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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, June 06, 1886, Image 8

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MEMORIAL DAY ECHOES —AT HORACE
GREELEY’S GRAVE—VETERAN ZOUAVES
IN BROOKLYN—MEADE POST ON BAKED
BEANS—HONORING A PHILANTHROPIST
— HIKER POST’S MONUMENT - WADE
POST VISITS NEW JERSEY—BROOKLYN
MEMORIAL NOTES—ITEMS OF NEWS.
MEMORIAL DAY ECHOES.
No doubt every veteran in this city is aware of
the fact that Memorial Day was duly celebrated on
Monday last. They surely must be if they were
feeling well enough to read the daily papers on
Tuesday morning. If they were not it was their
own fault, and the Dispatch does not intend to tell
the whole story over again. But it will say that
Grand Marshal Lutjens and his stall', consisting of
such woikers as Adjutant General David J. Mallon,
Assistant Adjutant Generals Trimble and Wharton.
Al. White, Aide-de-Camp Andy Horn and other
equally praiseworthy comrades, organ : zed and car
ried through the finest Memorial Day parade ever
seen in this city, and one that will favorably com
pare with a procession of any kind seen here or
elsewhere. Everything was propitious. The weather
was exactly of the right character, and the slight
shower that fell shortly before the march, cooled
the air and laid the dust. The regiments of the
National Guard were at their best; so, also, were
the sailors and marines of the regular service. As
for the Grand Army men, they looked as sprightly
and handsome as they did twenty-five years ago,
and every one of them could have won a wife in
Short order from among the bright-eyed, rosy
cheeked girls who watched them as they passed.
However, most oi the veterans are already well pro
vided in that respect, so they paid no heed to the
admiring glances that rained upon them. Grand
Marshal Lutjens was an especial object of admira
tion to all the ladies, and right well did he deserve
it. Comrade Andy Horn was another target for the
eyes of the spectators, and he certainly looked every
inch a soldier as he bestrode his prancing steed with
easy grace. In fact everybody connected with the
parade looked so well that it seems a waste of time
and space to make any discrimination.
The scenes at the reviewing stand were especially
pleasing. The President and a majority of his
Cabinet were present. So too were those glorious
soldiers gallant Phil. Sheridan and John M. Scho
field. Beside these there were scores of distin
guished civilians and military men whom their
fellow-citizens have delighted to honor. And not
the least interesting feature of the occasion was the
near vicinage of the lady who so shortly afterward
became the mistress of the White House. The
bright uniforms, the inspiring music, the fluttering
banners, the steady tramp of thousands of veterans,
and the countless throngs of spectators made the
occasion one which will remain in the memory
while life lasts.
The services at the tomb of General Grant, in
Ki verside, were another long to-be remembered
feature of the day, and the masterly oration of
General Logan added new laurels to those he has so
well won and worthily worn in the past.
The exercises at the Academy of Music in the
evening fittingly terminated so memorable a day.
The vast auditorium was crowded to its utmost
capacity, and the eloquent address of Postmaster
General Vilas was worthy of the occasion, of him
self and of the distinguished position he holds.
But all this and much more has already been writ
ten a score of times. It is enough to say that it was
a red-letter day for the G. A. R.
AT HORACE GREELEY’S GRAVE. ■ •* I
Horace Greeley Post assembled at its headquai .ers I
at eight o’clock on the morning of May 31, and after 1
the members had taken their seats Commander (
Wildman .-tale! that a lady, the wi'e of a member,
desired admission, Permission grained and t
Mrs. M. D. Savage entered the room and presented 1
the post with an elegant set of guidons, saying; “I J
take great pleasure in presenting you these guidons i
Woilied by my own hands at moments taken from 1
irome and bus ness duties. It has been said that (
the printers sticks are on the bend. 1 do not know <
much about sticks, but Ido about the work upon i
them. If you are as well pleased with them and *
take as much pleasure in carrying them as I now I
have in presenting them I shall be well repaid for t
my labor/' a
Commander Wildman accepted the gift in behalf c
of the post, and courteously thanked the fair donor, J
paying an eloquent tribute to the women of the 8
laud, who were the soldiers’best friends in the dark £
days of the war, and still remained interested in
their welfare, C
Alter participating in the parade, the post re- B
iUrsed ip jjeadquariew. where it was joined by Typo- ,
graphical Union No. 6, 300 strong, apd the two bodies 1
proceeded to Greenwood Cemetery, where Mr. Amos c
J. Cummings delivered an eloquent oration at the 1
grave of the decease 1 journalist. C
The adjutant then stepped forward and said that 1
he had received a sentiment “from one himself a c
printer, himself a friend of Mr. Greeley, himself an 3
editor, and himself an earnest and steadfast friend 1
of honest labor, Mr. Charles A. Dana.'* The senti- I
ment was as follows : a
••To Horace Greeley, who, during a laborious life, [
constantly employed his mind and his pen to pro- 1
mote the welfare of the masses of men and to in- a
crease liberty and happiness among them, the trib- i
Ute of our grateful memories should always be paid. 1
The apostle of equal rights, equal opportunities, 1
and an equal future for all the sons of men, his best c
monument will always be found in their apprecia
tion and their gratitude.” f
Frederick Bent played a cornet solo, ’’The Lost *
Chord.” and then all joined in singing “My coum- 1
try, ’tis of the thee.” A benediction was pro- 8
nonneed by the chaplain. t
Miss Greeley was present, and feelingly expressed *
her thanks lor the honor paid to her father’s c
memory. The post and its friends then adjourned
to Moore s Hotel, where a bountiful repast was in
waiijng. i,
VETERAN ZOUAVES IN BROOKLYN. j
The Veteran Zouave Battalion, commanded by *
Colonel T. F. Sheehan, visitedtßrooklyu on Memorial '
Day, as the guests of James H. Perry Post of that
city, and took part in the parade. While on the c
way to the ferry, the zouaves met the President and t
his party who were also bound for Brooklyn, and 8
escorted them to the ferry-boat “ Wyoming/’ When "
on board, the President expressed his thanks to the h
zouaves and complimented th?m upon their &
soldierly bearing. Arrived upon the Brooklyn side,
the zouaves took their place in the line, and re- 1
ceived an almost continuous ovation from start to d
finish. The chariot containing fourteen young 1
ladies, representing Columbia, and the original I
thirteen States of the Union, received much ap- 8
plause. When the Zouaves passed the reviewing <
stand the President paid especial recognition to
them, and from the manner in which he gazed at I
Surgeon Duffy the “ vets ” surmise that he intends I
giving him a fat position. Both Colonel Sheehan 8
and bis men deserve much praise lor the proficiency f
shown by the battalion in its maneuvers, and for a
flhowing Brooklynites what a crack veteran organi- a
zatkm is capable of doing. e
MEADE POST EATS BAKED BEANS.
