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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, September 19, 1886, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85026214/1886-09-19/ed-1/seq-8/

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®ta police gUAitK.
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HUMORS OF THE POLICE.
Passed the Fire Lines and was Clubbed—
Might be Made a Detective if He Hunts
Up the Complainant Against Him-Didn’t
Like the Manner of Arrest—The Way
Sometimes a Dollar is Made—He Gets
Dirty Water on His Head—Oath Against
Oath—Case Upon Case. Two of Them
“ Drunks”—What Neuralgia Did-Plstol
Practice in the Station House.
BEFORE COMMISSIONER VOORHIS.
The citizens had a field day at headquarters last
Wednesday. There were no less than fifteen com
plaints against officers charged with assault, and
with assault and arrest without cause.
CLUBBED WITHOUT CAUSE.
Albert Runkel, a confectioner, on September 2d,
was up in the vicinity of Fifty-fourth street and
Seventh avenue. An alarm of fire had brought a
crowd there, but he was not aware of a fire, he saw
none, and no fire trucks. It seems, however, that
the fire lines had been formed, and in passing
through them on his way to a customer, the officer
turned round suddenly, and seizing him, shoved
him up against a railing and clubbed him on the
head, shoulders and body, and arrested him. In the
Station House a false charge was made against him
and be was locked up over night.
At Court in the morning while he stood in front
of the bar, the officer spoke in such a low tone he
could not hear what was said. He was asked if he
went through the fire lines; he said if he did it was
not intentionally, He was fined $5, but five minutes
after the fine was remitted.
Threelcitizens, entirestraugers to Mr.Runkel, said
they saw the arrest and the clubbing, which they
considered unjustifiable. The doctor who visited
Runkel testified to the abrasions on the head and
arm, which must have been caused by a club.
The officer admitted making the arrest, as Runkel
had gone beyond the fire lines, but denied the club
bing. His stick weighed a pound; if he had hit
Runkel on the head he would have fractured the
young man’s skull.
MUST HUNT UP THE COMPLAINANT.
Mrs. McCullagh was not present to prosecute the
charge she had preferred again-t Officer Raleigh.
She charged that Raleigh and another officer sat on
the back stoop and drank beer, and abused her and
her son. He admitted sitting on the back stoop,
hut denied drinking beerand using the language
charged. Although the woman then lived in the
house, he did not know her. Since the charge had
been made she had moved, where to he did not
know, but he heard Greenpoint.
" See if .you can’t get a hold of her, and see what
a good officer you are in hunting up people,’* said
the Commissioner. "The Commissioners might
then make a detective of you. Try and bring that
woman here. I will lay it over and see if you can’t
;get a hold of her."
The case went over.
WHY AN ARREST WAS MADE.
Ripper was charged with making the false arrest
of Isaac Kahn, a dealer in hats, in Grand -street.
Kahn said two boys came in his store between
tw one o’clock to buy a hat. He offered to
sell them a $1.75 hat for sl. He wrapped up the
old hat in paper and they ran out of the store. He
then went out to dinner, and meeting the officer
and the boys he was asked why he did not-give the
boy his hat. He was ordered to go back and give
the boy the hat. He went back and gave the boy
his hat and he questioned the right of the officer to
interfere in his business. With that he charged the
officer with striking him a violent blow and dragging
him out of the store, and through the street like a
felon. When asked to walk without being held, the
officer said "No, you'll go this way,’’ held by the
arm, through Grand street where he was known.
The officer said Kahn took forcible possession of
the boy’s hat. The boy reported his loss at the
Station House, and the sergeant told him to get the
officer on post. He met Kahn and ordered him
back to the store and give the boy his hat. Then
the officer arrested him, but used no violence or
club, only took him by the arm as he would any
prisoner. He told him he would have to go, there
was no use in making a rumpus.
•• What charge was preferred?” asked the Com
missioner.
" Petty larceny. He was told by Justice Patter
son if brought before him again he would be dealt
with severely. The boy was bare-headed when I
saw him.’’
Three witnesses who were present swore no vio
lenc was committed.
BOUNCED, BUT DIDN’T CLUB.
Between 6 and 7 o’clock, Henry, of the,Third pre
cinct, was charged with assaulting citizen Edward
Butler, and did not arrest him.
Butler said he was at the Gunard dock and stood
with his hands behind his back, when the officer
came up and said, "Get away from here," and
struck him. On the 15th of August he was assault
ed in the same way.
The officer said the ship had just landed six hun
dred cabin passengers. Butler stood on the Cunard
dock, and made believe he was a longshoreman, and
had demanded payment for putting a trunk on a
hack. The deck hands or the hackman does that
free. He was not connected w’ith the boat and had
no business to make a demand. The officer would
have arrested him, but they were short-handed,
and he only shoved him in the street, where he be
longed.
The hackman testified to the illegal demand
made on his passenger, and all the officer did was
shove the man away.
ASSAULTED, BUT NOT ARRESTED.
Andrew Faust, a cigarmaker, residing at No. 228
Avenue C. said he was assaulted by officer Kelly,
who struck him with his club and didn’t arrest
him.
The cfgar makers were on a strike, and he was
standing opposite where he lives. A lady present
was working in the shop, and when she and others
S came out the children hollered •• Scab—scab !’* She
stood on the corner, and a policeman followed her,
and she was about to have a woman arrested. Com
plainant didn't say anything when he was pushed
away and clubbed. He jumped in his own house
and the officer tried to follow in. Complainant was
clubbed five times.
The officer sa.d the lady present asked him to ar
rest Faust. He asked what for. She said he had
called her a " and scab." He told her to go
and get a warrant. The crowd then swarmed
around him, till two other officers came, and the
people above threw dirty water on them, but al
though be scattered the crowd he used nis club in
no way. The crowd was such a jam he could have
used it only on the legs—he could not raise it to hit
on the head. If he had clubbed complainant he
would have arrested him.
DENIED SITTING.
O’Brien, of the Twenty-eighth Precinct, denied
sitting on a soap box. Roundsman Bach said he came
down on a Third avenue car to the station house,
and saw O’Brien si'tting on a small soap box. There
was an electric light and there could be no doubt of
his being seated—he saw him as plain as he did
now.
"Couldn’t he have been standing in front of it
and appear as if sitting? ’ asked the Commissioner.
•• No, the box wasn’t high, it would make the dif
ference of a foot on him. I saw him get up."
"It is a question of veracity between us," said
the officer. "He came up and said: ‘What, are
you here ?’ He did not accuse me of sitting and we
talked two minutes.”
" What did he say ?"
"Are you sitting on the apple-stand? I said
•No, sir.’"
"Has this roundsman any feeling against you ?”
" No.”
"Have you had any difficulty with him?”
"No.”
"Is there any reason that he should make the
charge against you ?”
"No."
CHARGES PILED UP.
John J. Walsh, of the Twelfth Precinct, but two
months on the force, had six complaints against
him. He had counsel and said he was not ready to
go to trial. Two charges were for being intoxicated,
one in a liquor store and two off post. He said he
wanted to procure witnesses and he had to consult
with his counsel, Mr. Blunt.
"Was Mr. Blunt to furnish the witnesses?”
"No."
"Why didn’t you have your witnesses?”
"I wanted to consult him.”
"He doesn’t make witnesses. You ought to have
■ them here.”
