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New York dispatch. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1863-1899, October 09, 1887, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85026214/1887-10-09/ed-1/seq-8/

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HUMORS 01? TH3 POLICE.
A Mystery Creator Than the Unfinished
Edwin Drood-He Staggered Into the ~ts
tio:,-House Drunk—Didn’t Think the Pro
prietor Wcu’d Leave Them >n the Lurch
A B»er Saloon That Couldn’t be Closed-
Escj’ped-When Excited, He Could Swear
Block and Blue.
BEFORE COMMISSIONER FRENCH.
TUB MYSTERY OF THE ASSAULT AND ROBBERY
OF MRS. PULVEKMAOHEB.
Ths care against officer George Price, of the Thir
teenth Precinct, was continued, and concluded, in
as much mystery as when it started, lhe woman,
Mrs. Puivermaoher. and her husband appeared
without the necessity of applying to the supreme
Court for an attachment. ..
The woman was assaulted and gagged, and tho
officer knew of the outrage, yet made no report oi
K The inquiry pursued by the two Commissioners,
Voorhia and French, was so searching as to lead to
the belief that tho officer knew a great deal more of
the case personally, than he did from knowledge
and belief, although nothing in the way of evidence
established that fact. i
Mrs. Pulvermacher is a very handsome, lady-.tKe
woman, but pussey and heavy. Avery heavy,
heavy woman to gag.
Her husband is a light-weight, weighing much
less than his wife, 120 pounds.
Both, in giving their evidence, told it through an
interpreter. , . ..
She said that on that afternoon, about three
O’clock, she was assaulted by some one; she couldn’t
tell who. Her husband was then at his work; he
was a cigar maker. The day of the outrage was the
first she saw the officer after she had been assaulted.
Her husband was the first to come in the bouse,
about four o’clock, an hour after the assault, lhe
mau pushed her against the wall and she fainted.
She could not tell when she first gained her senses;
her husband knew that ! She occupied five rooms
on the first floor; there were four floors in the
bouse. She made no outcry because she couldn t.
A man came up in the hall and inquired lor her
busband and she couldn’t describe him.
“Toll us what happened before you became un
conscious,” said Com. French.
HER STORY.
••The man knocked at the door; I asked who was
there; he asked if Mr. Pulvermacher was home; I
said no, he had an order for cigars. I opened the
door and he came in and placed himself in the door
and asked what time my husband would be home;
I told him about five o’clock; he told me he had
some good cigars and asked if I had any; 1 told him
to come back in the evening when my husband was
home; he said he had no time; he said my husband
should bring some cigars to his house, and when I
asked for his card he said he bad no cards. I went
to the passage to the front room and there was a
little dog in the passage, and when standing at the
table, hearing the dog bark, I saw him put it out in
the passage.
“Then, when we were alone, he took hold of me
by the throat; we had a tussle; my head was thrown
against the wall; I got a blow on the back of tho
head, and that is all I remember. I told my hus
band after he came home, when I regained con
sciousness.”
“Did he go out and call this officer?”
“No, this lady did/’—a witness.
Mrs. Mary Gillan, the woman alluded to, said a
woman came up stairs about four o’clock, and she
went out and got the officer. She know the officer,
saw him on post, but never in the house before
this occasion.
Mr. Gillan, the landlord, who keeps a bakery on
the firetfl’ saw Mrs. Pulvermacher on the floor,
and her husband very excited. That was all he
knew about it.
THE OJ EIGER’S STORY.
He had been in the precinct four years. This
charge was what caused him to make her acquaint
ance; never’ was in her house before that day.
Coming down Avenue B, between Tenth and Elev
enth streets, standing on the corner, a young lady
came down and said: “Officer, there has been a
burglary in the baker's house.”
He went with her, the baker stood at the front
door aud went up with him. He also went up with
the young lady, and the husband said when he went
in the house: “Who sent for the police ?” Ho asked
•what had happened, and could get no information
from tne busband. He could see the woman in the
inner room. When he asked for an explanation, the
husband said it was all right, and did not want any
thing said about it. When asked if anything had
been stolen, ho said some change, put bis hand on
tho shoulder of tho officer aud pushed him back,
and said he did not want to say anything about it.
Being unable to get any information, the officer
went down stairs.
THE HUSBAND’S STORY.
“ What time did you get home that afternoon ?”
asked the Commissioner.
“ About five o’clock.”
“ In what condition did you find your wife ?”
•’ When I opened the door I found my wife on the
floor. I looked at her. I saw her hands were tied at
the back, a rope was around the neck, and a gag in
her mouth, made out of a handkerchief.”
“ What did you do ?” asked the Commissioner.
•• First, I pulled the gag out of her mouth. I saw
she Lad been attacked. *
“Did she say she had been attacked ?”
“When she gained consciousness.”
“ How long after removing the gag did she gain
consciousness ?”
••Half an hour.”
•• What did you do during that half hour ?”
“I did the best I could to bring her to by sprink
ling water on her.”
•• Did you call for any help ?”
“ Twice."
He said his eall filled the house with all the wo
ida'a neighbors. Then he carried her to bed and
sent for the doctor. He came, and so did the police
man.
“ Why did you object to the policeman giving you
“I can't possibly give any reason; I was too much
excited to give the reason.”
••Had any robbery been committed ?”
•‘Yes sir.”
•‘ Why did you object to a robbery and an aseault
©n your wife being investigated ?”
