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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, December 26, 1886, Image 8

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W I
HUMOUS OF THE POLICE,
A Curious Phase of Policy L'fe-The Man
AdmHs He Punched Officer Harrigan,
Officer Harrigan Went Swear He is the
Man—Mead Might Get a Better Paper-
Twice Dosed in an Hour for Cramps and
the R suit—FVench’s Wit—A Genuine Irish
Bull-Off Post Looking at a Jig Dance—
A Sweeping Charge Relating to Sailors’
Boarding A Very Bad Record-
Stuck atr a Scotch Bali—That Sick Man
Hobcdx Saw. ~
COMMISSIONER FRENCH.
FUN ON THE POLICE.
Sunftay, the 12th inst., Officer Harrigan, of the
Twenty-first Precinct, was assaulted, and after John
McDosoell, who had painted his eye, was arrested,
he ref'aeed in ooQ-rt to make a complaint against
him. , , _
Tbe charge was true, said Captain Ryan, who had
preferred the charge. He-saw the officer on Sunday
aftoCTioon in the Station House with a black eye.
He looked used u.p, as if he had come out of a
fig**, The captain asked him where he got the
btwek eye. He said in a liquor store corner of
Tliarty-ninth street and First avenue. They had
first punched him, and then chucked him out of
Ctoedoor. He, the captain, called Officer Sherridan,
and told him to go with Harrigan, and if possible
And the man and bring him in. They went out and
brought the man in; the officer was sure ho was the
auftn bad kicked him out in the street. In court
mext day, he had no complaint to make and the
Man was discharged by Justice Smith. In court he
■said he could not swear to the man; the day before
ihe'said ho was the man, and pointed him out to the
■officer that made the arrest. The man himself said
he was the>individual that punched the*officer.
•Officer Sherridan said half-past two Sunday, Dec.
U2,'the captain ordered him to go out and arrest the
-man that had assaulted Harrigan. When they got
lo the corner of the liquor store John McDonnell
was there, and Harrigan pointed to him and said,
•That’s the man.” The man said that was so, he
-Struck the officer.
When the prisoner was brought in the station
house, Sergeant Hatton asked if he was the man
assaulted the officer; ho said yes, but it was his
•own fault,>he had no business to go in the saloon.
John McDonnell, of No. 344 East Fortieth street,
said the officer charged him with assaulting him in
a liquor saloon on Sunday. In court, on Monday,
had no complaint to make.
"Did you assault him ?”
"Yes, sir.”
"And give him a black eye?”
Yes, sir.”
" Wb-y didn’t he make a complaint against you in
■court ?”
" I don’t know.”
" What did be say tc Justice Smith ?”
•'Monday morning, when brought up, Harrigan
'Baid he was passing by and heard a disturbance in
the place. He went in the haltway, and four or five
were there, and he supposed I was the man that
struck him, but he was not positive, and the Judge
discharged me. In the station-house I told the
sergeant that I struck him. On tbe way to court I
told him I hit him, and would do it again under
tbe circumstances.” V ’
" I suppose you had both got in a scrape and you
swapped confidences, and you both thought the less
said the better,” said the Commissioner. " Pretty
elate of affairs.”
"I lost my job by it,” said McDonnell.
"Sunday afternoon it was my day off,” said Har
rigan. "I live in Thirty-fifth street, and going
down First avenue, I wanted to see a young fellow
that lives in this building over the liquor store. I
looked in the door. There is a room off tbe liquor
store, and you can get into the different
ways. I suppose they thought I was going to make
an arrest.” z -
" Whht made you think so ?”
"I suppose they thought I was out on the Ex
e sa.”
"Haw long have you been on the force?”
••Since August.”
"You were a frequenter of that place, and they
knew you ?”
"O, no; but they must have seen me on post. I
went in and there was a scuffle in tbe ball between
six or seven, and I was hit. "I thought this was
tbe man.”
"What did you do after you were struck ?”
"I went out.”
"Quietly back out?”
"Yes, sir.”
"You thought you had enough ?”
" 1 had nothing to perotect myself with. I thought
this was the man.”
'• At the time you thought this was the man the
man himself acknowledged that ho struck you?”
" Yes, sir.”
"Did that make your doubt greater or less ?’*
"I wouldn’t swear he was the man.”
"After you heard him admit to you on the way
do court that he struck you, had you any doubt
f-bat he was the man that struck you ?”
"Yes, sir.”
There was a second charge against Harrigan of be
ing jn a liquor saloon and failing to make an arrest
for violation of the law.
He said be only got as far as the entry way.
McDonnell said five or six of them were in
Patrick Farley’s liquor saloon. The officer camo in
and acted in a boisterous manner, putting on airs,
and he hit him on tbe eye and bounced him out.
Before that Harrigan was told to get out, he was no
good.
A MEAN SCRAP OF PAPER.
Parker was brought down all the way from Tre
mont for being off post at 173 d street and Third
avenue. The walking on Parker’s side of the avenue
was next to impassable, and Roundsman Mead find*
ing him on the other aide of tbe avenue patrolling
gate him a paper.
HIS SPEECH WAS "QUEER.” i
Drunk, December 7th, was tbe charge against
Sullivan, of tbe Sixth Precinct.
Sergeant Ryan said he was behind the desk when
the officer came in at 12:05, Dec..7th, A. M. He had ‘
not been relieved. The platoon to relieve had just
stepped out of tbo house. The captain’s attention :
was called to the officer, and when he came out he
charged Sullivan With intoxication. His treaih
smelled pf liquor ana staggered crossing the
floor- s°. ***
~ i/.o Lua been? xie didn't refhuhluer. He J
was asked who relieved him? He couldn’t tell. 1
The captain said when the officer came in the i
front office he staggered. Didn't know who relieved
h’ffl ahd h« wm $ rouph QHder Ibo influence of If- ‘
as lUe da fit io Jo duly.
"On that evening,” said the officer, "about 11 i
o’clock I was taken with Cramps. I had seen my £
sergeant at half flatten. I went into the back- {
room door or a liquor saloon and asked the barten- ,
fler it he had anything to relieve me. He madd a
that relieved for the time. Twenty minutes to i
twelve I got another dose, and I saw an officer on (
the other corner, and I thought it was my relief. I (
Was so bad I went to the station-house.”
* " How long on the force ?”
"Since last April.*V ]
"Was this tbe same place yob went in some time <
»;o ?” ;
"The same.”
" When you went in to get a lemon for a felon
that you said you had on your finger ?”
" That time I had not slept for five nights and I
took a glass of liquor. I was laid up fifteen days
with that felon.” 3
" Is that all you have got to say ?”
"Yes, sir.”
"You have been mistaken in your calling. You (
should chose some other occupation than a police
officer,” said the Commissioner.
The Commissioner remarked that some wag had
said that there were two classes that didn't have a
good record, the detective and the undertaker. He
thought it might apply sometimes to not a few
patrolmen.
Probably next week the President will give the
reporters a dig. Headquarter boys, however, are
not thin in the skin.
INVISIBLE.
Tobin, of the Thirty-fifth Precinct, is stationed at i
Aqueduct Shaft, No. 21. The roundsman looked
all around the place for an hour and a half and i
couldn’t find him.
"Could you explain to the roundsman why you
oouMn’t be iound?”
"No.”
'• Neither can I. You are the only man, however,
that could.”
MISTHER MALONEY.
Maloney was found in the liquor store at Forty
first street and Tenth ave.
He said that was so.
His post, said Roundsman Lane, was Tenth ave
nue, irom Thirty-fourth street to Forty-second.
Standing on the corner of Forty-first street, he saw
the door open, and Maloney come out. He said he
went in to ask the proprietor if he had lost any
thing the previous morning.
" That’s true,” said Maloney. "Itis a very, very
•bad neighborhood, this. The proprietor halloed to
me as I was passing, and asked the time. I stepped
•over the sill to give it; it was dark’outside. Then
he said he was very much obliged to me for a favor
I did him the night before. I said, 'Don’t mention
it; a policeman should never be thanked fordoing
hie .duty.’ 1 had seen him safe home; he lived on
my post.”
"Recalled you in to thank you for taking him
home?”
"Yes, sir,”
"Now, couldn’t he thank you on the sidewalk?”
" Well, I suppose he could,” said Maloney, giving
his shoulders a shrug. "But the greatest of us
•make a mistake once in a while. However, the
next time it won’t occur again,” said Mr. Maloney.
The Commissioner seemed to see the Hibernian
um,
THE ROUNDS SAW NO DEADHEADS.
