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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, November 02, 1884, Image 8

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HUMOUS 6F THE POLICE.
The Commissioner Didn't Think Haggerly
a Constant Tippler-Not Drunk, but Ex
cited ; “Growlers’’ Got the Best of Him—
Not Proven Drunk, but Lucky he was not
Crushed to Death-A Suspicion not
Enough to Convct-lf not Permitted to
Reform, will Wind Up with Murder— No
Great Loss if the Fellow had Biown his
Head Off-Four Charges and Four Ex
cuses—A Notice.
lIAD THE SYMPTOMS OF INTEMPERANCE.
•• Intoxis.ation ” was the charge against Officer
Haggerty.
••I visited fcisn at his house, and found him suf
fering from the effects of liquor, in appearance,”
said Dr. McLeod. Ho had all the symptoms of in
temperance. He was lying on the lounge, stupid,
and there was a strong odor of liquor in the breath.
Five days afterward he we»s on duty.”
"I had been suffering from diarrhea, and my
private physician prescribed opium and brandy,”
said Haggerty. " This day I went to get » pair of
uniform pants, and, taking them home, I was taken
with cramps, and perhaps I took a little more of
the prescription than I should have taken. There
is the doctor’s certificate.”
The certificate stated that the private doctor pre
scribed opium and brandy for the diarrhea. Dr.
Waish was his family physician.
'• Didn’t you drink too much brandy in your pre
scription ?” asked Com. Matthews.
*' Pe: haps I did.”
•’ It took Ayo days to get over it !” said Dr. Mc-
Leod.
“ Why didn’t you have the police surgeon ?” asked
Com. Matthews.
"The family doctor was doctoring my wife, and I
asked him to doctor mo. 1 did not want to report
sick and Jose time.”
” You ’fore appointed W said the Commissioner,
musingly. “Forty-six days’ fine—less than three
days a year?’
“ I never was intoxicated in my life.”
“You don’t look like a drinking man, but I’m
Sorry you took the chances.” Then, addressing the
police surgeon: "Doctor, from your examination
that day, did you think that he was always drink
ing, bnt never quite drunk ?”
“ This man met with a severe accident two years
ago, and gave up heart,” said the doctor.
’• From his general appearance, you don’t con
fiider him what is called a drinking man?”
” No, sir,” replied the doctor.
“I should think not,” added the Commissioner.
HAD THE APPEARANCE OF INTOXICATION.
Ryan was so much under the influence as to be
Unfit lor duty, at 10:50 October 7th,
Sergeant Woodward said the charge was correct.
Ryan came in the station-house with a prisoner,
followed by a large crowd, which excited him. The
sergeant told him to let go of his prisoner. He
went in the back room; was not very quick at com
prehending, and highly excited, but he walked
•traight. Hie lace was flushed, and he was disin
clined to let go of his prisoner. The prisoner was
arrested for disorderly conduct. Monroe street, the
sergeant said, was a very rough neighborhood.
Ryan did not smell of liquor. Told him he had
been drinking, and he denied it.
Sergeant Walsh said, when he came down to the
desk he found Ryan excited, but did not see any
signs of liquor on him. He complained of his torn
uniform. He had a prisoner who had escaped by
the interference of the man he subsequently ar
rested. He felt very much injured that the ser
geant should discharge his prisoner without any
reason. A party of men, Ryan said, had been work
ing the “ growler ” in Monroe street. He arrested
one of the “growlers,” and this man interfered and
the "growler” escaped. The officer’s face was
scratched, his buttons were torn from his coat, and
he had lost his hit.
The officer said a citizen came and told him that
there was a gang of roughs at No. 33 Monroe street,
working the "growler,” and abusing everybody.
He went and dispersed them, and they came back,
and when he undertook to arrest one of them this
man, who had just come from Brooklyn, interfered
with him and the prisoner escaped. He arrested
lhe man who interfered with him.
" Why didn’t you hit them ?” asked the Commis
sioner.
“It was a very hard crowd.”
“I think I would have tried to club them,” said
‘.he Commissioner. " Why didn’t you hold him ?”
the sergeant was asked.
" I was satisfied he had made a mistake. He was
interfered with, but the wrong man had been ar
rested.”
NIGH TO THE "JAWS OF DEATH.”
Patrolman James Mulany, of the Fourth Pre
cinct, was charged with being so much under the
influence of liquor that he fell under a moving ele
vated car at the Twenty-third street station, and
was released from his perilous position by a con
ductor.
L. H. Downs, the gateman, said about the hour of
12:40 he saw the officer get off the car at Twenty
third street, and saw him fall between the car and
the platform. He jumped off the car and pulled the
officer on the station, where the officer stood a few
m nutes. Witness then jumped on the train and
left the officer.
“ Did ho seem to be under the influence of
liquor?” asked the Commissioner.
•• He appeared to have been drinking.”
“ What was the occasion of his falling ?”
“ I did not seo him before he fell.”
" He was in a dangerous position ?”
“ Yes, sir.”
“ What did he say when you rescued him ?”
“ he was much obliged Io me for what I did.”
“ Had you helped him up?”
“ I I)<> in tin knocked him down, and I caught him
up and stood him on his feet.”
He didn’t think the officer was intoxicated.
John Meyer, the brakeman, said when the officer
go. o.i ihe train at Franklin Square he saw nothing
t.<o matter with him. After the officer got off he
slipped or fell from the platform under the cars
when it ha<l just started to move, The train was
stopped. Did not think him drunk.
Win Simmons, middle brakeman, saw the officer
on th -t" n. ' nt r -uidn’t say whether the officer
was runk or sober.
Conduce, s.iw the officer standing against
the post after being rescued; couldn’t say anything
about his condition as to sobriety.
Au officer went as far as Eighteenth street with
Ryan, and saw nothing to indicate that he was
under the influence of liquor.
A second officer saw Ryan twenty minutes before
the accident, and he was then sober.
i wo other officers swore to his sobriety.
•• You are not satisfied he was intoxicated, Mr.
Downs ?”
“ No.”
"You have an impression?” said the Commis
sioner.
“Yes, that he had been drinking.”
“Do youthink that fall was from being intoxi
cated ?” •
“ That I could not say.”
"You didn’t notice him stagger 1”
“No, he wnnt down stairs all right.”
“We may have our suspicions, but the evidence
docs not sustain the charge that the officer was un
der the influence of liquor,” said Com. Matthews.
GIVE DURANGO A CHANCE.
At 12 o’clock M., September 23d, Officer Major,
Seventh Precinct, assaulted Daniel Duraugo with
his club, used indecent language, and did not arrest
him. So read the charge.
“ On my way through Cherry street to Catharine,”
said complainant, "this officer. Major, and this
officer here, both came behind me and assaulted
and struck me violent blows on the arms and legs
with their clubs. I was doing nothing when they
punched me on the eye and said, ‘l’ll kill you, you
bou of a .’ ”
" What is your business ?”
Grocer—“l own the store. I have been a pretty
had boy, but that is not to say I should be perse
cuted and clubbed, aud have no redress.”
“ Have you ever been arrested ?”
"Twice for assault, once sent to the Penitentiary
for one year. 'J he last arrest was seven months
ago. The other charge was disorderly conduct.