“If I told him so, I don’t remember. I was sur
rounded by tho people, and I thought my wile was
dead. When I saw she was not dead, I was so glad,
I did not want anything to do with the police. I
was too glad my wife was alive.”
“Why did you object to the officer asking any
questions ?” asked the Commissioner.
“My wife was not in a condition to talk. It all
happened in a second, aud there was every sign
that she had keeled over.”
“Have you made any eflort to discover the man
that assaulted your wife and stole the goods ?”
“ I couldn’t do anything. I went to headquarters
and to Captain Schultz. The goods In the house
were disturbed but not taken.”
••I don’t think this case is of sufficient importance
to take up my time, if he doesn't, when he admits
his wife was outraged and he was ribbed,” fail the
Commissioner. “ What have you to say, officer ?”
“He would not allow me to enter his house.”
“ There are a great many things surrounding this
case that are a mystery,” said the Commissioner.
'•But it was your duty [addressing the officer] to
make a report of it.”
STAGGERED IN DRUNK WITH HELP.
Connery, a young man who has been but a year
on the force, was charged with intoxication.
Captain Brogan said immediately after roll call,
Sept. 24th, Roundsman Hickey told him Connery
Was under the influence of liquor, lhe officer did
Dot come in with the men. Five minutes after re
turn roll the roundsman noticed him come in with
the help of a citizen. The officer went in the back
room staggering, without answering his name. He
had him called out, and asked if he was drunk. He
was sober enough to say “Yez, zur,” Police Sur
geon Doran was sent for.
Connery said he felt unwell and when on post
took two or three drinks, to' brace up, and not be
ing accustomed tcriltfuorj it took effect.
“Where did you take those drinks?” he was ask
ed.
“In Macdougal street. I drank some whisky.
The same young man was with me that took me
in.”
“ What time did you commence drinking ?”
“Four o’clock in the afternoon. I felt a little
better after the first drink. In an hour I took
another to brace up. Half an hour after I began to
weaken aud took another drink.”
•• When did you take your fourth drink ?”
"I don’t remember.”
Dr. Doran examined the officer at 7 o’clock, an
hour after getting in the station, and he was then
drunk.
The officer said he turned out all right for duty
at 12 o’clock.
Roundsman Hickey said he saw the officerin Mac
dougal street. He staggered across the way over to
him. There was a young man with him. This
same young man helped him up the steps of the
station house.
The officer said he was sick on that tour of duty.
The Commissioner said the excuse given was suffi
cient—to break him.
GRANTED AN INDULGENCE.
Farley and Nevins, of the Sixth Precinct, were
fieiit out on Sunday to look alter liquor selling.
They made an arrest of a proprietor for violating
the law. He asked the officer to let him go up
stairs and get his Sunday best. He went, and later
to the station houee with a bondsman.
All that the officers could say was that they didn’t
think the proprietor would play such a dirty trick
on them. The barkeeper might run, the proprietor
never, as they could go for him any time, and he
knew that.
COULDN'T CLOSE A BEER SALOON.
Becker w •.« ordered to keep a beer saloon closed
at Eighty-sixth street and Ninth avenue, while an
athletic baseball club was playing its games.
The officer admitted that ha was stationed at the
door, but it was impossible to keep it closed as a
gang of workingmen were inside getting paid off.
They would burst the door open and come out.
Sergeant Fitzgerald said the officer had special
instructions to keep the place closed while the game
was going on. Twelve men were sent there during
the game. The sergeant found the door open and
the proprietor,at two o’clock,outside his open door;
the officer wasn’t there. There was; no crowd to
burst in the door. The place was open.
Roundsman Keating said the officer loft his post
twice. v
ESCAPE OF A PRISONER.
Officer Davis arrested a prisoner, took him to
Jefferson Market Police Court, and taking him back
to prison the man escaped from him. Twenty-four
hours after the escape he reported his loss.
He said he thought he might catch the man, and
that was the reason he delayed reporting the
escape.
WHEN EXCITED, COULD SWEAR BLACK AND
BLUE — WHEN COOLED OFF, WISHES TO
WITHDRAW THE COMPLAINT.
Patrolman John Elterich, of the Eldridge street
station, was called to answer a complaint made by
Isaac Marks, of 256 Madison street. Mr. Marks
charged that the patrolman did, at about 9 o’clock
on Sunday morning, August 21, without cause or
provocation, assault an old man, Abraham Kram
binsky, with his club, breaking his leg. The Com
missioner asked Mr. Marks if the charge was true
He replied that it was true. He was then told to
make his statement of the case, and Mr. Marks went
on substantially as follows:
“On August 21, Sunday morning, between 9 and
10 o’clock, I went to the corner of Hester and Lud
low streets. There is generally a big crowd there.
I saw Officer Elterich coming down in Hester street
and he went through the crowd; he never said a
word. He then turned back and raised his club,
and I believe, according to my statement there in
my affidavit, I was a little hasty then, and I am net
sure now that the officer struck him. At the time I
made that statement I could swear black and blue
that ha did bit him. J could not swear he hit him
Question —Why did you describe one state of facts
then, and swear black and blue to them, and now
you do not know whether they are true or not I
Answer—-At the time I made the statement I
could.
Q-—Why ?
A.—Because I was so excited at the time I made
my statement. lam a little cooled off now. If I
would be as cool when 1 made the complaint as I
am now, I would not have made the complaint
against the officer.
Q.—Who did you make the statement to ?
A.—To Superintendent Murray, I believe.
Defendant.—lt was before Inspector Steers.
