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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, June 12, 1887, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85026214/1887-06-12/ed-1/seq-8/

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W iMwe Rudite.
HUMORS OF THE POLICE.
Masterson Frightens a Merchant-Why Is
the Merchan : Afraid to Appear to Prove
His Charge ?- Out-of-the-way Pests Want
Coed Patrolling—The Killing of the Y-ung
Italian by Adams—No Indictment Found—
Leaving His Post Without Cause-No
More Police Excursions—A Station-Hcuse
Lawyer.
BEFORE COMMISSIONER FRENCH.
A SERIOUS CHARGE, AND THE ACCUSER DOES
NOT APPEAR.
It would seem almost proper to compel citizens
to give some sort of bond to prosecute after they
have made complaint against a policeman. Some
>iake complaint on the spur of the moment, when
the blood is hot. When they cool down they say
the lellow isn’t worth the powder, and there they
irop it. Others think that it is a satisfaction to have
had a complaint recorded, and there stop. While
there are others who say that their time is too im
portant to follow it up.
If a man can find tne time to enter a complaint,
he can certainly appear to prosecute. He loses a
great deal of time before the complaint can be en
tertained; at the most, to follow it to an ending,
the trial, it is seldom over an hour or two.
Then there are cases like the charge against Mas
terson, of the Eleventh Precinct, that seem strange
that when made, should not be prosecuted. The
complainant. Moses Ira Mendel, is in business at
No. 242 Grand street. Over his store there is a club
room. At 1:30 P. M.. May 21st. bo says Masterson
sat in a chair in the club room, intoxicated, and
used vile and indecent language.
Mr. Mendel says in his complaint that he was in
the habit of going up to tbe club room to wash hie
hands and face. On this occasion he expressed sur
prise at seeing the officer glued to tbe chair. Tbe
officer’s rejoinder was in “peeler English: “You
G— d— cur, what right have you here, you son of a
, ?•’ Mr. Mendel stood a few minutes dumb-
founded, when Masterson got up from his seat and
said, '■ I’ve a good mind to throw you down stairs.”
He thereupon made up his mind to get away from
the officer; his conduct was so outrageous that at
the time he made the complaint, and for several
dayp alter, he had not recovered from the shock.
Now, here is an officer off post, sitting taking it
cooly in the upper floor of a club room, for aught
known to the contrary, getting his whisky and
eigars iree, sitting there enjoying them when he
should be out on post, and a citizen that claims the
right to enter theolub, and leases tbe rooms, enters,
and the officer threatens to throw him down his
own stairs. After he makes this complaint Mr.
llendel does not appear to prosecute and gives no
reason why he is not present.
They waited half an hour for Mr. Mendel to put
in an appearance, and Mr. French ordered the clerk
to call tbe case. It was called and Masterson was
arraigned.
’• Win n did you last see this complainant, Mas
terson ?” asked Com. French.
“ I see him every day, yeur honor,” replied the
officer.
“ Did you have any conversation with him ?”
“No.”
“Do you know of any reason why he is not
here?”
“No.”
•’ You haven’t spoken to him to-day ?’*
•’ 1 have not spoken to him before or since.”
“ What were you doing absent from post ?”
“ In the water closet.”
The complainant said this occurred while Master
son was sitting in a chair.
The Commissioner ordered the clerk to make a
memorandum of the absence of Mr. Mendel, send
the same to Capt. Allaire, and ascertain from him
Why complainant did not sppear ? .Meanwhile, the
ease ifas indefinitely postponed?
Responsible fcosis neglected.
When an officer gets au obscure corner post he is
apt to neglect it. Nothing he thinks can happen
there and ho lays off in a lager Veer saloon and lets
3he posl run Ks«V.
v Wdfield, Ninth Precinct, had just such a post
that needed watchful guarding, it is one where a
thief can lure a drunken man down on his arm and
rob, aye, even murder, if the officer lays off. And it
is just such posts of danger to citizens that some
captains seem to put blocks of wood to guard.
The post that Westfield had was Thirteenth ave.
nue from Eleventh to Fourteenth street. Bounds
man Orr struck tbe post at Thirteenth avdhue ahd
Eleventh stmt find wept to Fifteenth street. The
officer had only thd east side of the street, so that
he could not be missed. Tbe roundsman went back
to Horatio street, and failing to tiud hiip, four
o’clock comm need to patrol the post, and search lor
him and tithe him. At 4:55 he found the officer
coming up after him at Fourteenth street. He said
to the roundsman he was “ raising” a drunken man
that he found behind a shanty,
“ Raising,” said the Commissioner to himself—“a
queer place to raise a man.”
Tbe officer said at four o’clock he started from
Bloomfield street; there he met an iceman and
talked a lew minutes with him, and the iceman
told him there was a man in the lot kissing the
sod. He went in and turned him over, and found
dried blood on his face. He got him on his feet,
and let him go home. He looked worse than he
real!* was. The man said he lived in East Twenty
eighth (street, and he started him for the other
■ide of the city by telling him to follow his nose till
he got to the East river. He was then by the Hud
won river.
The Commissioner said that might take fifteen
minutes; where was be the other forty minutes?
The officer thought following the roundsman.
“How long would it take you to go over your
post?” asked the Commissioner.
“I never timed myself.”
The roundsman said he could go over it in fifteen
minutes. He passed that lot spoken of, and if there
had been anybody in it he would have seen him.
He went four times over the post.
THE GRAND JURY FAILS TO INDICT.
The Grand Jury failed to Indict Officer Adams for
manslaughter, shooting and killing Panine Canala,
while standing at his uncle’s drug store, in Centre
Street. The circumstances of the case are these:
Adams arrested a man for burglary, and shortly
after another for petty larceny. He took both pris
oners to the Tombs, and arraigned them before
Justice Duffy, who committed them to answer.
While conveying his prisoners down the winding
stairs of the Tombs, he allowed tbe burglar, Mur
ray, to precede him. The Tombs gate was open,
and tbe burglar fled through it on the street. He
was more fleet of foot than the officer, and outran
him. This was at eleven o’clock, when the throng
was not so great as at an hour later. The burglar
ran from Franklin to Leonard, in the middle of
Centre street, and tbe officer fired one shot at him.
Passing Leopard street, tbe thief took to the pave
ment, where all sorts of pedestrians are on the
move. The officer fired, and the shot intended for
the burglar killed the young man standing by the
drug store. The escaped thief has gone to sea.