**l don t understand the proceedings here. I
thought it was advisable to consult with him."
"When did you get the first complaint ?”
* A week or more ago."
"Do you want witnesses in every one of these
charges ? Look over them and see ?’’
In looking over them, ho said every one was
wrong.
There was one case found where there could be
no witnesses, and he was tried on that. He could
not be found from 9:05 till 11:30. The roundsman
saw h m at half past eight, and he looked then as if
he bad been drinking. The roundsman turned and
traveled his post from that time. In going over his
post he rapped and whistled, and received no re
sponse. If the officer was in any lot he was off
post.
The officer said he was ten minutes off post in a
lot. The roundsman said he rapped in front of the
lot.
"Are there any liquor stores on my post ?” asked
the officer.
"Yes, sir;.there is one at 110th and one at 124th
street," said the roundsman. "A man at 110th
street said yon were in there drinking whisky. I
don’t know whether he told the truth or not."
"That is all of this case,” said the Commissioner.
"There are five other complaints against the-officer.
I will adjourn them till Tuesday morning."
CRAZED BY NEURALGIA,
Officer Duncan was absent from his residence
when visited by Police Surgeon McGovern. He
. said he had an attack of neuralgia that drove him
crazy, and he went to see some friends and they
kept him. He reported sick and the surgeon canie
to the house when he was out. He did not expect
the surgeon to call, apd went and saw another doc
. tor. It was the first time he ever called iu a doc
tor.
“Did you expect thephysician to visit you?”
"I nearly went out of my mind. Afterward I
knew I had-done wrong. I was really sick.”
DANGEROUS SPORT.
Sullivan, of the Sixth Precinct, threw a wet towel
at Farley in the sitting-room in the station-house.
Sullivan said the charge was (true. He threw iu in
fun.
•• What was the cause of it ?”
“A spirit of fun. It hit him <on the leg. I was
.about fifty feet from him. We were the best of
friends, joking and carrying on."
Earley said he didn’t know who .threw the cloth.
Sullivan was then put on trial, charged with fir
ing his pistol at Farley’s head. Farley was sitting
.on the bridge of the station-house.
•* Is that charge true ?”
"No, sir,” replied Sullivan.
" What portion of it Is untrue ?’’
" That part putting the pistol to hia head.”
"Did you discharge the pistol ?"
"It discharged itself.”
ff Where was the pistol—in your hand ?”
"Yes. sir. Sitting iu the back room I took the
pistal out and laid it on my lap. I ran out on the
bridge to see who had thrown the towel, and it
went off, five feet from hia head. I was excited
when I rap; I was half asleep. I saw somebody run
on the bridge; I couldn’t toll who threw the cloth.
I bit Farley s foot as I ran. and the pistol went off.”
" You didn’t know who ran ?”
"No.”
"If it had been a criminal he would have es
caped ?”
"He couldn't,"
" You would not recognize him ?’’
"I saw the shadow."
"All I know is that Farley threw the cloth, Sulli
van pursued him and fired the pistol at his head,”
said Capt. McCullough. "There was no passion or
op the part of either of th?
Several officers present saw nothing; they said
they were asleep or half asleep.
FAILED TO REPORT.
Loughlin failed to present himself at 1:30 roll
call, and did not appear till 2:30. He said he came
in at 1:30; the roundsman sat behind the desk, and
he thought the roundsman saw him. He then went
out to get dinner, and returned at twenty minutes
to two.
The roundsman said he didn’t see him.
THE WRONG NIGHT.
It is the duty of an officer to try all his doors on
the last tour. This, Munson of the Ninth Precinct,
failed to do. The roundsman charged that the
doors were not tried after 11:40. He did not lose
sight of him during the tour from that time.
The officer said he tried all the doors on his way
down the last tour.
Two witnesses said they saw him try the doors
near twelve o’clock. They saw him, however, not
on the night that the roundsman saw him.
OUR HRS DEPARTMENT.
THE CHARLESTON FIREMEN —
MISCELLANEOUS FIRE NEWS.
The Board of Fire Commissioners met as usual
last Wednesday, President Purroy in the chair.
A TRIAL.
After the reading of the minutes Fireman George
McTaggart, of Engine Co. No. 33, was placed o-n trial
charged with, first, that having been notified by
House Watchman Mark Kelly that there were not
enough men in company quarters to permit of his
going to his supper, he said, "I don’t care, I'll go
anyhow," and then left the house; second, being
absent without leave for one hour and forty min
utes, and third, with failing to report for duty on
the apparatus floor in answer to an alarm of fire,
and all these offenses occurred on September 6th.
He was appointed in the department March 3d,
1883. and assigned to do duty in Engine Co. No. 33,
and on December 26th, 1883, he was fined the loss of
three days’ pay for disobedience of orders.
In the present case he pleaded guilty to fche first
two charges, and not guilty to the last.
In his own behalf he said : "I went home to sup
per and had a very bad headache. I did not know
whether there were enough men in the house or
not. The house watchman told me I could not go.
I said, ‘I don’t care.’ I went and asked a drug man
what to do for a headache, and he told me to go to a
doctor. I did so and got some medicine, which I
kept taking all tho time, and a tablespoonful when
I went to bed. I got asleep and thus missed the
fire. The medicine made me drowsy. I never went
to the medical officer for a headache, because I
thought I might get over it in a little while."
President Purroy—•• Your excuse don’t help the
case much. There is already one charge against you
before this, and it is just the same as the present
one. This seems to be your failing. You decide
for yourself instead of being governed by your su
perior officer.”
Assistant Foreman Ryan—" He is a good man,
only for those shortcomings. I would hate to see
him transferred to another company.”
President Purroy—•• You should suffer everything
for the good of the service, and before leaving your
quarters you should get permission from your su
perior officer. Now, don’t you come here again on
such a charge."
He was fined five days’ pay.
DID NOT PAY A JUDGMENT.
The adjourned ease of Assistant Foreman John
McLeod Murphy, of Engine Company No. 7, was
next taken up for consideration, and the accused
said;
" The case was opened to-day, and the trial will
be bad on Monday.
The claimant said: "My counsel did not tell m e
that, but he said that the case stood as it was be
fore, and the judgment remains as recorded.”
President Purroy—"Well, we will have to adjourn
this case again, and the next time you come here
you must be prepared to meet it, and present such
evidence of what you say is true, that you can
show us that the charge against you is not true."
The case stands adjourned again until next Wed
nesday.
REQUISITIONS.
There were presented a very large number of
requisitions fox* mason and plumbing work to be
done to the various engine houses, which was or
dered.
HORSES.
By resolution adopted teams of horses were
ordered tor engine companies Nos. 16 and 40.
THE CHARLESTON FIREMEN.
Chief Engineer Shay sent in the following com
munication :
New York, Sept. 15, 1886.
Hen, Henry D. Purroy, President :
Dear Sir : The widespread suffering of the peo
ple of Charleston, S. C., caused by the recent visita
tion of several earthquakes to that city, having
appealed to and received most liberal aid from the
business community. I deem it my duty to ask per
mission from your Honorable Body for authority to
forward subscription lists to the officers and men
of this department for such assistance as they may
feel able to contribute to the officers and men of
the fire department of the city of Charleston, as, in
my opiniou (the community having relied mostly
on their protection since the calamity), they are in
great need of assistance.
Very respectfully,
Charles O. Shay,
Chief of Department.