Q.—Mr. Marks, what do you say now ?
Mr. Marks.—l saw the crowd was big. lam not
positive now that the officer struck him.
Q.—Did the man have his leg broken ?
A.- -As I understand it.
Abraham Krambinsky, of No. 115 Division street,
the man whose leg was broken, was examined
tnrough an interpreter. He said he had lived in
New York three years, and his occupation was that
of a peddler. At tho time in question he went
through the street to take a walk, and a police
man drove the people from the sidewalk, and
made them go in the middle of the street. Ho
went toward the policeman, and the policeman
struck him on tho leg, and ho fell down,
Q.—And broke your leg ?
A.—Broke my leg in two places.
Q — Mr. Marks, you came here and made the com
plaint. You ,now say that the officer did not do it ?
Mr. Marks.—l am not positive he did do it. The
crowd was too big. It may be possible, as the way
1 heard about it, that the old man fell down. The
officer told the crowd to disperse and they went off;
the crowd ran against Mr. Krambinsky. Friends
told mo they witnessed it. I could not swear the
officer broke his log. I made the complaint here; I
am sorry now.
Q. —You were here when this was fresh in your
memory, on the 24th of August. In your affidavit
you say: “I went to visit a friend and while on my
way to his home 1 mot the said friend on the corner
of Hester and Ludlow streets. A crowd was stand
ing on the corner, and while myself and friend were
in conversation I saw officer John Elterich of the
Eleventh Precinct, come down through Hester
street and pass through the crowd assembled on the
corner, and cross to the opposite side and engage in
conversation with another officer.” Is that true?
A.—Yes.
Q.—“ Officer Elterich then camo back and again
passed through the crowd; when he had gone about
nine or ten feet he turned around and raised his
club and said, ‘get out of here.* The crowd imme
diately dispersed with the exception of one old gen
tleman who was unable to go as fast as the others.”
Is that true ?
A. Y >s.
Q. —“ The officer camo up and struck him a vio
lent blow upon the leg, breaking it, knocking him
down, and then kicking him,”
A.—l could not say that.
Q.—ls it true you swore to this on August 24tb?
A.—Yes, 1 did.
Q.—Do you know the leg is broken ?
A.—No. lam not a doctor. 1 never saw the gen
tleman before.
Q.—-You saw him that morning ?
A. —No, I did not see him.
Q.—You saw some old gentleman, you don’t know
this is the man ?
A.—l believe it is him. Ido not know it is the
same party. 1 never saw him in my life before. I
was excited at the time.
Q.—A man was struck that morning and had his
leg broken ?
A.—Something of the kind, I cannot say he was
knocked down or if befell down. Ido not know
how his leg was broken or sprained.
The defendant made a statement as follows: “At
the time in question I was assigned to duty in the
vicinity of Ludlow and Hester streets’, known as the
Jew’s market. I found a large crowd of boys, ped
dlers and idlers of all kinds. A great many of these
peddlers peddle without a license. At the appear
ance of a policeman they get away; sometimes run
away. When I reached there the street and square
and sidewalks were crowded with a largo crowd,
and it was almost impossible for persons or vehicles
to pass by. I ordered this crowd to disperse. Some
of the vendors, who are afraid of being arrested, ran
away, and it caused the whole crowd to run, and
the result was a stampede. Several of them fell
down and among them was this old man. I nevor
saw him until the crowd got away. .Then, seeing
he was hurt, I took him, with the assistance of an
other officer, and carried him to the sidewalk. I did
not use my stick on him or anybody else. We took
him to the sidewalk and sat him in a chair. I ex
amined his leg, and from the experience I have had
in the police department, I came to the conclusion
that he was injured. I placed him in a cart and
took him to the station-house; there I summoned
an ambulance aud he was conveyed to the hospital.
That is the whole case.”
Jvcob Levy, of No. 17 Orchard street, president of
a Jewish benevolent society, stated that he saw Mr.
Krambinsky at the hospital, and asked him if the
officer had hit him with his club, and he said no—
that he had fallen down.
Jacob Herschberg, of No. 37 Ludlow street, said
he was present at the time of the accident, and that
the officer used no violence.
Dr. James H. McNamara, of Governeur Hospital,
stated he attended Mr. Krambinsky, and that the
fracture, in his opinion, was not caused by a club;
it appeared to him as if it was caused by the man
falling down.
OUR FIRE DEPKDIOT.
Trials—Temporary Loss of Mind—Absences
Without Leave- Dis bedience of Orders—
Conduct Prejudicial to Good Order—Did
Not Report—A Death—Goosip—Ths Bureau
cf Inspections of Buddings.
Wednesday last vyas trial day, and seven cases
only brought to the notice of the Board. The
word “guilty” rang out in almost all the cases, and
this plea not only shortens up matters, but helps
the accused.
The charge made against the two men of Hook
and Ladder Company No. 2, by citizens who failed
to appear to prove thtir charges, shows how much
tiO hie can be made. The two firemen had to ap
pear before the Board, go through all the formulas,
just as though they were guilty of some horrible
crime, and all for nothing, wheu the accusers did
not appear. There should be some way to compel
citizens to appear when they make charges, or the
fireman should be protected in some way so as to
secure redress, when such charges are not proven
or the complainants do not appear.
TEMPORARY LOSS OF MIND.