The Commissioner said it was pretty rough for a
citizen to be shot down at bis own door.
Captain McCullough said the officer was sorry
for it.
The officer said in the chase he saw nobody but
the man he was following.
The Comm ssioner said it was hardly necessary
for him to admonish him. He apprehended that
the officer himself must feel keenly at taking an in
nocent life. But it was hard that a man should be
Shot down under auch circumstances.
A SMALL HOLE.
There was a piece of broken pavement at Broad
way and Forty-second street, that Stevenson didn’t
think it worth while to report. That will cost him
$2.
FORGOT.
Greer lit his cigar up stairs after his tour of duty.
He came down with the cigar between his fingers.
On the stoop of the station bouse he took a puff.
He would have escaped Roundsman Conway’s no
tice but for Officer McGinley, be said. How that
was did not appear. McGinley ought to pay that
half day s fine.
A DOUBTFUL CALL.
Mahoney was absent from a special post corner of
Ninth street and Sixth avenue. What swindle was
going on there that required the constant attention
Of an officer was not stated. It is close by Jefferson
Market, and of course had reference to something
criminal. He said he was called off this stationary
post to arrest a disorderly woman in Clinton place.
'■ Who called you?” asked the Commissioner.
“A woman—l don’t know.”
“What did she say ? ’
•' She said a woman was raising a disturbance.”
“ What time was this ?”
“ I did not take the time. It might have been
two o’clock. I got there, and she had quieted down,
And the woman did not want to be arrested.”
"What was she doing ?”
“Sitting on the stoop.”
“Where did the live ?”
"Next door.”
“ How long were you there ?”
“Captain Brogan says half an hour.”
“How far off?”
“ Two blocks.”
Captain Brogan said the same statement was
made to him, but he wouldn’t accept such an ex
cuse.
SALUTING THE DESK.
Fenkin, of the Fifth Precinct, when be entered
the station-house, said he saluted the desk. Next
time he will salute the officer in command sitting
at it,
HIS AUNTY.
Maloy, of the Twentieth Precinct, was late at the
eight T. M. roll call. He said there was sickness iu
the house, and he overslept himself.
“Are you a married man ?”
“No.”
“Who was sick iu tbe house ?”
“My aunty.”
"Your aunty I That’s hardly excuse enough.”
THE LAST OF POLICE EXCURSIONS.
McFarland was late at the seven P. M. roll call.
“1 was at the police excursion and the boat drift
ed,” said the officer.
“ I think you officers have had your last excur
sion. More trouble have grown out of them ”
The Commissioner didn’t finish.
A STATION-HOUSE LAWYER.
McPhail should have been a Tombs lawyer, or a
police justice. He made a mistake becoming a po
liceman. He can talk even Commissioner French
out of his boots. That is saying a good deal. There
is nothing bashful about French, but it would be
tale to bet that if McPhail wanted a favor of the
President be could go in his room and talk it out of
him.
McPhail was ordered to go to the Polo Grounds,
at 110th street, at 3:30 P. M. There was a sort of
emuete there. The gamins wanted to see a baseball
game without paying an entrance fee. They broke
down part ot the fence, and tho police were not in
sufficient numbers to roll the mob back. Rein
forcemeats were sent for. McPhail was found at
Riverside lark at 3:30 and was one of several or
dered to the Polo Grounds to report there for duty.
He was not seen till near five o’clock by roundsmen
Thompson and Sweeny, who saw him then for the
first time.
He tried hard toprove he was on the ground
before five o'clock, but he didn’t. It was his duty
when he got to tbe Polo ground to report to his
superior and put himself under his orders. Ac
cording to his own story, if to be believed, and the
Commissioner said he didn’t, he acted as a skirm
isher on the grounds till seen by accident by his
superiors.
Millie entered a drug store to hunt up a builder’s
pame in the directory. He had violated the law.
Burns, of the Thirty-second Precinct, anxious to
see the news, bought a paper and looked at the head
lines before he folded it.
Curran and O'Connor were timed twelve minutes
in conversation. Curran said that he was de«cylbjng
three suspiowus oharaotsrs he had se«jj.
THE SHADOW OF DEATH
OVERHANGS
CAMERON
Saturday morning’s mail brought him
the following letter:
“CAMERON OF CAMERONVILLE:
i 6 Unless you cease selling suits at one
third the price of other Clothiers your doom
is sealed I! Thirty-five Mew York Clothiers
have sworn to have your blood. You have
ruined their business, and only your life
can repay the injury you have inflicted on
them. What fate is too horrible for the
man who only charges sls for a Satin-
Lined Prince Albert Suit? Cease doing
these things or beware the untold ven
geance of the Secret Society off Busted
Clothiers. Wild Horses will tear you
asunder.”
Executive Committee 5.5.8. C.”
CAMERON,
Nos. 200,202, and 209 Flatbush Avenue,
BROOKLYN.
P. S.—Tickets for CAMERON’S COMPLIMENTARY EXCURSION
can be had on application at the D .SPATCH OFFICE.
oca FIM OEf.UffflL /
NO MEETING OF THE BOARD
ON WEDNESDAY—THE RELIEF
FUND—NO BUSINESS OF IM
PORTANCE TRANSACTED BY
THE COMMISSIONERS DURING
THE WEEK.
There was no meeting of the Board of Fire Com
missioners on Wednesday morning last. An ad
journment to Wednesday next was had.
SICK FIREMEN.
The medical officers yesterday reported that the ■
sick and injured list of officers and men had been ,
reduced from fifty-seven to forty-eight.
EXONERATED.
Coroaer Eidman s jury, on Friday, exonerated
Owen O’Rourke, Assistant Foreman of Hook and
Ladder Company No. 4, from all blame lor the ;
death of Engineer William Wray, of Engine Com- ,
pany No. 54, who was run over and fatally injured
while trying to get up on the truck while it was
going to a fire at Seventy-first Btreet and the Boule
vard, on May 24th ult.
THE RELIEF FUND.
The committee, in charge of the theatrical bene
fit, which was lately given in aid of the Relief 1 und,
were somewhat disappointed in their expectations,as
but a small number of the members exerted them
selves. Had they done so, a very large sum could
have been realized. Every inducement was offered
in order that it might prove a success. As it turned
out, but a small sum will accrue from the afia.r.