When you have been once in that line, the police
are down on you,” said Durango. "Me and my
ho friendshad a drink alter we left the theatre,
and were going to a friend’s house. We were neither
singing or talking loud. I was told these two offi
cers were laying for me, and this officer, Major,
struck me without provocation. He did not say a
word, but camo right behind me and said, • damn
you, goon.’ ”
The officer said he left the station-house at a
quarter past twelve. Complainant stood before a
saloon culling on some ouo inside a liquor saloon to
come out and he would lick him. When the officer
got within twenty feet of the store they all ran but
complainant, and he struck the officer. He would
have arrested Durango if he too had not run away.
"He is perjuring himself.” said Durango.
“Stop, you are hurting your case,” said Com.
Matthews.
“ I can't help it when I hear perjury,” said the
citizen.
•‘There were two of them,” said the officer,
“they went off. I could not get close enough to
Catch him, or I would have locked him up.”
" What were they doing ?”
"Making a noise, and threatening this man in hs
store, call.ng him out to Ji nt. I deny hitting him
with the ciui), but this man has threatened to get
square with me.”
" My arms and legs were black and blue from the
clubbing ?" said Durango.
*• Officer Sullivan and I arrested this man March
JJth,” said Major, " and he was put under $ 00 bail,
or get three months. He said when he got out if i e
had a pistoi be would shoot us. He ran down t
bis cellar to get a pistol, alter he was discharged
but a friend disarmed him. He was arrested fur
assaulting an officer and got a year. He was ar
rested for highway robb< ry by Officer Martial. He
took a man out in a boat and robbed him.”
“I never was before a jury on that,” said Du
rango.
••I don’t justify clubbing a man,” said Com.
Matthews, "There is away of trying people first
be'ore clubbing, unless th< y resist or are in the per
petrat.on of a crime. You say he struck you on the
bands and ia e. He says he didn’t. You have been
arrested s *veral times ? ’
••I want tuis man to leave me alone,” said Du
rango, .utt rrupting.
•• ies, as long as you behave yourself. But if he
catches you drunk or disorderly, or in the perpet ra
tio .of a crime, it is different. If you behave your
self as a citizen should, you ought to be given a
ch nee to reform.”
“He has got to leave me alone, or this won’t be
the end of it.” said Lurango, as he retired.
DIDN’T SEARCH HIS PRISONER.
Charles Edleston. a defaulter, was arrested, Ippked
up at Jeuerson Market, and while Levouon-iy, w ho
made the arrest, was outside waiting ti»e complain
ants to make their complaints, the prisoner shot
himself in bis cell. The officer w.ts charged wXb
negligence, tailing to search bis prisoner alter mak
ing tne arrest.
The officer said while the prisoner was in front of
the desk he “soun ed” his outside pockets and
examined his pis ol pocket and found no pistoi.
The arrest was for embezzlement. Prisoner, wuo
was a drummer for his firm, believed that he had
been cheated out of $lO. To get satisfaction, he
caused his firm to ship West S3OO worth of goods on
fictitious orders. The goods, of course, were re
turned.
The Commissioner said it would not have made
much difference if the fellow had blown his head off.
EQUAL TO THE EMERGENCY.
There were four charges against Hackett, of the
Sixth Precinct. The first was late at rod-call.
He said be was belated by the cars.
Tihe second charge was absence from special roR
&all for inspection.
T&e day previous bis sister got married. His sis
ter and her husband slept on, and ehe neglected to
$aU him, and he too slept on.
The third charge was failing to properly patrol.
He got a sandwich, and stood Ina ‘’ark orner
it when the ro--ds-n-.n must have puw-i
AnmrAiaik IQ the themust
have had a tough 'sandwich, as he was three-quar
ters of an hour washing it out of sight.
The fourth charge was sitting down on a door
step. The roundsman told him to get up or he
might get the piles.
Hacket said directly opposite was a big flat,which
was frequented by thieves aud street-walkers. He
sat down, not to be seen, to “ pipe ” them off.
“ Are you sure you hadn’t a drink this morning ?”
asked Com. Matthews, amused at the various de
fenses.
“No, sir.”
" I rather doubt it. Drink a little less and you
won’t be caught. That is my impression. Four
cases, and you a young man of good physique. This
is only taking money out of the pockets of your
family.”
ANOTHER WEAK EXCUSE.
Two hours absent from his post, was the charge
against Charlton, of the Eighth Precinct. He said
he was in the water-closet all that time,
VARIOUS DEFENSES.
Devourseney was found in the jewelry store No.
ICO Thompson street- He said he only stood at the
side of the door and handed in his watch to be re
paired.
Roundsman Dark said the officer was inside the
store and was leaning up against the counter when
he called him out.
Dugaue, Tenth Precinct, was charged with talk- I
ing too long to A citizen.
“ Three years on the forotf," Baid Com. Matthews,
“and fined thirty days.”
'* These complaints were partly false.”
A WARNING.
Clarkin didn’t relieve on his relieving point,
"From Sixty-sixth street to Sixty-eighth street,
on First and Second avenues, is very disorderly,”
said Com. Matthews. “ I live up there. lean see
that liquor stores are not properly closed; they are
open alter one o’clock and on Sunday they open all
day. That place has to be better policed or there
will be trouble. This is one of the most disorderly
places in the city of New York: I am giving you
notice that crime and disorder must cease up there,
or wo will send others there.”
OS FIRE DEPARTSIEiVr.
The past week has probably been the dullest one
at beadquarters since the organization of the pres
ent Fire Department. There have been no trials of
any negligent or delinquent officers or men, and
the only item of importance which we can give to
our readers to-day is the reception by President
Van Cott of the following highly complimentary
letter to the department:
Compagnte General Transatlantique, 1
New York, Oct. 27, 1884. J
To the Hon. Cornelius Van Cott. President of the
Fire Department of the City of New York:
Dear Sir: Permit me to take occasion of the late
fires upon our steamships, “Normandie” and
“ Amerique,” to present the thanks of the company
to your department for the prompt and efficient as
sistance rendered us on these two occasions. I take
particular pleasure in referring to Engine Company
No. 24, which, on the latter occasion, reached the
scene of the fire in complete readiness to turn the
water upon it in less than five minutes from the
time the alarm was given. Such discipline and
readiness deserve the h ghest praise,
I have the honor to remain, sir,
Your obedient servant,
Louis de Be bi an,
A NEW SPECIAL ORDER.
The Board on Friday, through Chief Engineer
Shay, issued the following special order :
Headquarters Fire Dep’t, City of New York, 1
Office Chief of Department, k
New York, Oct. 29, 1884. j
Special Orders, No. 122.
I. The following additions to G. O. No. 20, O. B.
C., series of 1881, are hereby promulgated, xto take
effect on receipt of this order, and the orders on file
will be altered so to read:
SPECIAL BUILDING SIGNALS.
Station No. 189—Location, Weber's piano works,
Seventh avenue and Seventeenth street. Assign
ment, same as for station No. 357.
Station No. 191—Location, Behr Bro’s piano works, '
Eleventh avenue and Twenty-ninth street. Assign
ment. same as lor station No. 432.
Station No. 192—Location, Gabler & Bro. piano
works, No, 212 East Twenty-second street. Assign
ment. same as for station No. 386.
Station No. 193—Location, Steinway’s piano works,
Fourth avenue and Fifty-third street. Assignment,
same as lor No. 564.
By order of Charles 0. Shay,
Chief of Department.
THE OCTOBER SALARIES.