"There was a ball,” said Roundsman Lane, "at
No. 475 Ninth avenue. I went in and found burns
there when he should have been on post, as another
officer was there to see that all was kept in apple
pie order.”
" The ball was on my post,” said Burns. "There
was some disturbance there—some party wanted to
get in. Seeing me passing on post, they called me
in, and going in I put some fellows out that wanted
to go in as deadheads. Then I rapped for Officer
Rebholtz. There was a party of six or seven in the
hallway—more than one man could’manage. Then
there were four or five more that had managed to
squeeze in. I said, ‘Pick them out,’ to the man
ger, * and 11l bounce them. I’ll soon run them
out.’ ”
"There was an interesting jig dance, and he was
quietly sitting down looking at it,” said Lane.
"That a all the disturbance you saw—a jig
■dance ?” said the Commissioner.
Tbe roundsman said he saw no disturbance.
DIAMONDS IN MY EYE.
Moore was found coming on his post from the
Twenty-eighth to the Twenty-third Precinct, where
lie belonged. He said a man had called him off to
.investigate the loss of a diamond. He was forty
■five minutes off his post.
Roundsman Vail said when he saw Moore coming
back on post through Seventy-ninth street, he was
with a citizen who was very much intoxicated.
When asked where he had been, he said this man
iiad been robbed of a diamond. Tbe man stepped
np and.said, "Don’t mind him—l was only fooling;
don A justice this,” and wanted him not to make a
complaint of taking the officer off post to get a
. •'•nip/’ When the roundsman said he would make
a complaint 4 the naan abused him, and he threat
ened to arrest him. The man with the officer never
bad a diamond in his life to lose.
WILL LEARN BY FINES.
Mitchell, when charged with being off post in the
liquor store at No. 165 Park Row, said that night he
was not feeling well. They were about closing up,
When he wont to the water closet.
The roundsman could only say he saw him com
ing out.
He is a new man, and tbe Commissioner remarked,
that fie was beginning well
IS THAT POSSIBLE ?
| Mahoney, of ’Seventh Precinct, was found
Causing cut of a rUilor’s boarding-house. He said
■ h-c went in tqq»>oil a disturbance.
; "Did yoage in to find if there was any truth in
: that statement ?” asked the Commissioner.
"No.?
" Why T”
"From tho fact that I would not believe what a
sailor’s boarding-house keeper said,” was the
roundsman’s reply.
WHO LIED ?
"I was in there, but not sitting down,” said
Thompson, of tbe Eighth Precinct.
The charge was sitting on a lager beer keg in the
back room of the saloon No. 342 West street.
Roundsman Harris said he looked in the saloon
and saw tbe officer seated on a keg in the back
room.
"You couldn’t be mistaken?” said the Commis
sioner.
"No, sir,” replied tbe roundsman. "When tho
officer came out 1 asked what took him in there.
He said he had a chill.”
The officer again denied most emphatically that
he was in there sitting, and called a private watch
man, who didn’t see him on the keg.
"It was impossible for you to be mistaken ?”
" Imiiossiblo. I was as close to him as now when
I told him to get out,” said the roundsman.
"Your record- is such that you are not entitled to
a doubt,'’' said the Commissioner. " Sixty-six and
a half days’fine in five years (over $200). These
charges come regularly, right straight along. There
is something wrong about you, but you know best
what.”
BARE-LEGGED SCOTS.
They had a ball in the Caledonian Hall in Horatio
street, and Hurley was found there off post by the
roundsman, looking at the bare-legged Soots enjoy
ing tbemsolv s.
,Hurley said he went in to clear an obstruction in
tbe passage.
Jacobi said the man who took the tickets at the
door said there " Hadua been a whisht tfie whole
nicht.”
"Beside,” said the roundsman. " there was an
officer there detailed to see to the ball.”
INVITED IN A WAY.
Nash, found in a liquor store, said the charge was
true. The proprietor said, "Come in Nash; there
is a very sick ' cove ’ here, I guess he wants an am
bulance call.” He went in, and seeing no one sick,
he said, '• Where is he ?” The proprietor said, "O,
I was only joking; have a ‘ nip.' ” He came out.
The roundsman said Nash told him he went in to
see a sick man. He didn’t see him.
our firF departleht.
TRIALS AND JUDGMENTS—
TRANSFERS — APPOINTMENTS—
SICK FIREMEN—GOSSIP.
The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Fire
Commissioners was held on Wednesday last, with
President Purroy in tbe Chair, and Commissioners
Croker and Smith present.
TRIALS.
Tho first business transacted, as usual, was the
trials of the following named firemen:
NEGLECT OF DUTY.
Fireman Andrew McDevitt, of Engine Company
No. 8, was charged with Jailing to report for duty
on the apparatus floor in response to an alarm of
fire on December 6.
He pleaded guilty, and said—" I had been on the
first watch; 1 had also a very severe cold and went
to bed, and I did not hear the alarm come in.”
•• Captain Welch—" The trouble with him is he
drinks too much, and it makes him sleepy and
drowsy. He was not intoxicated, for if ho bad been
I would have mado the charge against him.”
President Purroy—(Showing McDevitt former
complaints which had been made against him, and
they were two feet in length.) " The Board cannot
pass your case by. You have got to that point
where the Board should show you no mercy. Your s
is one oi the worst records in tbe Department. If
you overcome here again on a serious charge, you
will have to leave the Department. Now I want
you to weigh well, what I am telling you; if you
care anything for yourself or your family you will
have to do better, if you want to remain in the De
partment. Now you are warned, and don’t come
here again, for if you do you will most certainly be
dismissed.”
♦ Me. Devltt was then fined five days pay.
Fireman Michael Sullivan, of Engine Company
No. 33, was charged with failing to report for duty
in response to an ambulance call for aid, on Decem
ber 17th.
He pieaded guilty and said: " I took a few drinks
that nigh-t and they made me sleep very sound. I
am generally, also, a sound sleeper, and that is the
truth.”
He was fined two days pay.
ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE.
Fireman Charles J. McGrath, of Engine Company
No. 6, was charged with being absent without leave
for forty-five minutes, on December 13th.
He pleaded guitly and said: "I bad been taken
sick, and while on my way to the company, I had
occasiou to stop at several places, and two days
afterward 1 reported sick, as I could not stand it
any longer.”
Captain—" When he came in I asked him what
had been the matter, and he said he had overslept
himself.
President Purroy—" You have not got a very
good record; this is the sixth charge against you,
and this kind of thing will not do. How do you get
over tbe c?ptaitt’s statement; you have told tbe
Board oue story and you told the captain another;
which is tbo true one ?”
McGrath—" What I told the captain was a lie.”
He was then fined five days’ pay.
Fireman William Stelzer, of Engine Company
No. 4, detailed to Engine Company No. 10, was
charged with being absent without- leave for one
hour and forty-five minutes on December 13th.
He, pleaded guilty and said: "While I was home
to supper my wile was taken very sick and I had to
go for a doctor. I stayed homo with her until a
friend Qamejn,” «
President Purroy—"You have been in the Depart
ment only since June last and this is your second
charge. That is not a good record for so short a
lime of service. Now, you had better look out and
don't come here too often, for you will find it will
bd very costly to you.”
He was fined throe days’ pay.
DISOBEDIENCE OF ORDERS.
James Fitzsimmons, of Engine Company
STo. 10, WSS-tlM'it'Uyl* ll , hfivine Leen cjjd'-oa
by Assistant Foreman FrauCiG exercise yrn
horses, he refused and said: "I will not do it/’
This occurred December 14tb s
8e pleaded noTgu
Assistant Foreman Carey— •• After he came back
from bis dinner, I ordered him to take the team out
and exercise them. He did so and kept them out
about ten jninilUl. I told him to go out and again
cxerciflfi them properly—that is fur a longer time.
He took them out and kept them ten minutes. I
told him to go out again and stay for an nour. He
took out one horse, and I told him to take out the
other and he said, ' I will not/ ”
Fitzsimmons, in his own behalf—" I took the
team out and kept them for fifteen minutes. I came
back, and told the captain I could not take them
out again, I was sore and could not ride them. I
got off and led them but the pain of my soreness
made me stop, and I could not stay out any longer.
I had been exercising them several days before that.
I did not say I would not do it—l couldn’t do the
work, that was all.”
Fireman Clinton —"I did not hear Fitzsimmons
refuse to take out the horses, but I heard him say
he could not take them out; that he was very sore.”
Assistant Foreman Carey recalled—" He did not
say anything to me about his being sore.”
He was fined five days’ pay.