President Purroy thereupon offered the following,
which were adopted :
Whereas, It is reported that the firemen of the
city of Charleston, 8. C., are in distress, in conse
quence of the disastrous earthquakes which have
occurred in that city; therefore.
Resolved, That the Board of Fire Commissioners
deem it proper that an opportunity asked for by
the chief of the department to subscribe for the re
lief of the firemen of Charleston should be given to
the charitably inclined members of this depart
ment, and hereby authorizes the circulation of sub
scription lists for that purpose.
NEW COMPANIES WANTED.
Chief Shay also sent in a communication stating
that in view of the rapid growth of the upper part
of the city on the west side, it will be necessary in
the near future to increase the fire-extinguishing
force of that part of the city, he therefore suggested
that the Board take such measures as may be neces
sary to procure for the use of this department that
part of the line oi the old Croton aqueduct situated at
the intersection of 107th street and Tenth avenue,
which would make a very desirable location for an
engine and hook and ladder company.
Which was ordered to be sent to the Commission
ers of the Sinking Fund.
FIRE ENGINE ELEVATORS.
The following, taken from the Scientific American,
are President Purroy’s views of utilizing our en
gine houses so as to accommodate two engine com
panies in one building iu order to save space and
expense:
"For some years the necessity of increasing the
number of engines that could be called upon for the
extinction of fires has been realized forcibly by the
fire department of this city. Their power of doing
this has been restricted by unfavorable conditions.
The districts where increased force is most needed
are crowded with houses, and property is held at a
very high valuation. For each engine company a
building twenty-five feet in front and of full depth
is required. The department has not felt able to
purchase new lots enough to carry out their desires.
"Some years ago Mr. Henry D. Purroy. now Presi
dent of the Board, conceived the idea that by utiliz
ing the cellars of engine houses the capacity of
each might bo doubled. At present the cellars re
present little more than waste space. They con
tain a small heating apparatus, and the great part
of their area, equal to that of the working floor, is
useless. He proposed to introduce elevators that
should be sufficiently powerful to raise and lower
an engine or tender, or other apparatus, from floor
to floor. If this idea were successfully carried out,
there would be ample room for a second relay of
men and horses on the upper floors, the extra ap
paratus would be storedin the cellar, and the work
ing floor would be as unobstructed as it now is.
"In the illustration we present Commissioner Pur
roy’s idea in some detail. Sections of the cellar and
working floor are made movable, and are connected
by heavy stanchions, so as to preserve an invariable
distance from each other. When the lower plat
form, sinking into a depression in the cellar floor,
comes to a level therewith, the upper platform is
flush with the working floor. Four guide posts run
from cellar floor to the ceiling of the ground story.
Upon the lower platform an engine or tender
is placed. Alter the regular engine has been called
out, the platforms are raised until the lower one is
even with the working floor. By any simple lock
ing device which may be automatic, the platform
is caught and secured in this position. The second
apparatus is then ready to answer a second alarm.
Our illustration shows the elevator rising as the
regular engine is leaving for a fire.
"By counterpoising, the weight to be raised may
be almost nothing. An engine represents some 10,-
000 pounds. While this seems a large weight, it is
an invariable one, and the elevator may be counter
poised within a few pounds of its load, and might
even be overbalanced, so that the platform, on a
catch being released, would rise automatically. For
such lifting power as may be required, it was
thought that a gas engine might be used.
••The length of the stanchions should be so adjust
ed that the upper platform would strike the ceiling
above or striking pieces attached thereto, and lock
itself there as the lower one came to its place. This
feature was included in the original idea, and ap
pears a very good one.
"With regard to the location of the elevator, it may
be in the front or rear. If in the front, then its up
per platform would always carry the regular engine.
If in the rear, the upper platform would be unoccu
pied, and would count as floor space. As the lower
engine rose, it could be run forward by man power
or the horses could be harnessed as it stood.
"By having it of sufficient length, the extra engine
could be carried up with its pole in place and the
harness hanging from the snap hooks on the lower
surface of the upper platform. On the other hand,
as it takes but a moment to place the pole in its
socket, the smaller elevator may be adopted.
"The widest range for application of power and
other details is still open. A direct or indirect hy
draulic lift may be employed, or a windlass worked
by some form of power would answer. The lower
engine need not be kept upoja the platform, but
may be stored in front or rear of it, and be run on
when the upper one goes out. To guide it between
the stanchions and guide posts, Commissioner Pur
roy has proposed the use of rails on the platform,
similar to those used on street railways.
"The double platform elevator counterpoised is
substantially the original idea, and presents, to our
mind, very great advantages. Plans have been pre.
pared by Messrs. N. Le Brun & Son, architects to
the department, which involve the use of a single
platform elevator worked by hydraulic power.
When the first engine has gone out, the elevator,
whose platform has hitherto formed part of the
working floor, is lowered to the cellar, receives its
engine or ofcher apparatus and rises withj it to the
upper level. Such elevator may be worked by a
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short cylinder directly under it or by an indirect
acting cylinder, such as is in use on most elevators.
"For cities of a more regular shape than New York,
this plan can be worked to even greater advantage.
Three or four houses can be made to coyer a large
area if worked upon this plan. While it seems a
peculiar merit of the method that it can be applied
to old houses, the department, not wishing to risk
a failure, have preferred to wait until a new house
was to bo built to test its merits. This is diw soon
to be done and it promises to offer a satisfactory
solution of a very troublesome problem.
•'The double platform elevator presents the Advan
tage that tho floor is always complete save as the
lower engine is coming up. On the other hand,the sin
gle platform arrangement does away with the ob.
structing stanchions and guide-posts. Each sys
tem, in other words, has its own advantages.”
CHIEF SHORT SEA SICK.
Chief of the Eleventh Battalion, Peter H. Short,
was never soa-sick in his life, but last Monday ho
went down on the steamboat "Patrol ” with several
officers of the Fire Department and a number of
other personal friends, to witness the yacht race.
They went as far as Sandy Hook, and after they had
been outside half an hour, Peter was asking how
salt pork would taste, or how it would do to swal
low a piece of pork with a piece of string attached.
Peter then realized that he was sea-sick, so he gave
Chief Purroy bis dinner ticket, who went down
stairs and had a good, substantial dinner, and
when he came up from the cabin and looked so con
tented after having had such an enjoyable dinner,
Peter got disgusted and said he thought he could
enjoy a meal himself, so he went down to get a din
ner ticket. He took a seat amidships, when a num
ber of police surgeons got around him, and they
asked him if he felt like eating a piece of pork, but
Peter said no, he didn’t think he could keep it on
his stomach. He, a little while afterward, had a se
vere vomiting spell, attended with no trouble
whatever, but the second time he suffered a great
deal, as he had nothing but water to throw off.
The surgeons then put him between decks, and
he did not make his appearance again until the
boat landed at the Battery. Peter got no dinner,
and the "boys" say that this is the first time in a
number of years, when he has been off duty, that
he has been home by nightfall, in the bosom of his
family, Peter said he could stand fire, smoke and
water, but he wanted "no salt water iu his,” nor
could he "go” the rough sea. He asked for his
partner to bathe his aching and fevered forehead
with eau de cologne, so that he might be free from
his pain. Peter said he wanted no more "yacht
ing."
THE "HAVEMEYER" AGAIN,
Next Wednesday tho Board will open proposals
for repairing the fireboat "William F. Havemeyer."