The first case tried was that of Assistant Foreman
John Hearn, of Engine Company No. 52. The tes
timony showed conclusively, backed by the pro
fessional opinions of both the department medical
officers, Drs. Ives and Joyce, that Hearn was suf
fering from temporary loss of mind, brought on by
a complication ot diseases, from which he had suf
fered for the last two years. During this state of
mind be had wandered off, and was entirely Ignor
ant of wh it had occurred until he had been brought
home and had there recovered.
Hearn has a first-class record, and his captain
spoke very kindly and feelingly in his favor. His
appointment dates from Sept. 22, 1365, and this was
the first time he was ever up before the Board.
Under the circumstances, therefore, the Board
found that as Hearn was suffering from temporary
insanity, with no sign of liquor or any other bad
cause to create it, the charges were dismissed.
ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE.
Fireman John Ward, of Engine Company No. 27,
who was charged with being absent without leave,
pleaded guilty, and said tiiat he had been busy at
two fires just before, and had gone to his dinner
and had fallen asleep, and had thereby overstayed
his time. Assistant foreman Hyde said there was
no reason to doubt the story, and as it was not
much of a case, and only a violation of a rule, he
was fined two days’ pay.
DISOBEDIENCE OF ORDERS.
Fireman John J. Lyons, of Engine Company No.
31, was up on two charges. The first, disobedience
of orders, and the second, absent without leave for
six minutes. He pleaded guilty, and said that he
asked the captain for leave to get a sandwich, but
was refused. But being hungry he skipped out,
got oue aud got right back, and was gone just six
minutes, which was the basis for the second charge.
He only went about one hundred feet away, and
knew he could catch the engine if an alarm came
in.
Captain Callaghan said that Lyons was a good
man, and the only reason he refused permission for
the man to go out was owing to the engine being
shorthauded, aud he didn’t want to take any
chances.
Had Lyons sent some one out to get him a sand
wich, he would have been richer this month by two
day’s pay, for that was his fine.
ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE.
Arthur J. O’Neill, of Hook and Ladder Company
No. 2, was charged with being absent without leave
for nine hours aud thirty-five minutes. He pleaded
guilty, and said he went home and found sickness
there, wife and child both ill. Had to take care of
them, sent a man to report matters to the captaiu,
but got no reply.
Captain Sattler said O’Neill was a pretty good
man, but he would take chances, and the messenger
seat by O’Neill was over two hours late. The fine in
this case was three days pay.
CONDUCT PREJUDICIAL TO GOOD ORDER.
Firemen William H. Dennia, and Willjam H. Sig.
ner, both of Hook and Ladder Company No. 2, were
charged by three citizens with conduct prejudicial
to good order, in knocking off a citizen’s hat, aud
using foul language. Denn.s pleaded not guilty.
Signer was not tried. These three citizens failed to
appear, and of course the charges were dismissed as
not having been proven.
NOT REPORTING FOR FIRE DUTY.
Fireman George Davis, of Engine Company No.
40, was up on the charge of not reporting for fire
duty. He pleaded guilty. He made no excuse, on y
that he could not account for it, was in bed and
asleep. His captain spoke well of him, as a man
who was trying to do right. But the fact of a bad
record in the past operated against him, so he was
fined two days pay.
A DEATH.
Assistant Foreman William B. Ferris, of Engine
Company No. 38, was buried from his late resi
dence, No. 196 Waverly Place, on Tuesday last, the
4th inst., with tho honors usually paid to those of
his rank by the department, on such occasions.
The deceased was born in Canada on the 3d of
August, 1847, and was at the time of his death in
his forty-first year. He joined the department on
the 7th of September, 1874, as a fireman, and Was
assigned to Engine Company No. 27, Before join
ing the uniformed force be was employed in the bu
reau of combustibles. On the 20th of May, 1884, he
was appointed to tAe position of assistant foreman,
and assigned to Hook aud Ladder Company No. 15.
Since which time he was with 5 Truck, 10 Truck,
Engines Nos. 18 and 38, doing duty. He leaves a
widow and three children, and the cause of his
death was consumption. He had a clean record,
and was a good man in all matters, especially as a
fireman. He was related as nephew to the late Fire
Commissioner Galway.
GOSSIP.
From the day the Vets started, one hundred and
six of them, and fourteen or fifteen of them took
their wives, until they came back, after being away
four weeks, not one of the party was sick, nor even
lost a meal. This is a remarkable fact, because
therefwas not a'man under forty-five years,’of age, ex
cept John Binns, and he is an honorary member.
While they are all gentlemen, we can truthfully
say, “ They are the ‘ toughest ’ set of men tha-t ever
went out of New York.”
The pay signal did not sound until the 4th inst,
This is rather hard on the men, as they feel they
should be paid on the Ist. The men who have
been retired are promptly paid on the first day
every time unless it comes on a Sunday, and the
other men ought to be paid then also.
George Scanned, of the Fire Marshal’s office, is
one of the most interesting men in the department.
He is full of information.
Captain John Binns looks very well after his trip,
and it seems to have agreed with him. He reports
that the trip was “simply immense.”
Uaptaiu Rattler, of Hook and Ladder Company No.
NEW YORK DISPATCH, OCTOBER 9. 1887.
2, burled his granddaughter, a little girl of seven
years, last week.
The Grand East of the main room of headquarters
is again illumined by the presence of Chief Shay.
He is back again, looking well alter his trip, and
says he had a very pleasant time.
George Lafaye, an old-time newspaper man. is the
occupant of one of the desks in the Building Bu
reau. George looks younger than ever.