Secretary Bishop has received many flattering
letters testifying to his ability as an actor, and it is
said that he has now under consideration an offer
to take out a company of barn-stormere next sea
son. Should he do so, Bill Borst will support him.
The chairman of the Exempt and Volunteer Fire
men's Associations' conference have not yet named
the place where they will meet to arrange in what
manner they will celebrate tho passage of the law
continuing to the widows and orphans the tax
which they have received for so many years past.
It was decided by the Exempts to have a parade,
but as October next has been named as the date to
hold it, many old firemen look upon it with dis
favor, as it is likely to entangle them with political
complications which, for the interest of the fund
hereafter, should be avoided. It is likely that the
parade will be abandoned unless it should take
place within the next few weeks, in which case no
political significance could be attached to it.
It has been suggested that the better way to tes
tify their appreciation of the law-makers, would be
to have the conference committees agree upon the
resolutions of thanks, in which special mention
could be made of those who were instrumental in
passing the law, then select the person to read
them, engage a large hall—say Cooper Institute or
the Academy of Music—issue tickets to the mem
bers and their families, also to.he widows and in
digent old firemen who are benefitted from the
fund, and have the resolutions put to the house for
public adoption. The committee could then have
a programme to follow in the shape of a concert,
music, &c.
This would be the better and more iatisfactory
way of giving thanks, and would stifle any attempt
of ringing in politics by whomsoever it might be
intended, and at tbe same time avoid the noisy
demonstration which should be considered foreign
to a charitable institution.
The resignation of Mr. Bonner was received dur
ing the week. No importance a'tacbes to it except
that as an old fireman he may have felt disappoint
ed that his old comrades did not see fit to side in
with his views ou tbe question of the Tax law. As
an offset to his resignation, a late Fire Commission
er Las paid one years' dues in advance, so that with
the remaining two thousand two hundred and odd
members, it is believed that the association can still
exist.
The friends of President Crane have been making
vigorous efforts to induce Mayor Hewitt to appoint
him a Fire Commissioner. It can be truly said of
Mr. Crane that he is a worker and rarely fails in
anything that he undertakes. At the last report
Mr. Crane was said to be in the advance, and that
the only reason why be has not been appointed al
ready was. that he was a non-resident. This is not
strictly correct, as we happen to know that Mr.
Crane has been a guest of tbe Hotel Madison for
mouths past, his bus.uese arrangements being such
that he could not afford the time to live out of the
city. Some members of his family reside in Brook
lyn. which, perhaps, has given rise to the story of
his being a non-resident.
The Exeuctivo Committoe of the Exempt Fire
men's Association of Troy have forwarded a list of
hotels, prices, etc.; also that the railroads through
out the State will carry companies of firemen and
delegates at tbe rate of three cents per mile for the
round trip, with but payment for one way.
There are forty-five hotels, accommodating over
five thousand people, and the average rates being
$2 per day, insures a large attendance at the con
vention, which is to last from the 16th to the 19th
of August next. Chief Engineer W. F. Holroyd is
chairman of the reception committee—a selection
that assures a good time to an old fireman, no mat.
ter what part of the State he hails from. The com
mittee are doing all in their power to make the oc
casion a memorable one in the fire history of the
State.
The affairs of the association were never in a more
prosperous condition than at present. A large num
ber have applied to be readmitted as members of
the Mutual Aid branch. Its benefits have been
shown in several cases of late—a fact which causes
many of the wives of the members to see to it that
they do not drop out through carelessness.
JU <sll- llingfers.
JUST WHERE THEY NOW KNOW THE LAUGH
DOESN’T COME IN.
Wilson Rock, aged seventeen, residing at No. 338
West Seventeenth street, and John White, aged six
teen, of No. 512 West Twenty-ninth street, were be
fore Justice O’Reilly, yesterday, charged with door
bell ringing, Friday night. White pleaded the baby
act—he was a minor, irresponsible for his acts.
This caused an adjournment till to-day. It under
age, as he says, or tries to prove himself, he goes to
the House of Refuge till he may be twenty-one.
Had they pleaded guilty yesterday, and said they
were sorry, a light flue would have been imposed,
and, it’ paid, that would have been the end of it.
Ida Vincent, a very respectable colored woman,
residing at No. 202 West Sixteenth street, said the
urisoners pulled her bell, banged the shutters, and
broke one side down. When she expostulated with
the y oung men they replied, “You go to , you
nigger.”
Rock said that was not so. She tried to catch the
NEW YORK DISPATCH, JUNE 12, 1887.
young man that did do it, but he ran; he stood,
and she didn’t .get the right one,
White acknowledged that he did not live in Six
teenth street, and couldn’t explain how he came
there.
They were committed in default of SSOO bail each
for examination this morning.
Pat Sullivan’s Story.
WHAT HE SAYS WAS THE RESULT OI A CLUB
BING.
Patrick Sullivan, a laborer, was charged with as
saulting Officer Linn, of the S xth Precinct. The
officer said Sullivan came out of a liquor saloon in
i’ toxicatod. A citizen told him the accused was strik
| ing everybody that came along. When tbe officer
I came up to Sullivan, he was struck across tho face
i with a billiard cue.
Defendant said he worked that day and hadn’t
I drank anything in three years before that night.
I When in this liquor saloon in Baxter street, a fellow
got a billiard cue and was going to bit him. Ho
grabbed it and it broke in two, and went on the
i sidewalk. Standing outside tbe door the officer
J came up and struck him, and beat him senseless,
and ho was laid up six months.
“How long were you iu Chambers street Hos
pital ?” asked counsel.
“Four months. I was lanced there from day to
day for four months, where the wounds had fes
tered where I had been clubbed. I was doing noth
ing but standing at tbe door after taking the bil
liard cue from the man.”
“The officer says you were intoxicated.”
“Yes, I give iu to that.”
“ Weren’t you going along flourishing this billiard
cue ?”
“No.”
” You had it in your band ?”
“Yes, I had one part; the fellow had the other.”
“You have been pretty severely punisbe 1,” said
Justice Kilbreth; “ten dollars flue.”
.TollTi and Sarali.
SHE SCRUBS AND WASHES, AND HE DRINKS
HER EARNINGS.
John and Sarah Hilley are a young couple, They
resided at 902 Third avenue. Last Sunday her hus
band assaulted her.
“ What did he do?” asked the Court.