It may be remembered that, a short time ago, this
work was contracted for, but there being some ir
regularity in tho bid, the work had to be readver
tised for.
SICK FIREMEN.
On Wednesday the medical officers reported that
there were twenty-five sick and injured officers and
men in the department.
THE PRESENTATIONS.
The Board on Friday issued through Chief En
gineer Shay the orders relative to the presentation
of the Bennett and Stephenson medals, in substance
as follows:
A brigade of the department will parade Saturday,
September 25th, on the occasion of the presentation
of the Bennett and Stephenson medals to Chief of
the Eleventh Battalion, Peter H. Short, and Foreman
Joseph Shaw, of Hook and Ladder Co. No. 13. The
Hon. Randolph B. Martine, the District Attorney,
will make the presentation address. First Assistant
Chief Engineer Hugh Bonner will command the
brigade.
The first battalion will be commanded by Chief
Joseph F. McGill, and will be composed of Engine
Cos. Nos. 7, 14, 16 and 53, and Hook and Ladder Co,
No. 13.
The second battalion will be commanded by Chief
Peter H. Short, and will be composed of Engine Cos.
Nos. 4,9, 13 and 34, and Hook and Ladder Co. No.
12. Four wheeled tenders equipped with scaling
ladders will be in the line. Each company will have
two officers and ten men. The brigade will form on
Washington square at two o'clock P. M., and the
presentation will take place at three o’clock P. M,
DISMISSED.
The Board held another meeting on Friday morn
ing, all the commissioners present, and they
unanimously dismissed from the department
fireman Patrick McHenry of Hook and Ladder Com
pany No. 15, whose case, in various aspects, has
been before the Board for the last four weeks.
Henry, it will be remembered, had a large num
ber of charges preferred against him,- the principal
ene being intoxicatian, and twice violently assault
ing his foreman, Henry Murray.
His counsel tried for a great while to work the
"insanity dodge" upon the Board, but made a
miserable failure of it, and when Henry was called
yesterday he did not appear, and the Board then
ordered his dismissal as stated above.
THE VOLUNTEER FIREMEN’S ASSOCIATION
BARBECUE.
The barbecue and picnic of- the Volunteer Fire
men’s Association was a greater success, if such
could be, than was the one given last year. From
3 P. M. until midnight a constant stream of
humanity flowed in and out of the gates. It was
estimated that upward of fifteen thousand persons
wore in attendance. The variety of amusements on
the programme, together with the excellent music
furnished by Cappa’s Seventh Regiment band, with
the two flute and drum corps bands made up a
scene that has seldom been witnessed in this or any
other city.
The race between a picked company from the
association and a like number of members of Wash
ington Hook and Ladder Company. No. 1, of Ho
boken, for a gold medal, caused much amusement,
and was won by the latter by twenty-eight seconds.
In the association race for a gold medal, there were
fourteen entries, only four coming in at the finish,
and was won by John Carroll, of No. 53 Engine, Ist;
Maurice Flynn, of Peterson Engine No. 31, 2d, and
Thomas Casey, of Forrest Engine No. 3. being a
good 3d. Thos. F. Goodwin, of Baxter H. and L.
No. 15, won the fat man’s race, with Patrick Keane,
of Eagle Engine No. 13, second.
The Association Badge, in shooting, was won by
Thomas F. Kerrigan, of Engine No. 19, with Mi
chael Ahner of No. 41 Hose, second. The shooting
for a gold medal by volunteer firemens’sons, was
won by Michael Ahner, Jr., and Edward J. Cotter,
second. F. Sasse, of the present Fire Department.
28 Engine, won the first prize, a gold medal, with T.
Kelly, who won the second prize, a gold medal. For
the all comers shooting match, A. Walker, T. Stoct
zel and Michael Ahner, Jr., were a tie. Tho com
mittee will arrange the manner of deciding the
match next Tuesday, when the prizes will bo award
ed.
The fire works were a success, and were very
much enjoyed by the young folks, who are not
treated to such exhibitions as often as they should
be. There was a time in this city when on the 4th
of July every park in the city presented similar
s'cenes.
The burning of the house was next in order, and
caused much merriment. One of the rescuers as
cended the ladder to rescue the imprisoned family,
and while hanging to a rafter some one removed
the ladder from under him. It was while hanging
in this position that the pipe was turned on him
full in the face—wo may add that he dropped. Old
Jefferson engine No. 26 fairly outdone herself by the
stream that she threw. Perhaps it was the ox-roast
that strengthened the old boys’ muscles, that did
•the work.
Philadelphia was represented by Major Wm. A.
Delaney, John G. Hollick, James H. Miller, Albert
Murray and a delegation from the Volunteer Fire
men's Association of that city. Long Branch sent
Chief Engineer Flynn,. Chief Thomas came from
New London, Conn., while large delegations were
present from a radius of hundreds of miles of the
city.
An Officer's Dignity Offended.—
Officer Brennan stood with his back to the dash
board of a Broadway car, when John Gardner came
up behind it driving a truck. Brennan told tho
driver not to drive so near the car. Gaidnerput
his hat one side and smiled. This was construed
into a sneer at the dignity of the law. The driver of
the car just then put on the brakes, and the j>ole of
the truck committed an assault and battery on the
dashboard of the car. Brennan jumped off and
arrested Gardner. Justice Smith discharged him.
EQUAL TO NEW.”
Blankets cleansed, • 75c. per pair.
Lace Cuidains, (ordinary quaiity)7s.c, per pair.
Ladies' and Gentlemeii’f Garments
Dyed mid Cleansed Whole.
L E W AAI) <) * S
French Dying and Cleansing Establishment,
STH AVENUE, cor. W. 14TH ST.
731 6TH AVENUE, NEAR 42D STREET.
276 BTH AVENUE, NEAR 23D STREET
Goods called tor and delivered free.
SEND FOR PRICE LIST.
NEW YORK, BOSTON, BROOKLYN,
PHILADELPHIA.
ISffrs
CAMGLIC SALVE.
The most Powerful Healing
Ointment ever Discovered.
Henry’s Carbolic Salve cures
Sores.
Henry’s Carbolic Salve allays
Burns.
Henry’s Carbolic Salve cures
Bruises.
Henry’s Carbolic Salve heals
Pimples.
Henry’s Carbolic Salve cures
Piles;
Henry’s Carbolic Salve heals
Cuts.
Ask for Henry’s—Take No Other.
OF COUNTERFEITS.
JOHN F. HENBY & CO., New York.
py-Write for Illuminated Book.
THE
YODKG LADIES’ JOURNIL,
For October,
NOW READY, contains a great variety of attractions, In
cluding the commencement of a new story, entitled
“A HANDSOME SINNER.”
A Splendid Colored Triple Fashion Plate of 24 Figures.
The ENLARGED GIGANTIC FASHION SUPPLEMENT,
nearly four feet square, containing
FIFTY-FIVE FASHION ENGRAVINGS
of all the latest Paris Fashions.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS.
Price Reduced to Thirty Cents per Copy.
THE INTERNATIONAL NEWS COMPANY,
General Agents, Nos. 29 and 31 Beekman street, New York.
Subscriptions received for all Foreign Periodicals, but
beware ot canvassers pretending to be our agents.
gfttstvttdm.