George G. Meade Post assembled at headquarters
at two o’clock last Sunday afternoon, and a brief s
yet impressive memorial service was held. Rev. Dr. d
Cookman of Bedlord Street M. E. Church ofliciating. f
At the conclusion of the service, the post, headed o
by Commander McConnell, marched to the City e
Hall Park, where the members were photographed c
in a group. Thence they proceeded to the foot of
Murray street, and embarked on the steamer Bristol C
for Boston, where they arrived at seven o’clock tho C
following morning. The comrades received a cor- t
dial welcome from the members of John A. Andrew o
Post, Department of Massachusetts, whose guests 1
they were, and were escorted to the United States c
Hotel, where breakfast was provided. a
Andrew and Meade Posts then took a special train V
for Mt. Auburn Cemetery, where memorial services s
were held, and the graves of about 400 comrades e
decorated. Ex-Mayor Fox of Cambridge, a member v
of John A. Andrew Post, delivered the oration, o
The train was then taken back to Boston, and the t
column marched to the soldiers’ monument ou
Boston Common, and here came a p’easant surprise.
Commander McConnell, on behalf of the visitors, 2
presented to the post a handsome banner of silk,
■which bore the coat-of-arms of New York and this 1
inscription : ©
” Presented by George G. Meade Post, No. 38
Dept. New York, G. A. R., to John A. Andrew Post’ 0
No. 15, Mass. Dept., G. A. R. Memorial Day, 1886.” I
Commander Pierce received the banner, and ex- '
Mayor Fox made the speech of acceptance. After r
an hour or two of social enjoyment, Meade Post 1
started for home, arriving here early the next morn- f
ing, greatly pleased with the trip and loud in their a
praises of the hospitality of their Massachusetts 1
comrades. >
HONORING A PHILANTHROPIST.
After participating in the parade on Memorial f
Day, Peter Cooper Post proceeded to Greenwood <
Cemetery to decorate the grave and honor the i
memory of the great philanthropist. Commander I
M. H. Whalen and acting Chaplain Mullen con- €
ducted the services prescribed by the ritual, and I
the comrades of the post joined in singing several I
appropriate National songs, accompanied by Prof, c
Bayne’s Sixty-ninth Regiment band. The oration 1
was delivered by Gen. James R. O’Beirne. who eulo- 1
gized the deceased philanthropist, calling the at- c
tention of the assemblage to the fact that Mr. t
Cooper bad done more for education, had given c
more in unseen charity, and had worked more en- i
ergetically to sustain the Union in its hour of peril
by his vast contributions, and his valuable advice,
than any other citizen of New York. He was one
of the first to advise President Lincoln to emanci
pate the slaves as a war measure if for no other rea- (
eon, and he heartily rejoiced when peace once more 1
reigned that the stain of slavery in our Repulic was 1
forever obliterated. t
Ex-Mayor Edward Cooper, Gen. Rice, and many of 1
the friends both of the Cooper family and of the f
post were deeply affected during the ceremonies, 1
and Gen. O’Beirne was highly complimented by the :
ex-Mayor and others at the conclusion of his ad- 1
dress.
RIKER POST’S MONUMENT.
J. L. Riker Post, after participating in the Me- '
mortal Day parade, proceeded to Lutheran Ceme
tery and unvailed the monument erected in honor 1
of deceased comrades. The oration was delivered
by Justice Patterson, and addresses were made by .
Messrs. Cashan and Botty. After singing by the
• Leiderkranz, the ceremonies were brought to a
close by the entire audience joining in ‘‘America.”
Comrade Judge Edward Browne presided. The
monument erected consists of a granite pedestal,
sixteen feet high, surmounted by a soldier standing
at “parade rest.” The statue is seven feet in bight.
Its erection is a credit to the post, showing as it
does their zeal and energy in everything pertaining
to the G. A. R. Especial praise is due to the Post
Memorial Committee, whose labors have been un
ceasing. The large cross displayed by Biker Post
on Memorial Day, which attracted so much atten
tion, was a gift to the post from George Meindal,
the Avenue A florist.
WADE POST VISITS NEW JERSEY.
The unanimous verdict of all who accompanied
Wade Post to Springfield, N. J., on Decoration Day
was that it was the most successful day ever spent
by Wade Post. The comrades turned out well, be-
DR.. RADWAY’S
(THE ONLY GENUINE)
SARSAPARILLIAN RESOLVENT,
The Great Blood Purifier,
,I(IH THE lllii; (ll' Al.k CHRONIC DISEASES
CHRONIC RHEUMATISM, SCROFULA, CONSUMPTION, BRONCHITIS, HLOUU
TAINTS, CONSTITUTIONAL. DISEASES, DYSPEPSIA, TUMORS, KIDNEY,
BLADDER, LIVER COMPLAINTS, ETC.
Now is the time to take RADWAY’S SARSAPARILLIAN RESOLVENT, to fortify the system against the
debilitating effects ol Spring, and make the Blood pure and healthy. It is the only successful cure lor all Blood
Impurities, effecting permanent and complete cure.
HUMORS AND SORES
Of all kinds, particularly Chronic Diseases oi the Skin, are cured with great certainty by a course of RADWAY’S
AARSAPAKILLIAN. We mean obstinate cases that have resisted all other treatment. a boule.
SOLD BY DRUGGISTS.
Dr. Railway & Co., N.Y., Proprietors of Rad way’s Ready Relief and
l>r. Kadway’s Pills.
ing about 100 strong, and perhaps 200 friends ac
companied them on the special train. Wade Post,
of Springfield, met them at the station and escort
in ed them to the cemetery, where, after the impres
-3 sive ceremonies of the ritual had been performed,
) the grave of Captain E. H. Wade was duly deco
[’ rated, a poem was then read, and comrades were
3 detailed to decorate other graves in that and the
t adjoining cemetery. This duty accomplished,
comrades and guests marched to a neighboring
grove, where a bountiful repast had been provided
under the spreading trees. After doing ample jus
tice to the good things, the drum corps recalled the
I scattered comrades who gathered about Senior Vice
i Commander Ackerman, who acted as toastmaster.
3 A wagon was backed down, into which the speak
j ers climbed, and using it as a rostrum, replied to
p their toasts. Mr. Graves, of Springfield, responded
I to “ Our Countryex-Alderman Wade to “Wade
t Post;” young Mr. Lyman, of New York, to “The
f Rising Generation,” and Comrade Packard res
ponded in eloquent terms to “ The Ladies.” Com
rade Ackerman thanked the Spriufield Post heartily
; and gracefully in behalf of his post. The meeting
then broke up and all started tor the railway sta
tion, pronouncing tho day and the occasion perfect
in every feature.
VETERAN POST AT WHITESTONE.
The Memorial Services held at Willett’s Point on
Decoration Day, under the auspices of Veteran Post
436, were very impressive, and the committee in
charge deserve great-credit for the manner in which
the ceremonies were performed. At their conclu
sion the Post returned to Whitestone, where it was
entertained in a generous manner by the citizens’
reception committee of that place, especially so in
the persons of comrade C. H. McCall. T. H. Corry,
Edward Bioecker and Mr. I. J. Merritt. At the con
clusion of the musical and literary exercises a ban
quet was spread and enjoyed by the comrades and
their families. Tho Butler Silver Cornet Band and
Kiel Drum Corps, which had the honor of serenad
ing President Grover Cleveland on his arrival in
New York, rendered very fine music and were re
peatedly complimented. Some fine singing was
done by tho Willett’s Point Glee Club, which was
repeatedly encored. Col. David M. Talmage and
Judge W. S. Overton delivered addresses that were
patriotic and appropriate, eliciting cheers from the
assemblage.