“He asked me for a quarter to go out and get
shaved and have a drink. Then lie came back and
asked for more money. I could not give it, and he
hit mo four or five times, and kicked me.”
“ How many children have you ?”
“Two.”
•* What does he work at ?”
“He is a coachman.”
“ Doc s ho give you good support ?”
“No, very little.”
“ What do you do?”
“I go out doing washing and ironing.”
“ What have you to say ?” asked the Court.
“Nothing.” replied the man.
“Your wife, with two small children, goes out
and does washing, and you beat her. Have you
nothing to say in your defense?”
"Nothing,” replied the man.
“We find you guilty. Can you get along without
this man ?”
“ I’ll do the best I can, if he keeps away from
me.”
“Four months,” said the Court.
Ned’s < Tiix rac tei?.
HE HAD BETTER REFORM OR LIVE ACROSS
TOWN.
Edward Rock looked quite a young man, not over
twenty-three, had served many short terms
in the City Prison and Penitentiary, and once, the
last imprisonment, in Sing Sing.
He was charged with assault with intent to steal
as a pickpocket, by Officer Hunt. The officer said
at ten minutes to two in the morning, at Morton
and West streets, he saw prisoner put his hand in a
sailor’s pocket. The sailor was lying on the side
walk drunk. When he first saw Rock he stood fifty
or sixty feet off. Prisoner raised the sailor up and
put him in an ice wagon, and said, “ Now, Jack, go
to sleep.” He waited till Rock lay down beside the
sailor, and was “going through him,” when he
came ou him.
“What did he say?” asked the Court.
*“ I didn’t think you would do that on me.’ He
is jUHt down two weeks from State Prison. I have
known him since he was a boy.”
“ I merely lilted the man up.” said the prisoner.
“He said he wanted to go to sleep, and 1 said you
can go to sleep there better.”
“ ’What were you doing out at that hour?”
“I work at Washington Market.”
“Guilty,” said tho Court. “What do you know
about him, officer?”
“He has been arrested four or five times for
grand iaroeny. He has baeu all his lifetime a loafer
around corners, never working, but living by rob
bing drunken people.”
“One year,” said the Court.
Claimed t® toe an Officer.
FLOURISHED A PISTOL AND WANTED TO MAKE
AN ARREST.
“On the second of this month did you see Joseph
Bennett?” asked the Court.
“Yes, sir; at No. 122 Allen street,” said Joseph
Lees. “He came iu the house and claimed to be
an officer. He said he had just come from Eldridge
street police-station, and he said he had a warrant
for somebody. He had a revolver in his band, and
. rushed up-stairs and rapped at the door. He stood
flourishing his revolver in the presence of four men
and a woman. I asked him who he wanted. He
said he wanted George or Harry somebody. I said
you can arrest the whole family, but you must
show your authority. He said, ‘l’ll show you,’
flourishing h s revolver. I went down to get an
SICK HEADACHE.
Biliousness, Costiveness, Indigestion, Dizziness, Female Complaints, Pains in the Back. Weakness, Foul Stomach
Bad Breath, Pain or Discomfort alter eating, Torpidity ol the Liver, Loss of Appetite, Nervousness, Palpitation oi’
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nourishing properties tor the support of the natural waste and decay of the body.
KADWAVS I’ILI.S.
For the cure of ail disorders of the Stomach. Liver, Bowels, Kidneys, Bladder, Nervous of Appetr e,
Headache, Costiveness, Indigestion, Biliousness. Fever, Inflammation of the Bowels, Piles and all derangements of
the internal viscera. Pure vegetable, containing no mercury, minerals, or deleterious drugs.
Frier, Si? cent ■ yer Pole! by all Druggists.
officer, nnd when he saw mo he ran; Iran, and he
flung the pistol from him.”
A witness said the prisioner camo up-stairs at
No. 122 Allen street, and asked if Kate Wilson lived
there. “Yes,” he was told, “ but she was out.” He
then said he was looking for her brother, to put him
to work. Then he said the brother had knocked
down a woman and stolen sll. He told him the
man hadn’t been there in two weeks. Prisoner said
he would get him; he was an officer from the El
dridge street station.
Prisoner sa d he went to the house to look for a
man named George Wilson. When he asked lor
him, two men told him to “get,” aud he .lid. and
ran. He got scared. At the Eldridge street station
the roundsman toid him he could go around and
make the arrest.
He was fined $25.
" Don’t ask me to go to church with
you again,” said a Minneapolis citizen to his wife;
“it won’t do you any good.” “Why not, John?”
she asked. • Didn’t you enjoy the sermon ?” “En
joy the sermon I” he repeated, angrily. “ Why, the
preacher kept boomin’ Bt. Paul, an’ never said a
dinged word about Minneapolis !”
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E, HALL’S
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the disease, and prevents the night
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chest which accompany it. CON
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you, even though professional aid
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for Illuminated Book.
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ready to attack wherever there is a weak point. We may
escape many a fatal shaft by keeping ourselves well fo; ti
tled with puYe blood and a properly nourished frame.”—
Civil service Cax >tte.
Made simply with boiling water or milk. Sold only in
hall pound tins by Grocers, labeled thus:
JAMES EPPS
CORSETS MADE TO ORDER.
Ladles who desire a PERFECT FITTING CO :SET, and
one that, lor comfort and durability, has no superior,
call at No. 311 Fa t Twenty-seventh street, where au
HONEST WHALEBONE COKSET is made to ord r. in
any style, size, or shape desired, and of any color, quality
or material you may select, at PRICES TO SUIT EVERY
BODY.
A lady in attendance, who will call at your residence,
if desired.
WHALEBONE CORSET C<’MP ’ NV
NO. 311 FAST 1 WENTY-bhVENTH bT O.ET.
AGENTS WANTED. NEW YOLK.
HUMPHREYS’
HOMEOPATHIC VETERIHAEY SPECIFICS
For Horses, Cattle, Sheep,
\ Dogs, Hogs, Poultry.
500PAGEBOOKonTreaX
mcilt of Animals and
Chart Sent Free.
cures—Fevers, Congestions, Inflammation,
A. A.—Spinal Meningitis, Milk Fever.
B. Strains, Lameness, Rheumatism.
C. C.—Distemper, Nasal Discharges.
D. D.-Bots or Grubs, Worms.
E. E.—Coughs, Heaves, Pneumonia.
F. F.—Colic or Gripes* Bellyache.
G. G.-Miscarringo, Hemorrhages.
11. H.—Urinary and Kidney Diseases.
J. I. —Eruptive Diseases, Mange.
. K.—Diseases of Digestion.