L 11) T? XTf 11 I Parisian Lady of experience will
A Av lU-L1 teach her language thoroughly in
six months. Call or address SUCCESSFUL, 249 W. 23rd
Street, New York.
MW.
Jere Johnson, Jr., Auctioneer,
WILL SELL ABSOLUTELY AND WITH
OUT RESERVE
The Bennett Homestead Property
BATH BEACH,
AT 1 O'CLOCK P. M., ON THE PREMISES,
THURSDAY, SEPT. 23. 1886
728 Elegant Building Lots.
400 FEET OF OCEAN FRONT.
30 MINUTES TO NEW YORK CITY BY
BOAT OR RAID.
This is the finest property ever offered at public sale in
the vicinity of New York City. Its unsurpassed beach
and bluff, beautiful drives a id aristocratic surroundings
make it a close rival to Long Branch, while its greater
facilities for reaching tho metropolis commend it far
above its rival as a place of abode tor the banker, profes
sional man, merchant or clerk. The new ferry from the
foot of Thirty-ninth street, which will be running before
Jan. 1. 1887, will, in coune<tion with the present rail
road facilities, bring this property within thirty minutes’
ride of the Battery. The Fifth Avenue Branch of the
Union Elevated is promised before September. 1887, and
will land you at the Brooklyn Bridge in less than thirty
minutes Bath Beach is the most convenient, healthy
and beautiful suburb of New York, and is a home beside
the sea the year round. It has schools, churches, stores,
and every requisite of cultivated society. l ure and
abundant water supply piped to the line of this property.
For cottages, hotels and boarding-houses it has nojequal.
A policy of the Title Guarantee and Trust Company
(capital $750,000), absolutely insuring the title, given
free to each purchaser.
The property can be reached by the Third Avenue.
Fifth Avenue and Court street line of cars, in connection
with the Biooklyn, Bath and West End Railroad. From
New York by the New York and Sea Beach Railroad, and
bv Starin Bath Beach line of steamers.
MUSIC and CODDATION on DAY of SALE.
FOR MAPS AND FREE PASSES TO THE
SALE
Apply to EDW ARD EGOLF.
213 Montague st, Brooklyn, or
JERE JOHNSON, JR.,
62 Liberty st., New York.
pianos.
13 9 A RJ 103 Ele " aut ’ New 3-
s S RS stringed upr’ght and square grand
H B Sa’SaPWlpianos; prices 5275 to $450.
Terms only $lO per month until paid. 100 beautiful 5-
o fave. 12 stop organs, 6 sets of reeds, only SBS. Terms
$5 per month. Every instrument warranted six years.
Also an immense stock of second-hand pianos and or
gans at great bargains for cash or installments $5 to $8
per month. Pianos rented $5 per month and part rent
allowed toward purchase. Old instruments taken in ex-
I change. Send postal for catalogue.
HORDE WATERS & CO.,
No. 124 Filth ave., near Eighteenth st., N. Y.
,
]gr GRAND, SQUARE AND UPRIGHT,
PIANO COVERS, PIANO SCARFS,
TABLE COVERS, STORE STOOLS,
M U SIC CABINETS and STANDS, larg
ISEA est assortment, lowest prices.
F. NEPPERT, Manufacturer
81111 importer, No. 390 Canal street,
near West Broadway, N. Y.
cJGtTwfi).
CLOTHDEPARTMENT
Now open, GENTLEMEN’S fall
and winter Suitings, (Trouser
ings and Overcoatings in the
best makes and newest London
styles. Also, Ladies' plain and
fancy "French,” "English,”
"Scotch” and "Irish” DRESS
CLOTHS in large variety.
1 At.
JL. STROUB’S OYSTER BAY? No.
• 2369 THIRD AVENUE, between 128th and 129th
sts., is furnishing oysters by the quart and hundred, and
is delivering on the half shell at all hours. The proprie
tor, John L. Stroub, is the patentee of the Clam Roaster
which is used at most all hotels,.oyster-houses, and by
firivate families throughout the country with great satis
action. They are sold at all the house furnishing stores
j throughout the U. S. Principal Depots: John L. Stroub'a
| Oyster Bay, 2369 3d av.; John L. Stroub’s Family Ovster
i House, 93 Canal st. ; John L. Stroub’s Bi ver View HoteL
foot of 125th street. North River. New York City.
Everett’s hotel
and grand dining rooms,
ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN.
BARCLAY AND VESEY, BETWEEN WASHINGTON
JMD WEST STREETS,
NEW YORK.
SAMUEL H. EVERETT,
Proprietor.
No. 827 BROOME ST., near BOWERI'.
GENERAL DEPOT FOR
GEO. BECHTEL’S EXCELSIOR LAGER BEER,
CHOICEST WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
■ SYLVESTER D. SCHAFFNER, Proprietor.
THE QUEEN ADJUSTABLE BUTTON CO.
This Button is by far the best in existence. It is simple in its construction, durable, neat and easily adjusted.
THE GREATEST FEATURE CLAIMED IS THAT IT CAN BE USED ON ANY BUTTON.
Its construction can easily be seen by reference to the following cuti
W-V' : - < / \\\ /, s // w/wlsS* 5
113 3
No. 1 simply shows face of the button as it appears when attached.
No. 2 represents the back open, ready for adjustment.
No. 3 shows the back closed after adjustment. To fasten, insert the button within the open shell, then, by
means of the little slot, move the slide around to position shown in cut 3; the button will then remain firmly and
securely in position.
THE PARTICULAR CLAIMS MADE FOR THIS ADJUSTABLE BUTTON ARE AS FOLLOWS:
First.—They can be used on any suit of clothing.
Second.—lt does away with all shanks and sticking processes, and renders button covers, open facing*, eyelet
holes and rings absolutely unnecessary.
Third.—lt is impossible for this device to cut or wear the buttons or button-holes.
Fourth.—They will give longer service than other buttons, as the gilt upon the shells is not affected in cleaning,
as by the usual process ot scouring with injurious substances—(note paragraph No. 3).
Fifth.—The wearers of the Queen Adjustable Button can always rely on this fact, viz.: Any lettering, design, etc.
which may be on the buttons will at all times show distinctly, as the lettering, etc., will always be in their right po
sitions. This is far more than can be claimed ot any other button in the market.
Sixth.—No big hole in centre of the button to spoil the monogram or design. No screw thread to wear out as
with other patent.
The Queen Adjustable Button Co’s, buttons are designed lor the ARMY, NAVY, MIDI
TARY, GRAND ARMY, KNIGHTS TEMPLAR, POLICE and FIREMEN, RAIL
WAY and STEAMSHIP EBIPLOY EES, and for all who use Uniform Buttons.
Correspondence is solicited. Full information regarding prices, designs, etc., will be cheerfully given. Samples
furnished on application to
The QUEEN ADJUSTABLE BUTTON CO., 401 Broadway (Room 15) N. Y. City.
It Is the only Adjustable Button that can he made in Staff Shape for Grand Army
and Militjirj- ' r. A. FQX, Patentee.
I A tri STREET THEATRE. Sept. 20.
JL Tfiz First appearance of
“THE SCAPEGOAT,”
By Sir Charles Young, Authur “Jim, the Penman.”
Act I—The Paul Salvauo Murder, in New Orleans.
Act ll—What a Waste-basket Revealed.
Act lll—"Stand Aside I I Will See His Face.”
Act IV—A Fatal Joy.
