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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, April 12, 1885, Image 8

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W f Mice HUduw.
HUMORS OF THS POLICE.
A Drink Spoiled-Caught Coming Out—ln
vited In—Just One Before Relieved—ln,
But Did Not Wet His Lips— In the 1 em
perance Part of the Saloon—A Soda With
out Whisky—The Hallway Sneak Dr nk—
Ginger Without Jamaica—Cards, But no
Whisky-Whisky Scu.-s Made at the Point
cf a Revclvei —Only Half Guilty.
BEFORE COM. McCLAVB.
Tho ten complaints of being in liquor saloons,
show a wonderful fertility of the imaginative pow
ers in getting up an excuse. Reporters are put in
the shade,
CAUGHT GOBBLING IT UP.
Coles and Ellis, of the Twenty-first Precinct, were
in a liquor saloon in uniform, No. 161 Bowery,
March 31.
"It was an off day,” said Coles; “we had been to
inspection parade, were thirsty, and went in to get
a glass of lager. Before we got a chance to drink it
we were gobbled up.”
" That is a very improper thing to do,” Baid the
Coicmicsinner.
” 1 know it is* but it is a very common thing,” re
plied Coles,
Jfillis said he was guilty, and gave tho same excuse.
IT LOOKS BAP.-
Leonard, of the Twenty-third Precinct, in the
liquor store, No. 1,151 Third avenue. He was gu.
Ho said he went into the water closet; as he camo
out tho roundsman came in. He told Roundsman
Folk where ho was: he wasn’t in the bar-room. Was
in about ten minutes. i
•* I would ftpd some other place, said tho Commis
sioner. “Citizens seeing officers come out are very
likely to suppose they were in getting a drink. I <
would try and got some other place than a liquor
store. You can get it if you try hard.”
WAS INVITED TO DRINK.
Graham, of the Twenty-first Precinct, was in the 1
liquor store No. 730 First avenue. 1
•• Correct,” said the officer.
" What doing in there ?”
•’A gentleman asked me to fap- .. ,
•‘From an examination tn mg&l’- '
Commissioner, “<♦ ’ rr youf fbfcora, said the
on as you bad. Il you continue
Two wbn’l be long on the force.
' w ifc't'difcatloh—January 10th and Sep-
‘fs a’mistake; that is another officer's record
Vjf the same name—John J. Graham.”
"Well, you were in this liquor saloon?’
"I was out from 6 o’clock, on my feet all tho tiiP£,
and was tired. The gentleman asked mo, ftp** be
fore 1 had finished my drink the roundsman was in
on me.”
THE WINDING £o# THE TOUR.
Conroy, Twenty-first PreCifict, found in a liquor
Wtore, said it wan tfhe winding up of the tour. He
thought everything was right, and just stepped Id
to take & drink before turning in.
••You seo how it ih working. Hero are four men
Oharged with beiug in liquor saloons,” said the Com
naissioner, "and I don’t know how many more are
to come. There is nothing that I dislike more than
to inflict a penalty, but it must be done as a matter
Of discipline. You know it is a violation of tho ,
Allies. There is nothing more serious, and yet one
third of the charges are for being in liquor stores.
I don’t know why you can't be more careful about 1
these things. Here you are. but a year on the force,
and five charges have been made against yon.”
NATURE’S SUMMONS.
Martin, Twenty-first Precinct, was in the liquor
Store at Thirty-seventh street and First avenue.
"What is your explanation ?” asked tho Commis
sioner.
"I bad to go to the water closet, and there was a :
man there and I came out. I told the roundsman
when I met him at the door.”
DIDN’T SIT DOWN.
Sims denied being in the liquor store, No. 17
Jackson street. Roundsman Deevos said he was.
On the morning in question, at 2;30, he saw tbo
officer near the door; this was across tho street
from his post. He went back and disappeared.
Deeves wont over in the place through the bar, and
found the officer sitting with citizens at a table,
and a young man waiting on them.
•• This was a liquor store ?”
" Yes, sir. I said this is a nice place to bo, get on
post. Ho ckme in the bar-room and I said I want
you to report a violation of the Excise Law. Ho said
I don’t see it. I said the bar is exposed. There
were more than two in there. He reported it, but
uaid he saw no violation of law. He left his post to
report the violation of the law, and saw none he
said. His post was the opposite side of the street.
‘The captain told him he, the roundsman, had no
right to look at the entry on the blotter.”
The officer said he had been in the Thirteenth Pre
cinct ten months, and was frequently on excise
duty on Sunday, in citizens clothes.
•‘ This was not Sunday,” said the Commissioner.
"I saw two men go in; it is a restaurant in the
rear. I found the men drinking coffee, and the
roundsman came in.”
" This was on another officer’s post?”
•• Yes, sir.”
•’ Did you sit down ?”
"I did not sit down or drink anything. I reported
the case to Captain Petty and he told me to get out
a warrant. I did, and Justice Gorman discharged
him. I went in because I did not see the man on
post.”
.Several witnesses swore that the officer did not
ait down at the table.
THE SECOND CHARGE.
A second charge arose out of the first. After mak
ing the arrest on a warrant, instead of taking his
prisoner to the station-house to have his pedigree
taken, he took him direct to court.
The officer thought in making the arrest on a
warrant, he was acting as a court officer, and neg
lected to first take his prisoner to the station-house.
It was the first time he had mado an arrest on a
warrant.
THE AUCTIONEER TREATED HIM.
Smith, of the Twenty-second Precinct, was in the
liquor saloon, Fifty-second street and Eleventh
avenue.
"The water closet, I suppose,” said the Commis
sioner.
"There was an auction sale next door,” said the
officer, "and a number of boys collected. I kept
them away. When they got through tbo auctioneer
asked me to step inside, and I had a soda.”
"Nothing in it ?”
" Nothing.”
BETTER WITHOUT A DEFENSE.
Bradley, of the Twenty-second Precinct, was found
in the hallway leading to a liquor saloon. He de
nied being in the saloon.
"He could have gone through the hallway with
outgoing in the saloon?”
" Y-c-s,” said the roundsman.
Bradley called a witness who saw him in tho hall
way.
“ How did you come to see the officer ?” asked the
Commissioner.
"I was serving a party in the hallway with li
quor.” /
Ginger and Water.
Dalton, of the Twenty-second Precinct, admitted
being in a liquor saloon. He was subject to diarr- ’
hcea, and went in and told the bartender to give
him some ginger and a little water.
“That isn’t an ordinary drink,” remarked the
Commissioner. “ Men are in the habit of putting a
little brandy in it.”
"They say it’s better with water. You can only
got so-called brandy there; it is a lager beer saloon.”
"He said he went in for a drink of water,” said
the roundsman. "It wasn't without color. When
1 asked what he had drank he couldn’t tell me.”
"I couldn’t speak, my mouth was burned,” said
tbo officer.
EUCHRED.
Kennedy, Cahill and Lawrence, of the Twentieth
Precinct, were found in the back room of the liquor
saloon. No. 460 Eighth avenue, sitting at a table
with coats and hats off. Cards wero before them,
and the roundsman entered and euchre! them.
They should have been out on patrol duty.
"Well, what were you doing there?” asked the
Commissioner.
" 1 answered an alarm rap,” said Kennedy; “Law
rence was chasing them that had been trying to
rob Roe’s packing-house. While chasing them in a
big hallway wo got our clothes all soiled, and went
in to scrape off the dirt. We were in tbo act of
coming out when we mot the roundsman.”
" What did you see ?” asked the Commissioner of
Roundsman Campbell.
"They were in their shirt sleeves, sitting down,
■with a pack of cards before them.”
"You were playing cards, as a matter of fact?”
eaid the Commissioner.
"We ain’t charged with that,” said Kennedy.
"I don’t believe in this long cross-examination to
gat at the truth, but I am satisfied that you were in
there playing cards.”
The other two pleaded guilty, and made no ex
planation.
THE AGONY PILED UP.
Gardner, of the Eighth Precinct, had three and a
half blocks for a post. Sergeant Christie was an
hour and a half going over it looking for him. The
officer said he was in a water-closet.
There was a second charge—coming out of a livery
stable. The sergeant asked him what he was doing
there. Gardner said, "You can’t bulldoze me.
Yon took me out of the ranks this morning when I
was as sober as you,” thus collecting a crowd.
The officer said a fire broke out at No. 96 Sullivan
street, and he put it out with a pail of water, and
remained there some time. Pulling bis fire-key
out, he pulled a five-dollar bill, and dropped it
there, and went back to look for it. Ha denied
using the language charged. When accused of not
patrolling, the sergeant called him a G
liar. He returned the compliment. The sergeant
raised his stick to strike; he put his up, and said
two could play at that game. It was the sergeant
liimself that collected tho crowd.