Assistant Foreman Cruger, of 9 Truck, has been
over sixteen years in the department.
In our account of the telegraph room at head
quarters, published in these columns some time
since, wo said there wore over 160 miles of wire. It
should have read 1,060 miles.
Fireman Thompson was promoted to be engineer
of the fireboat “ Havemeyer,” and Fireman Busse,
of Engine Company No. 26, to be engineer of that
company.
A number of the New Haven, Conn., firemen are
in the habit of visiting some of the members of
Hook and Ladder Company No. 16 when they come
to this city.
The contract for forage for tho use of the depart,
ment for the quarter ending with tho present year
was awarded by the Board to John Moonan, his bid
being SIO,BOO.
Chief McGill, Third Battalion, is again on deck,
hale and hearty, alter his trip with the Vets. Ho
looks tho personification of good nature, and bears
astrong resemblance to the late Police Inspoctor
Thorne.
The amount of monov to be spent for new build
ings, according to plans filed, amounts to $476 , 650,
for last week.
THE BUREAU OF INSPECTIONS OF BUILDINGS.
Tony Hart, the actor, had to secure a permit from
this bureau before he could put up a dog house in
his back yard, the law being very strict as to the
building of any frame structure within the limits
of this city, the same extending from the Battery to
138th street on the east, and 146th street on the
west.
It may not be generally known, but is neverthe
less a fact, that there can be no buildings erected
in this city until plans of the same have been filed
with this bureau, and been favorably passed upon
by it. Yet many people are ignorant of this fact, as
the bureau can testify.
Were it not so, the flimsiest kind of buildings
would go up, and neither life nor property be safe,
the case of Buddenseik and other dishonest builders
showing conclusively that the strictest vigilance is
often necessary, for the greed of some men for
wealth is almost beyond imagining. This bureau,
which we will now try to describe, was reorganized
under its present plan, on the 30th day of May, 1880,
and some idea can be formed of the magnitude of
the business ovor which it has control, irom the
fact that during the year 1886, plans for buildings
aggregating in cost $58,750,733 were filed and acted
upon. Over eleven hundred flats, over twelve hun
dred dwellings, aud over four hundred tenement
houses had to be examined and Inspected in the
interest of security, or in all over four thousand
structures in one year.
To superintend and examine into this vast
amount of business, beside doing many other duties
which devolve upon this bureau, there are required
and employed about fifty persons, and they are as
follows : A superintendent, deputy superintendent,
chief clerk, thirty-three district inspectors, an in
spector of iron, plan clerk and deputy, fire escape
clerk, violations clerk, unsafe building clerk, eleven
assistant clerks and four messengers.
Mr. D’Oench, under whose charge this bureau is,
was an architect before taking this position, and is
considered a good man in every way for the place.
There is no taint of any kind around this part of
the Department, and the strictest kind of conform
ity with the law is required in all cases, and there
is not the slightest chance ior the smallest evasions
of law. To this fact is the good management now
ruling attributed. There may have been a time
when politics had weight hero, but that time is
gone by, and is not of the slightest use now.
lhe deputy superintendent, Mr. C. C. Buck, is
an architect of over fifteen years’ experience, and is
considered an expert in his business —he of course
assists the superintendent. The chief clerk, Mr.
Shields, has charge of the clerical force of the
bureau, and Is a hard-working, competent, intelli
gent gentleman. He has been over fifteen years in
the bureau, and has won his way to his present
position by sheer merit.
The thirty-three District Inspectors have to travel
over their several districts from 9A. M. to 4P. M.
each day, rain or shine, inspect such buildings as
are in process of construction, report all violations
of law relative to buildings, and call the attention
of the Bureau to all buildings requiring fire escap s
and see that these are not so encumbered with
household stuff as to be useless if occasion requires
their use. Many people use the fire escapes for
sleeping places, keeping flowers, ice-boxes, etc.
This is contrary to law, and if the Inspector sees
such violations, he must report them, and the per
sons so doing are fined and then made to remove
the obstructions. The Inspector of Iron has to ex
amine all iron beams and girders and stamp them
officially before they can be used for building pur
poses. This requires an expert, and the present
Inspector is said to be of that class.
All plans for buildings are placed in the bands of
John J. Tindale, the plan clerk, and are carefully
examined by him and cannot be accepted until he
reports them to be correct. This is a very impor
tant position and is only filled by the most compe
tent men. Mr. Tindale has held this position for
over twenty years, a guarantee as to his fitness lor
Mio place.
The fire escape clerk, William H. Class, receives
all reports of violations of the law in regard to own
ers not erecting fire escapes, and sees to it that such
violations are promptly remedied; otherwise be in
stitutes legal proceedings which compel delinquents
to obey the law; if not, they are prosecuted and
fined.
When a District Inspector reports a building as
being unsafe, he files the papers with Mr. F. P. Dul
ley, the unsafe building clerk, and his duties are to
see that such buildings are at once properly shored
up or demolished before accident occurs and lives
lost; end there is not much grass grows under his
feet, either, when a report of this kind reaches his
desk. “A stitch in time saves nine” is his motto,
and it is a good one.
The complaint clerk, James Carroll, receives all
communications relating to complaints, a great
many of which are anonymous. Those are always
investigated, though when the name of the person
is signed to the complaint it is never divulged, and
good results by these methods are obtained.