Act V—“ Give Me Time, Only Give Me Time.”
„ HENRIETTA CHANFRAU,
Stella Boniface. Helen Bancroft. Myron Leffingwell, Lew
is Baker, Sidney Drew, Horace Vinton, Harry Weaver, Jr.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
STAR THEATRE. BARRETT.
Sept. 20th, Fourth and Last Week,
AIR. LAWRENCE BARRETT.
Monday—RICHELIEU. Friday—A double bill,
MERCHANT OF VENICE and THE KING’S PLEASURE..
Wednesday night and Saturday Matinee,
FRANCESCA DA RIMINI.
Thursday—JULlUS CAESAR. Friday—HAMLET.
Saturday night, closing Mr. Barrett s engagement,
YORICK’S LOVE and DAVID GARRIOK.
STAR THEATRE. SPECIAL.
MONDAY, SEPT. 27,
GENEVIEVE WARD,
W. 11. VERNON
And an Excellent Company.
In Sydney Grundy s most Spirited Comedy,
THE QUEEN’S FAVORITE.
Sale of Seats begins Thursday morning, September 23.
LYCEUM 23d st.
DANIEL FROHMANManager.
Evenings at 8:15. Saturday Matinee at 2.
THE MAIN LINE; Or, RAWSON’S Y,
THE MAIN LINE; Or, RAWSON'S Y,
THE MAIN LINE; Or, RAWSON’S Y,
THE MAIN LINE; Or, RAWSON’S Y,
AN IDYL OF THE RAILROAD.
By Henry C. De Mille and Charles Barnard.
Reserved Seats—soc., 75c., $1 and $1.50. (Telephone).
STANDARD THEATRE.
J. C. DUFF..Lessee and Manager.
Commencing September 25th,
A W ALL STREET BANDIT.
Box Office opens Wednesday morning.
POOLE S THEATRE,
EIGHTH STREET AND BROADWAY.
A POSITIVE SUCCESS.
W. J. SCANLAN
in Shane na Lawn.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY, AT 2.
Reserved seats. 50c., 75c., and S?L Family Circle, 25
WINDSOR THEATRE.
BOWERY, near Canal.
The eminent actor,
NEWTON BEJERS,
In the Superb Spectacular Success,
LOST IN LONDON.
Wonderful Scenery and Great Specialties.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
TO-DAY ! TO-DAY 1 TO-DAY I
Last Sunday in Camp of
BUFFALO BILL’S
WILD WEST.
THIS WEEK THE VERY LAST WEEK.
The Exhibition
MUST CLOSE NEXT SATURDAY NIGHT.
Visit the Camp to day (Sunday), and see how the Sabbath
is observed on the Frontier.
INDIANS ! COWBOYS ’ MEXICANS ’
A DELIGHTFUL SAIL FOR TEN CENTS.
Refreshments on the Grounds.
ADMISSION TO-DAY ONLY 25 CENTS.
Grand opera house.
Reserved seats (orchestra circle and balcony), 50c.
This week, Wednesday and Saturday Matinees.
Second production in New York of James A. Herne's
Successful Comedy-Drama,
THE MINUTE MEN.
New and Beautiful Scenery. An Unexcelled Cast, com
prising James A. Herne, Katharine C. Herne.
A Powerful Company and
UNION SQUARE THEATRE.
Under the management of J. M. HILL.
MONDAY, SEPT. 20, AIM EE
OPENING in
of the MAM ZELLE.
SI ASON.
AIMEE
MATINEE in
SATURDAY MAM’ZELLE.
Sardou’s comedy, MARITA, Monday, Sept. 27.
PEOPLE'S THEATRE.
MR. H. C. MINER.. ..Sole Proprietor and Manager
Every Evening, Wednesday and Saturday Matinees.
The most successful comedy drama
SHADOWS OF A GREAT CITY.
Poweriul Dramatic Company, Magnificent Scenic Ef
fects, Kepiesenting Localities in and around New York
City.
rpONY PASTOR’S THEATRE.
Positively one week only.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th,
First time in New York of the
Farcical Comedy in four acts,
ON THE SAHARA.
By Frank E. Dumm and Alice Crowther.
A DOMESTIC “SIMOON.”
A MISCHIEVOUS “OASIS.”
A BEAUTIFUL PALM TREE.
A LAST YEAR’S ‘ CAMEL.”
Supported bv the strength of the
CARAVAN.
RESERVED ARCH AND BALCONY, 50c.
NEXT WEEK—DAN KELLY, in
THE SHADOW DETECTIVE.
Niblos.
Reserved seats (orchestra circle and balcony) 50c.
Every evening at 8; matinees Wed. and Sat. at 2,
IMMEDIATE SUCCESS OF
MISS LILIAN OLCOTT.
In Sardou’s Greatest Play,
THEODORA,
ai With its wealth of Barbaric Magnificence.
rpHIRD AVENUE THEATRE.—J. M.
B HILL, Manager. JOSEPHINE CAMERON.
Monday, Wednes’y and Saturday evenings—CAMlLLE.
Tuesday evening, Wednesday Matinee— iNGOMAR.
Thursday, Friday and Saturday Mat.—EAST LYNNE.
Supported by BARTON HILL and a strong company.
NEXT WEEK—BERTHA WELBY.
AVENUE THEATRE. DIXEY.
? Mr. John Stetson Proprietor and Manager.
Monday Evening. September 20, TWO WEEKS.
Evenings at 8:15. Matinees Wednesday and Sat. at 2.
WELCOME HOME
to the Favorite Comedian, Mr. Henry E.
DIXEY,
supported by Rice and Dixoy’s
Big Burlesque Company in
ADONIS.
OSTER & BTAL’S, To-Night.
GRAND SACRED CONCERT.
First appearance of the Phenominal Tenor,
MISS MAY HAZLETON,
and a sc- re of artists of merit.
Monday Evening, the success of modern times
VENUS AND ADONIS.
The Lenton Brothers, The Montgomery Five,
Edward A. Glover, etc . etc.
XfATIONAL THEATRE,
Nos. 104 and 106 Bowery.
MR. JOE ALLEN in
A SISTER'S OATH.
MASON and TITUS, with their Shadowgraphs.
TWILIGHT QU A RTETTu. Colored Vocalists.
FANNIE and FRANK FORRESTER’S Masquerade.
VALVINO in Great Jugsling Act, etc., etc.
Admission: 35, 25. 15 and 10 cents.
Matinees Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
WALL ACK’S. Broadway and 30th st.
SECOND MONTH
JOSEPHINE I McCAULL
SOLD BY OPERA COMTQUE
HER SISTERS. I COMPANY.
EVENINGS at 8. SATURDAY MATINEE at 2.
F. PROCTOR’S NOVELTY
• THEATRE, BROOKLYN, E. D.
Matinees Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.
10 CTS.
Commencing I vnnTtr I T De Great
MONDAA. SEPT. 20 I avuih. | Military Drama,
Telephone Cali 813, Williamsburg.
HTIHEATRE COMIQUE. 125th st., bet.
■ Lex. and 3d ave.—Mß. JOSH HARTDirector
The Eminent Irish Comedian,
Evenings I MR. JOSEPH MURPHY. I Matinee Saturday
At K I ‘THE KERRY GOW.” | At 2.
SEPT. 27— KATE CLAXTON—" ARRAH-NA POGUE.”