Two citizens corroborated tho officer.
" Absent from reserve roll call was the third
charge. He said he took the chance to go home to
see his family.
He told the sergeant when he came back that he
foil asleep.
The fourth charge was preferred by Roundsman
Hyland, who couldn’t find him. The officer said
he thought he bad to take in Renwick street as part
of his post, and being there the roundsman missed
him.
MADE MAD BY ERYSIPELAS.
The defease of Quigley was curious. Captain
Hedden’s information reached him in the shape of
a rumor, that on March 6th the officer had entered
the liquor saloon of Thomas J. Ward, No. 17 Mont
gomery street, with a woman, called for drinks for
the two, and drew his pistol on the bar-tender.
John McCormick, bar-tendet at No. 17 Montgom
ery street, said that on March 6th, the officer, with a
woman, came in his place, and ordered two whisky
sours. This was between six and seven in the
jnorning. He told Quigley it was against the rules
of tho house to sell to ladies. The officer put his
Land in his pocket and drew out a revolver, and
presented it at his head, and said, "Now, you son
of a , make these sours that I ordered.” When
they wero made, he said, " Make a port wine for the
laly.” When they wero made he put his pistol
back in his pocket, and the man and woman drank.
••Did you ever see the officer before ?” asked the
Commissioner.
•• The evening before be had drinks. Ho was in
uniform.”
" How long was ho in the place?” asked counsel.
"About five minutes.”
"How long did be have the pistol pointed at
you ?”
•• While mixing tho drinks.”
••You made a charge against him at the police
court of intent to kill?”
" Yes; the Justice hasn’t rendered bis decision in
that case.”
The defense called Dr. C. T. Wbybrew, who said
that he was called in on the 6th of March, the day
of this occurrence, and found officer suffering
from erysipelas of tbo brain and in a high fever. He
was lying in bed; his face was mottled and purplish.
The doctor bad no doubt of the officer being out of
his mind from this disease. The disease had so far
advanced that he must have been in the same con
dition on tho 6th and 7th.
“ Drawing a pistol on the 6th, would you consider
it was from the disease ?”
"He was not competent or responsible for his
acts on the 6th.”
Dr. George Vandegraff, of No. 277 Henry street,
visited the officer at his house on March 6th, at
seven o’clock. He had all tho symptoms of erysip
elas, and was delirious. Then the police surgeon
had been sent for. His face then was swollen. He
would not have been responsible for his acts on the
morning of the 7th.
Dr. Satterlee, the police surgeon, saw the officer
on the 6th of March at his house. He was out of
his head, and was so for several days. He attended
him till the 26th, and ordered him on duty on the
27tb. He was two or tljre© days delirious. He
didn’t know the doctor. The mail fras suffering
from a severe attack of erysipelas. He was Dot
responsible fop big on the 6th or 7th, ho was
entirely out of his head.
Ihe officer said: "I bavo no knowledge of tho
occurrence. I don’t recollect going in that store,
of pulling a pistol, of saying anything to tho bar
keeper; have no recollection of going in the store,
or going out of it, or what transpired on the morn
ing of the 6th.”
'■ you ever have an attack of erysipelas before
this ?” asked the Commissioner.
“Two years ago.”
“ How did it affect you then ?”
•* la the same way.”
AS BAD AS DRUNK.
McCauley was found asleep in the street-cleaning
department.foot of East Sixteenth street, by Rounds
man Manniere. When he got up he said to the
roundsman he was tired.
Tpe officer said at 2:30 A. M., he got to the foot of
Eas? Sixteenth street, and went in to get a drink of
water. etable take care of the office
and went to go* Water.
“ What has that to do with falling C leop ? . .
"When he was gone I foil over in a sort of a
doze.”
NOT ON HIS POST.
feet fr '*'>dgc» Tnere wati a, drunken man twelve
CB ,- it, Rafferty refused to take him in be-
H was not on his post. When the roundsman
Cd a him to take him in, he told the roundsman to
take him to h .
The roundsman, with the help of another officer,
took the man in.
HALF IN.
O’Connell had one leg out and one log and head
in a grocery store. Ho held that was not being in
the place,
OUR WmßTfflT.
TRIALS AND JUDGMENTS-SICK
FIREMEN—NOTES.
The medical officers of the department reported
last week that they had on th-eir lists the names oi
fifty sick and disabled officers aud men.
The following were the trials of the session:
A FIGHT.
Fireman Gustave Fuhrman, of Hook and Ladder
Company No. 6, was charged with being engaged
in a fight with Fireman Luke McSherry, of the same
company, on the 3d inst.
Fireman Luke McSherry, of Hook and Ladder
Company No. 6, was charged: First—with being un
der the influence of liquor; second—with refusing
to clean the forward part of the apparatus when so
ordered by the foreman; third—refusing to leave the
apparatus floor when the captain ordered him to do
so; and fourth—with being engaged in a fight with
Fireman Gustave Fuhrman of the company.
Both cases were laid over until next Wednesday,
for the reason, as stated, that McSherry’s wife was
in a dying condition.
NEGLECT OF DUTY.
Fireman Timothy Sullivan, of Engine Company
No. 7, was charged with failing to report for duty
on tho apparatus floor and not going with his
apparatus to a fire; and again, with being ab
sent without leave for one hour and thirty
live minutes; these offenses being committed—in
the first instance on March 20th, and in the last on
March 25tb.
Sullivan pleaded guilty, and said that he had been
on duty for a long time before these violations of
the rules ot the board took place. Ho was only two
seconds behind time. Ho went to the fire on the
water tower, and took the pipe in the cellar.
Com. Purroy—“ You are guilty on all of these
charges, ain’t you ?’’
Tho accused answered, "Yes, sir.”
Com. Purroy—"Well, that’s all; return to your
company.”
Sullivan was then fined tho loss of ten days pay.
Fireman Lawrence Reynolds, of Engine Company
No. 18, was charged with being absent without
leave, and failing to report for' duty on the appara
tus floor on March 31st, ult.
He pleaded guilty, and said that on the night pre
ceding the offenses being committed he had been to
three working fires, and had had but little sleep,
and then came the annual inspection, after which
he went to sleep. When he woke up he got a boy to
get him a sandwich. When the "station ” came in
be was in front of company quarters awaiting
arrival of the boy with the sandwich. He was sor
ry for what he had done, but he did not go away
from the engine house, and if the alarm had been
In their district he would have been on hand to go
with the apparatus to tho fire.
The Board then fined him the loss of two days’
pay.
Engineer Thomas Walker, of Engine Company
No. 30, was charged with failing to keep the water
on a proper level in the boiler of the Fifth Battalion
spare engine, thereby causing the tubes to collapse
and the boiler to leak so as to extinguish the fire in
the furnace, and throwing the engine out oi service
—this occurring on March 27th.
Captain John Castles, who has charge of the re
pair shops, testified that the engine came to the
shops in a useless condition; some of the tubes
were collapsed, and the others were scorched, and
the apparatus required a new boiler, and so he rec
ommended. The engineer was responsible for the
supply of water to the boiler, aud that was what
caused the whole trouble. The engine was an old
Amoskeag one, and had been in service for eighteen
years, and when it was brought to the shop he
made a thorough inspection of it.
Mr. William O’Rourke and several other machin
ists of the repair shops, corroborated Captain Cas
tles’ testimony.
Walker, in his own behalf, said he had been work
ing the engine at the fire; he started it, and it
worked first rate for an hour and twenty minutes;
it worked at 80 lbs. pressure; the tubes were leak
ing at the beginning of the fire, and the accident
occurred when be was ordered to increase the press
ure to 125 lbs.
Assistant Engineer Grace said he screwed down
the safety valve, and the engine was leaking be
fore it went to work; the fire was black from the
leakage, and the engineer (Walker) said, " That’s
all right, it will soon take up.”
The Board believing that Walker was not to blame,
dismissed the charge against him.
Fireman Charles Sheridan, of Engine Company
No, 29, was charged with failing to report for duty,,
and not going with tb© apparatus to a fir© on
Mgrch 31st.
He pieiued guilty, and said he had been troubled
with a rheumatic affection; he had taken some
■ warm baths, which made him sleepy; he went to
bed and fellasleep; he did not feel well, ana waS
not a drinking man.
He was found guilty, and fined tho loss of five
days’ pay.
Fireman William J. Mulhare, of Hook and Ladder
Company No. 3, was also charged with similar of
fenses, thoy being committed on March 31st.