The sum of $108,294,14, will be required to pay all
the expenses of the Department for the month of
October.
The publication of General Order No. 12, in last
Sunday’s Dispatch was an error, the same not hav
ing been formally promulgated to the Department.
33A.SE BALL.
The following are the official averages of the Provi
dence champions, as furnished by Secretary N. E.
Young. They are compiled in his usual clear and
concise manner. A perusal of the figures will be in- |
teresting if not instructive :
Q > > td *0
p <-* c < p 2
PLAYERS. f f i f g § £ f
Hinesll2 480 92~82 146 .304' 205~l?83
Sweeney 40 162 24 .60 49 .302 61 1.52
Sturt 90 377 80 .88 103 .273 123 1.36
Carrollll2 447 90 .80 117 .261 151 1.34
Dennyloß 430 57 .52 108 .251 165 1.52
Irwin 99 305 73 .71 97 .245 122 1.23
Gilligan 80 286 47 .58 70 .244 90 1.12
Radboum 85 352 48 .56 82 .233 95 111
Farrelll69 459 70 .64 101 ,220 125 1.14
i.adford 93 346 55 .57 70 .202 8$) 092
Bassett 21 76 9 .43 11 .144 15 071
Nava 32 112 10 ,31 10 ,689 10 0.31
BASE BALL NOTES.
Milwaukee will be represented by a Union Asso
ciation club next season. The players of the teams
have left lor their homes, and the majority of them
will again play here next season. Baldwin, Cush
man Porter, and Broughton have been signed. In
dications for next season are that the sa.aries will
be considerably smaller, and a great many players
will be open for engagement. The weak spots
in the club will be strengthened, notably first
base, third base, and short stop. The Directory
has had many offers from prominent players who
are desirous of playiug here. Although no con
tracts have been made with these men. some of
them will be signed the coming week. Porter has
been very successful as a pitcher, aud with better
control of the ball he will be able to show a far bet
ter record next season. Broughton’s play behind
the bat has been excellent; in fact, no more satis
factory work could be desired. It is proposed next
season to have a club that shall be equal to the best
of them, aud no money or pains will be spared in
making the selection of players.
The Toledo Baseball Club, of the American Asso
ciation, has disbanded. The club was backed by
President Colburn, who made a game fight to con
tinue the club through 1885, and a strong appeal
was made to the lov rs and patrons of the game in
Toledo to come to the rescue with financial aid, but
without success. At a meeting held by the direc
tors. the financial exhibit for 1884 showed net re
ceipts, after j.aying visiting clubs, of only a trifle
over SII.OUO The expenses were $21,000, of which
$15,000 were paid out to players, making a deficit of
$ o.vov. President Colcurn says that $6,000 was
con ributed by the directors oi the Toledo Associa
tion.
The Cincinnati Union club is already making
preparations to open the season of 1885 in a most
elaborate manner, aud will start with everything in
shipshape. The team wi.l be strengthened, and
new buildings will ’be erected this Winter. Presi
dent Tnorner has letters from first-class players.
However, five nc\v men will bo engaged; a first, sec
ond and third baseman, and another new battery.
The men the management have in view for these
posit.ous are first-class League and American Asso
ciation players.
The annual meeting of the American Association
will be held at the Grand Central Hotel December
12th, aud promises to be one of the most important
that has ever been held by that organization.
There is u movement ou foot to have but ten clubs
in the association next season, and they areas fol
lows: Metropolitan, Athletic, Baltimore, Brooklyn,
Pittsburg, tit. Louis, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Col
umbus and Louisville, beveral changes will be
made in the playing rules.
The attack made on the reputation of Mr. James
Jackson, who is organizing the New York State base
ball League, by an obscure sporting sheet published
n Philadelphia was unca.led for. Mr. Jack.-ou does
nut des.re to enter into any newspaper controversy
with this alleged baseball editor, as his character
aud reputation are so well known to the attacked
party tnat it is hardly worth while to make any
comments upon it.
The St. Louis Club stand a good show of winning
the American Association peunent in 1885, as.they
nave signed Mullaue, dark.ey and Poorman. Tho
former is considered one of the best pitchers in the
country. The club will be managed by Morton,
late of the Toledos.
The New York State Base Ball League will appoint
a committee to attend tho annual meeting of the
League American Association conventions, and will
ei de ivor to arrange a series of exhibition games for
next season.
Mr. Diddlar, the late Secretary of the Eastern
League, is wanted as manager by several League
and merican Association Clubs, out will not sign
unl< ss be can get absolute control and a salary of
SU,SJO.
Manager Watkins, of the Indianapolis Club, was
in Cincinnati during the ween, endeavoring to sign
several of the Cincinnati Unions players, but failed
to secure any.
Of the disbanded Toledo Club, Mullane, Welch,
Barkley and Poorm.m o«-«u eng. « uy tn- von
der-ahe St. Louis Club, of which Morton will be
the manager.
Thomas Luftus will again manage the nine, and,
as he is a ba.l player and a gentleman, he receives
the respect of the players and audiences at ail
ti nes.
The cities that have signified their intention of
becoming members of the State League, are, Syra
< use, Auburn, Albany, Utica, Binghamton and
Elmi.a.
The National Club, of Washington, claims the
iol owing players for next season: Lynch. Hines,
1 owell, McClellan, Baker, Fulmer, Gagus and Hal
pin.
The Baltimore Club has made more money than
any other club in the American Association, with
the exception of the tit. Louis and Philadelphias.
The Eastern League will not be in the field next
season, notwithstanding the announcement in a
Philadelphia local journal to the contrary.
The Union Club, o? Balt more, will not be in the
field next season, and Manager Barnie will have
the field all to himself.
Lucas will place a Union Club in Philadelphia
next season, which will be managed by George M.
Thompson.
The series of games between the Metropolitan and
Providence clubs were not a success financially,
Mr. Diddlcr. the Eastern League Secretary, Is
stumping Pennsylvania for Blaine and Logan.
A Western baseball club will be organized, and
« ill join forces with the Vuion Association,
has not been reserved by the Providence
Club, but will, however, play next season.
NEW YORK DISPATCH, NOVEMBER 2, 1884.
Miller has been released by Providence, and has
been signed by the Indianapolis Club.
The base ball averages of the National League
players will appear in our next issue*
' The Cincinnati Unions have failed to secure
Reilly, Corkhill and Carpenter.
The Cincinnati Unions will make four changes in
their team next season.
Gebhardt will sign with the National Club of :
Washington.
Corey, of the Athletic Club, will Winter in Provi
dence.
The Boston Union Club has lost $17,000 this sea
son.
A Cook fob the Tombs.—James Bi
ley, an aged cross-grained' codger, entered the Six
teenth Precinct Station-House drunk, and insisted
on being furnished with lodgings. They couldn't
persuade him to leave, so they locked him up. Yes
terday Justice Patterson gave him ten days.
The officer said the accused was a cook on the
Island.
jaßiley asked if he couldn’t ba sent to the Peniten
tiary where he belonged; ho would then be serving
[ hi’’time wjth pay; beside the mush at the Tombs
would kill him.
The court declined his request. Tho next ten
days the prisoners at the Tombs will have a "pro
fessional” doctoring there — soups aud mush.
Genuine cookery at the Tombs for once.