AN INSPECTOR’S CASE.
Inspector James F. Flannelly was charged as fol
lows; First—With neglecting to report that the
building on tbe southeast corner of 127th street and
Second avenue, was being altered without a permit
having been given for it. Second—With neglecting
to file a complaint for violation of the building
laws, against the owner of the house. Third—With
neglecting to report that an elevator shaft was be
ing built, without a permit, in the building on the
southwest corner of 121st street and Third avenue;
and, Fourth—With neglecting to report that a frame
structure for a tank was being built without a per
mit, in the last-named building.
He pleaded not guilty, and in reply to questions
propounded by Superintendent D’Oencb, he said:
"I saw the builders of these buildings and told
them to stop the work until they got permits; I did
not file violations, as Deputy Superintendent Buck
said he had done so; I did not report the matter to
tho Superintendent; the district is too large for me
to go over it and each building every day, but I
went as often as I could; Ido not know whether
tbe work was going on according to the specifica
tions or not; I did not know anything about the
elevator or the water-tank until I was told.”
President Purroy—"You must do your work
promptly and properly, and, if you can’t, you
ought to retire, and we will put somebody in your
place who will.”
Ho was fined five days’ pay.
GOSSIP.
The medical officers report that there are forty
two sick and disabled officers and men in the De
partment.
RETIRING FIREMEN.
It is understood that a bill is being prepared to
be submitted to the next Legislature making it
obligatory to have firemen, who have served twenty
years in the Department, put upon the retired list.
WIRES UNDERGROUND.
The work of laying the new underground cables
of the Department was begun last week at Madison
avenue and Sixty-fifth street. They will be run to
Central Park and by tbe way of the transverse road
to Eighth avenue, end, when this is done, the east
ern section will be laid. This will be run from
Sixty-fifth street to Lexington avenue, to Sixty
eighth street, where it will connect with the new
headquarters in Sixty-seventh street, just west oi
Third avenue, and continue thence easterly to Ave
nue A. It is said that some fifty miles of wires
will be laid, and the work will be completed in
thirty days.
MOVING.
During tho past week men have been busily en
gaged in moving desks, etc., from the old head
quarters to the new one, and a temporary fire tele
graph apparatus is being constructed, to be used
while the new one is being put up in the new head
auarters, and all arrangements have been made
that everything will have been moved and in readi
ness for business in the new headquarters on Mon
day, January 3, 1887—except, perhaps, the tele
graph apparatuses, which, being a very complicated
and delicate piece of mechanism, will require con
siderable time to have it placed in thorough and
complete working order.
APPOINTMENTS.
The following-named probationary firemen, who
have been reported by the foremen of the different
companies iu which they have done their twenty
days’ experimental service, were favorably reported
upon on Tuesday morning, and they were formally
appointed as third grade firemen, at an annual sal
ary of SI,OOO. and Chief Shay assigned them to the
following companies:
To Engine Companies—R. Hyde, No. 17; W. F,
Bennett, No. 9; II.A. Hauck, No. 18; J.D.Benson, No.
6; E. Ford, No. 18; J. D. Toher, No. 18; E. Skoot, F.
Smith and L. Heick, No. 33; J. T. George, No. 7; R.
C. Lithauser, No. 18; J. McQuade, No. 31; F. M.
Fuchs, No. 32; E. D. Farrell, No. 24; J. A. Nicol,
No. 27.
To Hook and Ladder Companies—J. W. Garside,
No. 6; J. P. Johnson, No. 1; C. A. Reilly, No. 15;
Wm. Kehoe, No. 10; A. M. Searle, No. 9; M. H. Siev
in, No. 9; J. Kelly, No. 1; J. R. Langford, No. 1; W.
H. Kleenfeldor, No. 8, and M. Cesar, No. 8.
TRANS! ERS.
The following transfers were made on Wednesday
morning and went into effect at 8 o'clock on Thurs
day morning;
Fotiemen—Arnot Spence, of Engine Co.-No. 27, to
Engine Co. No. 51; Robert R. Farrell, of Engine Co.
No. 51, to Engine Co. No. 27; James Cosgrove, of
Engine Co. No. 30. to Hook and Ladder Co. No. fl.
NEW YORK DISPATCFz, 26, 1886.
Assistant Foremen. —Martin J. Toukey, of En
gine Co. No. 12, to Engine Co. No. I; Jobn'J. Burns,
of Hook and Ladder Co. No. 11, to Engine Co. -NO.
33; William Miller, of Engine Co. No. 11, to Engine
Co. No. 45; Richard F. Kencban, of Engine Co. no.
45, to Hook and Ladder Co. No 5; Edwin H. - 10 " 111,
of Engine Co. No. 31, to Engine Co. No. 23, and Jas.
Moss, of Engine Co. No. 11, to Engine Co. No. 44.
Engineers.—William Wray, of Engine Co. No.
to Engine Co. No, 54; George C. Rand, of Eng ne Co.
No. 18, to Engine Co. No. 33; William H. Binns, of
Engine Co. No. 33, to Engine Co. No. 18; 1 eter b.
Sheedee, of Engine Co, No. 33, to Engine Co. No. 44;
Patrick J. Walsh, of Engine Co. No. 49, to Epgino
Co. No. 44, and John J. Howe, of Engine Co. No. 64,
to Engine Co. No. 34. -r aa
Firemen.—Jacob Becker, of Hook and Ladder co.
No. 12, to Engine Co. No. 51; Richard P. Moore, of
Engine Co. No. 52, to Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1J;
Luke Clayton, of Engine Co. No. 18, to Engine Co.
No. 19; Edward L. Gard, of Engine Co. No. 23, to
Engine Co. No, 44; Paul Bauer, of Hook and Ladder
Co. No. 4, to Engine Co. No. 47; Thomas E. Schie),
of Engine Co. Nq. 47, to Engine Co. No. 52; James
Kelly, of Engine Co. No. 16, to Engine Co. No. 44;
Peter J. Bonner, of Engine Co. No. 32, to Engine Co.
No. 33; Samuel T. Warren, of'Engine Co. No. 30, to
Engine Co. No. 14; John Scofield, of Hook and
Ladder Co. No. 1, to Hook and Ladder Co. No. 13;
William J. Mulhare, of Engine Co. No, 33, to Engine
Co. No. 18; Jarnos Ryan, of Engine Co. No. 18, to
Engine Co. No. 33; Peter Murphy, of Engine Co. No.
21, to Engine Co. No. 16; Bernard Uniack, of Engine
Co. No. 5, to Engine Co. No. 1; Edward Lacy, Jr., of
Engine Co. No. 27, to Engine Co. No. 5; Henry F.
Mackey, of Engine Co. No. 17, to Engine Co.-No. 15;
John T. Devauney, of Engine Co. No. 18, to Engine
Co. No. 54; Thomas King, of Engine Co. No. 10, to
Engine Co. No. 53; Patrick Trainor, of Hook and
Ladder Co. No. 8, to Hook and Ladder Co. No. 10;
Gustave Fuchmann, of Hook and Ladder Co. No. 6,
to Hook and Ladder Co. No. 15; William Cullen, of
Hook and Ladder Co, No. 6, to Hook and Ladder Co.
No. 3; Patrick Boylan, of Hook and Ladder Co. No.
7. to Hook and Ladder Co. No. 6; James Pearl, of
Engine Co. No. 1, to Hook and Ladder Co. No. 7;
Andrew Carey, of Engine Co. No. 28, to Engine Co.
No. 5; Frank J. Hennessey, of Engine Co. No.
5, to Engine Co. No. 28; Frank Kelly, of En
gine Co. No. 18, to Engine Co. No. 34; Henry
Kratch, of Engine Co. No. 42, to Hook
and Ladder Co. No. 17; Lorenzo D. Ferren, of
Engine Co. No. 26, to Engine Co. No. 54; John J.
Leo, of Engine Co. No. 52, to Engine Co. No. 42;
John Timon, of Engine Co. No. 42, to Engine Co.
No. 45; L. Hauck, of Engine Co. No. 45, to Engine
Co. No. 42; Hugh F. Grinnon, of Engine Co. No. 30,
to Engine Co. No. 1; Michael Sullivan, of Engine
Co. No. 33, to Hook and Ladder Co. No. 7; Eugene
J. Fergus, of Engine Co. No. 24, to Hook and Ladder
Co. No. 12; Charles D. Dietch, of Engine Co. No. 43,
to Engine Co. 41; John Barringer, of Engine Co. No.