Lee Avenue Academy of Music, Williams
burg.—Monday. Sept. 20th. Matinees Wednesday
and Saturday. Celia Alsberg and Lewis Morrison in
"Faust and Marguerite ” Magnificent scenery and cos
tumes. Sept. 27. “ ihe 'White Slave.”
SANSIODCI MIO HALL,
Broadway and W. 31st st.
T. E. GOULDManager
FRANK LAWTONStage Mauagur
This handsome<edifice is crowded nightly by the upper
ten oi the metropolis.
FIVE HOUKS OF SOLID AMUSEMENT.
Those wishing to drive away ,the blues should visit this
cosy resort and witness one of the most unique and novel
performances ever given in this or any other city in
America.
New attractions for the coming week; all of the old
favorites retained. Our elegant orchestra (each one a
soloist) will discourse all of the.popular airs from the
leading operas, corned es. Ac.
POSITIVELY CLOSED ON SUNDAYS.
CASINO, Broadway and 39th st.
UNPARALLELED SUCCESS!
of the Sparkling Comic Opera,
ER MI NI E .
“Received with roars of laughter.”
Roof Garden Promenade Concert after the opera.
Admission, including both entertainments, 50c.
Madison square theatre.
Mr. A. M. PALMERSoIe Manager.
Evenings, at 8:30, Matinee Saturday, at 2,
“HELD BY THE ENEMY.” .
“A storm of applause atter each act.”—lV. K Herald.
FTARRIGAN’S PARK THEATRE.
il EDWARD HARRlGANProprietor.
M. W. HANLEYSoIe Manager.
Everybody delighted with the truly artistic and natural
acting Of EDWARD HARRIGAN’S D’Arcy Flynn, in IN
VESTIGATION. Received with rounds of applause, and
crowding this cosy theatre nightly.
DAVE BRAHAM and his Popular Orchestra.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
DOCKSTADER’S,
BROADWAY, between 28th and 29th
A SUCCESSFUL INAUGURATION OF
MINSTRELSY.
EVENINGS HEREAFTER AT 8.30.
Globe museum.
298 Bowery, near Housten street.
MEEHAN AND WILSONProp’s.
REOPENED FOR THE SEASON.
THE FAMILY RESORT OF THE METROPOLIS.
REFITTED and REDECORATED.
New and Startling Wonders from all parts ot the World.
First appearance in any Museum of the
10 VENETIAN TROUBADOURS. 10
The only lady Mandolin Players in America.
Performances in Theatonum every hour.
10 cents. Admission to the Entire Show. 10 cents.
Open daily from 11 A. M. to 10 P. M.
BIJOU OPERA HOUSE. 2d Week.
MR. N. C. GOODWIN,
Supported by Miles and Barton s Burlesque Co. in the
Great Success,
LITTLE JACK SHEPPARD.
X/J ERRIMAC AND MONITOR NAVAL
I_VJL BATTLE. Not a moving picture, but an actual
battle scene. Open day and evening. Madison avenue
and Fifty-ninth street.
HALF PRICE ON SUNDAYS.
rgIHEISS’ CONCERTS, 14TH ST,' NEAR
JL 3d av. New Music Hall and Alhambra Court.
CONCERT EVERY AFTERNOON and EVENING.
The only Sliding Roof in the world with a Coney Island
breeze.
1886 1887.
EDMUND COLLIER in JACK CADE, METAMORA and
VIRGIN!US, NOW EN ROUTE.
Address, J. W. COLLIER, Morton House, N.Y,
Harry hill’s. to-night.
Vocal and Instrumental Concert. Open every
nignt with a first class variety show.
Banjo Instruction—ss Course. Pupils
taught lor the Stage. Rapid advancement guar-
Fine Banjos, heads, strings, pegs, etc. Play for callers.
Dore Brothers, 112 West 35th st., opposite Harrigan’s.
BANJO —BANJO.—Banjo Instruction for
Stage or Home amusement. $4 course.
Play for callers. I CHARLES DOBSON,
Banjos all prices. | 153 West 42d st., corner Broadway.
(Carpets, &r.
ESTABLISHED ~ - - 1807
B.M. Cowperth waits, Co.
Furniture, Carpets, Bedding,
Stoves, Crockery, Every
thing for Housekeeping.
153,155, 157, 159. 161, 163, 165 CHATHAM ST.,
193, 195, 197, 199, 201, 203, 205 PARK KOW,
INJEW YOBK.
Between City Hall or Bridge Entrance and Chatham
Square Elevated Station.
Goods sent everywhere. Liberal terms or cash dis
count. New Price Lists mailed.
Important Notice to the Traveling Public
and Shippers of Freight.
THB STEAMERS OF THE
PEOPLES’ LINE,
DREW AND DEAN RICHMOND,
Will make regular trips to ALBANY, connecting for all
points North and West, from Pier 41, N. R., foot of Canal
street, at 6 P. M. daily, Sundays excepted.
STATE ROOMS WARMED.
N. B.—Freight received until the hour ot departure.
W. W. EVERETT, President
£ov the IsNe.
GOLD MEDAL, FABIS, 1878.
BAKER’S
BreaKast Cocoa.
Warranted absolutely pure
Cocoa, from which the excess of
t Oil has been removed. It has three
L times the strength of Cocoa mixed
' B with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar,
ulft and is therefore far more economi
-1 cal, costing less than one cent a
II A cup. It is delicious, nourishing,
i strengthening, easily digested, and
Jk admirably adapted for invalids as
If fl aa f° r P ereops * D health.
F®*® Sold by Grocers everywhere.
W. BAKER & CO., Dorcliester, Mass.
GRATEFUL-COMFORTING.
Epps's Cocoa.
BREAKFAST.
“By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws which
govern the operations of digestion and nutrition, and by
a careful application of the fine properties of well
selected Cocoa. Mr. Epps has provided our breakfast
tables with a delicately flavored beverage which may
save us many heavy doctors’ bills. It is by the judicious
use of such articles of diet that a constitution maybe
gradually built up until strong enough to resist every
tendency to disease. Hundreds of subtle maladies are
floating around us ready to attack wherever there is a
weak point. We may escape many a fatal shaft by keep
ing ourselves well fortified with pure blood and a prop
erly nourished frame.”— Civil Service Gazette.
Made simply with boiling water or milk. Sold only in
half pound tins by Grocers, labeled thus:
JAMES EPPS & CO., Homoeopathic Chemist.,
London, England.
Site
SECRET OF A BEAUTIFUL FACLT
■ Every lady desires to be
considered handsome. The
most important adjunct to
beauty is a clear, smooth,
soft and beautiful skin.
With this essential a Lady
appears handsome, even if
her features are not perfect
Ladies afflicted with Tan,
Freckles, Rough or Dis
colored Skin, should lose no
time in producing and ap
plying
LAIRD’S BLOOM OF YOUTH.
It will immediately obliterate
all such imperfections, and is
entirely harmless. It has been
chemically analjzed by the Board of Health of New York
City and pronounced entirely free from any material injuri
ous to the health or akin. 75 Cents Per Bottle*
Queen of Beauty
Is the most delicate and elegant
? Beautifler of the complexion in the
world. It has no equal. It imparts
to the matron the freshness ot
« youthful maidenhood. The most
ffc « ordinary looking lady is made
J “ strikingly beautiful” by a single
application. Its use is invisible, ex
cept in effect. It removes tan.
freezes, blotches, sallowness, and
JcgSR all eruptions, and purifies the skin,
and renders it soft and “ velvety.”