BROOKLYN MEMORIAL NOTES.
Grand Army men in Kings county, generally dep
recate the expressions of bad feeling on the part of
those who had charge of the Memorial Day cere
monies in Brooklyn and at Riverside; at the same
time the conclusion has been reached that in the
future no individual post, aud more especially, no
single individual shall be permitted to arrogate to
themselves or himself powers which rightfully be
long to the Memorial Committees, and the
Grand Marshals of New York city and Brook
lyn. The posts in the Brooklyn column
who were not reviewed by the President
think he might as well have remained away alto
gether, for, although the sight of a “ live President”
is no novelty to them, his haste to get away ap
peared to mar tho effect of what might otherwise
have been considered an honor to the veterans aud
the city they represented. He did not even see the
Philadelphia and Riverside Phalanx. In contrast to
this, Mayor Whitney remained alter the lower re
viewing stand had broken down and reviewed the
entire column.
The visit of Major-General John F. Hartranft to
Brooklyn gave great pleasure to his old comrades in
that city, although, had his intention to be there
with his staff and review them have been more
generally known, his welcome would have been
| much warmer Coma again General, and the Brook
lyn ’’boys” show you some old time hospi
tality I xno general stopped at the new St. George s ;
Hotel until Tuesday, when ho returned to Phila- I
dolphia. ■
Post entertained their guests, the Four- ,
teenth Regiment War Veterans, at Saengerbund i
Hall, aftej their return from Greenwood. Qong- \
mander Woodruff extended to them a warm greet- <
ing,which was responded to by Counsellor Anthony ]
Barrett and others. Major Walker spoke briefly, £
Comrade George H. Phelps recited “Banty Tim,” (
Comrades James H. Hasoa and Wakeman, of Ran- i ,
kin Post, gave vocal selections, as Comrade g
“ Baldy Cann/* of the War Veterans, while Cointade
Keating, the old Fourteenth’s color bearer, almost
brought down the house with a comic recitation
aud impersonation. Drum Major Henry Eason was t
complimented upon the fine appearance of the t
youthful drum corps in the parade. In their hand- 1
some zouave uniforms, new white helmets and leg
gings they were “just too lovely.” t
The ceremonies at the tomb of the martyrs. Fort t
Greene, on Sunday morning, were very impressive, I
Mallcry Post, with members of other posts, assem- a
bled at their headquarters at 8:30, and, preceded bye
Rank-in Post Drum and Fife Corps, and the Society a
of Old Brooklynites, William E, Sprague, Marshal, J
marched to Washington Park, where Commander i
George W. Stillwell introduced Hon. John W. Hun- e
ter as chairman. Hon. Mark D. Wilbur was the I
orator, aud he alluded touchingly to the fact that, f
although so mauy years had elapsed, no monu
mental shaft yet marked the spot where reposed the <
bones of thousands of tho Revolutionary heroes 1
and martyrs of the prison ships. He said that he f
had lately learned that there was on deposit in the (
Dime Savings Bank several thousand dollars, raised
a number of years since, for the purpose of f
ing a monument, and if the Society of Old Brook- I
lynites would take this and.add more to it, the neg- t
lect of past years might be atoned for. The chil- c
dren of public school No. 12 furnished the singing, f
while the tomb and surroundings were gracefully <
festooned with wreaths of evergreens and flowers, a
under direction of Colonel John Y. Cuyl&r. It is 1
hoped, by the way, that the colonel will be retained
as Park Superintendent, for it is due to him that
the beautiful memorial services at the tomb of the 1
martyrs and Lincoln Monument "ere enabled to be
carried out i!0 successfully. r
President Win. Henry Harlan, M. D., and A. A.
Wemmell, M. D., of the Board of Examining Sur- I
geons for Kings county, paid a visit to Washington 1
last week. They were cordially received by Gen. i
Black, Commissioner of Pensions, and complf- a
mented upon the able and efficient manner in z
which the duties of the Board were fulfilled. Dr. c
Warren C. Snedon is secretary of the Board. Many c
of the cases require patient and careful considera- 1
tion, and this is given in all cases. There are two
special examiners now in Brooklyn, J. M. Burnett
><i)d George W. Paschal, Examiner J. H, Warner
having removed to Maine for the benefit of hia f
health. I
C -r E. A. Dubey’s project of a sdiivOhir
banner and album to be taken to California by the c
delegates from this Department to the National '
Encampment is meeting with hearty support. 1
Posts and individuals desiring to aid the pro oct t
should send their contributions immediately to
Comrade Dubey, Room No. 14, City Hall, Brooklyn, t
Captain Henry A. Phillips, the treasurer of the
Bureau of Employment and Emergency Fund of 5
Kings county, is indefatigable in his efforts to 4
secure justice for needy comrades, and many 1
families are grateful to him for obtaining favorable 6
action on long delayed pensions and other claims 1
against the government. Comrade Turnbull too is 1
ever on hand.
SOME WASHINGTON ITEMS. J
Major McLean, the Deputy Commissioner of Pen- . i
sious at Washington, has been in the city for a few
days past. The major is an old soldier, and hails f
from Terre Haute, Indiana. He is the wheelhorse I
oi the Pension Bureau, and is untiring in his <
efforts to push forward the claims of worthy appli- . i
cants. i
During the illness of Major Frank A. Butts, i
Comrade Elnathan Mead, Assistant Chief, acted as I
Chief of the Army and Navy Survivors’ Division in
the Pension Bureau. He is a very courteous and t
obliging gentleman. Dr. Campbell, Chief Medical s
Reviewer, Dr. Conroy and Dr. Barton of tho Medi- i
cal Board of the Pension Bureau, showed special <
attention to Dr. Harlan, and his associate. Dr. <
Wemmell, of the Brooklyn Board, during their f
stay in Washington. It requires personal knowl- 1
edge of the duties of the bureau to understand its s
workings. Captain James M. Curtin. Assistant Chief
of the Eastern Division, has charge of the files in
that branch of the department.