A Card. —To all who are suffering from
errors and indiscretions of youth, nervous weakness, early
•decay, loss of manhood, Ac., I will send a recipe that will
you, FREE OF CHARGE. Tins great remedy was
discovered by a missionary in South America. Send self
addressed envelope to REV. JOSEPH T. INMAN,
Biatiun D, Nsw York.
Tape Worm
IwFALLiBLV CtftED
wit'll TWO SPOONS or MEDICINE In two or three hours.
For particulars address, with stamp,
11. EICKHORN. No. 6 St. Mark’s Place, New York.
- ' gitblirationsi.
“THAT HOUSE OF MYSTERY, ’’
AND
“ THE LOVE AXD THE MARRIAGE/’
are the titles of two deeply interesting stories just com
menced in Part 43 (December. 1884) of THE NEW
MONTHLY DOUBLE JOURNAL,
“SOMETHING TO READ."
Fart 43 (December, 1884), now ready, consists of 120
LARGE PAGES OF NEW AND ORIGINAL STORIES,
with 33 HANDSOME ILLUSTRATIONS anti a BEAU
TIFUL COLORED PICTURE, forming the BEST AND
CHEAPEST Magazine ever published.
There are Five Long and Complete Stories; several
Short Sloi'ies for the young; also Fashions, Guide for
Homo Cdmforts, Ac., Ac.
Price 25 cents per copy. For sale by all newsdealers.
THE INTERNATIONAL NEWS COMPANY,
General Agents, 29 and 31 Beekman street, New York.
gulifiral.
Regular Republican Nomination
for .H ixn:
COURT OF COMBION PLEAS,
Henry E. Hawland.
Regular Republican Nomination
FOR
MAYOR,
Frederick 8. Gibbs.
FOR CONGRESS,
12TH DISTRICT,
Abraham Dowtev.
«/
INDORSED EY
TAMMANY HALL,
COUNTY DEMOCRACY.
IRVING HALL,
INDEPENDENT REPUBLICANS, and
GERMAN CITIZENS’ ASSOCIATION.
n ote: zeot?,
PATRICK DIVW,
FOR ALDERMAN,
SECOND ASSEMBLY DISTRICT,
FOURTH AND SIXTH WARDS.
FOR CONGRESS,
TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT,
COMPRISING ELEVENTH, SIXTEENTH AND EIGH
TEENTH ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS,
Hewitt.
(KlDtlting.
AND EXAMINE
Nicoll the Tailor’s
I.AKOE ASSOBTMENT OF
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
SUITITVOS
AND
OVERCOzkTINGS
FOR PRESENT SEASON.
CANNOT BE SURPASSED IN-
STYLE, FIT and DURABILITY.
Overcoats to Measure, from $lB
Suits to Measure, from ■ 20
Pants to Measure, from - 5
SAMPLES AND SELF-MEASUREMENT RULES
MAILED ON APPLICATION.
620 BROADWAY,
139 TO 151 BOWERY.
Post-Office Notice.
Letters for Europe need not be speciallj’ directed for
dispatch by any particular steamer in order to secure
B|.e.dy delivery at destination, as all Trans-Atlantic
mails are forwatded by the fa? test vessels available.
Foreign mails for the week ending N<n ember Bth, will
close (promptly in all cases) at this office as follows:
TUESDAY.—At 7:30P. M. for Vera Cruz. Mexico, per
steame • via New Orleans (letters must be directed
“ per steamer via New Orleans ’).
WEDNESDAY.—At 3:30 A. M, for Europe, per s. s. Servia,
via Queenstown (letters for Germany and France
must be directed " per Servia at 3:30 A. M. for
Germany, etc., per s. a. Fulda, v'a Southampton and
Bremen (letters for Great Britain and other European
Countries must be directed "per Fulda”); at 5 A. M.
for France direct, per a. s. St. Germain, via Havre.
THURSDAY—At 4:30 A. M. for Europe, per s. s. Adri
atic, via Queenstown (letters for Germany and France
must be directed “per Adriatic”); at 5:30 A.M. for
Europe, per s. s. llammonia, via Plymouth, Cher
bourg and Hamburg; at BA. M. for Porto Rico direct,
per s. s. Antillas; at 9;30 A. M. for Venezuela and
Curacoa. per s. s. Caracas; at 1:30 P. M. for Cuba and
Porto Rico, via Havana: and for Campeche, Chiapas,
Tabasco and Yucatan, Mexico, per s. s. African (let
ters for other Mexican States must be directed “per
African ’).
FRIDAY.—At 11:30 A. M. for Jamaica, Savanilla, etc.,
Grey town and Limon, per s. s. Alvo.
SATURDAY.—At 6:3 A. M. for Europe, per g. s. City of
Berlin, via Queenstown (letters for Germany, etc.,
must b n directed “ per City of Berlin”); at 7:30 A. M.
for Belgium direct, per s. s. Pennland, via Antwerp;
at 7:30 A. M. for Scotland direct, per s. b. Anehoria,
via Glasgow; at 9.30 A. M. for Newfoundland, per s. s.
City of Mexico; at 11 A. M. for Europe, per b. b.
Rhein, via Southampton and Bremen; at 1:30 P. M.
for Nassau. N. P., direct, and for Cuba and Porto Rico,
via Havana, per k. a Newport.
Mails lor China and Janan. per s. s. Arabic (via San Fran
cisco), close here November *4th at 7P. M. Mails for
Australia, New Zealand, Sandwich and Fiji I elands,
per 6. a Australia (via San Francisco), close here No
vember *lsth at 7 P. M. (or on arrival at New York of
b. u. City of Chicago, with Britiflh mails for Australia.)
•The schedule of closing of Trans pacific mails i® ar
ranged on the presum: t:on of their uninterrupted over
land transit to San Francisco. Mails from the East ar
riving ox time at San Francisco on the day of sailing of
steamers are dispatched thence the same day.
HENRY G. PEA* BON, Postmaster,
fotl OrriCl. NSW YOBM, N. J.» October a>*L 18M,
ORAND opera house?
Vn Reserved Scats (Orchestra Circle and fialconyh 50c.
ir Nov - 3 - ON ' E week only.
MAHNLES TUESDAY (Election Day) AND SATURDAY.
The complete Wallack Theatre Company in
MOTHS,
MOTHS.
V allack Theatre scenery and costumes.
Next week—EDOUIN <fe SANGER S Sparks Company m
A BUNCH OF KEYS, OR, THE HOTEL.
Park THEATRE, Broadway & 35th st.
5 EVERY EVENING, THIS WEEK.
Grand revival of Offenbach's
GRAND DUCHESS,
with a superior cast, including Emma Carson, Fanny
Wentworth, Hayden Lilia, Louie Nathal, W. B. Sevmour,
Kirtland Calhoun.. James Jones and CATHERINE LEWIS.
SPECIAL MATINEE, ELECTION DAY, AT 2.
AMERICAN INSTITUTE,
2D AND 3d AVES., BETWEEN 63d AND 64th STS.
NOVEL MACHINERY IN MOTION.
Hundreds of Inventions and Improvements for
HOMES, OFFICES AND WORKSHOPS.
Complete outfit as furnished by the Government to
OREEIjY RELIEF EXPEDITION.
GRAND CONCERT AFfERNOON AND EVENING.
Railways to entrance. Admission, 50c.; children, 25c.
NIBLO’S garden.
POOLE A GlLMOßEProprietors A Managers
Reserved Seats (Orchestra circle and Balcony). 50 cenU'.