When a builder files plans for a building, and
they are not approved, and he feels that he has con
formed strictly to the law in all parts, tho depart
ment cannot arbitrarily insist that the plans are not
correct, for it may err. In such a case as this the
builder can demand that the Board of Examiners
shall pass upon his plans. This is done, and the de
cision of this board is final. It is a body of men se
lected from different associations connected with
building interests. William J. Fryer, Jr., repre
sents the Society of Architectural Iron Manufactur
ers; Cornelius O’Reilly represents the Ileal Estate
Owners’ Building Association; John Banta and Ed
win Dobbs, the Mechanics’ and Traders' Exchange;
N. Le Brun, the Architects’ Association, and P. Not
man, the Board of Fire Underwriters.
This Board meets once a week in the Superin
tendent’s room, so that there may be no delay.
When a district inspector condemns a wall as being
unsafe from any cause,.and the owner thinks hon
estly that it is all right, he objects to the re
port, and a survey is called, and the gentlemen com
posing it, after careful examination, decide as to
whether it is unsafe or not, and a majority of Its
body settle the matter. The members of a survey
are a representative from the Building Bureau, oue
of the members of the Examining Board, and a man
selected by the owner of the wall in question, and
as they decide so is the result. There is also an at
torney connected with the Bureau, whose duty it
is to proceed legally against all those who violate
the bull ling laws, and he js kept very busy all the
time, for tho Bureau push the cases to a speedy is
sue, regardless of all consequences.
This department then, as can be seen, is a very
important one, for in its care rest the saiety of the
people, their lives and property. If great interest
be not taken in all matters by the employees, much
trouble might ensue, and many valuable lives sac
rificed. And when we reflect that to-day there are
men in Sing Sing, sent there by and through the
efforts and vigilance of this department, we can
truly be proud of the work done and the results ob
tained.
ORDER OF AMERICAN FIREMEN.
On Wednesday last Hugh Bonner Council held a
meeting, Capt. H. W. McAdams in the chair. A
very large number of members were present. A
committee on by-laws was appointed, consisting of
Captains Shay, Bradley, Searles and Cooney and
Fireman Hexter.
A committee was appointed, with power, to en
gage a hall for future meetings, consisting oi As
sistant Foreman Moss and Foreman O’Hearne.
Delegates were then elected to represent this
council at the State convention, to be held this
week. Their names are as follows : Captains Mc-
Adams, Cook, White, Bradley; Fireman McCarthy,
of Engine Company No. 43; Fireman T. Hulpin, of
Hook and Ladder Company No. 5; Fireman Wm.
Quigg, of Hook and Ladder Company No. 11; As
sistant Foreman Hopper, Assistant Foreman Moss,
Assistant Foreman Reilly, Captain Searles, Fireman
Landers, Captain Boynton and Captain McAvoy—
fourteen iu all.
It was then voted that an assessment of fifty
cents be collected later from all the members, to
pay the expenses of tho delegates, Any members
who desire cun go at the reduced rate, provided
they send word to Captain McAdams in time lor
him to make arrangements.
Alter some other ordinary business, the meeting
adjourned.
The council is growing very rapidly, and will
have a powerful vote and voice in the proceedings
in future conventions. The delegates who were
elected were also instructed by lhe members to
vote as a unit, after the majority of them had de
cided as to what was best for tho good of the coun
cil.
SHEEPSHEAD BAY FIREMEN.
At the first regular meeting of Friendship Engine
Co. No. 1, oi Sheepshead Bay, which took place last
Monday night, tho following officers were elected;
Wm. Boyle, President; Hans Kronika, Vice Presi
dent; Peter B. Mullen, Foreman; Jas. Jameson, Sr.,
first Assistant; Edward McDevitt, Second Assist
ant: Alex. B. Hean, Recording Secretary; Thomas
Ford, Financial Secretary, and Lo Loosing, Treas.
The trustees elected were Jas. McKaue, Chairman;
Henry Osburn, Anton Huismann, H. Kronika, Leo
Loosing, John Y. McCane, ex-officio.
THE VETERAN FIREMEN’S ASSOCIATION.
The reception and banner presentation of the As
sociation of Veteran Firemen, held at their rooms,
No. 191 East 121st street, last Tuesday evening, was
the occasion of a large and brilliant gathering, over
200 ladies and gentlemen being present, among
them being many representatives of the oldest and
best families of Harlem.
The association held a business meeting previous
to the reception, and, beside adopting an emble
matic badge, made arrangements for holding the
annual ball of the organization at the Lexington
Avenue Opera House, December 5.
'J he reception began at 9:30. After a short musi
cal programme a magnificent banner was formally
presented to the association by Mrs. H. F. Liebonau,
wife of one of the prominent members of the or.
ganization.
The speech of presentation was made by Mr. Wil
liam H. Burns, of old “Big Six.” President Hugh
Masterson responded in fitting terms on behalf of
the association, thanking Mrs. Liebenau for her
beautiful gift.
The banner is made of white silk, with a red silk
border and blue back. On it is the inscription,
“Association of Veteran Firemen of New York.”
On the back is a monogram of the initials of the as
sociation, with lhe date of its organization. On the
red border are thirteen stars, representing the
thirteen original States. At the top of the pole is
a fire cap ot the association. The banner is fringed
with gold bullion.
After the presentation there was vocal and instru
mental music, speeches, recitations, and a colla
tion, and the company did not separate until a late
hour.