Stable Case, with Specifics, Manual,
Witch Hazel Oil and dedicator, $7.00
Price, Single Bottle (over 50 dosesX - .GO
Sold by Druggists; or
1 Sent Prepaid on Receipt of Price.
Humphreys’ Med. Co., 109 Fulton St., N, Y.
I HOMEOPATHIC
JSPECIFIC No.fiO
In use 30 years. The only successful remedy for
Nervous Debility, Vital Weakness,
and Prostration, from* over-work or other causes.
$1 per vial, or 5 vials and large vial powder, for $5.
Sold by Druggists, or sent postpaid on receipt of
price.—Humphreys’ Medicine Co., 100 Fallon Bt., N. Y.
18Q7
BJTV
&Qo.
Bedding,
FURNITURE,
Refrigerators, Crockery,
CARPETS,
Pictures, Curtains.
Everything for Housekeeping
is3> J ss> is7> T s9> l 6l > i6 3> i 65
Chatham Street,
193,195,197,199,201,203,205
Park Row,
Bet. City Hall & Chatham Square Elevated
R. R. Stations,
NEW YORK.
Credit or Cash Discount.
Goods sent everywhere. Price lists mailed
on application.
OOWPMTHWW.
I). NY. BItOWIN,
CARPETS,
Furniture, Oil Cloths,
and Window Shades.
CASH $1 OR $2 WEEKLY.
Nos. 282 and 288 GRAND STREET,
AND No. 103 ELDRIDGE STREET.
RIDLEYS’,
Grand St., New York.
BOYS’ CLOTHING.
READ CLOTHING HOUSE PRICES, EXAMINE
THEIR OFFERINGS, AND THEN COMPARE THEM
WITH OUR LARGE ASSORTMENT, AND BE CON
VINCED OF THE ACTUAL AND MATERIAL SAV
ING TO BE ENJOYED.
500 WASH KILTS, 95c., $1.19, $1.38.
WHITE PIQUE, $1.85, $2.25. $3.00, $3.25.
1,500 ALL-WOOL BLOUSE SUITS, AGES 4 TO
16, HANDSOMELY PLAITED, $2.50.
1,600 SAILOR SUITS, $1.25, $2.00, $2.50, $3.00,
$3.50, $5.00.
Men’s Suits.
SPECIAL—IN SUMMER CLOTH.
100 LINEN OFFICE COATS, 65c.
500 SEERSUCKER COATS AND VESTS, $1.50.
BLACK ALPACA COATS, $1,25, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50,
$3.00.
THE FINEST ASSORTMENT OP
MOHAIR COATS AND VESTS, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50*
$5.00, $6.00 AND $7.00.
600 IMPORTED BLACK CORKSCREW SUITS AT
$14.50; WORTH S2O.
Boys’ Sats,
BOYS' MIXED STRAW HATS, 19c., 23c., 300., 35c.
BOYS' MACKINAW STRAW HATS, WITH ALL
SILK BANDS, 330. AND 50c.
BOYS' FINE MIXED STRAW HATS, WITH SILK
VELVET TRIMMINGS, 69c.
BOYS' IMPORTED SAILOR HATS AT 71c.;
WORTH $1.25.
BOYS' FINE MILAN TAM O’SHANTERS, 95c.;
HAVE BEEN $1.63.
Men’s Hats.
MEN’S GENUINE STRAW HATS, 33c. AND 43c.
MEN’S FUR FELT DERBY HATS, NEW FANCY
COLORS, AT $1.30; WORTH $2.00.
MEN'S CASSIMERE HIGH HATS, $2.00, $2.50
AND $3.00.
MEN’S FUR FELT POCKET HATS, ALL COLORS,
75c.; WORTH $1.25.
E. RIDLEY & SONS,
309, 311, 313 to 321 GRAND STREET,
56, 58, 60 to 70 ALLEN STREET,
59, 61, 63, 65 ORCHARD STREET,
NEW YORK.
(Bxnirmg.
Soldiers, sailors, civilians.
GRAND EXCURSION TO NEW HAVEN,
FRIDAY, JUNE 17,
on the splendid three deck steamboat "COLUMBIA,”
to attend the dedication of
SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT,
ROUND TRIP TICKETS sl.
For sale at all G. A. R. Posts and Col. McENTEE, 4
City Hall, N. Y., and Capt. PHILLIPS, 14 City Hall.
Brooklyn. Refreshments on board at city prices. Splen
did daylight sail through the Sound. Number limited to
1,500. One-half capacity of boat.
Leave Foot W. 22d st., 7 A. M.; I eave Pier 6, N. R.,
7:20 A. M.; l eave Jewell’s Wharf, Brooklyn, 7:40 A. M.;
Leave Foot E. 23d st., 8 A. M.
LEAVE NEW HAVEN TO RETURN, 6 P. M.
CASH or CREDIT.
JORDAN &
MORIARTY,
167. 167 1-3, 169, 171, 173 CHATHAM ST,
307, 307 1-3, 309. 311, 313 PARK ROW,
NEW YORK,
furniture, Carpets,
Oil Cloths, Bedding,
Stoves, Refrigerators,
&c., &0.,» &c.
JORDAN & MORIARTY
STOOLS.
■"■^^***PlANO COVERS, PIANO SCARFS,
TABLE COVERS, STORE STOOLS,
MUSIC CABINETS and STANDS,
€3 MANTEL LAMBREQUINS, GRAND
and UPRIGHT COVERS MADE TO
ORDER.
/zMmi F. Manufacturer
md importer. No. 390 Canal street,
wear West Broadway, N. Y.
J L. STROUB’S OYSTER BAY, No.