POSITIVELY LAST WEEK OF THE 7 RAVENS.
DE COMA BROTHERS, THE GREAT LECLAIR, and
BEST BALLET ever seen in New York.
MATINEr.S WEDNESDAY and SATURDAY at 2.
EXTRA MATINEE ON ELECTION DAY.
EXTRA MATINEE ON ELECTION DAY.
Nov. IJ-KATE CLAXTON—“SEA OF ICE.”
STREET THEATRE, cor. 6th av.
LAST WtEk,
HABRISON ANi> GOURLAY
SKIPPED | THE LAUGHING CRAZE.
BY THE LIGHT EVERY EVENING AT 8.
OF THE MOON. I MATINEES WED. and SAT.
Popular Prices. A good seat for 50 cents.
MONDAY, NOV. K), FANNY DAVENPORT in Sardou’B
greatest success. FEDORA.
I PEOPLE’S THEATRE,
Bowcry opposite Spring street.
HARRY MINERSoIe Proprietor and Manager.
Reserved Sen-ts. 35c., 50c., and 75c.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
MONDAY. NOV. 3d,
blue and gray.
MUSEE, 23d st., bet. sth & 6th av.
_J OPEN FROM '1 TO IL SUNDAYS ITO 11.
TWO GRAND S YCRED CONCERTS TO-DAY.
New: “THE BARTHOLDI STATUE. 26 Ret in hight,’’
Lifelike Tableaux in Wax. Stereoscopes, Concerts.
Also, by special arrangement, and without extra charge,
Dr. Lynn’s London and Paris Mystery,
II ATJM
N. B.—Election Returns will be displayed in the Winter
Garden on Tuesday night.
ADMISSION TO ALL, 50 cts.; Children, 25 cents.
fIIHEA THE COMIQUE, 728 & 730 Broad’y.
JI HARRIGAN A HARTProprietors
GREAT SUCCESS! GREAT SUCCESS)
MONDAY EVENING. Nov. 3d,
Tenth week oi Mr. Edward Harrigan’s new farcical
comedv, entitled
INVESTIGATION.
New music bv
DAVE BRAHAM
MATINEES TUESDAY AND FRIDAY,
Madison sqare theatre.
EVENINGS at 8:30. SATURDAY MATINEES at 2.
THE PRIVATE SECRETARY.
A NEW FARCICAL~COMEDY IN 3 ACTS.
U NION SQUARE THEATRE,
SHOOK A COLLIER Proprietors.
THE GREAT LAUGHING SUCCESS,
FRENCH FLATS,
IJN 4 STORIES.
With the ft llowing people in the house :
Misses Sara Jewett, Maud Harrison, Nellie Howard. Mrs.
E. <i. Phillips, Misses hl a Vernon, Eloise Willis, Nellie
Wotherell; Messrs. J. H. Stod< art, John Parselie, J. B.
Polk (especially engaged) Jos. l. Whiting, J. B. Mason,
Owen Fawcett, E. L. Tilton, Julian Magnus, Geoffrey
Hawley, Ac.
• THE TENOR WAS BEHIND THE DOOR.”
yy' ALLACK’S LAST JHGHTS
NITA’ITfIRST. LAST MATINEE.
Tuesday, Now~Ll—A NEW ROMANTIC DRAMA.
GRAND CONCERT, under direction of JESSE WILLIAMS.
Last week of the charming burlesque artiste,
MISS MARIE LOFTUS.
Production of Operatic Selections from “The Lovely
Galatea” and ' The Rose of Auvergne,”
with LOUISE LESTER and great cast.
Mr. J. D. DYLLYN in his greet topical songs.
To-morrow, appearance of WAINRaTTA, KingoftheWlre.
mONY PASTOR’S THEATRE. 14th st.
JL GRAND HOLIDAY MATINEE ELECTION DAY.
TONY I TWO SHOWS IN ONE. THE GREAT
PASTOR’S LEADING COMPANIES OF HOWARD
OWN J THE WORLD. THE GREAT- ATHENEUM
GRAND I EST SHOW EXTANT. TONY SPECIALTY
COMPANY. I PASTOR AT HOME. COMPANY.
WILLIAM CARROLL AS THE BAI) B )Y.
THE TWO MACS, COMIC WONDERS, LIZZIE SIMONS.
ELECTION RETURNS read from the Stage TUESDAY’.
QRD AVENUE THEATRE.
O EVERY NIGHT (except Friday).
MATINEES ELECTION DAY AND SATURDAY,
JOHN A. STEVENS
in his successful drama.
UNKNOWN,
Supported by a Powerful Company.
ELECTION DAY—MATINEE at 2.
FRIDAY—JOHN A. STEVENS’ BENEFIT.
Monday, Nov. 19—Evans and Hovey—PARLOR MATCH.
V iIW YORK MUSEUM, No. 210
Lni MORRIS IJK KMaNProprietors
• LAST DAY
of the impenetrable Parisian and London mystery,
TO MORROW,
bv kind permission of the lion. P. T. Barnum,
THE &RUINAL “ AZTECS” OF ANCIEN T MEXICO.
Numerous o'.her living curiosities.
Stage performances hourly.
Admission to entire show 10 cents.
/GENTLEMEN WILL FIND GENIAL
xJT companionship by repeated visits to the entertain
ments furnished every evening during the week at tne
SANS SOUCI CONCERT GARDEN.
Broadway and 31st street,
by spec’alt.v artists of the first water, assisted by an or
cnestru entirely composed of solo artists, each one the
best, in Ifis line.
ProprietorTlloS. E. GOULD
ManagerFßANK LAWTON
CONCENTRATED BEAUTY.
Miss LILLIE MAY, Miss AGGIE MANSFIELD,
Miss J..NNIE MEAD, Miss ANNIE GRANGER,
Miss NEi.LIE STEEN, Miss FANNIE LAWSON,
Rubio Brooks, George Harley, Max Murphy,
Tim Holland, Johnny Fury, Fred Wilson,
And the poouiar Quartette,
PROCTOR, CRIBBiNS, FIELDS and PIPER.
FTIHEISS’ CONCERTS. 14th street.
B MESIC HALL and ALHAMBRA COURT.
CONCERT EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
T. HoCH, Emperor of all Cornet Virtuosi.
Mlle. NATAiJE DESIREE. French Opera Eouffe.
First aj p arance, SUNDAY, NOV. 9th, of
Mlle. ROSA MARLIANA,
Ard every evening until futrher notice,
Mite. ROSA MARLIANA.
mHEISS’ CONCERTS, 61 West 14th st.
B THEISS’S CONCERTS, 61 WEST 14th ST.
THEISS'S CONCERTS, 61 WEST 14th ST.
• EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
National theatre,
Nos. 101 and 106 BOWERY.
MR FRANKE. TNNNEHILL in
A DAUGHTER'S ('RIME.
HARRY G. RICHMOND in bis great specialty.
HENSHAW and TEN B OECK in Deception.
NOON and GENTRY. Bluck Theatricals!
Mr. FRANK HIL’ION, Contonionis. Act.
Admission- 35,: 5, 15 aud 10 cents.
Matinees. Tuesday, Thuisday and Saturday.
DIME MUSEUM, 298 Bowery.
Vjr Messrs. MEEHAN A WlLSONProprietors
MOKE ATTRACTIVE ADDITIONS.