V Queen of Beauty is an en-
tirely “new departure,” and is the
PERFECTION of Cosmetics. Warranted free from lead,
bismuth, arsenic, or chalk (commonly used). Recom
mended by physicians and chemists for its purity. Ladies
may test it with a few drops of ammonia. Any cosmetic
so treated, which turns dark, should be instantly rejected
as poisonous. Elegantly put up in white, flesh, and cream
tints. Price, <I.OO per bottle. Sold by druggists and fancy
goods dealers everywhere. Sealed circulars, 4 cents.
MADAME FONTAINE, 1» East 14th St., N. Y.
PARALYSIS
Er Isa most insidious disease
It is often preceded by SCI-
A TIC A and other pains. If
not checked the L I in B S
esP I WASTE and sometimes the
J® I SPINE BECOMES SOF-
4'o I TENED and disorganized.
It can be perfectly cured by
BR,BUCKLEND’S
■sleeplessness, Nervous Dyspepsia,
Paralysis, Locomotor Ataxia,
Jpium Habit, Headache,
Drunkenness, Ovarian Neuralgia,
Hysteria, Nervous Exhaustion,
Neuralgia, Epilepsy,
Sick Headache, St. Dance,
Sciatica, ~~ Neurasthenia, &c.
This is in no sensea PATENT MEDICINE. Con
tains no Opiates or Chloral. It is a Nerve and Brain
Epod Tonic, and is the best N atural Tonic and Rest
orative known. I Hunt rated Treatise on Nervous
Diseases, Exhaustion, Opium Habit, &C. sent FREE
to any address. $2.00 per Bottle.
Your Druggist keeps it, Fresh.
SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE CO., 174 Fulton St, N.Y
gjry gjwfei.
eJlotßoft)
Co
BETAIL EXPOSITION
OFELEGANT FALLNOVELTIES
inFINE DBESS GOODS,uiz:Rich
Fancy Silh and Wool Plushes,
Beaded Effects, etc., adapted
for (Combination Suits. Also,
an extensive assortment of
New Plain Fabrics in the lat
est colorings.
(G 1 pll? <st.
ete.
LINCOLN SAFE DEPOSIT CO.
AND
Eireproof Storage Warehouse,
Nos. 32 to 38 East Forty-second st.,
OPPOSITE GRAND CENTRAL DEPOT,
AND
Nos. 45 and 47 East Forty-first st.
Boxes Rented from $lO per year
Upward.
Silver and Valuables Stored under
Guarantee.
Rooms or space rented in the FIRE-PROOF STORAG3
DEPARTMENT.
Carting and Packing done on brief notice.
T. L. JAMES, President
J. R. VAN WORMER, Sec. and General Manager.
SECURITY, CONVENIENCE/
AND
PRIVACY.
Safe Deposit Vault
OF THE
I
National Park Bank
OF
-\ICAV YORK,
Nos. 214 and 216 BROADWAY.
Open Daily, Except Legal Holidays, from
9 A. M. to 4 P. M.
OW.
GOOD NEWS - ’
jpagESCT TO LADIES!
Oreateßtladucement.ev.roffere* ,
Er Now’s your time to get up orders foe'
crar celebrated Teas an<l|
to trees and secure a beautifuM
Gold Band or Most Rose China TeM
MmimuiiimMi Bet, or Handsome Decorated Gold?
Band Moss Rom Dinner Set, or Gold Band Mow!
Decorated Toilet Set. For tall particulars address -
THE GREAT AMERICAN TEA CO.,
(P. O. Box 28S.J UandNVuey at., N.w Tort
<LO
"fresh eggsT
A FEW FAMILIES CAN HAVE
New-Laid Eggs Delivered at)
their Houses
BY ADDRESSING “FARMER,” BOX No. 1773
NEW YORK POST-OFFICE.
Can refer to this paper as to reliability.
■——gaj-i. .. ii i
grmrtan.
EXCELSIOR’
The Justly Celebrated an 4
World-Famed
EXCELSIOR
Lager beeß
MANUFACTURED BY
GEORGE BECHTEL
IS STRICTLY PURE.
It is the FINEST FLAVORED!
and MOST WHOLESOME Beeit
before the public. It is pro<
nounced the
BEST AND PUREST BEER
by eminent Physicians and Chem<
ists, and they recommend it foi?
INVALIDS as well as the robust.
It lias received
MEDALS
from PHILADELPHIA, NETO
YORK, PARIS, SYDNEY ancW
JAPAN for excellence and puri«
ty, and
STANDS UNRIVALED'.
Tliis celebrated beer is now put up id
bottles expressly for FAMILY <
USE and Exportation.
ALL COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED T(®
GEO. BECHTEL,
Stapleton, Slaten Island, N.Y.’,
I s NYROYALT’TILS-I
Warranted Rafe, Certain and Effectual. Taken®
with my “Elixir of Pennyroyal,’’ theyfl
never fall. Send 4c. (stamps) for particulars.fl
Dr. J. V. Stanton,■ 116th St. New
I^Al»f/\riiAnA BtrenKthens * enlarges and devel V>
i
mating Pills, sl. All postpaid Address •’s
New England Medical Institute, a
No 24 Tremont Row. Boston. Mass, fl
THTiWnnr* WHET) ONLY by the
Kill II In Elastic Truss, worn with ease night?
XL 111 A Ull>U and dav -. L ady in attendance toe
Ladies. Send for circular. IMPROVED ELASTIC TRUSS
CO., 822 and 824 Broadway, corqer 12th street, N. Y.,
Afl AM AI EBl E develops the Bust. Change
IvlnlllnLLnt ten d»y». Harmless and
——■mu ii ■ mmn iin ■ i certain. Particulars 4 Cts.
WILCOX SPECIFIC CO., PHILADELPHIA, PA.
46TTARMLESS. SURE AND QUICK.”-*..
XJ_ COMPOUND EXTRACT COPAIBA, CUBEB&
AND IKON, is a certain and speedy cure. Price, sl, ba,
mail. At the O'LD DK CG STORE, No. 2 First avenuef’
corner of Houston street, and by druggists generally.
Tapeworm removed in two
HOUKS.—A PERMANENT CURE GUARANTEED
IN EVERY CASE. Prof. A. W. ALLEN, No. 604 Grand
street, New York city. ALLEN’S SWEET WORM WA*
FERS, a positive cure lor STOMACH and PINWORMS,
All druggists. Pamphlet tree.
“piul'OF TAKSX '
I ■■■ Healed particulars 2 ct&
WHcox Specific Mediciue Co.. Philadelphia,
T\ISEASES of Men Only; Blood Poison J
| y skin diseases, inflammation; obstructions bladder,.;
kidneys and other organs; weakness, nervous and general!
debility; mental, physical prostration, &c., successfully
treated and radically cured; remarkable cures
in old cases which have been neglecled or unskillfuiljri
treated; no experiments or failures, it being self-evident
that a physician who confines himself exclusively to tha
study of certain classes ot diseases, and who treats thou-’
sands every year, must acquire greater skill in thosa.
branches than one in general practice. DR. GRINDLE*,
No. 171 West 12th street, between 6th and 7th aveniMjjr

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