• 2369 THIRD AVENUE, between 128th and 129th
sts., is furnishing oysters by the quart and hundred, and
Lb delivering on the halt shell at all hours. The proprie*
tor, John L. Stroub, is the patentee of the Clam Roaster
which is used at most all hotels, oyster houses, and by
private families throughout the country with great satis*
faction. They are sold at all the house furnishing stores
throughout the U. 8. Principal Depots: John L. fitroub s
Oyster Bay, 2369 3d av.; John L. Stroub’s Family Oyster
House, 93 Canal st. ; John L. Stroub’s River View Hotel*
foot of 125th street. North River. Mew York City.
caMitfsg nr -"WiM WMWMKBtrr iw ■*< r n siw mw—g——
FEED. NEITHER,
BOTTLER OF
Gee. Ehret’s New York,
“ “ Franciskaner
Jo;- Schli'z Brewing Co’s. Milwaukee,
Rochester and Imported
LAGER BEER,
FOR THE TRADE, FAMILY USE AND EXPORT.
NOS. 155 AND 157 WEST 20tIi ST.,
(Between Sixth and Seventh Avenues.) NEW YORK.
BROOKLYN DELIVERIES. TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS.
EXCELSIOR!
The Justly Celebrated and
World-Famed
EXCELSIOR
Lager beeß
MANUFACTURED BY
GEORGE BECHTEL
IS STRICTXir PURE.
It is the FINEST FLAVORED
and MOST WHOLESOME Beer
betore the public. It is pro
nounced the
BEST AND PUREST BEER
by eminent Physicians and Chem
ists, and they recommend it for
INVALIDS as well as the robust.
It has received
MEDALS
from PHILADELPHIA, NEW
YORK, PARIS, SYDNEY and
JAPAN for excellence and puri
ty, and
STANDS UNRIVALED!
This celebrated beer is now put up in
bottles expressly for FAMILY
USE and Exportation.
AZZ COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO
GEO. BECHTEL,
Stapleton, Staten Island, N. Y.
gUtumentg. |
Acme of Human Effort! Crowning Achievement of Genius!
AN AMAZING AND UNPARALLELED PRESENTATION OF SPECTACULAR GRANDEUR.
TO BE SEEN ONLY AT THE PEOPLE’S SUPREME PLEASURE RESORT,
SAINT GEORGE, STATEN ISLAND,
ana A d.“c ra to n t U hroceSAL“GS", to? handsomest Bay in the Universe, past the GRAND STATUE OF LIBERTY
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE
STATEN ISLAND AMUSEMENT CO., LIMITED.
Wednesday Evening', June 22, at 8:15 o’clock,
d”tu "e e ort“me" pain? anu e « 6 h” t oj naU ‘ !U '' ation, after “ en “ re Wlnter ’ s elaborate preparation and at fabulous ezpen-
Tlie Most Gigantic Spectacular Enterprise of the Centnry,
MrangJd C at”a'wnatton endeav<>r ' totaily «IW->g every former effort in the same line, and now
TO enthrall, electrify and entrance a continent.
THE FALL OF BABYLON AMUSEMENT CO.
Will present an incomparable, amazing and astoundingly beautiful Historical and Biblical Drama,
THE FALL OF BABYLON
IN WHICH WILL APPEAR
IMHE KERAIFY’S
GRAND spectacular company of over
1,000 Specially Selected, Accomplished Artists. 1,000
Produced with every adjunct and auxiliary that human Ingenuity could devise and unlimited capital secure.
ON THE MOST EXTENSIVE STAGE EVER ERECTED IN THIS COUNTRY.
p„.^t en , ery blastonbhing altitude, wealth and Impressive beautv, painted in oil bv a reco<'niaod master T„l,n
a p d , br “ ,<1 JO withstand a cyclone. Paraphernalia i' incred.blo cost aito oraiwiess mvrlad
stage effects el almost unbelievable novelty, richness, rarity and brilliancy. ornateness, and myrrad
$50,000 Worth of Startlingly New Electric Triumphs. $50,000.
$100,000 Value of Europe’s Richest Costumes, Expressly Made. $100,000.
with a 1 h° usan , d and one other features ot only less magnitude and worth. but of bewildering
variety, picturesQuencss and wondrous oddity, making, without exaggeration, “
A Spectacle of Most Bewitching Loveliness,
the equal ol which was never before known under any auspices In any age In »uy country under the sun.
I ersian Attack on the City ot Overwhelming' and Impressive
Babylon. Pageantry.
An immensely thrilling scene, in which huge cata- A most orginal, magnificent and gorgeous series ot
pults, battering rams, annihilating fire-balls and other ,• ,
destructive weapons are used with startling results. 8 tableanx ' composed of 1,000 living figures, ele-
GRAND CHORUS ofCHALDEAN PRIESTS pl,ants - camels and otber Ponderous beast.; golden char
by the entire chorus of the National Opera Company, lot5 ' m0T,ne ” asse9 of m »« ‘han Oriental grandeur,
augmented by many voices. thrilling and sensational dramatic climaxes, 4c., 4c., the
~ „ whole subject to and controlled by electricity, an in
GRAND GEADIATORIAIj STRUGGLES vention used in this country for the fir»t time.
AND BABYLONIAN PASTIMES,
By troupes of imported artists and athletes. THE CHORUS OF THE JEWS*
THE FETE OF BABYLON. THE FETE OF BABYLON.
Presenting an open air scene of mind enrapturing luxury and elegance. Grand T erpsichorean Revels, engag
ing over 60J picked artis s of Europe and America in a fascinating and uni me divertissement, specially ar
ranged and produced by Europe’s Maitre de Ballet, SIG. ETTORE COM Pl MI.
THE FEAST OF BELSHAZZAR.] THE HANDWRITING ON THE WALL.
SURPRISE BY THE PERSIANS.] DESTRUCTION OF BABYLON.
Music entirely new and specially composed by ANGELO VENANZI, Chef d’Orehestra, La Senia
Milan. All Costumes grander than any e'er wen in America, specially designed by WILHELM, ©• Lon
don, and DR A NKR, of Paris, trom documents obtained from and searcl e< made in the BKiTlSH
Ml SEUM, London, an 1 the AMBROnIAAA LIBRARY, Milan; manufactured by MISS FISHER.
Londou. and E. LANDOLFF, Paris. The whole bewildeiingly lovely spectacle produced under the per
sonal direction of IMRE KIRALFY.
Countless e itures too numerous to particularize. Saint George is the nearest point to New York: is favored
with never ceasing, alwaje refreshing sea breezes, and is the accepted popular Summer evening resort ot the
nation’s metropolis.
Doors Open at 7. Grand Opening Scene at 8:15. Admission, 50c.