SOME INFORMATION WANTED. j
To the Editor of the New York Dispatch : t
By an act of our Legislature, Chapter 247. Laws of 1
New York, passed April 19th, 1883. a burial fee, not 1
exceeding fifty dollars, was provided for, to be paid 1
by the County Treasurer in the respective counties <
of the State, when the soldier’s relatives were too 1
poor to defray the expenses—thirty-five dollars of i
which amount is paid on proper application being
made by the undertaker performing the services of
- the soldier—and fifteen dollars is retained
for the purpose, so claimed, of placing a headstone
at the grave. A contract was given to a certain
party in the county of New York to attend to the
marking of such graves, but the writer is informed
that the contract has been cancelled some time
since, and nothing in the way of marking soldiers’
graves at public expense, can be done until the Board
of Apportionment acts in the premises by making a
new contract. In the meantime how many Veteran
Union Soldiers’ graves will go unmarked and unheed
ed, remains to be seen. This negligence was forcibly
brought to the attention of the writer on Memorial
Day, when in company with some of his surviving
comrades, he visited Greenwood Cemetery and
planted flowers on the unmarked grave of one of
his deceased comrades, who had been buried there }
on Thanksgiving day, in November, 1884. Will not
the Memorial Committee of the G. A. R. of the city
of New York, give a little attention to this subject
matter ? A Veteran Union Soldier.
mcclellan post attends church. i
The General George B. McClellan Post attended
divine service at the McDougal Street Baptist
Church on last Sunday evening, and listened to a
most eloquent and appropriate sermon, delivered
by the Rev. E. Halsey Knapp. The text chosen was
the last four words of the twenty-first verse of the
fourth chapter of Joshua, “ What mean these
stones?” The interpretation of the text was to il
lustrate the commemorative services of Decoration
Day, and was most beautifully applied by the
speaker. His sermon was one of patriotism, and
most thoroughly conservative. His allusions
to the dark and gloomy periods of the late
struggle were eloquent and pathetically given,
and his remarks upon those who were upon
the opposite side were full of pathos and sympathy.
The post under the command of Commander W. J.
Holmes, was very attentive, and throughout the
entire discourse followed the speaker with a silen t
and reverential attention seldom seen on such oc
casions. A large collection was taken up which
was handed over to the McClellan Post to assist it
to defray its expenses on the following day. After
appropriate ceremonies the congregation dispersed,
and the universal sentiment of all, and especially
of McClellan Post, was that they had an unusual
feast of oratory and kindness from the pastor and
his congregation.
DECORATING THE GRAVE OF THE FIRST
VOLUNTEER.
The Sixth Regiment, New York Volunteer (Wil
son's Zouaves) Association, met last Sunday at
their headquarters, Congress Hall, No. 192 Third
avenue, and proceeded in a body to the grave of
their beloved Commander, Colonel William Wilson,
in Calvary Cemetery, and decorated his grave. The
ceremonies were very simple, yet thoroughly im
pressive. The old and highly revered chaplain of
the regiment. Father Michael Nash, of Troy, who
NEW YORK DISPATCH, JUNE 6, 1886.
> delivered the oration on the 22d Hit., whs unable to
, ne present on account of his pastoral duties in
, r °y. the services were rendered by the Presi
mJ 1 . Mr ’ Kntwiß tl©. assisted by several members.
’ 1,011 credit is due to Mr. Charles J. Campbell,
- manager of the street railroad, who is a member of
3 ine organization also, and who provided free trans
j portation from the ferry to the cemetery and ro
’ !?h°’ T,ig HBBOci aßon will hold a reunion < n tho
I ln8t “ to celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary
L or their departure to the seat of war.
’ THE YOUNG COMMANDER ON DECK.
, Farragut Post assembled at headquarters on the
morning of May 31, with its band and drum corps.
Commander H dL'erty presented each comrade with
( a button-holo bouquet which set the boys off to
, advantage. The post then marched to Fiftieth
i Btret, t with three floral wagons in the rear. At that
wagons left the line and proceeded to
Woodlawn Cemetery, where the post joined them
alter taking part in the parade. On arriving at the
cemetery the post marched to the tomb of Admiral
L»ayid G. Farragut, where the comrades were drawn
up in a circle. After a few remarks by the Com
niandor. a dirge by the band, and a prayer by
Chaplain Murphy, Commander Heilferty introduced
congressman Egbert L. Viele as tho orator of the
day. while Gen. Viele was delivering an eloquent
oU Y > f. y ou t,IQ great admiral, a detail oi com-ades
ana the floral wagons made a circuit of the ceme
tery and decorated the graves of Commander De-
Long, of Arctic region fame, and his five com
panions; also those of Col. R. Wright, August
Schmid, Dr. Rogers, William Beatty, Samuel and
McClintock, and a large number of others.
After strewing the grave of Admiral Farragut with
flowers the post adjourned to Schrader’s Hotel,
where Quartermaster Clery had provided refresh
'*S eil L 8 wbicll the ” vets” finished in short order,
then took tho train for home well-pleased
with the experiences of the day. Farragut Post
made a fine appearance in the parade, and their
popular Commander never does things by halves.
He is a worker and means to keep his post in the
front rank if he has to sit up all night to do it.
DECORATING ELMER E. ELLSWORTH’S GRAVE.
A delegation of Ellsworth Post left Pier 41, N. R.,
on Saturday evening, the 29th ult., en route for
Mechanicville, to decorate the grave of the gallant
Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth. As the “Daniel Drew”
passed Twenty-third street the boys waved their
salutes to the bluejackets on the men of .war, which
were heartily returned by the tars.
At Albany they were met by a delegation from
libbitts Post, of Troy, and conveyed to that city on
the “Whitney,” which they (Tibbitts Post) had en
gaged for the occasion. There they enjoyed the
hospitality of their host by partaking of a good
breaklast at the American House, after which they
proceeded in carriages aud carryalls to Mechanic
ville, twelve miles distant.
The ride over the good roads and among the
green fields was heartily enjoyed by the city “boys.”
At Mechanicville they were met by a number of
delegations, consisting of the Chief of Fire Depart
ment and assistants, D. E. Miller Steamer and Hose
Company, Ancient Order of Hibernians, No. 2 ;
Gilbert Thomas Post, No. 480 ; Ellsworth Lodge, A.
O. W., No. 192 ; Hoosick Falls Drum Corps, Harts
horn Post, No. 487 ; Walter A. Wood Band, Post
Wood, Hoosick Falls; citizens of Hoosick Falls,
distinguished guests in carriages, and escorted
through the town. One feature of the parade was
the old h(wse that Colonel Ellsworth used to ride, i
Saddled and bridled he marched at the bead of Post
Ellsworth, and many were the kind attentions that <
he received from the Veterans.
The services at tho grave were attended by about I
3,0u0 persons. The address was delivered by Judge
| Blake, of Conn., and was an eloquent tribute to the
! soldier and especially to the gallant patron of the
post. After the services at the grave the posts were 1
ad invited to dine with the President of the village.
A return of twelve miles back to Troy, brought i
them just in time for the evening boat to New York.
The boys were loud ijj their praise of Tibbitt’s Post, g
of Troy, whose hospitality Je proverbial and only
bide the time when they may reciprocate, They i
also found on their return that their Commander,
Col. Jacob Wilcox, had won the G. A. R. sword that
#’as voted to the most popular Commander at the
Lawrence Fair.
ITEMS OF NEWS. ’
Among the many impressive ceremonies which
took place on Decoration Day, few were more bo
than that at the grave of the late Captain James a
Plunket, Co. D, Sixty-ninth Regiment, N. G. 8. N.
Y., who for mauy years was known as a cigar man- f
ufacturer at No. 22 Bowery. After taking part in fl
the annual Decoration Day parade, Co. D, accom
panied by fourteen files of Co. H, same regiment, s
and many old friends, proceeded to St. John’s Cem- €
etery, Newark, N. J., and on reaching there were
agreeably surprised to find that Co. A (Capt. John I
J. Berry), First Regiment, N. G. 8. N, J„ had al
ready decorated tho grave, as a token of their re
spect for the deceased. Each member of Co. D
passed tho grave in single file and deposited his
floral tribute on the grave of the one he loved.