He pleaded guilty, and said ho was tired out; he
went to bed and got asleep, and overslept himself.
Nobody called him to respond to the alarm, and he
therefore slept through tho fire.
Captain Meagher stated that the accused was not
under influence of liquor, and he was generally
a
Mulhare was then fined two days pay.
A SERIES OF CHARGES.
Fireman William Farrell, of Engine Company No.
47, was charged, first, with failing to remove the
ashes from the heater and other stoves in
the quarters of the company, and leaving them in
good order when relieved from house-watch on
April 4th; second, using direspectful language to
fireman Edward Curley on the same day, and third,
with failing to discontinue the use of such bad
language when ordered by Captain McCormick.
Ho pleaded not guilty to the charges. Engineer
Carolin testified that he heard loud voices in the
house, he thought there was some altercation be
tween Farrell and Curley down stairs; tho foreman
wont down stairs to ascertain tho trouble. Farrell !
said he removed the ashes down stairs, but not up
stairs in the stoves there.
Curley testified he went down stairs to look at
the fire, and asked if the boater had been fixed, and
ho had a.dispute with Farrell as to who should fix
the fires. Farrell then abused the witness and
called him a " , and a sucker; he
was nothing but a sucker.”
I The witness removed the ashes from the heater
and the captain came down stairs, and tho witness
generally did Farrell’s work, and h© said to Farrell,
“Now, you go away from me, I am attending to my
business.” Had never had any trouble with Farrell
before.
Fireman George Davis testified ho was at home
eating his dinner when tho row took place, and when
he returned to company quarters Farrell was clean
ing out the stoves; did not hear any disturbance
between Farrell and Curley, nor any improper lan
guage used; heard them talking loudly, that was
all.
Farrell, in his own behalf, said he made some re
mark to Curley about cutting up hay, and at that
timo he could not attend to the heater nor tho
stoves. Witness said he was a little " hot-headed”
and excitable at times; Curley and he had had
some ugly words down stairs; he could not swear
that he did not use the words imputed to him, but
he did use the word "sucker,” and could not remem
ber exactly what language he did use; he and Curley
were both "hot-headed.”
Captain McCormick testified he heard the wrang
ling down stairs and said: “W’hat’s the matter,
can't you fellows agree. Now, I want this thing
stopped, and stopped now, too.”
Farrell said: "Well, Cap, it is stopped.”
The captain said: "H—l! if you don’t stop it, I
will send you before the Commissioners.”
The captain then in the most positive
manner that Farrell did use the words named in the
complaint, to Curley.
Com. Purroy—"Well, Captain, the witness Davis
swears that he did not hear any bad language used
by Farrell. Now, I want you to ventilate this mat
ter, and if you find that Davis or any other of the
witnesses have testified falsely here to-day, you
must prefer charges against them. Now, remem
ber, Captain, I expect to hear from you in this mat
ter. I don’t want any false swearing upon the part
of a fireman to shield one who is on trial.”
Farrell was then fined ten days’ pay.
NOTES.
The Board, next Wednesday, will open proposals
and award a contract for building a new house for
the department on the northeasterly side of Tre
mont avenue, between Vys© street and the South
ern Boulevard, for Engine Company No. 45.
Commissioner Purroy, the treasurer of tho Relief
Fund, submitted a report on Wednesday to the
Board, showing that for the quarter ending March
31st ult., the receipts were $8,672.29, the disburse
ments $22,346.95, and th© balance on hand was
$453,929.25.
A few days since the widow of the late Fireman
William D. Bliss, of Hook and Ladder Company
No. 5, received from th© " Life Insurance Fund ”
i the sum of SI,OOO.
On last Monday night, Hook anti Ladder Truck
No. 4 ran into a hole in front of the building No. 8
) West Fifty-sixth street, and the apparatus was up.
set, throwing violently to the ground Firemen Wil
i liam T. Lear and Thomas Conklin. They were both
taken to St. Luke’s Hospital. Lear had his collar
l bone broken, and Conklin received several severe
' injuries.
' On last Sunday morning, while in the quarters of
j Engine Company No. 18, located in West Tenth
NEW YOBE Disr ATCH, APRIL 12, 1885.
street, near Greenwich avenue, the Dispatch fire
reporter was informed by a fireman, who was tem
porarily detailed there for duty, that "this com
pany has a representive from every county in Ire
land.”
On tho eighth day of October last, the Board dis
missed the service Fireman Robert L. King, for be
ing drunk while on special duty at the Star Theatre
four nights before.
King took his case to tho Supreme Court, which
last week rendered a decision reinstating him to
bis former position, and substituting for his sen
tence of dismissal, suspension from pay and duty
for six months, and the Commissioners, regarding
this as an outrage, propose to get a stay of proceed
ings, with a view of carrying the case to the Court
of Appeals.
Fireman Dixon McQueen, of Engine Company No.
51 (the fire-boat Zophar Mills), has been comifli
mented for his bravery in saving lives.
Station No. 224, special building signal, is th© Ly
ceum Theatre, located on Fourth avenue near
Twenty-third street, and is the sanio as Station No.
38L
The following apparatuses ar© now in th© repair
shops either undergoing repairs or being rebuilt:
Engines Nos. 10, 24, the second company of Engin’S
No. 27; Hook and Ladder trucks Nos. 4, 19 and 12;
the water tower; Engine Company No. I’s tender,
and also Engine Company No. 2’s tender.
VETERAN FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION.
At a meeting of th© N. Y. Veteran Firemen's Asso
ciation, held at Clarendon Hall, on the evening of
March 30th, 1885, the following gentlemen wero
elected officers: Goorgo W. Anderson, President;
John Moller, Vice-President; James F. Wenman,
Treasurer; R, Sweeney, Recording Secretary; J.
H. Financial Secretary; Henry Jones, Ser
geant-at-Arms; Trustees, Fred. A. Ridabock, A. C.
Hull, Eugene Ward, Abraham Slaight, JohnTuomey,
Henry Gunther, George T. Patterson, Edward Bon
nell, Patrick Dailey, Thomas Barrett, William Or
ford, Richard Evans, Daniel Garvey, Daniel Quinn,
Thomas Cloarey.
BROOKLYN FIRE NOTES.
RECEIPT CF STORES — TRANSFERS — SICK —
A CCI DENTS—GOSSIP—ETC.
There appeared to be plenty of news at, and in
the vicinity of headquarters last week, from which
we cull tho following:
The reticence as to the date of tho examination of
foremen, to fill tho position of District Engineer,
and of privates to be appointed as foremen, has for
months (afforded a general topic of conversation
throughout the entire department. That those up
on and behind the throne, so to speak, have good
and sufficient reasons for withholding any informa
tion wLicli might indirectly, perhaps, tend to
weaken the efficiency of the force, must not be ’ xO gt
slgiit of for a moment. That in due t g e 80 .
lection to fill both positions will bq j s 86 1 K
evident, and will occur in due events. Thati
tho action of many, aspirations aro as ridkju
lous as their loudly fitness to fill any
vacant positiq fl bpen upon tho force, is notv well
known i s generally condemned. None, wo von
turq co g a y, tut tried and true men may hope to
Bttcceed in obtaining promotion at tho coming ex
amination; at least, so we aro informed, and from
what souroo tho Dispatch is not in honor bound to
reveal.
Captain Murphy, with his assistants in tbo Equip
ment Department, has been busily engaged during
the past week in receiving and storing supplies for
general use. It i but just to here remark that the
executive ability of the genial captain is recognized
by those who aro even outside of the force.
This column, it must bo remembered, is not in
tended ae a medium for the ventilation of malicious
ideas. Tho Dispatch is not depending upon reports
from private individuals "who have a bone to
pick,” and the reporters thereof know that five and
one are six. Draw your own inference, gentlemen.
We regret to state that McNamara, of Truck No.
3, owing to a breakage of the running gear of that
apparatus, was seriously injured at tho call 234 last
week. Mac, however, is not easily knocked out,
and will, we trust, yet be able to waft around the
corner to see a friend.
A visit to the new engine houses was made this
week, and it is safe'to say that they will each be in
perfect order and ready lor occupancy ere long.
The telegraph force will connect tho wires the mo
ment the house are accepted by the city. Consider
able fault is found, however, with the position of
the stalls, which, it is predicted, will be altered
upon the arrival of the company with apparatus.
In tho suit for damages against tbo De Kalb Ave.
R. R. Co., for injuries received by being thrown
from the tender of Engine No. 9 while attending a
fire, Boerum, of that company, has consented to
compromise, it is said, for the sum of $75. Dirt
cheap. W
Much complaint is now indulged in over the fact
that one of the recently appointed firemen is a resi
dent of Jersey City. This is strange, too.