Special Engagement of
COUNT ROSEBLD and BARON LITTLEFINGER,
33 yrs. old, 39 in. high. 36 vrs old, 39 in. high.
Last week of the QUICHE MARIMBA COMPANY.
Last week of THE DaMON LWARF.
Stage Penurmance in Theatorium Every Hour.
OPEN DAILY FROM 11 A. M. TILL 10 P. M.
ALY’S THEATRE.—Every Night, 8:15.
Matinees Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday.
| “Ti>E . OODEN SPOON.”
MATINEE "A Brilliant Succe.-s.”—Tribune.
ELECTION DAY. | “An Intellectual treat.”—Herald.
fITTH AVENUE THEATRE. Opera Bouffe.
ONE WEEK ONLY. MONDA .. NOV. 3, Bij. u Ope. a
Boufl'e Co. in ORPHEUS and EURYDICE. Special Matinee
on Election Day, (Tuesday) at 2. Mon. Eve , Nov. 10, The
Hanlons new grand spectacular pantomime Fantasnia.
BIJOU OPERA HOUSE, B’way near 30th
street.
THIRD I RICE’S BIG BURLESQUE COMPANY
AND MR. HENRY E. DIXEY in the
MONTH. | Spectacular Burlesque NIGHTMARE. ADONIS
CASINO. Broadway and 39th street.
Last week of Millocker’s c.iarming opera comique,
THE BEGGAR STUDENT,
By the McCaull Opera Comique company.
SATURDAY, NOV. Btb, NELL GWYNNE.
Every Sunday evening, Grand Popular Concert.
JACOIBIW
WINTER GARDEN,
100 Third Ave. and 134 & 136 E. 13th St
JACOB BLANKManager and Proprietor
The Finest and Best Family Resort in the city.
SUNDAY, NOV. 2,
Two Grand Sacred Concerts iafternoon and evening.)
CARL STREMBA S ORCHESTRA.
New Attractions every week. For this week: Mlle.
LUCIA SELADA, Mlle. ELSA ALBERTI, the WIENER
NACHTIGALLEN SINGERS, IGNATZ CONRADI, CARL
STREMBA, Violin Soloist.
All the instrumental soloists will appear at each per
formance. Matinees evary afternoon at 4 o’clock. En
tire change of performance every week.
LARENDON HALL, HAVING BEEN
handsomely decorated and remodeled, is now one
oi the largest and MOST COMPLETE BALL ROOMS in
the city. Also desirable Lodge and Meeting Rooms. En
gagement book now open.
HARRY HILL’S, to-night. The original
Black Diamond Quartette, with Dr. Byrd's “Old
Log Cabin Jubilee Band” in wonderful Negro Melodies.
Greatest free show on earth
at
H A I? i L LD,
NOS. 57 and 59 BLEECKER STREET.
Sparring Exhibition by 8 of tho most scientific pugilist*.
VOCAL CONCERT AND A GRAND BALL EVERY.
NIGHT.
Strict attention paid to Ladies and Gentlemen visiting
ARY ANDERSON,
NOW PLAYING
AT THE
Lyceum Theatre, London, England,
address all communications to
MR. HAMILTON GRIFFIN,
Box ®O, long Branch, W, J.
j gry
RIDLEYS’,
Grand, Allen and Orchard sts.,
NEW YORK
BROCADE SATINS.
75 pieces BROCADE SATINS, in 30
odd patterns, purchased at auction, the
same goods having sold this season at A ,
85c., and are now being sold elsewhere • tlvV©
at from 60c. to 69c. the yard. We place YARD,
a limit on these goods, and agree to sell
but twenty yards to each customer
50 pieces SATINS, all colors, 35. Elsewhere, 50c.
25 pieces BLACK SATIN, 59c. Worth 75c.
T-T A. T S.
5,000 doz. FRENCH FUR FELT IIATS, ] Z» 0
bound and unbound, real value being i
$1.23....,i..J .EACH.
WOOL FELTS, 24c., 43c. andssc.
VELVET HATS AND BONNETS, 59e. and 98c.
Fine PLUSH HATS, all shapes ami Colors, $1.98, $2.25.
GOLD AND SILVER CROWN velvet trims, 59c. and
98c.
750<10z. SCHOOL HATS, trimmed, 69c. and 68c.
Dress Goods.
2 Cases 28-inCb BLUE AND BLACK, AND BED AND
BLACK PLAID WINCEYS, 10c. yard.
3 Cases 2S-inch WALTON SUITINGS,.dark colors,(l2%c.
Worth 20c.
2 cases ENGLISH MOHAIR SUITINGS, 20c; cheap at
31c.
2 cases, extra fine, ENGLISH CASHMERES, in colors,
27 pieces, 48-inch, all wool, BLACK CASHMERES,
45c.; worth 65c.
23 pieces, 44 inch, BLACK FOULE, very tne, 59c. ;
worth 85c.
LADIES’ SUITS.
SEAL PLUSH SACQUES. largest assortment In the
city, $16.75 and $18.75.
LONDON SEAL PLUSH SACQUES, $35, S4O, $45;
worth SSO to $65.
SEAL PLUSH WRAPS, 52 inches long, $20.00; worth
$40.00,
BROCADE VELVET SHORT WRAPS, trimmed,
Chenille. $17.50.
FRENCH DIAGONAL CLOTH DOLMANS, trimmed,
Fur, $ 1 .50.
FRENCH DIAGONAL NEWMARKETS, tailor finish,
$10.50.
IMPORTED HEAVY JERSEY JACKETS, trimmed,
Braid and Astrachan, $7.50; worth $12.00.
TAILOR MADE CLOTH SUITS, $12.75 and SIB.OO.
FLANNEL CLOTH SUITS, all wool, $6.75.
MISSES AND CHILDREN'S OUTFITS, in large and
choice assortments.
WZIffTBB.UN'DEK.WEAB.
TWO CASES LADIES’ MERINO! QOp
TESTS AND DRAWERS, TRIMMED £OV.
SEAMS, FULL REGULAR CUFFS, THE
GARMENT.
GOOD VALUE AT 45c.
LADIES’ SCARLET MEDICATED WOOL VESTS AND
DRAWERS, SILK TRIMMED, TRIMMED SEAMS, FULL
REGULAR CUFF, AT 95c., WORTH $1.38.
CHILDREN’S SCARLET MEDICATED WOOL
SHIRTS, PANTALETTES, AND DRAWERS, 16 to 36
inch, at 15c. for 16 inch, and up according to size.
GENTLEMENS" FLEECE ANDI
STOCKINET JERSEY JACKETS.sin- . $3.50 up,
gle anddouble breasted, bladk and co
„ t , According to Size,
lots, making an excellent garment . J
SHOES.
LADIES CURACOA KID OPERA SLIPPERS, 79c.;
worth $1.25.
LADIES’ CURACOA KID BUTTON BOOTS, Spanish
Arch or Common-Sense Last, $1.72, worth $2.50.
MISSES’ AND CHILDREN’S SOLID LEATHER
SCHOOL SHOES, 97c., worth $1.25.
BOYS’ SOLID LEATHER SCHOOL SHOES, $1.48,
worth $2.
MEN’S EMBROIDERED OPERA SLIPPERS, 97c.,
worth $1.35.
To quote the many additional inducements to be found
in our 52 departments, seems unnecessary, since we give
our candid assurance that the prices throughout the
house are low, and that a visit to our Establishment will
not disappoint the shrewdest buyer.