Information is wanted of the present whereabouts 1
of James Corrigan, late of Co. K, Fifteenth Regt.,
N, Y. Engineers. Also the name and address of any (
former member of Co. K, Twenty-fourth (N. Y. Vol.)
Cavalry. £
E. D. Morgan Post, whose members acted as
guards and ushers at the ceremonies at Riverside t
Park, on Monday last, attracted much attention by
the fine appearance of the comrades and the effl- t
ciency and lack of display with which they per
formed their duties. Commander Sam, Minnes and $
Quartermaster George J. Wenck were in charge,
and it is needless to say that thoir work was well j
performed.
The first annual camp-fire of Perry Relief Corps
will take place at Euler’s Broadway Park, Brook
lyn. E. D., to-morrow evening. Professor Bauer s c
Thirty-second Regiment band will furnish the t
music.
Colonel William Seward, Jr., commanding the c
Ninth Regiment, has invited the veterans to attend
Divine service with the regiment this evening. The
invitation has been accepted, and the veterans will I
assemble at their headquarters at six P. M., in citl I
zen’s dress. The services will be conducted by the I
chaplain, Rev. Dr. E. A. Reed, in the church corner I
of Madison avenue and Fifty-seventh street. The
next regular meeting of the Veteran Association
will be held on the evening of Monday, June 14th.
A full attendance is requested.
Lew Morris Post, 121, of Albany, decorated the
grave of Col. L. O. Morris on Monday last very ’
handsomely. It also decorated the grave of Gen.
Von Steinwehr with aG.A. R. badgo, in the centre »=
of which was “Steinwehr Post 192, G, a, R.” This
was sent to Albany by the latter post. Another
handsome decoration was a star composed of roses, g
the gift of two children, Grace O’Connor and Millie "
White, who raised the necessary funds by giving a
Children’s entertainment.
Tho 165th Regiment N. Y. Vols. (2d batallion Dur- '
yea Zouaves) alter the parade on Monday, proceeded
to Greeewood Cemetery and decorated the graves of
Lieut. Carville and Qartermaster Ellsworth. A
sumptuous banquet was afterward partaken of at
headquarters provided by the former major of the
regiment, now Gen. Felix Agnus, editor of the Bal
timore American, who was in command of the regi
ment for the first time in twenty-three years, The ■
veterans enjoyed themselves heartily and sat up
rather late.
The grand entertainment, ice cream and cake
festival of the Woman’s Veteran Relief Corps, will ’
be held at No. 70 East Fourth street, near Bowery,
on Monday evening, June 7th. Comrades and their
wives and families are cordially invited. It prom
isee to be one of the events of the season. Sons of 1
veterans and others are requested not to forget to
bring their girls. Think of it—ice cream and cake. .
A delegation of comrades from Reno Post visited (
the grave of their late comrade, Harlan P. Hager,
at Greenwood Cemetery, and decorated the same
with choice flowers and flags under becoming ■
ceremonies. Comrade Hager held the position of I
quartermaster for over eight years in the post, and I
for his kindness and faithfulness was much bo- 1
loved by his comrades; hence this tribute of re
spect. _
Important. —When you visit or leave
New York city, save baggage, expressage, and $3
Carriage hire, and stop at the Grand Union Hotel,
opposite Grand Central Depot. 600 elegant rooms,
fitted up at a cost of one million dollars, $1 and up
ward per day. European Plan. Blevator. Restau
rant supplied with the best. Horse cars, stages and
elevated railroad to all depots. Families can live <
better for less money at the Grand Union Hotel than <
at any other first-claes hotel in the city.
Third Annuil Excursion and Picnic
OF
Lebanon Lodge Association,
F. and .A.. M.,
TO
IDLEWILD GROVE,
TUESDAY, JULY 20th, 1886.
A commodious steamer and the barge ” Walter Sands”
will leave U. S. Barge Office. Battery, at 9 A. M.; South
Fifth street, Brooklyn, E. D., at 9:30 A. M.; and foot of
East Thirty-second st., E. R., at 10 A. M. sharp. i
TICKETS, FIFTY CENTS EACH,
to be had ot members of the lodge and on the dock on the
morning of the excursion.
summerHwmes
ON THE
PICTURESQUE ERIE.
Containing hundreds ot reliable Summer boardine--
places, with full information as to prices, attractions,
Ac., is ready lor distribution, and can be obtained at any
ot the ticket offices of the Erie Railway. Applications by |
mall will receive prompt attention.
JNO. N. ABBOTT, General Passenger Age nt,
No. 21 Cortlandt street.
CONSUMPTIONCANBfiCUBED.
S HALL’S
BALSAM k
Cures Coughs, Colds, Pneumonia, Con
sumption, Bronchial Difficulties, Bron
chitis, Hoarseness, Asthma, Croup,
Whooping Cough, Influenza, and all
Diseases of the Breathing Organs. It
soothes and heals the Membrane of
the Lungs, inflamed and poisoned by
the disease, and prevents the night
sweats and the tightness across the
chest which accompany it. CON
SUMPTION is not an incurable mal
ady. HALL’S BALSAM will cure
you, even though professional aid
fails. For sale by all Druggists.
JOHN P. HENBY & CO., New York.
for Illuminated Book.
TOOLS.
grand, square and upright.
JPI 11 ANO COVERS, PIANO SCARFS,
TABLE COVERS, STOKE STOOLS,
MUSIC CABINETS and STANDS, larg
est assortment, lowest prices.
F. NEPPERT, Manufacturer
and importer. No. 390 Canal street,
West Broadway, N. Y.
> iry (Sum
f
THE GREAT SALE
NOW IN PROGRESS AT
EM Ridley & Sons,
tad, Allen and Orchard sts.,
INJEW YOKK,
Presents Bargains
which possess honest merit and advant
ages seldom to be enjoyed by the pur
chasing public.
THIS SALE
is made necessary, owing to our inten
tion to Erect (about July Ist), on which
the old buildings now standing on 125
feet of our Grand Street Front, are torn
down, a
NEW BUILDING,
TO BE A FIVE-STROY IRON FRONT
STRUCTURE.
This will necessarily require a
REDUCTION OF STOCK
and condensing of all departments, made imperative by
the contraction of space.
EVERY DEPARTMENT
throughout the establishment will display upon the
counters
THE BARGAINS
we are offering, each of which will be
found ticketed in plain figures, and
showing a bona fide reduction in many
instances of at least
50 Per Cent.
THIS IS A GENUINE SALE, and we give our assur
ance that in using the WORD BARGAIN, we do so in
full sense of the meaning of the word, and in full con
fidenca that prices are such as to make a gainful and
satisfactory transaction to all visiting our establishment
on this eccasslon.
The Extensiveness of
Our Stock
has no parallel in this or neighboring
cities, if indeed, it has in the country
at large. We mention this fact merely
to convey to the mind of the reader
the largeness of assortments and the
smalluess of any possible disappoint
ment.