29, to Engine Co. No. 5; Patrick O’Brien, of Engine
Co. 40, to Engine Co, No. 54; John McParlen, of En
gine Co. No. 54, to Engine Co. No. 47; Henry A.
Hauck, of Engine Co. No. 18, to Engine Co. No. 4;
William Stelzer, of Engine Co. No. 4, to Engine Co.
No. 18; John L. Kroig, of Hook and Ladder Co. No.
1, to Hook and Ladder Co. No. 2; William Klein
feld er, of Hook and Ladder Co. No. 8, to Hook and
Ladder Co. No. 1, and Dennis M. Massine, of Engine
Co. No. 17, to Engine Co. No. 43.
THE SCALING LADDER.
At an early hour on Wednesday morning last, a
fire broke out in the dweliing-house, No. 232 West
Thirty-third street, and had it not been for the
promptitude of Fireman Michael Brady, of Engine
Company No. 34, loss of life would have followed.
When Engine Company No. 34, reached tbe fire, a
German named Gustav Schoushaler, twenty-eight
years old, was discovered at the third story window
crying for help, as his escape by the stairs was cut
off, and the fire had entered the room, wherein he
was'made a prisoner. At that time no hock and
ladder company had appeared, and the hero, Brady,
at once went to tbe four-wheeled bose-tender, and
grabbed a scaling»ladder, on which he ran up to
the window more like a cat than a man, and seizing
tho poor half.dead from fright follow, took him
from his perilous position in safety to the ground.
The placing of the scaling ladders on tbo four
wheeled tenders is an idea which originated with
President Purroy, and which was carried out by
Chief Bonner, and is intended as a means of esca'pe
from a burning building in case a truck is not on
band in time, and is to bo used iu just such cases
as tbe ono . alated above, and the rescue ol this poor
German is the first under the new order.
THE ROLL OF MERIT.
On Friday afternoon. Foreman Charles H. Perley,
of Engine Company No. 34, sent in a communica
tion to the Board reciting the heroic rescue, by
Fireman Michael Brady, of his command (published
above), and stating that the rescue was made at
great personal risk to Brady, and adding that tho
hero's name should be placed on the "Roll of
Merit,” which recommendation the Board at once
adopted.
VOLUNTEER FIREMEN’S ASSOCIATION.
The Volunteer Firemen’s Association met la-st
Friday evening at Clarendon Hall. Chief Decker, the
President, presiding. It being Christmas eve, many
of the members absented themselves, no doubt
staying at home lying iu wait to catch Santa Claus
at their grandchildrens' stockings, while their bet
ter-halves were doing the marketing lor the Christ
mas dinner. Consequently, there was a slim attend
ance, but it was made up for in spirit if it did lack
in numbers. Upon the announcement of a com
mittee. who were appointed to revise the By-Laws,
to meet certain disputed points that require atten
tion, much discussion ensued in relation to tbe
funding of moneys that belong to tbe mutual aid.
It seems that in their anxiety to build Up the fund,
that the Board of Directors have called for assess
ments pretty steadily of late, notwithstanding, it is
claimed by. many, that tbe Board have nothing to
do with the levying of assessments, that duty de
volving upon the treasurer alone, by a section of
the By-Laws defining his duties in the premises.
As the matter stands now, there is upward of $3,000
belonging to the mutual aid, which, it is claimed,
should be paid out before another assessment is
called fof. » •» - - -
Some of the directors claim that they are justi
fied in looking to the future by investing apart of
the assessments belonging to the Mutual Aid. Well,
if that is the case nobody can object to it, but it
should be done properly by amending the by laws,
so as to provide for a certain percentage of each as
sessment collected, to be invested as a permanent
fund ; and further, provide that it cannot be di
verted for any purpose until such time as tho
membership shall, by reason of death, or other
causes, have fallen off, so that an assessment will
not provide the means to pay the amount as in
tended, in wbicli case it will then bo proper to fall
back upon the permanent fund to make good the
claim. As the by laws read now there is no author
ity given to any officer to bank any of tho money
belonging to the Mutual Aid, although the direct
ors, Ly their act on. claim the right to do so, be
cause the treasurer is directed to invest certain
surplus mQneys that may accumulate in his hands.
This, we claim, has reference only to the moneys
accumulating in the general (uud, and should not
becoQstriy4fa&njroHi;rway. '
Mr. John Mulligan introduced a resolution that
there be 3,500 copies printed of the report shortly
to be made by the expert, who has been examining
the books oi the association since its organization,
which Wtis
The auditing committee who were appointed to
examine tbe accounts of the officers of the commit
tee on tbe late barbecue, made the following report:
Total receipts, $2,911.25; disbursements, $1,266.88,
and amount realized to general fund, $1,644.37, with
about SIOO due yet from delinquent members. Tbe
report was received and referred to the finance com
mittee of the Directors for final action by tbe
Board.
The committee on legislation reported progress
and asked to have their numbers increased to ten
members, which was adopted.
The chair appointed a committee of ten members
to engage grounds and make arrangements for the
next annual barbecue. Mr. William Gleason is chair
man.
Twenty-six new members were elected and thir
teen candidates proposed.
The Troy company, who are to visit that city and
take part in the parade next Summer, will meet to
morrow night at headquarters. All members who
intend to take part are Invited to be present.
The ball committee will meet, also, at headquar
ters on Tuesday evening next for the purpose of
giving out the tickets, &c.
THE VETERAN FIREMEN.
The members of the Veteran Firomons’ Associa
tion will have their second annual ball at the Me
tropolitan Opera House, on Tuesday evening, Jan.
18tb, 1887. Gilmore’s Band will furnish the music
for the occasion, and the members will endeavor to
have this ball far excel, if it is possible, the one
they had last season.
Hints to dyspeptics.
WILL PIE-EATERS GIVE IT ANY HEED ?
(From Cassell’s Family Magazine.)
Much oi the value obtained from mutton depends
upon its cooking and previous tenderness. It
should be kept till tender, and the time will depend
upon the weather.
It is the tenderness of meat and its cooking, cause
the fibres thereof to be more easily broken in the
stomach ;it is thus digested without delay. Beef
steak should be most tender before being submitted
to the process of cooking. It should always be
done—or rather undone—over a clear fire, coal cin
ders or coke, which is better still.
The dyspeptic will do well to give hashes and
stews a wide berth, unless they are exceptionally
well cooked.
Tripe is an easily digested and most succulent
supper dish.
Now as to pork : For a man who is in good
health, and has the opportunity of taking constant
exercise in the open air, this food is good and nutri
tious, but the invalid and dyspeptic must beware
of it. Ham or bacon, with eggs, in the morning,
however, Is tolerably easily digested. So is pig’s
liver with bacon, and cold pig’s cheek is good either
as a supper or breakfast dish to those in ordinary
health.
After pork comes veal in the scale of indigesti
bility, so that, on tbe whole, my best advice to the
dyspeptic is to leave both alone, with the exception
of frizzled thinly-cut bacon as a relish in the morn
ing*
Sweetbreads whether calves, or sheep’s, are very
nutritious and assist in tbe digestion of other
foods.
On the whole, tbe health-seeker will do well to
make the flesh of the sheep and ox, in moderate
quantities, hisstable solar as albuminoid food is
concerned, but he must vary this constantly with
chicken, game and fish, when in season.
He will hardly need to be told that beef and mut
ton, when good and properly cooked, give him life
and energy, and therefore comfort, and to a great
degree happiness; but I may remind him that an
undue proportion of animal food renders more
liable to inflammatory troubles, whether acute or
chronic; and again, if subject to rheumatism or
other blood complaint, be must be cautious iu the
use of such viands.
SICK HEADACHE.
Biliousness, Costiveness, Indigestion, Dizziness, Female Complaints, Pains in the Back. Weakness, Foul Stomach,
Bad Breath, Pain or Discomfort alter eating, Torpidity ol the Liver, Loss of Appetite, Nervousness, Palpitation of
the Heart, are all cured by
J3H 11 A. T) WAY’S IIEGULATING JRILdLS,
THE GREAT LIVER REMEDY.
PURGATION MADE PERFECT BY DR. RADWAY’S PILLS. UNIFORMITY AND
SAFETY OF ACTION SECURED.
Digestion
Will be accomplished by taking one of Radway’s Pills every morning about 10 o’clock, as a dinner pill. By so
30. eg, Dyspepsia, Headache, Foul Stomach, Biliousness will be avoided and the food that is eaten contribute its
n ourishing properties sor the support of the natural waste and decay of the body.
DP.. RADWAY’S PIEI.S.