Edw. Ridley &.Sons,
309, 311, 311 1-2 to 321
GRAIND STREET,
Nos. 5S to 70 ALLEN STREET,
Nos. .59 to 65 ORCHARD STREET.
Co
DRESS _GOODS.
We are offering an unusually fine se
lection of the choicest Paris Styles in
Angora and Astrachan Cloths, Plain and
Mixed Corkscrew Suitings, Carmelite
Serges, Fancy and Clan Plaid Scotch
Suitings, Striped Lincoy Skirtings.
Also, a fine stock of Plain wool Fabrics
in light and dark colorings, etc.
1 ptg 61.
guW.
Everett s hotel
AND GRAND DINING ROOMS,
ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN.
BARCLAY AND VESEY, BETWEEN WASHINGTON
AND WEST STREETS,
NEW YORK.
SAMUEL H. EVERETT,
Proprietor.
hotel
On Hie European Plan]
AND
DmißffG BOOMS,
Nos. 44 and 46 Chatham st.,
Ji ND
No. IO Centre street,
NEXT DOOR TO STAATS-ZEITUNG BUILDING,
Extra Entrance, No, 10 Centre st.,
NEW YORK.
A.
BROGAN’SI NEW YORK HOUSE,
No. 11l BOWEHY,
NMr «nad .treat, N.w You.
A CHOICE SELECTION OP
WtMSf Uyaon, Clgori, Boor, Ao>
KBXC. aaOGAN, Proprtatafc
X3L O R-Ttf’S
HOTRL,
NM. 11, 13 and 15 EAST BROADWAY.
FINEST appointed hotel on the east sidr
THE CHOICEST WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
GEORGS BECHTEL’S LAGER BEER.
A. HORN. Proprietor
■OEMW.Y 07 WIMAAM AND FEAsI tlTMUfr*
ARN HEIM’S.
A great portion of our time is devoted in selecting goods best adapted for style
and wear. Every piece of goods must stand the most critical test of examination.
We have a chemical process for testing all colors, and the least inferior in color on
fabric they positively cannot pass us to present to the trade. Our past record will
show the great caution we have taken in this respect, and what we recommend the
purchaser will find fully substantiated in the wear.
We pride ourselves on our ample facilities in turning out elegantly fitting gar
ments, thorough workmanship and the satisfactory ease and comfort taken in the
wearing.
We claim to have the largest stock, greatest variety, and most handsome, fash
ionable styles in Suitings, Trouserings and Overcoatings in New York.
Suits to order, .$16.00 upward.
Trousers to order, .$4.00 upward,
Overcoats to order, SIB.OO upward.
51.115 L ozr JSettizn. T a
All goods marked in plain figures and strictly
OXE P It! CE.
ARN HE IM’S
MAMMOTH MERCHANT TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT,
Nos. 190, 192 and 194 BOWERY,
CORNER SPRING STRFJ'T.
DO YOU KNOW
THAT
LORILLARD’S CLIMAX
FLUe TOBACCO,
With Red Tin Tag, is the best, ia the purest; is never
adulterated with glucose, barytes, molasses, or any dele
terious ingredients, as is the case with many other to
baccos ?
LORILLARD’B ROSE LEAF FINE CUT
TOBACCO
is also made of the finest stock, and for aromatic chewing
quality is second to none.
LORILLARD*S NAVY CLIPPINGS
take first rank as a solid durable smoking tobacco where
ever introduced.
LOR!LLARD’S FAMOUS SNUFFS
have been used for over 124 years, and sold to a larger
extent than ar y others;
the ®aW.
GRATEFUL—COMFORTING, -
EPPS’S COCOA.
BREAKFAST.
" By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws which
govern the operations of digestion and nutrition, and by
a careful application of the fine properties of well-selected
Cocoa, Mr. Epps has provided our break fast-tables with a
delicately flavored beverage which may save us many
heavy doctors’ bills. It is by the judicious use of
such articles of diet that a constitution may be
gradually built up until strong enough to resist every
tendency to disease. Hundreds of subtle maladies are
floating around us ready to attack wherever there is a
weak point. We may escape many a fatal shaft by Rap
ing ou) selves well fortified with pure blood and a properly
nourished frame.”— Civil Service Gazette,
Made simply with boiling water or milk. Sold in tins
only Ga lb. and lb.) by Grocers, labeled thus:
JAMES EPPS & CO,. HOM<EO / ATHI1 ’ chemists,
London England*
tGOLD MEDAL, TARIS, 1878.
BAKER’S
Breakfast Cocoa.
Warranted absolutely pure
Cocoa, from which the excess of
Oil has been removed. It has three
times the strength of Cocoa mixed
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar,
and is therefore far more economi
cal. It is delicious, nourishing,
strengthening, easily digested, and
admirably adapted for invalids as
well as for persons in health.
Sold by Grocers everywhere.
W, BAKER & CO., Drtester, Mass.
£feamlwm
Have you been to the white
MOUNTAINS ?—The popular route is now via
Steamers RHODE ISLAND or MASSACHUSETTS, ol the
PROVIDENCE LINE,
that leaves from Pier No. 29, N. R., daily (except Sun
days) atP. M.
Tourists can enjoy a delightful sail on Long Island
Sound and Narragansett Bay, arriving at Providence at. 6
A. M. The White Mountain Train, with Parlor Oars,
leaves Steamers’wharf (passengers have ample time Cor
breakfast on steamer and dinner at Plymouth), and runs
through to Fabyans without change, arriving early in ai
ternoon.
Send to
F. W. POPPLE, G. P. A., No. 177 West street, N. Y., for
SUMMER EXCURSION BOOK.
BOATS.
PEOPLE'S LINE,
DREW and ST. JOHN
Leave Pier No. 41 N. R., foot of Canal street, EVERY
WEEK DAY at 6 P. M.
N. B.—Tickets sold and baggage checked to all stations
on New York Central and We>t Snore Railroads. Regular
unlimited tickets of above roads are good for passage and
state-room berth; limited tickets for pa sage only.
W. W. EVERETT, President.
FOR BRIDGEPORT. —Steamer Rosedale
leaves Pier 24, E. R., at 3:00 P. M.; foot 31st
street. East River, 3:15 I’. M., daily, Sundays excepted.
gooo nbws
_TOJ, ADIES!
Greatest inducements ever offered
fig •ngM Now’s your time to get up orders for
gesggj?S[Tgsa our celebrated Teas anu
Coffees and secure a beautiful
Gold Band or Moss Rose China Tea
- Set, or Handsome Deeorated Gold
Band Moss Rose Dinner Set, or Gold Band Moss
Decorated Toilet. Set. For tYxll particulars address
THE GREAT AMERICAN TEA CO.,
P. O. Box 289.] 31 and 33 Vesey st., New York.
SPECTACLES— BRAZILIAN PEBBLES
and Double Vision Glasses, in gold, sliver and other
frames. Also, the celebrated Eye Preservers, so highly
appreciated at the Eye Hospital and the Eye InOimary.
being superior to any other article, giving ease and vigor
U> the weak, aud preserving the periect sight lor many
years. Prolessor FRAN KB, Oculist and Optician, Lecturer
on the Human Eye and Optics, accurately and ecienutto
ally adjusts these lar-famed spectacles to deiective visioue
aliusotoce. No- 310 Grand street, near Allen.
mrwitrWm r-mrtni ——
JFXAWOSTOOXST
3?iano ©overs,
PIANO SCARFS, TABLE COVERS,
STORE STOOLS, M USIC 'CABINETS
and STANDS, lar est assortment, best
goods, lowest prices.