Station of the Second Avenue Elevated
directly opposite the entrance to our es
tablishment. Fare on this line now being
only five cents.
Edw. Ridley & Sons,
309, 311, 311 1-2 to 321
STREET,
56 to 70 ALLEN St.; 59 to 65 ORCHARD ST.,
NEW YORK.
Jordan
and.
Moriarty,
167, 167 M, 169, 171 and 173 Chatham street.
LONGER TIME AND EASIER TERMS GIVEN THAN BY
’ ANY OTHER HOUSE IN THE CITY.
CASH OR SPECIAL CREDITS IF REQUIRED.
Furniture, Carpets,
Oil-Cloths, Bedding,
Stoves, Refrigerators,
<fcC.
Housekeepers who are desirous
of furnishing their homes for the
Spring and Summer, can get the
best assorted stock of PABLOB,
DINING-ROOM FURNITURE
and CARPETS of every descrip
tion. Such as
Wilton, Moqnettes, Body Brus
sels, Tapestry Brussels
and. Ingrains,
i. nd on the Most Liberal Terms
of Payment at
Jordan & Moriarty’s
167, 169, 171 and 173 Chatham street.
Having purchased
500 Pieces India Pongees
in new and desirable styles,
will offer the same very much
below former prices.
13Je are offering the balance of
our
Paris and City-made Costumes
AT VERY MODERATE PRICES.
"Wraps, Long Coats, Ulsters,
jackets, etc.
NIBLO’S GARDEN. Reserved Seats, 50c.
FIRST TIME IN AMERICA.,
THE GREAT LONDON SUCCESS,
Conquest and Pettit’s grand Melodrama,
BOUND TO SUCCEED.
Played in London tor 28 weeks.
REALISTIC SCENES AND EFFECTS.
~ A STRONG METROPOLITAN CAST.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
June 14, Mrs, G, C, Howard—UNCLE TOM'S CABIN-
PEOPLE’S THEATRE.
MR. h. c. MINER... .Sole Proprietor and Manager.
Every Evening, Wednesday and Saturday Matinees,
The great sensational Comedy Drama,
ONE OF THE BRAVEST.
Illustrated by a strong company of Comedians.
THE STARTLING FIRE SCENE.
THE CHINESE OPIUM DEN.
A GREAT FIREMAN’S PLAY.
rjIONY PASTOR’S THEATRE.
Monday, June 7th.
Sixth and Last Week of
Dau Sally’s Corner Grocery.
Souvenirs to Ladies at every Performance.
iLa:t Laughing Matnecs Tuesday and Friday.
IVTATIONAL THEATRE,
A.N Nos. 101 and 106 Bowery.
MISS MAMIE WALLACE,
supported by a strong company, in
east lyxne, or the elopement.
frank BUSH, the inimitable.
MLLE. ZITTELLA and MATT FLYNN.
s MINNIE LEE, JOHN CARROLL, Ac., Ac.
Admission: 35, 25. 15 and 10 cents.
Matinees: Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
WINDSOR THEATRE?
Bowery, below Canal street.
FRANK BJMURTHa SolejManager.
To morrow evening. Wednesday and Saturday Alatinees,
ATKINSON’S COMEDY COMPANY,
In the new musical version oi
PSSK’S BAD BOY.
Popular Prices—7s, 50, 35 and 25 cents.
Next ueek—COLLEEN BAWN.
Grand opera house.
Reserved seats (orchestra circle and balcony), 500.
THIS WEEK ONLY (Wednesday and Saturday Matinees).
MR GEORGE C. BONIFACE,
in the great spectacular production,
THE STREETS OF NEW YORK!
A car load oi scenery! An army of people 1 Greatest
fire scene ever witnessed!
MONDAY, JUNE 7, GRAND FIREMEN S PARADE.
Volunteer Firemen in line. Old fashioned engine, etc.
TTNION SQUARE THEATRE.
VJ Under the management of J. M. HILL.
FRANK DUMONT’S Society s Preference Everywhere
•BURLESQUE, McNISH. JOHNSON AND
LITTLE SLAVIN’S
FLY REFINED MINSTRELS.
COON. THE
EVERY EVENING. MINSTREL SUCCESS
Matinees Wednesday OF
and Saturday.THE SEASON.
Koster & bial’s, To-Night.
SACRED CONCERT.
Spec;al Bill of Vo al and Instrumental Novelties and
Selections irom the Operetta
Charity Bogins at Home.
To-morrow Evening continuation of the popular craze
I X I O N.
with change o specialties and music.
FJIHEISS’S MUSIC HALL AND AL
HAMBRA COURT,
Fourteenth street, near Third Avenue.
CONCERT EVERY AFTERNOON and EVENING.
SUNDAY EVEXING, JUNE 6,
Appearance of MR. FREDERICK N. INNES,
The World's Greatest Trombone Virtuoso.
CASINO, Broadway and 39th st.
The Most Successful Comic Opera ever presented
at the Casino,
ERMINIE.
Great cast, new and beautiful costumes, scenery, Ac.
Roof Garden Promenade Concert after the opera.
Admission, including both entertainments, 50c.
BIJOU OPERA HOUSE.
Evening at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2.
THE i Sydney Rosenfeld’s adaptation of
BRIDAL Audran's -Le Berment d'Amour.”
TRAP. IROLAND REED and a great cast.
STANDARD THEATRE. 2d MONTH.
Houses Crowded to see
HOYT'S
TIN SOLDIER.
EveningsatjJ.Matinee Saturday at 2.
WALLACK’S. SECOND WEEK.
AUTHORIZED PRODUCTION.
THE CROWING I McCAULL OPERA
HEN. I COMI JUE COMPANY,
With COMPOSER’S ORIGINAL ORCHESTRATION.
3~D AVE. THEATRE. J. M. Hill, Man’r.
BIG 4 COMEDY AND SPECIALTY CO.
Smith. Waldron, Martin and Haley.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
Next Week, Rose Lisle in SEA OF ICE.
" SANS SOUCI MUSIC HAIL,
Broadway and W. 31st st
T. E. GOULD Manager
FRANK LAWTONstage Manager
This handsome edifice is crowded nightly by the upper
ten of the metropolis.
FIVE HOURS OF SOLID AMUSEMENT.
Those wishing to drive away ,tbe blues should visit this
cosy resort and witness oue of the most unique and novel
performances ever given in this or any other city in
America.
New attractions for the coming week; all of the old
favorites retaintd. Oir elegant orchestra teach one a
soloist) will discourse all of the popular airs irom the
leading operas, con ed es, <tc.
POSITIVELY CLOSED ON SUNDAYS.
HARRY HILL’S THEATRE, Houston
and Crosby streets.—Grand Athletic and Variety
Show every night. Sunday Concert.
storage, etc.
LHCOLN SAFE DEPOSIT CO.
AND
Fireproof Storage Warehouse,
Kos. 82 to 38 East Forty-second st.,
OPPOSITE GRAND CENTRAL DEPOT,
AND
Nos. 45 and 47 East Forty-first st.