For the cure of all disorders of the Stomach, Liver, Bowels, Kidneys, Bladder, Nervous o f Appet.te,
Headache, Costiveness, Indigestion, Fever, Inflammation of the Bowels, Piles and all derangements Of
the internal viscera. Pure vegetable, containing no mercury, minerals, or deleterious drugs.
Price, 25 cents per box. Sold by all Druggists.
Two €h)od Stories.
ONE ABOUT JIM McKLOSKEY AND THE OTHER
ABOUT SENATOR SAULSBURY.
(From the Washington Cor. of the Indianapolis News.)
I met George Alfred lownsend the other day,
fresh from his ranch on South Mountain. He says
he has spent about $15,000 on his new place there
and the whole fourteen buildings which comprise
it are designed and decorated under his personal
direction. It is a wild and lovely spot and over
looks the most historic valley of Virginia. Town
send does all Lis literary work there. He has, fn
fact, turned out moye novelsand other matter since
he began life anew at South Mountain than he ever
did in twice the time elsewhere. He is a very en
tertaining talker and is chuck full of reminiscences.
Among other stories of his early life in Delaware he
told me one about Clayton, a well-known Delaware
politician. Clayton was a political demagogue who
stooped to anything for a vote. He used to call at
th§ cabins of laboring men, and ins
Irish, and himsnlf Ih Ifiolr good graces.
One day he dropped in at Jim MeKlosky’s shanty.
Jim wasn’t home, but his wife was, so on her Clay
ton began to play.
" Ah, Mrs. McKloskey, I am glad yon are here.
I want to have one of those fine potatoes roasted in
the ashes, just as we used to get’em in Ireland.
iou will not be offended, Mrs. McKloskey ?”
"Offinded I Indade I am not. Yob shall have
the best in tho house.”
And the potatoes, ono for each, were rolled in tbo
hot ashes and roasted. During tho operation Clay
ton got around to tho real object of his visjt.
"Mr. McKloskey is not at home?”
"No, he isn’t; bad luck to him.”
"You know there’s an election, coming on, Mrs.
McKloskey,” suggested the canvasser.
"An eliction, is it ? Well, Jimmy McKloskey will
be there, sure. Ov course (thoughtfully), divil take
him!”
This opinion of Jim rather dashed Clayton, but
he pushed another question as be affected to munch
his potato with great gusto.
" There aro the Whigs and Democrats, you know ?”
” Yis, sur; the whigs and dimecrats,” she re
peated.
"Is your husband a whig or a democrat, Mrs. Mc-
Kloskey ?”
" Jim McKloskey, is It? I’ll jis’ tell ye sor; whin
he’s wid the whigs he’s a whig, and whin he’s wid
the dimecrats he’s a dimecrat, and whin he’s at
home he’s a son of a gun I”
Townsend says this definition of Mrs. McKloskey‘s
is something that will wear. It applies to a good
many other voters of to-day.
Speaking of Delaware, reminds me that Senator
Eli Saulsbury walked into the dining-room at Wil
lard’s the other day and a Chicago member of Con
gress asked me who he was.
" Eli Saulsbury,” said I.
" But who is ho? I mean what is he ?” persisted
my congressional friend.
" Why, he’s a Senator of the United States !”
"Oh, I thought he was a distinguished-looking
man. I don’t know many Senators.” Then, after
a while. " What- State did you say he was from ?”
" The State of Delaware. Didn’t you ever hear
of him bofore?—the Saulsburys, of Delaware?”
"No; at least I don’t recollect,” was the naive
reply.
And yet there has been ono of the Saulsburys in
the Senate, from Delaware, as long as my memory
goes back. This one is in the middle of hie third
term, and he succeeded Willard Saulsbury.
The inquiring Congressman is one I recently
heard decrying tbe intelligence of the East because
some of the Eastern statesmen had never seen Chi
cago.
A Firm Teacher.
THE KIND THEY HAVE IN ARKANSAS.
(From the A rkansaw Traveller.)
Schoolmarm.—Children, you must behave your
selves. I’ll go wild if you don’t. Jimmy Smith,
stop catting that desk (Jimmy doos not stop). I’ll
put your knife in tho stove if you don't. Never
mind, I’m going to write a note to your father*
Jimmy.—Don’t care if you do.
Schoolmarm.—Don’t you talk to me that way.
Put up that knife this very instant or I’ll box your
ears (starts toward him). Never mind, sir (taking
her seat), I’m going to tell your mother.
Jimmy—Don’t care if you do.
Schoolmarm—Don’t you talk to me that way.
Never mind, sir, I’m going to keep you iu after
school. Willie Brown, you must not eat in school.
Willie! Willie Brown/ Never mind, sir. I'm going
to tell your father.
Willie—Ain’t got no father.
Schoolmarm.—Well, I’ll tell your mother.
Willie.—Ho, she won’t do nothin' but scold me.
Schoolmarm.— Then I’ll whip you myself. Bobby
Guns, go out and get me a switch.
Bob.—Bill might hit me after school.
Schoolmarm.—l never saw tbe like in my life. If
you all don t stop making such a noise my head
will split open. Al of you except Jimmy Smith
may go now. Jimmy, don’t you go out of the
bouse. Jimmy, Jimmy! Well, then, go on, you
good-for-nothing thing. No, I won’t kiss you. Go
on away, I won’t. Well, then (kissing him), I’ll kiss
you this once. Don’t you put your dirty little arms
around my neck. O, look how you have mussed up
my hair. You little rascal (hugging him), I can’t
help loving you.
lending a Hand.
AN ANECDOTE OF WILLIAM E. GLADSTONE.
About forty years ago several haulers were em
ployed in carrying pig-iron from Braymbo to
Queensberry. Among the number was one William
Griffiths, who is still alive. The man, when going
down Tinkerdale one day with his load of iron, was
accosted by a stranger, who chatted very freely
with him. Among the questions, the stranger
how much he got per ton for carrying tho
iron.
"Six and sixpence,” said the carter.
" What weight have you on the cart ?”
" About a ton and a half.”
"And what do you pay for gates?”
" Eighteen pence.”
"How much does it cost to keep the mare ?”
"Thirteen shillings a week.”
Presently they reached the foot of the Mill Hill.
" How are you going to get up this hill?” asked
tho stranger.
" Oh, I man get my shuder’ and push up here.”
"I’ll help you a bit,” said he; and he at once put
to the Qjjd pushed up tho hili
When they reached the top the hauler said;
"Y'eu an’ me been as good as a chain horse.”
"Well, well,” said the stranger, "I don’t know
how tho poor horse’s legs are, but mine ache very
much indeed. I suppose you can manage now ?”
" Yes, thank you,” said the hauler; and wishing
him good-day, they separated. As soon as the
stranger was gone, a tradesman asked Griffiths il
ho knew who bad been helping him.
"No,” said he, he’s a perfect stranger to me.”
•'That wm Mr, Gladstone,” said tbe tradesman.
“Sir. Clladslohe r responded 1
know what he’ll think o' me, then; for I never Sir’d
{Hm, nor nothin’. I thought he was some farmor.”
He Was Prepared.
When Mr. Jenkins went to his bed-room at 1:30,
it was with the determination of going to sleep, and
with another detefmination that he would not be
interviewed by Mrs. Jenkins. So as soon as he had
entered.the door and deposited his lamp upon the
dressing-table, he began his speech :
•• I locked the front door. I put the chain on. I
pulled tbe key out a little bit. The dog is inside.
I put tho kitten out. I emptied the drip pan fn the
refrigerator. The cook took the silver to bed with
her. I put a cane under the knob at the back hall
door. I shut the fastenings over the bath-room win
dows. The parlor fire has coal on. I put the cake
box back in the closet. I did not drink all the milk.
It is not going to rain. Nobody gave me any mes
sage for you. I mailed your letters as soon as I got
down-town. Your mother did not call at the office.
Nobcdy died that we were interested in. Did not
hear of a marriage or engagement. I was very busy
at the office making out bills. I have hung my
clothes over chair-backs. 1 want a new egg for
breakfast. I think that is all, and I will now put
out the light.” » * „
Mr Jenkins felt that he had hedged against all
inquiry and a triumphant smile was upon his face
as he took hold of the gas check,and sighted a line for
the bed. when he was greeted with a ringing laugh
and the query from Mrs. Jenkins :
" Why didn't you take off your hat ?”
Supposition.
THE ACCUSED WAS NOT CONVICTED ON IT.
Master William Newman was charged with malic- |
iously breaking a pane of glass in the window of
Morris Cohen’s store, The glass was worth $2.50.
"How do you know he broke it?” asked the
Court.
