ ANTED -AGENTS (S2O PER DAY)
to sell the celebrated HOME SHUTTLE
SEWING MACHINE. Has the UNDEB-FEKD,
makes the “lock stitch” (alike on both sides),
and is fully licensed. The best and cheap-#
est Family Sowing Machine in the market, /
Address JOHNSON, CLARK & CO., Boston*
Mass.; Pittsburg, Pa.; Chicago, 111., or
Louis, Mo.
gg— 2- ■ <> i
ffialffrff.
A LARGE NUMBER OF NEW ANU
second-hand Billiard Tables, with our improved
Combination Cushions, which have been proved to b$
the most correct and durable cushions ever made. Speci-t
mens of our tables that have been in constant use foj;
many years may be seen in the principal hotels and sa*
loons in this city. Parties intending to purchase, will
find it to their interest to call an 1 examine our stocK* y
which is the largest and finest in the world. Boys BU*
Hard Tables. PHELAN & GOLLENDER,
No. 738 Broadway, New York,
Near Astor Place.
IWEHM PRIMW.
ALL DESCRIPTIONS
BONE BY
WILLIAM A. SMITH,
AT
No. II FRANKFORT ST.
OPEN DAyTJSP NIGJHTZ

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