[ Thirteen sections of damaged hose were la week
shipped to the American Rubber Hose Company at
Boston for the purpose of being re-lined.
Silk, of Truck No. 3, has been permanently de
tailed to headquarters, and will, it is said, occupy
quarters assigned him, nightly. Stoney deserves
recognition, as he is one of tho most worthy mem
bers of the force.
Malone, of Engine No. 19, has boon assigned to
duty with Engine No. 6.
The request of Friel, of No. 17, and Shaughnessey,
of Truck No. 2, to be reinstated as Foremen has not
as yet been granted, and it is feared that their suit
will be unsuccessful.
" Incendiarism seems to be upon the increase of
late, and the miscreants who set fire to buildings
should meet a worse fate than Mills, the wife mur
derer,” thus spoke a patrolman to the reporter last
week. We know for a fact, that were it not for the
foresight of District Engineer Dale, and Foreman
Duff, of Engine No. 3, a holocaust might have fol
lowed a recent tenement fire in the Sixth Ward.
The action of the Assembly Cities Committee re
garding the abolishment of the Fire Marshal’s office,
will be made known during the coming week. It is
said that the duties of the latter have been assigned,
in the coming future, to one of the most popular of
the present fire force.
We happened to pass in our perigrinations the
Dean street house recently. The boys are no doubt
efficient in the capacity in which they are employed.
That No. 19 can discount any Engine Company in
the W. D., is denied. Money now awaits the man
who can rouse from a deep sleep, dress and repair
to the floor in less than two minutes. A young
lady being asked by her beau what she thought of
the latters collar replied, that it reminded her of a
white fence surrounding a lunatic asylum. Nothing
personal remember.
REPAIRS.
The employees at the repair shop do not to
have the time for which they receive pay, squan
dered in the endeavor to help inventors. The in
troduction of oil, therefore, is wholly condemned.
Engine No. 13, whose hind axle was recently
broken, was, on Friday, brought to the shop for re
pairs.
Truck No, 1, after being slightly repaired, was re
turned last fweek.
Engines No. 11 and 12 are at present in the repair
shop—the former needing repairs to spring and
tank, the latter needing a general overhauling.
After all, we might as well make a proper show in
soiling our fire department as is afforded many of
those Who ar© pot “ Oh© Of ours,” speaking as lire
melh
Suicide of Prof.
WRITING HIS OWN DEATH NOTICE FOR THE
NEWSPAPERS.
Prof. Julius Loiseau, an old resident of the village
of Woodside, town of Newtown, where he owned a
handsome property and resided with bis wife, alter
eating his midday meal on Friday, went to his room
lor a nap, leaving his wife in the sitting-room. He
had been gone but few moments when Mrs. Loiseau
was startled by the report of a pistol, followed by a
dull sound, as of a heavy body falling to the floor.
Sh© rushed up-stairs, and upon entering the room
found her husband’s body lying upon the floor.
He was undressed and was dead. A navy revolver
that he had kept under his pillow lay on the floor
near him. He had evidently stood in front of the
looking-glass when he shot himself. An examina
tion by Dr. W. H. Nelson and Coroner O’Conneli
showed that tho pistol-ball had passed between tho
fourth and fifth ribs, lodging near the heart.
Coroner O’Connell, of Newtown, found among the
papers taken from the body of Jules Loiseau, ol
Columbia College, who shot himself through the
heart at Woodside, Friday, a memorandum read
ing as follows: ♦’ Died at Woodside, L. 1.,
ary 19, 1885, Jules Loiseau, age 56. Funeral on WTO
nesday. Train leaves Long Island City 11:35 A. M.”
It is supposed that the above was prepared by the
j dead man, it being in his own handwriting and
evidently intended for a notice in the newspapers
in anticipation of his death cn the day mentonod,
and leads to the belief that he had contemplated
suicide prior to and since then. Mrs. Loiseau has
been unconscious all night.
Got ller License.
COMMISSIONER MORRIS FREES HIS MIND.
Mrs. Nelson applied for a license to sell liquor at
No. 91 Cherry street some timo ago. As the police
reported that the place was tho resort of loose wo
men, tho Excise Board rejected her application. She
closed up, and after two weeks mado a fresh appli
cation. This time the police reports were silent as
to the character of the place, there being nothing to
report on. Mrs. Nelson suggested at the Bureau, in
the hearing of Commissioner Morris, that if she
could raise five or six hundred dollars she would
get a license without trouble.
Mf. Morris informed his associates, and they per
emptorily refused her a license. Yesterday Com
missioners Haughton and Mitchell reconsidered
their decision, and voted to give her a license.
"I vote no,” said Commissioner Morris, indig
nantly. "It looks to me as if some one bad got that
Woman’s $500.”
"What do you mean?” retorted Commissioner
Haughton, hotly, flaring up.
"Just what 1 said,” was Mr. Morris’s answer.
"It looks bad. lam not in any secrets, aud charge
nothing. I just tell you how it looks, and vote
no.”
Mrs. Nelson got her license.
Breaking a Show Window to Steal.
—A crash of falling glass on Broadway, near Seven
teenth street, between 12 and 1 o'clock Saturday
morning, attracted the attention of Policeman Pet
tit of tho Park Department. He ran after a man
who went through Eighteenth street to Fifth ave
nue. Policeman Robinson stopped the runner,
and found a package of shirtings and half a dozen
umbrellas, taken from the haberdashery of E. A.
Newell, of No. 859 Broadway.
Upon investigation it was discovered that one of
the large side lights, valued at $75 had been broken
to allow the things to be taken out. The prisoner,
who was poorly dressed, and gave the name of John
Daly, twenty-three years old, of No. 38 Bowery, was
taken before Justice White, in the Jefferson Market
Police Court yesterday, and held lor trial on a
charge of burglary, preferred by Mr. Newell, bail to
the amount of $2,000 not being offered.
The Most Precious op Gifts.— Health
is undoubtedly a more precious gift than riches,
honor, or power. Who would exchange it for these
—the chief objects of human ambition ? It is obvi
viously the part of wisdom to employ means for the
preservation of health and the prolongation of lite,
which time and experience have proved to be relia
ble. Many of the dangers by which health is threat
ened may be nullified by the use of that most irre
sistible of correctives and tonics, Hostetter’s Stom
ach Bitters, which, by increasing vital power and
rendering the physical functions regular and active,
keeps tho system in good working order and pro
tects it against disease. For constipation, dyspep
sia, liver complaint, nervousness, kidney and rheu
matic ailments and neuralgia it is invaluable, and it
affords a sure defense against malarial fevers, beside
removing every trace of such disease from the sys
tem. Half a wineglasßful nofor.- meals im
• proves the app-tito . ....
and aasimilat.. n-
Urcacli of "V o-
NOT TO BE ANNOUNCED UNTIL MONDAY.
Mr. Isaacjßlumberg, the young Hebrew who was
sued for breach of promise of marriage by Miss
Fannie Zerovich, who demanded $5,000 damages,
alleging that he had broken a marriage contract,
was early about tho court yesterday, and walked up
and down the corridors and around the rotunda
meditating as to what the result of the jury’s de
liberations would be. He had put in an appearance
about the Supremo Court in the expectation that
the verdict would be announced yesterday, but in
this he was mistaken, as the court adjourned until
Monday morning. Th© jurors, to whom th© case
had been submitted for their verdict, remained in
their room until late Friday evening, when they
arrived at a verdict and were discharged. The
result will be announced in court next Monday.
’fmoWlFtailorm
O TJ R
Spring and Summer Stock
IS COMPLETE.
ALL THE LATEST NOVELTIES IN
X’LjVIUK AND CHECIC.S
FOR
SUITINGS and TROUSERINGS.
FULL LINE OF
SPRING OVERCOATINGS,
DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED.
PANTS TQ QRDER~from ... $ 5.00
SUITS TO 6?I n ER, from .... 20.00
Spring Overcoats to J?rder, from , ■ 16.00
Sftmplesjand Rules for Self-Mea? lll V ment mailed on
application.
141 TQ 151 BOWERY,
AND
Broadway and Ninth st., opp. Stewart’s.
BOWERY STOKES OPEN EVENINGS.
Co
BARGAINS IN CARPETS.
We aro offering a largo line of English
Axminotor at $1.75 and $2.00 per yard.
English and American Wiltons at
$1.75 and $2.00 per yard.
Moqnettes, in superior colors, for Par
lors, $1.15 per yard.