" I was in the store and I heard a crack. When I
comes out I seen him run.”
"Was he in your store?”
"Yes, sir, but not that day.”
" How do you know he broke your light ?”
"I know he run. He was dressed that day as he
is this day. He had a flat hat, it fell off and he
didn’t stop to pick it up. That was like a drunken
man.”
" How near to your place was he when you ran
out?”
•’ O, he was just turning the corner.”
"How do you know then that he broke the win
dow ?”
"He took a stone from the pavement, and fired it
in the window.”
" You didn’t see him ?’*
"No.”
"How do you know he is the man, when you
didn’t see him ?”
" They told me so.”
"Then it was hearsay; have you got Mr. Hearsay
here?’ ’
Officer Barrett, as " Mr. Hearsay,” was produced.
He could only testify to making the arrest and
Bill was discharged.
Is this a jfuff for Electricity ?
A NEW THEORY OF BALDNESS.
(From the Electrical World.)
The causes of baldness have often been sought
for and guessed at, but it-cannot be said that any
satisfactory explanation has, up to the present time,
been given. It is now discovered by a New York
hair-dresser, who says:
"People give all kinds of explanation for it—dis
sipation, cutting the hair too short, letting it grow
too long, smoking, drinking strong coffee, wearing
high hats, wearing low hats, wearing your bat in
doors, not wearing it out-door, late hours, and a
hundred other things. Now, you will notice that
there are no classes of men more frequently bald
than retail sales men, bookkeepers and office clerks
in certain lines of business.
"Why should baldness affect them more than
others ? Because they habitually stand or sit near
ly every evening under gaslights. Book-keepers
always have a strong light right over their heads or
just in front of them. So do clerks who have to
I work at night. Retail salesmen sell goods at night
directly under two powerful burners, and most of
tho time their heads are not more than two or three
feet from tbe flame. The artificial heat dries out
the hair, makes it brittle and unhealthy, and fipally
kins it at the root. If you will pass your hand
through your hair after you have been standing
under a gaslight for a few moments, you will see at
once how it is. Although you may not have no
ticed the heat on your head, your hair, if you’ve
got any, will be hot to the roots. You’ll be sur
prised to observe, too, at what a distance from the
light the hair will absorb the heat.
" Now, there is nothing so bad for the hair as
getting it dry. That is why the use of water on it
is so injurious—because it evaporates so readily and
takes with it the natural oil of the hair. Your hair
should be moist ail tbe time, and with the oil that
is secreted by the little cells at the roots. When the
oil is continually and rapidly dried out, as it is
when the head is kept heated by gaslight, the cell
dries up and the hair falls out. People who sit
lb? wpar some kind of a
ndn-conaucting bead-goar to protect themselves i
have an idea, too. that after the electric J’ght has
been in universal use for a generation ojj two bald
ness will be as scarce as it was gaslight and
night work got common
v ■ii ■»11 ■ i ■u 11
CITIZENS’ SAVINGS BANK OF THE
CITY OF .NEW YORK, Nos. 56 and 58 Bowery,
corner of Canal street.
FIFTY-THIRD SEMI ANNUAL DIVIDEND OF IN
TEREST.—The Trustees have ordered that interest at
the rate of THREE AND ONE HALF PER CENT,
per annum be paid to depositors on and alter January 17,
on all sums of ss—and up to s3,(XX)—which have re
mained on deposit for the three or six months ending
December 31, 1886.
Bank open everyday from 10 A. M. to 3 P. M.
EDWARD A. QUINTARD, President.
Henry Basler, Secretary.
Charles W. Held, Cashier.
Faralysls
Isa most Insidious disease
It is often preceded by »
A TIC A and other pains. If
not checked the Ij I ITI IS S
Wa I WASTE and sometimes the
SPINK BKCOYIES SOF-
H TENED and disorganized.
■*** It can be perfectly cured by
T}EL.BUCKLHND’S
Sleeplessness, Nervous Dyspepsia,
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Opium Habit, Headache,
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Sick Headache, St. Vitus’s Dance,
Sciatica, Neurasthenia, &c.
This is in no sensea PATENT MEDICINE. Con*
tains no Opiates or Chloral. It is a Nerve and Brain
Food Tonic, and is the best Natural Tonic and Rest
orative known. Illustrated Treatise on Nervous
Diseases. Exhaustion, Opium Habit, &c. sent FREE
to any address. 55»2.00 per Bottle,
Your Druggist keeps it, Fresh.
SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE CO., 174 Fulton St, N. Y
Scovill’s
SARSAPARILLA
on BLOOD ADD LIVER SYRUP.
A. peerless remedy for Scrofula, White
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which are SARSAPARILLA and
STILLINGIA. The cures effected, are
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JOHN F. HENRV & 00., New York;
tSf" Write for Illuminated Book.
the ireahfasit
ISOLD MEDAL, PARIS,7IB7B?
BAKER’S
BwaW Cocoa.
Warranted absolutely pure
>coa, from which the excess of
1 has been removed. It has three
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th Starch, Aryowroot or Sugar,
d is therefore far more economi-
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•engthening, easily digested, and
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ell as for persons in health.
Sold by Grocers everywhere*
W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass.
GRATEFUL-COMFORTING.
EPPS'S COCOA.
BREAKFAST.
“By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws which
govern the operations of digestion and nutrition, and by
a careful application of the fine properties of well
selected Cocoa. Mr. Epps has provided our breakfast
tables with a delicately flavored beverage which may
save us many heavy doctors’ bills. It is by the judicious
use of such articles of diet that a constitution mav be
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tendency to disease. Hundreds of subtle maladies are
floating around us ready to attack wherever there ie a
weak point. We may escape many a fatal shall by keep
ing ourselves well fortified with pure blood and a prop
erly nourished frame.”—Cirß Service Gazette.
Made simply with boiling water or milk. Sold only in
hrJf pound Udb by Growers, labeled thus:
JAMES EPPS & CO., Homoeopathic Chemists, i
London, England.
Should be used in place of Tea
and. Coffee by all persons suf
fering from Dyspepsia, Flatu
lence or Nervousness. N most de
licious and nourishing beverage.
The continuous use of COCOA
FEPTINE will cure ail forms
of Dyspepsia when medicines
have failed.
TOR SALE BV DRUGGISTS AND GROCERS EVERYWHERE.
GEO. w. LAIRD & CO., Chemists, 39 Barclay St., N. Y.
10-ounce Box sent by Mail on
receipt of 50 cents.
QRASSMUCK BRO’S, RESTAURANT,
NO 120 NASSAU STREET.
Branch of Metal Exchange Wine Rooms,
No. 2. Burling Slip.
THE FINEST WINES LIQUORS AND CIGARS
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all communications should be addressed to
GEO. BECHTEL,
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Swam
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"aHnees Wednesday and Sat
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Mrs. lasgtry
mbs.
THE LADY OF LYONS.
LADY OF LYONS.
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’ . BOWERY, near Canal,
une
The great Original and Only
TONY DENIER’S
iiu.mpl’y i>i’.vli?a’y
„. • PANTOMIME.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY and SATURDAY.
1 dTH STREET THEATRE,Cor. 6th ave.
JL-dt MONDAY, DEC. 27—TWO WEEKS ONLY,
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY,
MB. AND MRS. OHO. S. KNIGHT
in she popular Musical Comedy,
over the garden wall.
Reconstructed and Renewed. More Fun than ever.
„ tv „ POPULAR PRICES.
Gallery, 25 cents; Reserved, 33c., 50c., 75c., sl, &c.
Tony pastor s theatre.
A SA£l’ Y NEW YEAR TO AI.L-3 MATINEES.
EXTRA MATINEE NEW YEAR’S DAY.
. __ Also Tuesday and Friday.
« RAND AND A GREAT HOLIDAY SHOW.
T HASTOR AND a SPLENDID NEW COMPANY.
THOMAS J. RYAN, LAURA LEE, MARTENS’TRIO, THE
JULIANS, LENTON BROS, and LESTER HOWARD.
BURTOEff’S DOG CERCUS.
LEOPOLD AND BUNELL, LOTTIE ■ ELLIOTT,
HEFFERNAN AND MCDONALD.
PROF. CROMWELL
THIS EVENING WILL
GIVE HIS ILLUSTRATED LECTURE.
Subject:
HOME
AND SOUTHERN ITALY.
AT THE GRAND OPERA HOUSE.
Prices—2sc. and 50c.
PEOPLE’S THEATRE.
MR 11. C. MINER.. ..Sole Proprietor and Manager
ONLY MATINEE NEW YEAR’S DAY.