F. NKPPERT, Manufacturer
and Importer, No. 390 Canal street,
near West Broadway, N. Y.
0 J. N. Lawrence & Sons,
FA No. 487 CHERRY st., cor. CORLEARS, N. Y.
Manufacturers of
TEN-P!N s AND BALLS.
Also ’ W<JOD ’ S PATENT LUSH’D BALLS.
feOSRi BOWLING ALLEYS BUILT
vWS/tW and REPAIRED,
and ever yth.ng
appert aj n i n g
thereto furnished.
JL. STROUB’S OY6TER BAY. No.
• 2339 THIRD AVENUE, between 128th and 12! th
sts., is furnishing oysters by tl e quart and hundred, and
is delivering on the half sheila, all hours. The proprie
tor, John L. Stroub, is the patentee of the Clam Roaster
which is used at most all hotels, oyster houses, and by
private families throughout the country with great satis
fact on. Tlrev are sold at all the house furnishing stores
throughout the U. S. 1 rincipal Depots: John L Stroub’s
Oyster Bay. 2369 3d av.; John L. Stroub’s Family Oyster
House, 93 Canal st.; .John L. Stroub’s Fiver View Hotel,
foot of 125th street. North River, New York City.
a ■ .. can do their own stamping for Em-
I A UISh \ broidery, Painting, etc., by using out
S muISLu artistic patterns. Th-y are ea.-ilv
tea arn B Bat w and quickly transferred to silk, ve -
vet, felt, plush, etc., and maybe a hundred tin •>
orer. Our ft: -cent Outfit contains 23 Useful and
Artistic work ng Patterns, as fo lows : One spray each
of Doub’e R ses, Single Roses, For.xet-Me Nets, Golden
Rod and Sum ic lea es, Daisies, Corner of Daisies to
match. Ferns ai d Butterflies, Water Lilies, one sh< et of
10 smaller Patterns o- Flowers, Greenaway ligutes. But
terflies, Beetles, etc., with your own initials, in handsome
2-inch letter, for Handkerchiefs, Towels, etc., with Pow
der Pad, and directions for Indelible stumping, ft »cents,
post pa d. Agents wanted. Patten Pub. Cu., No.
3:- W. 14th s»«, N, Y.
I New ■’scrap Pictures and Tennyson’s Poems mailed
LOO lor lOcts. jCAI'ITuL CARD CO., Hartford, Conn
PAIR of EYE GLASSES FREE. Card Co., Hartford,*Conn.
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR positively re
moved—instantly, permanently, naimessly, harm
lessly—by new and marvelous discovery, circulars free.
YOUNG & CO., Chemists, No. 69. Broadway, N. Y.
PENNYROYAL PILLS!!
T a n?r;CI I (CHICHESTER’S ENGLISH.)
i.filllKXl Theoriginid and only genuine.
IfiUfiUPj Ket er fail. Indi.peß.able to >0
■ LADIES. CUT THIS OUT, naming paper, and
i inclose 4 cents in stamps for particulars in Utter tent
■ you by return mail.
CHICHESTER CHEMICAL CO..
W 8 Madison Bqaare. PUlad'a, Fa.
fin tma a
KgSng Their Tricks and Devices exposed. Bend dtggjSL
for my mammoth circular, Beni REC to
wSSr AIIOHL Address, «r call is person.
Wm t Bsmmtn. JkvT«tau ▼
Co
WOOLEN DEPARTMENT.
A fine stock of Ladies’ Suiting Cloths
in the new shades. Ladies’ and Chil
dren’s Black and Colored Cloakings,
Serges, Satteen and Quilted Linings.
West of England Cloths. Cassimeres
and Doeskins for Dress Suits, etc. En
glish, Scotch and Irish Suitings, and
Overcoatings. “ Carr’s ” celebrated Mel
tons. “ Crombie’s” Elysians. "Brook’s”
Jerseye, etc.
cXj 1 6t.
etr.’
DOGS and their Skillful Treatment.-—
Dogs boarded, etc. Medicines for all diseases. Pre
pared lood for mocking birds. DOVEY, Doctor and Sur
geon. Office and private residence, 26 W. 4th st.,n. B’wayi
EXCELSIORS
THE JUSTLY CELEBRATED
AND WORLD-FAMED
ExcelsiorLagerßeer
MANUFACTURED BY
GEORGE BECHTEL,
ES STRICTLY PURS.
It is the FINEST FLAVORED
and MOST WHOLESOME Beer
before the public.
It is pronounced the BEST and
Purest Beer,
by eminent Physicians and Clicm
ists, and they recommend it for
INVALIDS as well as the robust.
It has received
from PHILADELPHIA, NEW
YORK, PARIS, SYDNEY, and
JAPAN tor excellence and pu
rity, aud
Stands Unrivalled!
AH communications should be addressed to
STAPLETON, STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.
There is a Beautiful Greve, Bowling
Alleys, Restaurant, &c., connected with the
Brewery, for the use of Pleasure Parties.
D. G.IUENGLING; Jr.’s
Exti-a Fine
Lager Beer,
ALE and PORTER.
BREWERIES:
128th STREET and 10th AVE./
NEW YORK.
BOTTLED FOB EXPORT. TUB TRADE, AND FAMI
LIES B¥
A- LI EBLER & CO.
ORDERS SENT TO THE BREWERY
PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
sgtSSl ©fit
SADIES’ FORMS
A natural, healthy, permanent DEVELOPMENT
given to such portions of the human form as may
have lost or never attained desirable dimensions.
Original, successful methods of self-treatment.
Results as sure and healthful as development of
muscle by athletic exercise—in compliance with
the same laws. Full explanations, references, etc.,
mailed in plain sealed envelope. Address Erie
Medical Co., Buffalo, N.Y.
F A K IP M and all suffering from
|HH Nervous Debility, Lost
Manhood, etc., 1 will send particnUrs of 1 n simp!e anjj
C (H JWL E E&T
I RUF UK E, VARICOCELE,
near 25th bt. Open day and evening. Advice rue.
Nervous Debility
S n 5E ES CURED New method.
S Holds any case with per-
fect comfort. City references of cures. Also varicocele,
without operation. PEET & CO., No. 501 Sixth ave
nue, cor. 30th st. Advice Free. Open day aud evening.
/CONFIDENTIAL CONSULTATION IN
lemale diseases by Mrs. GOLLAS, ladies’ physical
No. 301 58th st., cor. 2d uve. Takes in confinements.
Diseases of Men Only ; Blood Poison, skin
diseases, inflammation: obstructions bladder, kia-
©eys and other organs; weakness, nervous and generjJ
debility; mental, physical prostration, Ac, suc<<-sflW
treated and radically cured; remarkable curesperiectea
tn old cases which have been neglected or unskillrtfrlw
SLTo™ “u eVSiI I>i.ctk-e Dr. C.RINDL&
iSan b«tr«a eti> ud 7U> ...mm.
A WELL KNOWN AND HIGHLY REO
jX ommenued Clairvoyant is Mm*. HODMNG, Ne»
I AHU» corner SlxU avenue.

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