And in addition to the very large
stock of Hartford five-frame Body Brus
sels, now selling at SI.OO, wa have
added some patterns of English, at the
same price, making the assortment
more varied and complete.
191 S 61.
JMPORTANT NOTICE
TO THE TRAVELING PUBLIC AND SHIPPERS OF
FREIGHT.
HUDSON RIVER OPEN.
THE STEAMERS OF THE
PEOPLE'S LINE,
DREW AND DEAN RICHMOND, 1
noted for their elegance an 1 superb accommodations,
will commence their regular trips to Albany and con
necting for all points North and W©st on THURSDAY,
April 9, at 6 P. M., from Pier 41, North River, foot of
Canal street.
N. B.—Staterooms warmed. Freight received until
time or departure. W. W. EVERETT, President.
BILLIARDS.
TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS.
SCHAEFER, SLOSSON, SEXTON, DION AND DALY,
At the 14-inch Balkline Game,
IRVING HALL.
Commencing Monday Even! ig, April 20th.
ADMISSION 50 cents. RESERVED SEATS, sl.
Notice
AND CLUBS.
RIVERVIEW PARK,
(Formerly Bellevue Garden),
Foot of East Eightieth street.
New name, new proprietorship, and newly fitted up. I
ajn now ready to make arrangements with all societies
and the public In general for Picnics and Summer Nights’
Festivals. The above place will be under first-class man
agement. Your patronage solicited. S. LEVI.
GRATEFUL-COMFORTING.
EPPS'S COCOA.
breakfast.
“By a thorough knowledge ot the natural laws which
govern the operations ot digestion and nutrition, and by
a careful application oi the fine properties of well-selected
Cocoa, Mr. Epps lias provided our breakfast tables with a
delicately-flavored beverage which may save us many
heavy doctors’b.lls. It is by the judicious ot such
articles of diet that a constitution may be gradually built
up until strong enough to resist every tendency to dis
ease. Hundreds of subtle maladies are floating around
us, ready to attack wherever there is a weak point. We
may escape many a 'atal shaft by keeping ourselves well
fortified with pur§ pIQQd and properly nourished frame.”
—Civil Service Gazette.
Mado simply with boiling water or milk. Sold only in
hall-pound tins, by Grocers, labeled thus:
JAMES EPPS & CO., Homoeopathic Chemists,
London, England.
JL. STROUB’S OYSTER BAY. No.
• 2369 THIRD AVENUE, between 128th and 129th
sts., is furnishing oysters by the quart and hundred, and
is delivering on the halt shell at all hours. The proprie
tor, John L. Stroub, is the patentee of the Clam Roaster
which Is used at most all hotels, oyster-houses, and by
private families throughout the country with great satis
faction. They are sold al all the house furnishing stores
throughout th< U. 8. J'rincipal Depots: John L. Stroub's
Oyster Bay. 2369 3d av.: John L. Stroub’s Family Oyster
House, 93 Canal st. ; John L. Stroub’s River View Hotel,
foot of 125th street. North River. New York City.
SPECTACLES— BRAZILIAN PEBBLES
and Double Vision Glasses, in gold, silver and other
frames. Also, the celebrated Eye Preservers, so highly
appreciated at the Eye Hospital and the Eye Infirmary,
being superior to any other article, giving ease and vigor
to the weak, and preserving the neriect sight tor many
years. Prcfesoor FRAN KB, Oculist and Optician, Lecturer
<m the Human Eye and Optics, accurately and scientifio*
aßy adjusts these far-famed spectacles to detective visiomi
ftthis office. No. 810 Grand street, near AUexx.
<QOOI> NEWS
-TO LADIES I
Greatest inducements ever offered
Now’s your time to get up orders for
Otar celebrated Teas and
C offees and secure a beautiful
Gold Band or Moss Rose China Tea
Set, or Handsome Decorated Gold
Band Moss Rose Dinner Set, or Gold Band Moss
Decorated Toilet Set. For ftill particulars address
THE GREAT AMERICAN TEA CO.,
[P. O. Box 289.] 81 andß3 Vesey st., New York.
DOGS and their Skillful Treatment.—
Dogs boarded, etc. Medicines for all diseases. Pre
pared lood ior mocking birds. DOVEY, Doctor and Sur
geon. Office and private residence, 26 W. 4th st.,n. B’way.
Post-Office Notice.
Letters for Europe need not be specially directed for
dispatch by any particular steamer in order to secure
speedy delivery at destination, as all Trans Atlantic
mails are forwarded by the fastest vessels available.
Foreign mails for the week ending April ISth will close
(promptly in all cases) at this office as follows :
TUESDAY.—At 6P. M. for Brazil and the La Plata Coun
tries, via Para and Pernambuco, per s. s. Paraense,
via Baltimore.
WEDNESDAY.—At 2:30 A. M. for Europe, per s. s. Fulda,
via. Southampton and Bremen; at 7:30 P. M. tor
Mexico, per s. s. Estaban, via New Orleans (letters
must be directed “per Steamer, via New Orleans”).
THURSDAY—At 12:30 P. M. lor Europe, per s. s. City of
Richmond, via Queenstown (letters for France, Ger
many, etc., must be directed “par City of Rich
mond’ 1 ); at IP. M. for Bermuda, per s. s. Orinoco; at
1:30 P. M for Cuba and the West indies, via Havana,
and lor Campeche, Chiapas, Tabasco, and Yucatan,
Mexico, per s. sOPity oiJ J uebla (letters for other Mexi
can States must be directed per “City of Fuebla”); at
1:30 P. M. for France, Germany, etc., per s. s. Gellert,
via Plymouth. Cherbourg, and Hamburg (letters lor
Great Britain and other European countries must be
directed “per Gellert’’); at 9 P. M. for St. Pierre
Miquelon, via Halifax.
FRIDAY—At 1:30 P. M. for Porto Rico direct, per s. s.
Andes; at 9 P. M. for Newfoundland, via Halifax.
SATURDAY.—At SA. M. tor Europe, per s. s. Servia, via
Queenstown; at 5 A. M. for Belgium direct, per s. s.
Westernland, via Antwerp (letters must be directed
per Westernland”); at 5 A. M. for Scotland direct,
per s. s. Devonia, via Glasgow (letters must be directed
“per Devonia”); at 8 A. M. for Europe, per s. s.
Neckar, via Southampton and Bremen: at 9A. M. for
Jamaica, per s. s. Verturonus; at 12 M. lor the Wind
ward Islands, per s. s. Moruca; at 1 P. M. for the
Windward Islands, per s. s. Flamborough, via Barba
does; at 1:30 P. M. for Cuba and Porto Rico, per s. s.
Niagara, via Havana.
SUNDAY. —At 7:30 P. M. for Honduras and Livingston,
ner s. s. City of Dallas, via New Orleans.
Malls for China and Japan, per s. s. Oceanic (via San
Fi ancisco), close here April *2lst at 6P. M. Mails for
Australia, New Zealand, Sandwich and Fiji Islands,
Ser s. s. Australia (via San Francisco), close here
ay *2d at 7 P. M. (or on arrival at New York of s. s.
Adriatic with British mails for Australia).
*The schedule of closing of Trans-Pacific mails is ar
ranged on the presumption of their uninterrupted over
land transit to San Francisco. Mads from the East ar
riving on time at San Francisco on the day of sailing oi
.1; .‘liners are dispatched thence the same day.
iil-.NRY G. PEARSON, Postmaster.
■(•>-! , t , r :.N. Y_. Auril IGU*- iXiV.
ADISON SQUARE GARDEN. MADISON SQUARE GARDEN.
BL TI^'F;^ I)EST Inhibition man
SHOWING* MOIU . . JttvKTAL LYES COMPAS^S^N yiSIT AND TEN TIMES MORE THAN WAS
Exhibiting in all its e 2 t“/ roo '‘' yll on April 20th '
A REALLY CHASTE, PURE, MORAL?UNIQUEr INSliv^C'"' OP ANIMATE,
~. ... INANIMATE. CURIOUS, WONDROUS AND MOST <?F EARTu LY OBJECTS,
delighting and instructing the young, charming and amazing the old, and eiii'apt antl captivating every
tt,. individual visitor, irrespective of age or nationality. ,
ultra-gorgeous and most brilliant revival of Coliseum Sport s and Ancient Contests on ft Grano Woman Race Track
and Arena nearly half a mile long.
R a T. BARNUM’S
GREAT ROMAN GREAT BOMAN
x-x x i» i> o k. o ivz es .
CONTAINING ALL ITS MARVELOUS, NOVEL, EXCITING AND SOUL-STIRRING RACES AND FEATURES—re
introduced, revived and again presented to the public, larger and better than ever.