Boxes Rented from $lO per year
Upward.
Silver and Valuables Stored under
Guarantee.
Rooms or space rented in the FIRE-PROOF STORAGE
DEPARTMENT.
Carting and Packing done on brief notice.
T. L. JAMES, President.
J. R. VAN WORMER, Sec, and General Manager.
‘SECURITY,
AND
PRIVACY.
Safe Deposit Vault
OF THE
National Park Bank
OF
NEW YORK,
Nos. 214 and 216 BROADWAY.
Open Daily, Except Legal Holidays, from
9 A. M. to 4 P. M.
HOTEL,
NOS. 11. 13 and 13 EAST BROADWAY.
FINEST APPOINTED HOTEL ON THE EAST SIDE,
SHE CHOICEST WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
GEORGE BECHTEL’S LAGER BEER.
FORMERLY OF WILLIAM A.ND pVahL StSeetS _
Everett’s hotel
AND GRAND DINING ROOMS,
ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN.
ba am.AT and vbsey, between Washington
BBUVAU. WEST gTRBET3 _
NEW YORK.
SAMUEL H. EVERETT,
PropriAWT. _
Important Notice to the Traveling Public
and Shippers of Freight.
THE STEAMERS OF THE
PEOPLES’ LINE,
DREW AND DEAN RICHMOND,
Will make regular trips to ALBANY, connecting for all
points North and West, from Pier 41, N. R., foot of Canal
street, at 6 P. M. daily, Sundays excepted.
STATE ROOMS WARMED.
N. B.—Freight received until the hour ot departure;
W. W. EVERETT. President.
EXCEXSIOR. HAII,
No. 327 11B0OME ST., near BOWERY.
GENERAL DEPOT FOR
GEO. BECHTEL’S EXCELSIOR LAGER BEER.
CHOICEbT WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
SYLVESTER D. SCHAFFNER, Proprietor.
TV* S dRI fl g Any one can become no
B 63 1 1 I I thoroughly posted in three
■■ 11 I M weeks reviewing with The
L_ r? BJ I I Common School Question
■■ BIW ■ ■ Book as to successfully pass
the most difficult and teenni
cal legal examinations ior leacheis’ certifi
cates.
By its aid thousands of young people earn
an honorable and lucrative livelihood, n
25,000 sold last year. ££
Full descriptive circulars and speci Eg
men pages sent for stamp.
Agents Wanted. H
A SCHOOL
Caldwell, Racine Co., V U I | U U
WISCONSIN.
1845 . . - . . . 138 S
BARNUM’S.
Immense Sale of Clothing.
ALL-WOOL CASSIMERE SACK SUIT. CUT STRAIGHT
IN FRONT, 815.
FINE BLACK CORKSCREW, DOUBLE BREASTED
PRINCE ALBERT SUIT. FOR 830: SOLD ELSE
WHERE FOR S2B.
BLACK CORKSCREW, FOUR-BUTTON CUTAWAY
SUIT, sls.
ALSO FINE BROWN CORKSCREW, FOUR-BUTTON
CUTAWAY SUIT, $lO.
NORFOLK JACKETS OF VARIOUS PATTERNS AT
VERY LOW PRICES.
OUR BOYS’ DEPARTMENT CONTAINS MANY NOV
ELTIES.
MOURNING SUITS FOR BOYS AND CHILDREN,
FROM BLACK CHEVIOT AND ASSABET SUITINGS.
$3.50 TO $lO.
FULL LINE OF YOUTHS’ 4-BUTTON CUTAWAY AND
STRAIGHT FRONT SACK SUITS.
MEN’S FURNISHING GOODS, HATS. Ac.
WE ARB AGENTS FOR STACY. ADAMS A CO.’S
CELEBRATED $3 CALF SEAMLESS SHOE.
My 3F W
Wb /
All customers buying $15.00
or over will receive an elegant
Patent Xever Stem-Winding
WATCH
(AND CHAIN).
Guaranteed Perfect Time Keepers.
S. C. BARNUM & GO.,
196,198 and 200 Chatham Sq.
Grand Display
of
Summer Suitings.
CASSIMERES, WORSTEDS, SERGES,
Domestic and Imported.
Prices to Suit All.
Samples and Self Measurement Rules sent
on request.
145, 147,149 Bowety
and
771 Broadway,
Cor. Ninth Street.
Bowery Stores Open Evenings.
the ©able.
GRATEFUL—COMFORTING.
Epps's Cocoa.
BREAKFAST.
“By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws which
govern the operations of digestion and nutrition, and by
a careful application of the fine properties cf well
selected Cocoa. Mr. Epps has provided our breakfast
tables with a delicately flavored beverage which may
eave us many heavy doctors’ bills. It is by the judicious
use of such articles of diet that a constitution maybe
gradually built up until strong enough to resist every
tendency to disease. Hundreds of subtle maladies are
floating around us ready to attack wherever there is a
weak point. We may escape many a fatal shaft by keep
ing ourselves well fortified with pure blood and a prop
erly nourished frame.”— Civil Service Gazette.
Slade simply with boiling water or milk. Sold only in
half pound tins by Grocers, labeled thus:
JAMES EPPS & CO., Homoeopathic Chemists,
London, England.
©liters.
JL. STROUB’S OYSTER BAY, No.
• 2369 THIRD AVENUE, between 128th and 129th
sts., is furnishing oysters by the quart and hundred, and
Is delivering on the half shell at all hours. The proprie
tor. John L. Stroub, is the patentee of the Clam Roaster
which Is used at most all hotels, oyster houses, and by
private families throughout the country with great satis
faction. They are sold at all the house furnishing stores
throughout the U. 8. Principal Depots: John L. Stroub’s
Oyster Bay, 2369 3d av.; John L. Stroub’s Family Oyster
House. 93 Canal st.; John L. Stroub’s River View Hotel,
foot of 125th street. North River. New York City.
good ni:w-j
Sigil -TOLADIESJL.
Greatest Inducements ever offered
Now’s your time to get up orders for
our celebrated Teas and
Coffees and secure a beautiful
I&dgfa&Afc’l Gold Band or Moss Rose China Tea
SMBra Set, or Handsome Decorated Gold
Rand Moss Rose Dinner Set, or Gold Band Moss
Decorated Toilet Set For ftill particulars address
THE GREAT AMERICAN TEA CO.,
(P. O. Box 289.1 81 and 38 Veaey rt.. New
SECRET OF A BEAUTIFUL FACL
■ Every lady desires to be
considered handsome. The
most important adjunct to
beauty is a clear, smooth,
soft and beautiful skin.
With this essential a Lady
appears handsome, even if
her features are not perfect
Ladies afflicted with Tan,
Freckles, Rough or Dis
colored Skin, should lose no
time in producing and ap
plying
LAIRD’S BLOOM OF YOUTH.