GRAND STAND, 25c. Extra. BOXES (Holding 6), $6. CHILDREN UNDER 5, FREE*
Ample provision made by the Staten Island Ferry Company to convey 2O.noo people an hour cn their spacious
bo a s from the foot of Whitehall st., Battery, terminus of all Elevated Kailroads. Particulars of o.her boats later
APISON SQUARE GARDEN.
COMMENCING MONDAY, June 18,
Magnificent revival of
PINAFORE,
which will be produced upon a scale of Realism never
before adopted.
REAL MAN-OF-WAR IN REAL WATER.
200 VOICES ON DECK.
CUTLASS DRILL BY A CORPS OF MARINES.
GRAND BALLET OF CHILDREN AS MIDSHIPMITES,
Popular prices, 25c. and 50c,
Matinee prices, children 15c.
<♦>
TWO PERFORMANCES DAILY, 2 P. and 8 P. M.
OPEN TO-DAY.
OLD LONDON. 728-730 BROADWAY,
OLD LONDON. NEAR ASTOR PLACE.
GRAND SACRED CONCERT
from 3 to 6 and from 8 to 11,
by well known vocal talent and Von Schiller’s celebrated
band.
MIGNOT’S CELEBRATED PICTURES.
To-morrow and every afternoon and evening this week,
PROMENADE CONCERT.
HERCAT'S
MARVELOUS ENTERTAINMENT,
and the celebrated comical eccentric,
MAJILTON.
ADMISSION, TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW, 250.
GLOBE MUSEUM. No. 298 Bowery.
ANOTHER GREAT ATTRACTION,
A VOICE FROM THE
S P I K IT LAND,
Invisible, yet answers all questions; The Transparent
Lady, and life size figures of (he Murdered Rahway Girl
and her supposed murderer. Grand stage performances
hourly of a new drama, the
THREAD WEAVERS OF NEW YORK.
Open from 11 A. M. io 10 P. M. Admission, 10 cents.
NIBLO’S.
Mr. E. G. GlLMOßEPropr’etor and Manager
Reserved seats, Orchestra Circle and Balcony, 50 cts.
LAST WEEK. LAST PERFORMANCES.
MR. AND MRS. MCKEE RANKIN,
in Clay Greene's latest dramatic success,
THE GOLDEN GIANT.
THE GOLDEN GIANT.
Evenings at 8. Matinees Wed. and Sat., at 2.
Monday, June 20—Travers House.
TTNION SQUARE THEATRE.
I J J. M. HILL ..Manager.
MURRAY AND MURPHY in OUR IRISH VISITORS
Herald.—k more enthusiastic audience never gathered
in a thea’re. Times.— Everything they did woke nn ap
plauding Bedlam. Sun —The play is silenco itself com
pared with the laughter and applause ot the audience.
World,—Any amount of tun. The audience was con
Madison square theatre.
Mr. a. M. PALMERSoIe Manager.
Cooled by Iced Air. Begins at 8:30.
Richard Mansfield.
Week of the 500th Performance.
JPHINCJJa It A. KU.
Theatre decorated with flowers and ferns.
CROWDED HOUSES.
CASINO, Broadway and 39th street.
Evenings at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2.
SECOND YEAR.
“SUCCESS GREATER THAN EVER.”
THE SPARKLING COMIC OPERA,
EK M INIE.
Received with Roars of Laughter.”
ROOF GARDEN PROMENADE CONCERT AFTER OPERA
Admission 50c., Including Both Entertainments.
WALLACK’S. Monday, June 13.
First Production in America
of the Great Parisian Success.
JACQUETTE. I JAOQUETTE.
JACQUETTE. I JACQUETTE.
Bv the
McCAULL OPERA COMPANY. .
LLRGE CHORUS. INCREASED ORCHESTRA.
MAGNIFICENT COSTUMES.
Admission 50c.Only Matinee Wednesday at 2.
STANDARD THEATRE.
ROYAL JAPANESE.
I Every night at R:ls. Saturday Matinee at 2.
' MARSHALL’S
JAPANESE
JAPANESE
JAPANESE
TOURISTS,
DANCERS, ATHLETES, ACROBATS.
In their astonishing performances oi the Antipodes.
S~~ MINER’S PEOPLE’S THEATRE.
MR. FRANK MAYO
P AS „
u D’Artagnan the Gascon, fj
in Mayo and Wilson’s <;
lIROYAL GUARD.?
j K. I Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. s
STAR THEATRE. Bi-RNHARDT.
Important announcement. Four tare well perform
ances, commencing WEDNESDAY Eveniug. June 15, oi
MME. SARAH BERNHARDT.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, JUNE 15. FEDORA.
THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 16, and
Friday afternoon, June 17, Grand Matinee. THEODORA.
Friday evening, June 17, benefit of Mme. BERNHARDT,
HERM N I .
Prices, $3. $2, sl. Seats now on sale at box-office. ~
mHEISS’S. THEISS’S.
A ALHAMBRA COURT AND MUSIC HALL,
14th street, near Third avenue.
THE “MONSTER ORCHESTRION »
T EXINGTON AVE. OPERA HOUSE,
9 J TERRACE GARDEN AND TERRACE PAVILION,
145 to 155 E. 58th St, and 146 to 160 E. 59th st.
THE HANDSOMEST AND MOST COMMODIOUS
ESTABLISHMENT
in the suitable to hold or give
BALLS, SUMMER FESTIVALS, PICNICS,* THEATRI
CAL PERFORMANCES, CONCERTS, RECEPTIONS,
BANQUETS. WEDDINGS, ETC., ETC.
Committees are respectfully reque.-ted to call at an
early day if they wish to obtain a desirable date for the
coming
SUMMER AND WINTER SEASONS.
All information will be cheerfully given by
MICHAEL H EUM ANN, PROPRIETOR.
jUTumbi if taught by mail without a master.
Sample tune, with full instructions
rtxs, b how to tune, frer and play, and
igj A lyT g A catalogue of 8,000 tunes for 10
i «£r -<A JLM U 1J cents and stamp. Send for circu*
w lar. Dime. Banjo Music Company,
205 Fulton st., Brooklyn, N. Y.
BANJO INSTRUCTION.-$5 Course.
Pup Is taught lor the stage or home amusement. |
Rapid advancement guaranteed. Fine Banjos, Strings,
Bags. etc. DORE BROS., No. 112 West Thirty-filth street,
. inofle I’nrrit'an’s Theatre.