All the wonderful Equestrian, Aerial and astounding Circus Acts retained.
100 ORIGINAL AND DARING ACTS. 100 300 CHAMPION RING PERFORMERS 300
THE FAMOUS LILIPUTIAN COUPLE, COUNT AND COUNTESS MAORI (MRS. GEN. TOM THUMB
MARRIED AT CHURCH OF HOLY TRINITY, APRIL 6, AND NOW RECEIVING CONGRAT
ULATIONS DAILY FROM 1 TO 4 AND FROM 7 TO 8 O’CLOCK, P. M.
TERRIFIC ROMAN CHARIOT RACES, FOUR HORSES ABREAST.
THRILLING ROMAN DOUBLE TEAM STANDING RACES.
WILD, DASHING MALE AND FEMALE JOCKEY RACES.
DARING AND FEARLESS HURDLE RACES.
EXCITING AND RAPID FLAT RACES.
Comical, Amusing, Laughable. Difficult, Hnmorous, Puzzling, Impediment and Obstacle Races.
BARNUM’S GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH, UNITED WITH THE GREAT LONDON CIRCUS.
BARNUM .BAILEY A. HUTCHINSON, Sole Owners.
TWO PERFORMANCES EVERY DAV. AT 2 AND 8 P. M. DOORS OPEN ONE HOUR EARLIER.
JUMBO. THE COLOSSUS OF LIVING BEASTS—THE CHILDREN’S GIANT PET AND GENTLE FRIEND.
Arada, the Wild Man. Miremba Band. Jo-Jo, the Dog faced Boy.
Royal Band of Burmese Musicians. Horses doing everything but talking.
NALA DAMAJANTI, THE HEROIC HINDU SNAKE CHARMER, WREATHED IN SERPENTS.
Giants, Midgets. Dwarfs, Skeletons. Fat People, &c. Acrobatic, Athletic and Special Performances.
Wonderful Rollerskating. Bicycling, Unicycling, Ac. Trained Goats, Dogs, Pigs, Ponies £c.. Ac.
MISS ZAMAM<TO MOUNTING WITH BARE FEET THE LADDER OF SHARP, NAKED SWORDS.
Vast Ethnological Congress of Savage Tribes. Nearly Every Known Type of Human Being Represented.
The Beautiful White Sacred Elephant. Twenty Pantomimic Clowns.
ADMISSION TO EVERYTHING, 50 CENTS (Fourth avenue side); CHILDREN UNDER NINE, 25 CENTS.
Resereed Seats, SI (Madison ave. side); Private Boxes (seating six), sl2; Single Box Seats, $2. *
CACA£>EWWESIG?J
WESLEY SISSON. .■P irCOtf 'L.
Evening at 8: 20. Saturday Matinee at 2. **
STEELE MACKAYE’S five act drama,
DAKQLAR.
Cast includes R. B. MANTELL, J. B. MASON, JOSEPH
FRANKAU, ARCHIE LINDSAY, VIOLA ALLEN, SADIE
MARTINOT and others, assisted by pupils of the Lyceum
Theatre School ol Acting.
: REGULAR PRICES.
ADMISSION, sl. BOXES. sls and S2O.
»♦* ALL SEATS VIRTUALLY ON THE AISLES. •»*
Decorations by LOUIS C. TIFFANY A CO.
I A TH STREET THEATRE, Cor. 6th ave.
E Every Evening at 8. Matinees Tuesday & Friday.
HARRIGAN AND HART
in Mr. Harrigan's revised iarcical comedy
“THE MAJOR.”
Now in its LAST WEEK, and will be positively with
drawn for the reproduction on APRIL 20th, of
CORDELIA’S
with its original cast of characters. New scenery by Mr.
Witham, and music by Mr. Dave Braham.
1 A TH STREET THEATRE, Cor. 6th ave.
B This (Sundav) Evening, April 12th, at EaS-Q-'ClocE.
1-KOFESSOK CROMWELL’S ILLCSTRXDWKS,
LONDON AND WESTMINSTER ABBE®.
Reserved Seats, 50 cents. Family Circle, 2o.oents.
TJNION SQUARE THEATRE.
AN INSTANT SUCCESS.
MISS ESTJEIuIuIi: CLAYTON
IN
FAYETTE,
THE STORY’ OF A WAIF,
JJNION SQUARE THEATRE.—EXTRA.
APRIL 27. I MINNIE PALMER.
APRIL 27. MINNIE PALMER.
APRIL 27. I MINNIE PALMER.
APRIL 27. I MINNIE PALMER.
ADISON SQUARE THEATRE.
MR. A. M. PALMERSoIe Manager
EVENINGS at 8:30. "SATURDAY MATINEE at 2.
A NEW COMEDY DRAMA, IN FOUR ACTS,
by MRS. J. C. VERPLANCK,
entitled
Sealed Bnstmctions.
EDEN MUSEE, 23d st., bet. sth and 6th avs
OPEN FROM 11 to 11. SUNDAYS. 1 to 11.
HISTORICAL MONUMENT,
ALL THE PRESIDENTS OF
THE UNITED STATES
Surrounding
BARTHOLDI’S STATUE OF LIBERTY.
Further,
THE IRISH PATRIOT GROUP,
Parnell, O’Connell, Butt, Davitt and Emmet.
To-day—Two Grand Sacred Concerts
SUNDAY ADMISSION, 25 CENTS.
NIBLO’S GARDEN.
POOLE & GlLMOßEProprietorsand Managers.
Reserved Seats (Orchestra and Balcony), 50c.
LAST WEEK of M. B. CURTIS.
LAST WEEK of the GRAND REVIVAL of
SAM’L O’ POSEN.
SAM’L O’ POSEN.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY at 2.
*»* Monday, 20th inst-. Grand Production ol THE HAN
LON’S Spectacular Pantomime, FANTASMA.
RAND OPERA HOUSE.
Reserved Seats (Orchestra Circle and Balcony), 50c.
One week, commencing to-morrow (Monday) night,
Chas. H. Hoyt's laughing triumph,
A RAG BABY,
A RAG BABY,
Presented by a Perfect Comedy Cast.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AJiD SATURDAY.
Next week, Union Square Theatre Co. in 3 WIVES TO
1 HUSBAND and ONE TOUCH OF NATURE.
Fifth avenue theatre.
Proprietor and Manager'Mr. JOHN STETSON
SECOND AND LAST WEEK.
CONTINUED SUCCESS. NEW FEATURES.
MONARCHS OF MINSTRELSY,
THATCHER. PRIMROSE A WESTS
FAMOUS ORGANIZATION.
BEST SEATSONE DOLLAR. Others 75c.. 50c. ami2scts.
Monday, April 20, return or the Mestayer-Vaughn Co.,
"WE, US & CO. AT MUD SPRINGS.”
EAVITT & PASTOR’S 3d Ave.
POPULAR PRICES. Admission 15 and 25 cis.
Second week of the comedy success,
MCFADDEN’S SPIRITS.
MATINEES “The piece is an uproarious hodge-
WEDNESDAY podge of Irish ‘funny business,’ and will
and make money for the
SATURDAY. FOUR SHAMROCKS
at and their friends, the authors. ’— Tieraid,
2 P. M. April 7th.
PEOPLE’S THEATRE,
Bowery, opposite Spring street.
HARRY MINERSoIe Proprietor and Manager.
Reserved seats 35, 50 and 75 cents.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
HARRISON AND GOURLAY
in “SKIPPED BY’THE LIGHT OF THE MOON.”
MONDAY. APRIL 20th,
THE HANLON BROTHERS
in “LE VOYAGE EN SUISSE.”
NEW YORK MUSEUM, 210 Bowery.
LOUIS HICKMAN... .Sole Proprietor and Manager.
First appearance of the Marvelous
TRANSPARENT LIVING TURK
and the SIO,OOO Living Mite,
HOP 0’ MT THUMB,
the smallest man in the world; age, 21 years; Light, 14
inches; weight, 4% pounds.
The Giant Albino, Charles Price, and his Mammoth Fat
Bride. Mme. Pettit, ami numerous other new features.
MURPHY <fc MILES' ALL-STAR >PECIALTYCOMPANY
appear in Theatorium hourly.
Open from 10 to 10. Admission. IO cents.
CASINO, Broadway and 39th st.
LAST NIGHTS OF '
Johann Strauss’ .Yost Successful Opera Comi quo
DIE FLEDERMAUS, |
By the McCaull Opera Comique Company.
MONDAY, APRIL 27th.—" POLLY.”