■ Among the many present were: Wm. H. Burns
and wile; Col. H. F. Liebenau, wife and daughters;
Richard Evans: Wm. Banham, wife and daughter
in-law; John Reid, Clerk of the City Court, and
wife; Edward L. Vermilye and wife; Hugh Master
son and wife; Col. W. R. W. Chambers and wife;
Wm. S. Norman and wile; James D. Ridley and
wife; Stephen C. Still, wife aud niece; Reuben E.
Mount and wife; John Hart and wife; J. i?. Brem
nor an » wife; Jonas L. Coe and wife; James Owen
and wife John F. Ford and sister; W. L. Clark and
wife: Andrew Glore, wife and daughter; John Ro
dermond and wife; Miss Mattie Johnson; A. J.
Fisher and wife; John V. Force and wife; Henry A.
Southorton and wile; Charles H. Headden and wife;
the Misses McGibbon; Chief Short and wife; Theo,
dore Hause and wife, of Albany; L. D. Ormsby and
wife; John Owens aud nieces; H. H. Hawkins and
wife; Thomas McGraun and wife; J. Haley and wile,
and Isaac Nodine aud wife.
CHIEF DECKER’S QUAINT EXPRESSION.
Some years ago, the writer of this was on a train
going to his home in Connecticut. A iow seats in
front or him he saw a stout gentleman with a face
and whiskers that bore a great resemblance to the
features he had seen of the great Forrest. A num
ber of the passengers spoke to the gentleman, and
he was very polite and affable to all. One peculiar
ity was his voice. Ho spoke out in loud, clear, deep
tones, each word being audible to every one in the
car. Among those who greeted the gentleman was a
passenger who was acquainted with the writer, and
after ending tho interview came down the aisle, and
told him that tho gentleman was John Decker, ex-
Chief ot the Old Volunteer Department. At Stam
ford Mr. Decker changed to a branch train, as did
the writer,and as there were but a fow passengers in
the car he decided to introduce himself to Mr. Deck
er. He went up, spoke to him, and was very cor
dially received by the ex-chief, and for some mo
ments a lively interesting conversation ensued.
'•By the way," tho writer remarked to the ex
chief, “I think you knew my father?”
“Indeed,” said Mr. Decker, “what was his
name?”
Ho was told. For an instant tho old chief was
silent, and then a pleasant light camo into his eyes,
and be threw his head back aud roared out with all
his might; every one in the car looked toward
him, he seemed to be so much pleased. ” W’y yas,
w’y yas—me boy—know him, why dod blink me
pluck, I knew him well.” Then ho put out his
band, and the smile and the grand hearty shake he
gave the son of the man he knew, spoke well for the
acquaintance and the admiration he had for the
man.
O’Hara’s Mistalce.
HE CLAIMS THAT HE SAW A THEFT AND DID
NOT STOP IT.
John O’Hara said his daughter’s dress was stolen
by the prisoner, Bridget Treaoy, a woman well up
in years, poor, but honest iu appearance. John
valued the dress at ten dollars. He said Bridget came
there to see his daughter on business; she had a
basket with her. The daughter came in and had
dinner, and left. Mrs. Treacy asked him if he had
anything to read. She got a paper and read; he
looked out of the window and she put the dress in
the basket and walked out.
“Did you see her put the dress in the basket?”
asked the Court.
“Yes, sir,” replied John. “She went down the
stairs, they were dark, and I missed her.”
“How do you know she took the dress; you said
you were looking out lhe window?”
“I saw her take it.”
“ Why didn’t you stop her ?”
“I followed her to get it, but she must have gone
in the yard when I went in tho street,”
“What do you say to that, Bridget?” asked the
Court.
“ I’ve nothing to say; be arrested me wrongfully.
I went to see his daughter on business, and waited
till she came for dinner. The old gentleman made
mo stay and talk with him. I had my basket, and
had to do marketing. Leaving, I bid him good
evening. He said, • Good evening;’ and said, 'l’ll
have to get up and sweep the hall.’ So I left, and
beard nothing of it for several days. My daughter
worked with her daughter, and my daughter came
home and said there was a great scandal. I paid no
attention to it, till an officer came and arrested
me.”
“ Did you steal that dress ?” asked Justice Mur
ray.
•• No.”
“ Discharged,” said the Court.
What at Twenty-Nine ? — Jimmy
Kearn was before Justice Duffy charged with using
obscene language on the street.
“ How old are you ?” asked the Justice.
“ Nineteen.”
“ What'Will you bo at twenty-nine ? Think’of it,
using foul language on the street at nineteen. At
twenty-nine you will be in the State Prison, Fif
teen days.”
■—.-—
Joe Astonished. — Joseph Hogan, a
stylishly dressed young fellow, was found trying
to force his way into several houses of bad repute
in Thirty-second street, that have been closed. He
didn’t know it. To Joe’s astonishment, he was
sent up for a month on the Island.
A Young Fisherman. —Robert Har
rington, aged six, went fishing yesterday from his
home, No. 2,638 Eighth avenue, to 147th street,
Harlem river, and throwing out his line, went with
it and was drowned.
A Sudden Call. —David J. Berry was
attacked with hemorrhage in the salaon at No. 186
Monroe street. An ambulance came, but ho died
on the way to the hospital.
Not Paved With Gold.— Fred Lamb,
but two weeks from London, England, was forced
to steal to get his supper. He was seat to tho lea -
tentiary for five months.
fWai low.
No. 21a BBOADWAY,
Cor. of FULTON STREET, NEW YORK.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.
OYSTER AND CHOP HOUSE.
All the Delicacies of the Season servedin First Class
Style. < arstairs, McCaull & Co.’s Monongahela Mona
gram Whiskies.