FANNY DAVENPORT.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY EVENING
AND SATURDAY MATINEE,
_ . . FEDORA.
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, .and Saturday Evenings,
LONDON ASSURANCE, and
OLIVER TWiSl’.
/"BASING, Bi Old way and 39th street.
Evenings at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2.
Houses crowded. Success greater than ever.
The Sparkling Comic Cpjra.
EBMINIE,
Herald—“ The greatest of all Casino successes.”
" Rece.ved witli Roars of Laughter.”
Great cast, beautiful costumes, scenery, etc.
Admission 50 cents. Seats secured in advance.
Jan. 4th, 209th representation ef ERMlNlE—Souvenir
and Gala Night.
KOSTER & BIAE’S.
TO NIGHT, GRAND SACRED CONCERT.
■The California Quartette, El.a Wesner, the Captain.
The Vanishing Lady, and selections irom
MONSIEUR CHOUFFLEURS.
To-morrow. 12th Week of the Great Burlesque,
CAPT. JACK SHEPPARD.
ADISON SQUARE THEATRE.
Mr. A. M. PALMER Sole Manager.
THE HIT OF THE YEAR,
ra®, THE FEaraKAIV.
BEGINS AT 8:30, OVER AT 11.
SATURDAY .MATINEE at 2.
Madison square garden.
ADAM F..REPAUGII Sole Lessee
BUFFALO BILL'S
'Wild West
(W.- F. CODY and NATE SALSBURY, Proprietors and
SUCCESS BEYOND SUCCESS UNPARAL
LELED !
A GRAND DRAMA OF CIVILIZATION.
AN ASTOUNDING ARRAY OF NOVELTIES.
m T ,- rt Ever Y Evening and Special Matinees
TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS AND SATURDAYS.
ADMISSION, 50c. ; CHILDREN UNDER 9,25 c.
Reserved Seats, 75c., $1 and $1.50. Boxes, SB, $lO, and
sr~. Branch ticket office, Pond’s Music Store, No. 25
Union Square. Doors open at 1 and 7P. M.
828 ARRIGAN’S PARK THEATRK
11 EDWARD HARRIGAN Proprietor
M. W. HANLEY Sole Manager
Everybody delighted with the gifted author-actor,
Mr. EDWARD HARRIGAN, as BERNARD O’P.EA&AN,
in his excruciatingly funny local comedy, called
THE O’BEAGANS. THE O’REAGANS.
Mr. Dave Braham and his Popular Orchestra.
MATINEE WEDNESDAY.
Grand Gala Matinee New Year's Day, at 2 P. M.
POOLE’S NEW
Eighth street, between Broadway and 4th ave.
Proprietor and Manager Mr. JOHN F. POOLE.
"An elegant, cosy comfortable house.”— N. K World.
THE Irish Comedian
MR. JAMES M. WARD,
In a grand production of the Irish drama
THE RED FOX.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY,
Sunday, by PROF. De MORGAN—THE HOLY LAND.
DOCKSTADER’S
FUNNIEST BURLESQUE,
OUR MINNIE.
Also,
OUR XMAS TREE.
Mementoes for the Children.
SPECIAL MATINEE WEDNESDAY.
NighttqS j3O. Broadway, near 29th street.
£TH AVE. THEATRE.
O’ Third Week. Continued Success.
ROBERT B. MANTELL
in John W. Keller’s Society Drama,
TANGLED LIVES.
The best American play that has been written.—Jour
nal.
The play finely mounted, cast excellent.
Evenings at 8, over at 10:30. Saturday matinee at 2.
Carriages, 10:20. Seats secured two weeks in advance.
HR. JACOBS’S 3D AVE. THEATRE,
• Thirty-first street and Third avenue.
A GOOD RESERVED SEAT FOR 35 AND 50 CENTS.
WEEK OF DECEMBER 27,
Shadows of a Great Citv.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
National theatre,
Nos. 104 and 106 Bowery.
GREAT ATTRACTIONS FOR HOLIDAY WEEK.
MR. DOMINICK MURRAY
And an efficient Dramatic Company,
In bis great Sensational play, entitled
ESCAPED from sing sing.
Admission: 35, 25, 15 and 10 cents.
Mati nee* Tuesday, Thursday .and Saturday.
Other Novelties in active preparation.
LOBE MUSEUM, No. 298 BOWERY.
MEEHAN A WILSON Proprietors
LAST WEEK OF THE
LADY TAXIDERMISTS.
A Truly Wonderful Exhibit.
EVERY LADY VISITOR PRESENTED WITH A HAND
SOME SOUVENIR. .
Open daily, from 11 A. M. to 10 P. M. w
WALLACK’S, MONDAY, DEC. 27.
First appearance this season of
MR. JOHN GILBERT,
and first time in four years, of Sheridan’s
SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL.
UNION SQUARE THEATRE.—Week
I Dec. 27, The Honeymoon.
MARGARET MATHER. Jan. 3, Grand Production of
I ROMEO AND JULIET.
J. M. HILL, Manager. | New Years Matinee Saturday.
U ART’S THEATRE COMIQUE, 125th st.
JLA THIS NEW YEAR'S WEEK.
EVENINGS, 8:15. NEW YEAR’S DAY MATINEE, 2:15.
The Famous Comedians.
EVANS and HOEY, in “A PARLOR MATCH.”
Jan. 3—MR. JOHN T. R AYMOND.
LYCEUM THEATRE, 4th ave. & 23d st.
8:15 P. M.—DANIEL FROHMaN, Manager.
HELEN DAUVRAY I Last Six I A SCRAP OF PAPER.
HELEN DAUVRAY I Nights of | A SCRAP OF PAPER.
*** Tuesday. Jan. 4, Bronson Howard's new comedy,
entitled MET BY CHANCE.
TTY ALY’S THEATRE. Every night at 8:15.
H ° I The new eccentric comedy.
Love in Harness. LOVE IN HARNESS.
I Received with delight.—Times.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY AT 2.
TANDARD THEATRE.
Fourth Week—Pronounced Success.
ROSINA YOKES in THE SCHOOLMISTRESS.
Every Night at 8:15. Saturday Matinee at 2.
Seats secured two weeks ahead. ■
8~~ IJOU OPERA HOUSE. 3d Week.
The most pronounced hit of the season—MYEES.
MR. NAT C. GOODWIN in
TURNED UP,
1 and THOSE BELLS.
T EE AVE. ACADEMY, W’MSBURGH,
B J Dec. 27, Frederick Warde. Mon. and Thurs., Richard
HI; Tues, and Fri., Galba. the Gladiator; Wed. inat., In
gomar; Wed. night. Richelieu,Ne v Year’s mat.. Delicate
Ground and Katharine &. Petruchio; Sat. night, Virglnius*
THEISS’ CONCERTS, 14TH ST., NEAR
3d av. Music Hall and Alhambra Court.
Concert every afternoon and evening.
FLICK and FLOCK, the Great International Character
Comedians and Duettists.
STEINWAY
THE
Standard Pianos of the World!
The Largest Establishment in
Existence.
Warerooms : Steinway Hall, New York.
J-piABTO STOOIS.
GRANO, SQUARE AND UPRIGHT.
PIANO COVERS, PIANO SCARFS,
TABLE COVERS, STORE STOOLS,
MUSIC CABINETS and STANDS, larg
est assortment, lowest-prices.
F. NEPPEKT, Manufacturer
and importer. No. 390 Canal street
near West Broadway, N. X.

Everett’s hotel
AND GRAND DINING ROOMS,
ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN.
BARCLAY AND WASHINGTON
NEW YORK.
SAMUEL H. EVERETT,
Pronrietor.
CREDIT
Jordan
Hloriariy,
167, 167>2. 169, 171, 173 Chatham st!?
207, 207, 2, 209, 211, 213 Park Rew,
NEW YORK.
LONGER TIME AND EASIER TERMS GIVEN THAN BY
ANY OTHER HOUSE IN THE CITY.
A FEW OF OUR PRICES:
PARLOR SUITS, IN ALL COVERINGS.') From
VIZ., HAIR CLOTH, REP, PLUSH, I
RAW SILK, PETTIPOINT, BRO ( $25.00 up..
CATELLE, Ac. J F
OIL PAINTINGS.
CHAMBER SUITS IN CHERRY, ASH, 1 From
WALNUT, ANT IQUE OAK, AC. ) $17.00 un.
EXTENSION TABLES ’ From $4 00 up.
LOUNGEb •• 500 no.
CLOCKS AND BRONZES.