It will Immediately obliterate
all such imperfections, and Is
entirely harmless. It has been
chemically analyzed by the Board of Health of New York
City and pronounced entirely free from any material injuri
ous to the health or skin. 75 Cents Per Bottle,
SCIATICA
Sometimes called SCIATIC
RHEUMATISM is one of
the most painful and obstinate
W of nervous diseases. But it and
HL all forms of NRURAIi
% BA <«IA , NERVE PAINS and
NERVE and BRAIN Dis-
eases, can be cured by using
Sleeplessness, Nervous Dyspepsia,
Paralysis, Locomotor Ataxia,
Opium Habit, Headache,
Drunkenness, Ovarian Neuralgia,
Hysteria, Nervous Exhaustion,
Neuralgia, Epilepsy, '
Sick Headache, St. Vitus’s Dance,
Sciatica, Neurasthenia, &c.
This is in no sensea PATENT MEDICINE. Com
tains no Opiates or Chloral. It is a Nerve and Brain
Food Tonic, and is the best Natural Tonic and Rest
orative known. Illustrated Treatise on Nervous
Diseases, Exhaustion, Opium Habit, &c. sent FREE i
to any address. $2.00 per Bottle.
Your Druggist keeps It, I resh.
SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE CO., 174 Fulton St., N. Y |
To-Night.

ARNOLD,
CONSTABLE & CO.
FINE CARPETS
and
ORIENTAL RUGS.
Are offering some exceedingly
beautiful specimens of AXMIN
STEK, WILTON, MOQUETTE!
and VELVET CARPETINGS,
which have just been received.
Special attention is invited to
our
BUG AND MATTING STOCK,
which. contains many great nov*
elties.
BZIOADWAY, cor. 19th st.
FRESH EGGS.
A FEW FAMILIES CAN HAVE
New-Laid Eggs Delivered at
their Houses
BY ADDRESSING “ FARMER,” BOX No. 1775,
NEW YORK POST-OFFICE.
Can refer to this paper as to reliability.
He ETS"I m
The Justly Celebrated and
W orld-Famed
EXCELSIOR
LAGER BEER
MANUFACTURED BY
GEORGE BECHTEL
XS STRXCTZT PURE.
It is the FINEST FLAVORED
and MOST WHOLESOME Beer
before the public. It is pro
nounced the
BEST AND PUREST BEER
by eminent Physicians and Chem
ists, and they recommend it for
INVALIDS as well as the robust.
It has received
MEDALS
from PHILADELPHIA, NEW
YORK, PARIS, SYDNEY and
JAPAN for excellence and puri
ty, and
STANDS UNRIVALED!
This celebrated beer is now put up ia
bottles expressly for Family Use and
Exportation.
AH communications should be ad
dressed to
GEO. BECHTEL,
Stapleton, Staten Island, N. I.
LOST MANHOOD and GENERAL DEBILITY.
Varicocele & Spermatorrhoea safe & speedily cureci
ABSOLUTE SUCCESS GUARANTEED
when other treatment fails. Our TREATISE and
DIRECTIONS for Home Cur© MAILED FREE
GREVILLE BEMEPY AGENCY, 141 Broadway, N. Y.
WE AK ME N. & B d. e I X
sions quickly cured by Dr. Cooper’s English Vigor Pills.
Sent by mail, $1 per box. Address
E. R. Co.. 47 Broad street. New York.
LEAN LADIES
Harmless and certain. Particulars 4c. WILCOX.
SPECIFIC MEDICINE CO., Philadelphia, Pa>_
IMPOTENT MEN
Be they Young or Old,
having Lost those
• ttrl b utOß
PERFECT MAIIHOOD
H a y Regain Quickly
Sexual Power
Procreative Abilitt,
Pl-0/. Jean Civiale. BY THE USE OF
The Civiale Remedies.
They cure every trace of DEBILITY, BPER
MATORSUHEA, VARICOCELE and every
form of Seminal loss and weakness whether due
to Youthful Folly, Abuse, or Natural Failure.
This treatment originated by PROF. CIVIALE.
adopted in every HOSPITAL in FRANCE and
unqualifiedly endorsed by the Medical Profession,
is EASILY APPLIED, PAINLESS, QUICK,
and above all LASTING IN ITS RESULTS.
FREE TO ALL.
will send free to any earnest inquirer, our splen
did illustrated 64 page medical work, giving symp
toms of all forms or Sexual Disease, description
of this treatment, prices, testimonials and news
paper endorsements, Ac., <Src.
We are also agents for the new and certain to
cure, Self-Adjusting and Glove Fitting Cradle
Compressor, for the thorough and radical cure,
without surgery, of
VAR9COCELE
Consultation with full Medical Staff, FREE.
Civiale Bemadial Agency,l74 Fulton st.,N.Y.
BiiLfiC=aS»
tive.—Kapid and B 3 gTI ft ft extraordinary I
cure of all dis- Bsd a9 a | 11 charges, recent
rMxw mAIIIU
brated Dr. Ricobd, and is found ■ aA >q |[V
to an re " n n
Sold by all Druggists. LiUUIiL
A life experience. Remarkable and quick cures. Trial pacx
eges. Consultation and Books by mail FREE. Address
£ Dr & CO,, LOUISIANA, MO-
EPILEPSY permanently cured
£ JL .A. by a new system of treatment. TWO
Trial Bottles sent free. Send for Treatise giving:
full particulars. Address, JSpilcptic TpTPTIQ
ItemeduCo., 47 Broad St.. N. 7. A JL I.KJ
■QTT ‘E’Q Instant relief. Final curein 10
K~ 18 j Fiej. days, and never returns. No purge, no
salve no suppository. Sutterers will learn of a simple
remedy Free,by addressing U. J. Mason, 78 Nassau st., N.Y
CAI/ B B F" Bl suffering from the ef-
W ul A iV Sa l&l fects of youthful er-'
" Ewi b ilrors, early decay, lost
manhood, etc. I will send a valuable treatise (.Baled)
containing full particulars for home cure, free of
charged Address frrof.F. 0. FOWLER, Moodus, Conm_
riIAPEWORM REMOVED IN TWO
I HOURS.-A PERMANENT CURE GUARANTEED
IN EVERY CASE. Prof. A. W. ALLEN, No. 604 GRAND
street. New York City. ALLEN’S SWEET WORM WA
FERS, a positive cure for STOMACH and PINWORMS.
All druggists. Pamphlet freft
Tms of tafisy
I .jMM ii ■—a— Sealed particulars 2 etg,
Specific Medicine Oowf Madelphla. fth
TYISEASES of Men Only; Blood Poison,.
I J skin diseases, inflammation; obstructions bladder,
kidneys and other organs; weakness, nervous and general!
debility; mental, physical prostration, 4c., successfully,
treated and radically cured; remarkable cures perfected
in old cases which have been neglecled or unskillfuily
treated - no experiments or failures, it being self-evident
that a physician who confines himself exclusively to the
study of certain classes ot diseases, and who treats thou
sands every year, must acquire greater skill in those
branches than one in general practice. DR. GRINDLE*
No. 171 West 12th street, between 6th and 7th avenues.
tl ARMLESS, SURE AND QUICK.”—
J. COMPOUND EXTRACT COPAIBA, CUBEBS
AND IRON is a certain and speedy cure. Price sl, by
mail Al the OLD DRUG STORE, No. 2 First avenue
corner Houston street, and by druggists generally.

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