Sale of Scats Commences Thursday, April 16th.
THIS SUNDAY EVENING G RAND POPULAR CONCERT.
National theatre,
Nos. 104 and 106 BOWERY.
Engagement ol the eminent young actor,
MR. GUSTAVUS LEVICK in the
GALLEY SLAVE.
ELLIS and MOORE, GALLAGHER and WEST,
TENNYSON and O’GORMAN, EDITH CROLIUB,
Mamie Wallace.. Alice Roberts, W. T. Dulany, &c.
Admission, 35, 25,15 and 10 cents.
Matinees, Tuesday, Thursdayand
rnONY PASTOR’S NEW 14th St. Theatre.
a THE REIGN OF LAUGHTER.
To-morrow (Monday) even’ng, and until further notice.
MATINEES TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS.
Triumphant return of the Apo«tle of Fun and Laughter.
DAN ’ L S U LL Y
and his comedy,
THE CORNER GROCERY.
SPECIAL—A handsome bouquet given to each lady pa
tron of Tuesday’s Matinee, April 14th.
WALLACK’S.
OUR JOAN.
OUR JOAN.
OUR JOAN.
OUR JOAN.
Every Evening at 8 and Saturday Matinee at 1:30.
Koster * bial’s, to night at 7:30
AN EXTRAORDINARY PROGRAMME.
THE MARTENS TRIO, LOUISE SEARLE,
LE CLAIR AND RUSSELL,
SALZER and STERNHEIM. TISSOT’S LIVING PIC
TURES, and last appearance of NEENA,
Acme of Wonders.
To-morrow, Resurrection of
IXION,
With a Powerful Cast and Grand Chorus.
merFcan institute hall,
Third avenue, between 63d and 64th streets.
KNICKERBOCKER ROLLER SKATING CLUB.
Second grand carnival fancy dress masqueradje and ball,
TUESDAY NIGHT, APRIL 14.
Admission, 50c. Children. 25c. No reserved seats.
NOTlCE.—Visitors need fear any interference on the
part of police authorities at this Carnival, for reason that
license for sane has been granted.
CITIZ^NS , BICYCLE (LI B
MEETING FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 17.
Admission, 50c.Reserved seats, 50c. extra.
OLUMBIA ROLLER SKATING
ACE. MADISON AVENUE and Fifty-ninth street.
HANDSOMEST RINK IN THE CITY.
TO-MORROW, MONDAY, APRIL 13th,
First of the Great Races for
A BEAUTIFUL MEDAL,
Made by Tiflanv & Co..
BETWEEN THE BEST AMATEURS IN THE COUNTRY.
GRAND CONCERT AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
CONVENIENT TO ALL THE CARS.
Harry Hill’s, Houston and Crosby sts., to
night. The Electric Quartette. Grand Fancy Dress
Ball, Tuesday. April 14th. Matinee Thursdays.
agdSKMaaaaßßg-gg — ni'nrxqgragamagaaßgmga
*XAKO STOO&S,
' Fiano Covers,
PIANO SCARFS, TABLE COVERS,
STORE STOOLS, MUSIC CABINETS
and STANDS, largest assortment, best
goods, lowest prices.
S’* NKPPIERT, Manufacturer
I and Importer, No. 390 Canal street,
near West Broadway, X. Y.
Globe dime museum, r T
Messrs. MEEHAN A WILSON... xfiOS BOWCry.
Proprietors.
Having recovered fr<-
t tt z-< t * .«n her sickness,
.Lj U vJ A -/A. « n » - rri w?,
THT , Z A K A T E,
THE SMAT HUMAN DOLL,
Age twe* -xnEST WOMAN IN THE WORLD.
r years. Hight fourteen inches,
./eight four and three-quarter pounds.
WILL POSITIVELY APPEAR HERE,
MONDAY, APRIL 13,
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY.
SEVERAL OTHER NEW ATTRACTIVE FEATURES.
Stage performance in Theatorium Every Hour.
Open daily from 11 A. M. till 10 P. M.
THEISS’ CONCERTS. 14th st., near 3d ave.
NEW MUSIC HALL and ALHAMBRA COURT.
GREAT SUCCESS.
ENGAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY.
LEVY! LEVY!! LEVY!!!
LEVY! LEVY!! LEVY!!
LEVY!LEVY!!LEVY!!
THEISS’ CONCERTS, 61 West 14th st.
THEISS’S CONCERTS, G1 WEST 14th ST.
THEISS’S CONCERTS, 61 Wi’ST 14th ST.
EVERY AFTERNOON AM) EVENING.
(£2 ANS SOUCI MUSIC HALL,
kJ? Broadway and West Thirty-first street.
TH OS. E. GOULD Business Manager.
FRANK LAWTON....Stage Manager.
THE FAVORITE RESORT OF THE ELITE.
An elaborate constellation of gems from the Variety
Diadem, will appear nightly in a new and varied pro
gramme. interspersed with choice selections by promi
nent instrumental soloists. The following well-known
and popular Lady Artists open MONDAY, April 13th, viz:
Engagement extraordinary of the bewitching and talen
ted vocal queen, Miss MAY LEWIS. Second appearance
at this place of the favorite Song and Dance and Skiup.ng
Rope Artiste, Miss JENNIE MEAD. Reengagement of
the prepossessing young Balladist, Miss AGGIE MANS
FIELD. Continued success of the favorites. Miss MAY
DIAMOND, Miss LILLIE MAY, Miss NELLIE HUGHES,
and the well-known Quartette,!!
PROCTOR, WOOLFERT, CRIPPEN AND PIPER.
CLOSED ON SUNDAYS.
American mabille,
No. 59 Bkeckcr street, near Broadway
At this Popular Resort nightly appear eminent vocal
artists in songs, duets, etc., assisted by the celebrated
MABILLE QUARTETTE.
The large and spacious Ballroom attached to this
establishment is continually thronged with the devotees
of the Tespsichorean Art, and every attention is paid to
the comfort aud convenience of guests.
J. PHELPS, Proprietor.
“]L>ook Plays, etc.. 15c.; Tableaux, 25c.; Re-
JL> citations, 30c. Set illustrated, catalogues 5, Chwj
Plays, etc., sc. Happy Hours Bazaar, 21 Beckman st.,N.Y.
IVJL NOW PLAYING
AT THE
Lyceum Theatre, London, England,
ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO
NIR. HAMILTON GRIFFIN,
Box 60, Itong Branch, KT. J.
“THE LEXINGTON,"
9753 THIRD AVJE,, N. ‘W. cor. 58tli street.
Also, THE NEW YORK HOUSE,
114 BOWERY, near Grand street.
Choice Refreshments and Cigars. Lager Beer and Fine
Domestic Goods a Specialty.
JOHN C, BROGAN, Proprietor.
Wo
IIOJJ.T..
„ Nos. 11, 13 and 15 EAST BROADWAY
FINEST APPOINTED HOTEL ON THE EAST SIDR
THE CHOICEST WINES, LIQUORS AND CICARsT
’ GEORGE BECHTEL’S LAGER BEER.
FORMERLY OF WILLIAM AND PEARjL sSeetS’
Everett’S hotel
AND GRAND DINING ROOMS,
ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN.
BARCLAY AND VESEY, BETWEEN WASHINGTOM
AND WEST STREETS,
NEW YORK.
SAMUEL H< EVERETT.
. Proprietor.
!On the European Plan)
AND
DHHIW books,
Nos. 44 and 46 Chatham st,,
AND
No. 10 Centre street,
NEXT DOOR TO STAATS ZBITUNG BUILDING,
Extra Entrance, No. 10 Centre st, '
NEW YORK.
A. STO RMS.
UM!!
THE JUSTLY CELEBRATED
AND WORLD-FAMED
ExcelsiorLagerßeer
MANUFACTURED BY
GEORGE BECHTEL,
XS PURE.
It is the FINEST FLAVORED
and MOST WHOLESOME Beer
before the public.
It is pronounced the BEST and
Wrest Beer,
by eminent Physicians and Chem
ists, and they recommend it for
INVALIDS as well as the robust.
It has received
from PHILADELPHIA, NEW
YORK, PARIS, SYDNEY, and
JAPAN lor excellence and pu
rity, and
Stands Unrivaled!
All communications should be addressed to
GEORGE BECHTEL,
STAPLETON, STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.
There is a Beautiful Grove, Bowling
Alleys, Restaurant, &c., connected with the
Brewery, for the use of pleasure Parties.
D.XWENGLING, Jr.’s
Extra Fine
Lager Beer,
ALT, and PORTER.