BOOK STANDS •- -A 50 up.
COUCHES «• 11 00 up.
COTTAGE SUITS •• . 12 00 up.
WARDROBES “ 950 up.
FOLDING BEDS, great variety " 12 00 up.
SPRING BEDS •• 100 up.
BUREAUS •• 400 up.
MATRASSES, all kinds “ 150 up.
FEATHERBEDS. y
COMF >RTABLES.
BLANK I TS.
STOVES and RANGES •• 600 up.
FANCY TABLES. 1
PE DEST ALS •• 300 up.
PILLAR EXTENSION TABLES “ 12 00 up.
KITCHEN CHAIRS “ 35c. up.
CANE CH AI RS “ f,o<. up.
OILCLOTHS •• 25C. up.
INGRAIN and HEMP CARPETS “ 25c. up.
Moquet, Wilton, Velvet, Axminster, Hotly
Brnssel Carpets; Velvet Rugs, Smyrna
Rugs, and Mats of Every Description an*’ 1
Quality on Hand,
Jordan & Moriarty,
167, 167%, 169, 171, 173 Chatham st.,
207, 207%, 209. 211, 213 Park Kow.
NEW YORK.
JL. STROUB’S OYSTER BAY, No.
• 2869 THIRD AVENUE, between 128th and 129th
furnishing oysters by the quart and hundred, and
is delivering on the half shell at all hours. The propria,
tor. John L. Stroub, is the patentee of the clam Roaster
which Is used at most ail hotels, oyster houses, and by
private families throughout the country with great satie
faction. They are sold at all the house furnishing stores
throughout the U. S. Principal Depots: John L. Stroube
Oyster Bay. 2369 3d av.; Jahn L. Stroub’s Family Oyster
House, 93 Canal st. ; John L. Stroub’s River View UoteL
foot of 125th street North River. New York City.
•MEW.SWERB,
Hotel, Drug', General Store, Financial and
Business Broker, 23 Park Row.
Offices, Nos. 36 and 37.
Stoi'es ofall kinds sold at private sale or
auction. Partnership* negotiated. Addi
tional capital procure;! for merchants,
manufacturers and others. Mortgages,
leases, contracts and bills of sale exe
cuted.
N. B.—Hotels, restaurants, dry and fancy
goods, groceries and drug stores a special
ty. Established over thirty years. Mer
chants' and bankers’ references.
“NEVER KNOWN TO FAIL.”
TARRANT’S EXTRACT
0P
CUBEBS and COPAIBA
I® an remedy for-
VR\ gonorrhoea, glevt, and all dis
[fffj eiises the urinary organs.
}■»/ Oi Its neat, portable form, free-
IkJi I IKil 4 ( ’tn from taste, and speedy
lual tSgffij ijUiS w? action (it frequently cures in
’Pi'i® I'3l three or four days, and always
IfSl in l ess time than any other
vma preparation), make "Tar-
5 /m/ rant s Extract'’ the most <ie-
sirable remedy ever manu.’ac
tured.
To fraud, eee that
each package has a red strip •
across the lace of label, with •
he signature of Tarrant * Co., New York, upon it.
PRICE sl-00.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
She toilet.
Quebn of Beauty
Is the most delicate and elegant
-aA Beautifler of the complexion in the
world. It has no equal. It imparts x
to the matron the freshness d
v youthful maidenhood. The n.ost
V*. -Y ordinary looking lady is made
f strikingly beautiful ” by a single
application. It s use is invisible, ex
cePk effect- It removes tan. .
freckles, blotches, sallowness, and
all eruptions, and purifies the skin,
Es andrenders it soft and “ velvety.”
V Queen of Beaut y is an en-
r tirely ‘‘ new departure,’’-and is the
Pewection of Cosmetics. Warranted free from lead,
bismuth, arsenic, or chalk (commonly used). Recom
mended by physicians and chemists for its purity. Ladies
may test it with a few drops of ammonia. Any cosmetic
so treated, which turns daric, should be instantly rejected
as poisonous. Elegantly put up in white, flesh, and cream
tints. Price, §I.OO per bottle. Sold by dru-rgisls and fancy
goods de rlers everywhere. Sealed circulars, 4 cents.
MADAME FONTAINE, 19 East 14th fet., N. Y.
tai.
GOOD NEWS
JLO_L ADIES!
Greatest Inducements ever offered
Now’s your time to get up orders for
our celebrated 'Feas anil
Coffees and secure a beautiful
Gold Band or Mos? Rose China Tea
Set, or Handsome Decorated Gold
Band Moss Rose Dinner Set, or Gold Band Mose
Decorated Toilet Set For ftill particulars address
THE GREAT AMERICAN TEA CO.,
IP. O. Box 288.] 81 andßß Vesey st. New Ycrfc
OATADDIJ^ wre< I* Sample TreatmewtCOrr
bn I nulll.B. S. Lauderbach &Co., Newark. N. J.f Hut
BLADDER, Strictures, Prostate Gland,,
Kidney, Bright's, old diseases and weaknesses,
Drove fatal because sufferers don't use the ASAIIEL •
WAUKESHA NATURAL MINERAL SPRING WATER or
MEDICAL BUREAU LOCAL and INTERNAL REME
DIES. Book of CUREB and directions mailed free by old ■
physician, No. 291 Broadway. N. Y. N. B.—IT IS AN
UNEQUALED DELICIOUS TABLE WATER. DRINK NO >
OTHER. ■ <
DYKE’S BEARD ELIXIR
a WANTED for DR. SCOTT’S beau*
AGENTS ra
quick sales. Territory given, satisfaction guaranteed.
Address DR. SCOTT, 842 Broadway, N. Y.
WMffi!
Whose VITALITY is failing, Brain DRAINED and
EXHAUSTED or Power PitEMATURELY WAfe'K
ED may find a perfect and reliable cure in the
ISSimWMWA
Adopted by all French Physicians and being rapidly and
sue essfully introduced here. A*H weak- ning Josses and
drains promptly checked. TREATISE giving news
paper and medical endorsements, &c., FREE. Consults/-
tion (office or by mail) with six eminent doctors FREE.
CIVIALE AGENCY, No. 1 74 Fulton Street. New York
vn J I MARRIAGE secrets.
I veals secrets that all men about to marry should
■— -w- know. Howto cure Semina! Weakness in two
g-t |- a weeks. Priceso cents (stamps taken.) Address
L» ■ Dr. J. Schnable, 525 Biddle Street, S:. Louis, Mo
B“ B 0 « Pcnrls. Send for cur new Illustrated
“Guide to Health.” Absolute secrecy.
Aledleul CUnie, 85 Nassau St., N. Y. ,
I < >nwCrt’»aai>a J!tren S thens - en,ar " eß a,,d R
rerieziones-
mating Pills. sl. All postpaid Address g
New England Medical Lnstitutb, £
No 24 Tremont Rot. Bo ton. |
TirrflWiTTnTl CURED ONLY by the Improved
RilP iDI KF. T ™ ss . ' vora wiil ea:e ni - ht
AliUl A Ull/bJ an d day. Lady in attendance for
Ladies Send for circular. IMPROVED EL A STIC TRUSS
CO., 822 and 824 Broadway, corner 12th street, N. Y.
fi! fl BjSI fl I C Develops the Bust. Change
BW AmALcilt ten days. JinrmleM and
iuiimmi —!■■■■ n certain. Particulars 4 Cts»
WILCOX SPECIFIC CO., PHILADELPHIA, PA.
TOSJSIIEMSSSiF
manhood etc. I will send a valuable treatise (sealed)
MntaininL' full particulars for home cure, free of
chaSS Address Arof.F.O. FOWLER.Moodus, Conn.
iiTj ARMLESS, SURE AND QUICK.”—
BT COMI’OGND EXTRACT COPAIBA, CUBEBS
avn Htox. is a certain and speedy cure. Price. sl, by
mail At the OLD DKLG STOKE, No. 2 First avenue,
corner of Houston street, and by druggists generally.
TTUISEASES of Men Only; Blood Poison,
I " skin diseases, inflammation; obstructions bladder,
kk'neys and other organs; weakness, nervous and general
debility; mental, physical prostration, Ac., successfully
treated and radically cured; remarkable cures perfected
i * old cases which have been neglecled or unskillfuily
Created; no experiments or failures, it being self evident
hat a physician who confines himself exclusively to the
jtudy of certain classes ot diseases, and who treats thou
lands every year, must acquire greater skill in those
branches than one In general practice.
No. 171 West 12th street, between Ctb and 7th avenuea

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