WINDSOK THEATRE.
BOWERY, near Canal.
ONE WEEK, commencing MONDAY, JUNE 13th.
ARIZONA JOE, the Shooting Star. Mon., Tues. A Wed.,
Black Hawks; Thurs., Fri., Sat., Th© Wild Violets. Mati
nees Wednesday aud Satuiday.
1 |TH STREET THEATRE, Cor, 6thave.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
A NEW AND SUC< ESSFUL PRODUCTION.
HYPO RITE,
Cast includes Osmond Tearle, Newton Gotthold, Her
bert Kelcey, Annie Robe, Ac., Ac.
LYCEUM THEATRE -Begins 8:30, Ends
10:40. DAMELFROHMANManager
THE HIGHEST BIDDER -SEVENTH WEEK
THE HIGHEST BIDDER SEVENTH WEEK
»<* JUNE 21st, Fl FT!ETH REPRESENTATION.
BIJOU OPERA HOUSE. 2d WedG
Evenings at 8:15. Wed. and Sat. Matinees at 2.
THE GREAT HERMANN,
as-isted ny Madame Hermann, in his
WORLD OF MA(tI( , MUSIC AND MYSTERY.
POOLE’S THEATRE. Bth st. near 4th ave»
10C. 2Oc. | N. S. WOOD I Mat's
Reserved I Monday Mat. and Ev’ng, I Mon. Wed.
30c. I THEB/YSCcUT. |Thur. Sat.
Wed. & Thur., Jack Sheppard. Fri. A Sat. Boy Detectiv©
EVERETT’S HOTEL
AND GRAND DINING ROOMS,
ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN.
BARCLAY AND VESEY, BETWEEN WASHINGTON
AND WEST STREETS,
NEW YORK.
SAMUEL H. EVERETT,
Proprietor.
G°°l> NEWS
-JO-LADIESI.
fSfcgls Greatest Jnducements ever offered
Now’s your time to get up orders fof
our celebrated Teas and
Coffees and secure a beautifufi
v Gold Band or Mom Rose China Tea
Set, or Handsome Decorated Gold
Rand Mos? Ros© Dinner Set, or Gold Band Mom
Decorated Toilet Set. For full particulars address
THE GREAT JLMERICAN TEA CO.,
[P. O. Box 28d.] W<aaMVlWtt.,Sß» Yotfc
FOR THE COMPLEXION, USE
suphub BATH gospodjd
Cures all Pimples. Sk.n Diseases. Rheumatism,
pepsia. Headache, Malaria, Sero ula, Blood Poison, etc.
All the benefits ot the Sulphur : prings at home. Makes
the weak strong. Induces Sleep aud prevents contagidus
diseases.
lib., 2-) Baths $1; l/to. 25c., by Mail. Ask your Drug
gist lor it. 6ft>s. 1 xp.
MIDJDLETOWN < HEMICAL CO.,
MIDDLETOWN. CONN., U. S. A.
Nervous Debilitk
WEAKNESS, Ac., and all disorders brought on by
indiscretions, excesses, overwork ot the Brain and Ner
vous System, speedily and radically cured by
Winchester’s Specific Pill,
a purely vegetable preparation, the most successful rem
edy known. Send for circular. Price $1 per Box: six
Boxes, s>. by mail. WINCHESTER & CO.,
Chemists 16'4 William St,, New York.
description of yours‘lf. with 15c., lor com-
OUJIN JLJ plete written pred o ion of your future life,
&c. N. M. Geer. Port Hu»on, Jefferson Co., Ohio,
yni ] MARRIA&E SECRETS.
| veals secrets that all men about to marry should
■“ T’ know. Howto cure Seminal Weakness in two
B- I week). Pricesocents (stamps taken.) Address
O 1— I Dr. J. Schnable, 525 Biddle Street, S:. Louis, Mo
TtCURED ONLY by the Improved
Kll P I 31 nF. Elastic Truss, worn with ease night
1 UltaJ and day. Lady in attendance for
Ladies. Send for circular. IMPROVED ELASTIC TRUdi
CO., 822 and 821 Broadway, coruer 12th street, N. X.
CRIM AU LT’S ~~
INJECTION - CAPSULES.
Where all other medicim s have failed these prepara
tions were always effectr e. They insure rap’d and ex
traordinary cure of severe, recent and chronic cases of
disease. They are used in the Hospitals of Paris by the
celebrated Dr. Rico: d and are found greatly’ superior to all
remedi.s hitherto known. For sa.e by 7 all druggists,
w£ak. undeveloped parts
or’the budy’enlarged and strengthened, i ull particulars
sent (sealed) free. ERIE MEDICAL CO., Buffalo, .N. Y.
S ')A»LniA»tA i,tr(9 « thena ’ enlarges and devel ■
B r an - v P art of tho boo 'y- K
El VI lUfdVia J Nervnus debility pills sl. Invig K
M .rating Pills, sl. AH postpaid Address J
sj New England Medical Institute, b
@ No ’’4'’ rem n' Pow. Ro ton. Mas«. ■
Bf AMSY PILLSI
Bl Sui'e. Certnin nn<l Effectual. Particulars
£2 4c. WILCOX SPECIFIC CO., Phlla., I’a.l
.xdSMWBk
Manly Vigor, Weakness or Loss of Memory pen
manently restored by the use of an entirely new
remedy, IT lie Yertia Santa from Spain. Spanish
trochees never fail. Our illustrated,32page book and
:estimonials,(sent sealed). Every man should read it,
FON GRAEF TROCHEE CO., DDpn
59 Park Place. New York. AlujJjj
uair removed sgss
■■ tion or injury with “ Solvene.” Sealed particu*
lars 6 cents. Wilcox Specific Co., Philadelphia, Pa,*
of Men Only; Blood Poison*
ir skin diseases, inflammation; obstructions bladder
kidneys and other organs; weakness, nervous aud general
debility; mental, physical prostration, Ac., successful!*
tr eared aud radically cured; rema kable cures perfected?
11 old cases which have been neglecied or unskillfuil*
treated; no experiments or failures, it being self evident
hat a physician who confines himself exclusively to tha
itudy of certain classes ot diseases, and who treats thou*
lands every year, must acquire greater skill in thos<
brunches than one in general practice. DR. GRINDLI',
No. 171 West 12th street, between Bth and 7th avenuMt

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