BREWERIES:
128th STREET and 10th AVE.,
NEW YORK.
BOTTLED FOR EXPORT. THE TRADE, AND FAMI
LIES BY
A. LBEBLER & CO.
OBDBRS SENT TO THE BBEWEBY
I PKOMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
C& Co
Upholstery Departoient
Will offer this week a k y
varied assortment of Tapes' > ° ’
tains and Furniture Co- t‘ ry for ° Ur ‘‘
in price from $1.25 v ™
W ard. -per yard and up--
. Lace Curtains (four yards
aJ per pair and upward.
xiadras Lace Curtains, $5 per pair
and upward.
Nottingham Lace Curtains (three and' 1
a half and four yards long, $1.53 per
pair and upward.
Aubusson Cretonne Cloths, in great"■
variety, from 20c. per yard and upward. .
Turcoman Portieres, from Simper
pair and upward.
The above special offerings are much «.
below cost of importation.
£Bw<x<)wixt| cXj -3 pll? dto ■
’1760 11&85* t
Rose Lest, Fins Cut, ‘
Navy Clippings
and Snuffs ■
!
■fAZ! Pictures and 100 Album Verses, only lOe..
jC. Scrap Sample Book, 6c. J.B. Husted, Nassau, N.Y f
FHKK’S BEARD ELIXIR^ —X
•U.. -tamp, or .her. x. l. SMITH & CO., Sole Agt’g, PalMline, 111.
“MUSTBE USED.
Dr. Young’s Patent Electric Belts.
A SURE CURE FOR NERVOUS DEBILITY. LOSS OF
MANHOOD, YOUTHFUL ERRORS, WEAKNESS OF
BODY AND MIND, Ac.
A MEDICAL WORK
TO BE GIVEN AWAY,
showing sufferers how
niHV bo CUi- e<l,
“HEALTH RESTORER" health, strength
tfraT . trade mark manly vigor WITH
OU T THE AID OF MF.D-
■ ICINE, will be sent free
by post on receipt of stamped directed envelope. Ad
dress. Secretary,
Electro Medical Company. No. 2CO Hudson street, two
blocks north of Canal street, New York,
“MIDY’S
SANTAL GAPSOLES
are now used In the Hospitals of Paris, in place
of Copaiba, Cubebs and Astringent Liquids.
They will cure in forty-eight hours all de
rangements of the urinary organs in either SOS,
without inconvenience of any kind.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
OB OOTHi 83 8T CURED. New method,
■ijr it S £■ Can hold any case. Per-
fect comfort. Alsu Vaiicucele, without operation. Pay
when cured. Advice free day and.evening. PEET A C 0.,..
No. 501 Sixth avenue, corner Thirtieth street.
OrORANZ,
The Well-known Specialist,
and proprietor and consulting physician of the New York
Botanic Medical Institute, 513 8d ave., New York City, has
made the treatment of PRIVATE DISEASES ot MEN a
special study and practice for many years. Over 4,000
cases treated yearly. Recent cases of private diseaset
cured in a short time. Ulcers, Hzimors and Blotches on
Face or Body cured without giving mercury or other
poisons. Mercury is the curse of the human race. Your
children will sutler from its effects. Avoid it as you would
any deadly drug. These diseases are being cured at this
Institute without mercury.
Dr. FRANZ is a graduate of a regular Medical College,
is well known over the United States and Canada by
thousands of old and young men he has cured, and it is a
well-known fact that tor years lie has confined himself to
the study and treatment of Sexual and Chronic Diseases,
thus giving him advantages that few possess. Dr.
FRANZ addresses himself particularly to those who have
already tried various physicians and remedies from whom
they have received no benefits, and who, in fact, have
done them more harm than good. By a combination of
remedies of great curative power, Dr. FRANZ has so
arranged his treatment that it will afford not only im
mediate relief, but permanent cures.
i U UIW Ivllli Who are sufiering from the effects of
youthful indiscretions showing some of tno following
symptoms: Nervous and Physical Debility,
Impotence (incapacity), Lost Manhood,
Abuses of the System, Exhausted Vitality,
Confusion of Ideas, Dull and Loss of Bril
iiancy to the Eye, Aversion to Society, De
spondency, Pimples on the Face, Loss of
Energy, and Frequency of Urinating. You
may be in the first stage, but remember you are fast ap
proaching the last. Many a bright and naturally gifted
young man, endowed with genius, ha* permitted his cas©
to run on until remorse racked his intellect, and finally
death cla med its victim. So lay aside your pride, and
consult on? who thoroughly understands your ailment,
and who will know your case, and find permanent relief
for au aliment that has m ide day a drudgery and night
hideous. Thousands upon thousands of men, in good
standing in the social world, are to-day suffering from the
fruits oftheir doings, the seeds of which were sown during
moments of thou rhtlessness. Young man, turn and gaze
upon thy com pan < n, or seek the mirror for proofs to
substantiate this fact: so embrace the opportunity and
enjoy life and happiness longer. If you can claim to be a
man, act your part manly. Do not console yoursell with
the thought that Nature will help itself, for in doing so .
vou not onlv fan the flame, but wreck Nature and your
self. “ Little ills germinate fatal diseases.”
f/iICDLE-AGHi M-N prematurely a result of
excesses or youthful follies, and who are troubled by too
frequent evacuations of the bladder, often accompanied
by a slight smarting or burning sensation, and finding a.
deposit or ropy sediment in the urine, and sometimes
small particles of albumen will appear, or the color will
firstbe of a thin or miikish hue, and aga ; n changing to a
dark and torpid appearance, causing nervous debility
and lens of vitality. Remember, this is the second stage
of Seminal Weakness. In all such-cases a perfect cure ia
fuaranteed, and a radical restoration of the Genito
urinary Organs. All interviews and letters are racredly
confidential, but all letters must have $1 inclosed for
advice, or they will not be answered. Advice and ex
amination at Institute $1 without medicine. No hum
bug business here, nor advice and medicine tor a dollar.
All charges according to case or monthly. No physician
that gives you first-class treatment can afford to give yon
his time and also medicine lor a dollar. Investigate your
self and find your mistake. Cheap medicines and cheap
doctors are no good. Medicines packed so as not to excita
curiosity, and sent by express, if full description of case
is given", but one personal interview in ail cases preferred.
Call early and avoid crowding. Office hours, 9A. M. to
4P.M,6t0 BP. M. Sundays, 10 A. M. to 2 P.M. Please
mention Ln what paper you saw this notice,
WILL REMOVE MaY IST TO CORNER OF LEXINGTON .
AVENUE AND 31ST STREET.
Debility Manhood ȣ Decay
A favorite prescription of a noted specialist (nowro
tiled.) Druggists can fill ft.
Da. Ward & co.. Louisiana, im _
lABBONmis
•• TBEAT4S3E ON SET-F DEVELOPMENT
OF THE FEMALE I2F9T,’’ colored anatomical
plate, full explanation, medical opinions, etc. Shows that .
undeveloped or shrunken condition 13 abnormal and un
healthy ; how to enlarge to full and proper proportions.
Safe, simple, absolutely certain. (Other portions and mem
bers developed by similar process.) A copy of this valu
able book mailed in sealed envelope for 20 cts. Address Zk
p. O. Drawer BUFFALO, N.
W, OlfflMß ’
OF THE HUMAN BODY EXLAHGED. LIIiVEL-'
i OPED, STRENGTHENED.” Etc., is an intorestinff
advertisement, long run in our paper. In reply to i~
guinea Wo Will say that there nHioevidencc of hum
pug aboutthis. On the contrary, the advertisers are
highly indon-edT Interested persons inay peb
sealed circulars"giving all particulars bv addressing
faira tvIEOICAL 6i>.. Buffalo, bi. V-— lolcdv i-.cf uinif Bee.,
T 0 IE*!! MEliSBi
manhood, etc. I will send you a valuable treatise upon
“An ihovo diseases also directions for self-eure. free of,
nharee Address Prof. F. 0. FOWLER,Moodns,Conn.
•r\lseases of Men Only; Blood Poison, skint
B / diseases, inflammation; obstructions bladder, kid-'
no™ and other organs; weakness, nervous and general
debility; mental, physical prostration. Ac., successfully-,
trLmod and radically cured; remarkable cures perfected
in old cases which have been neglected or unskill fully
treated -no experiments or failures, it being self evident
that a physician who confines himself exclusively to the
atudv of certain classes of diseases, and who treats thoa
eands every year, must acquire greater skill in k those
branches than one in general practice. Dr. GRINDLE*.
Halil Wa< utbSt.,between6tband 7ibavcuuet.

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