The New York and Staten Island Brewing Company’s.
Tivoli Beer on draught.
H. W. THORP, Proprietor.
MUTUALRESERVEFUND
LIFE ASSOCIATION,
POTTER BUILDING, 38 PARK ROW, N. Y.
E. B. HARPER, President.
CENTRAL TRUST CO. OF NEW YORK, TRUSTEES
OF RESERVE FUND.
LIFE INSURANCE
AT
One-Half Usual Cost.
$1,200,000 Cash Surras.
$2,000,000 Assets.
M.OOO Cash per day paid to WitFows and
Orphans. Total payments to 1,000 Wid
ows and 5,€00 Orphans of deceased mem
bers, more titan
$3,750,000.
Admission Fees and One Year's Annual Dues:
For $5,000 Life Insurance $ 35
For SIO,OOO Life Insurance 70
For $20,0c0 Life Insurance 140
Annual Dues after first year §3 for each
81,000 insurance.
MORTUARY PREMIUMS PAYABLE BI
MONTHLY, BASED UPON THE AC
TUAL DEATH CUAI3IS,
More than Fourteen Million Dollars in
Cash already saved to members by re
duction of premiums. Save your money
by insuring with the
MUTUAL RESERVE FUND LIFE
ASSOCIATION,
Home Office, Potter Building’,
38 FARK ROW, KEW YORK.
AT THE OLD ESTABLISHED
OF
No. 171 Sixth avenue, Corner 12th St,
Spring Beds, Mattresses,
Live Geese Feathers,
Down Quilts, Comfortables, Blankets,
Brass and Iron Bertsteails.
p IA xo COVERS, PIANO SCARFS,
TABLE COVERS, STORE STOOLS,
Jhl MUSIC CABINETS aud STANDS,
MANTEL hAMBREQUINS, GRAND
and UPRIGHT COVERS MADE TO
ORDER.
F. NET-PERT, Manufacturer
in( l importer, No. 390 Canal street,
near West Broadway, N. Y.
-a „ -■'ryj a wgg-a jgmjL ran
Everett’s hotel
AND GRAND DINING ROOMS,
ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN.
BARCLAY AND VESEY, BETWEEN WASHLNGI’ON
AND WEST STREETS,
NfcW YORK.
SAMUEL H, EVERETT,
Proprietor.
R. R. R. RADWAY'S READY RELIEF.
FOR THE INSTANT RELIEF AND QUICK CURE OF ALL
Colds, Sore Throat, Bronchitis, Rheumatism, Neuralgia,
Inflammation of the I.ungs, Kidneys and Bowels, Sciatica, Chilblains. Frost Bites, Sprains, Bruises, Toothache
Headache, Pains in the Back, Chest and Limbs. The application of RADWAY S READY RELIEF to the parts
affected will instantly relieve and Boon cure the sufferer of these complaints. Internally taken in doses of from
thirty to sixty drops In half a tumb:er of water, it will cure in a few moments Cramps, Spasms, Sour Stomach Colic
Flatulence, Heartburn, Diarrhea, Fick Headache, Nausea. Vomiting, Seasickness, Cold Chills, Palpitation’ of the
Heart, Nervousness, Sleeplessnejs, Malaria and all internal pains. As a Tonic or Stimulant, a few drops taken in
water are belter than French brandy or bitters. 50 cents a bottle. For sale at druggists.
RADWAY’S SARSAPARILLIAN RESOLVENT RADWAY’S REGULATING PILLS
A remedy for Scrofulous and Syphilitic Comnlainto, For the cure of all disorders of the Stonr ch T Ivor and
chronic Rheumatism, Skin Diseases and Impurities of Bowels, Biliousness, Dyspepsia, Constipation Sick Bead
the Dlouih Sold by druggist®, $1 » bvAle ache. Sold by druggists, 2b cents a box. ’
BICKERING HALL. 8:15 P. M.
For week commencing Monday, Oct. 10.
GRAND ULYSSEUM. , ,
Lifo and services of Gen. U. S. GRANT, from Cradle to
Grave, depicted by a series of magnificent paintings,
16x20 feet, each from the brush of Mr. William Voegtliu,
the eminent arti. t.
Incidental music under the personal leadership of Mr.
Harvey B. Dodsworth.
This < n ertainment, under the auspices Of the Boston
Art Association, is given by the
GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC,
for the benefit of disabled veterans.
~ POOLE’S THEATRE. “
Eighth street, between Fourth avenue and Broadway.
AM GRAY in “EAST LYME”
ADMISSION, 10c., 20c. RESERVED, 30c.
Matinees Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday.
OCT. 17, A. M. PALMER S Madison Square Theatre
success, HAZEL KIRKE.
V&fINDSOB THEATRE,
v Y BOWERY, near Canal.
One week, commencing MONDAY, Oct. 10th.
Last appearance in New York, of
as BESSIE BARTON,
the heroine in Frank Harney’s powerful domestic Dra
ma, in five acts, entitled
WOMAN AGAINST WOMAN.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
Act Ist—THE VILLAGE OF WILLOWDALE.
Act 2d—JOHN TRESSIDER’S HAPI'Y HOME.
Act Bd-THE SISTERS.
Act 4th—RUINED HOME OF JOHN TRESSIDER.
Act Sth—BACK AGAIN IN WILLOWDALE.
Tony pastor’s theatre, nth st.
LAST WEEK of Preliminary Season.
GOOD RESERVED SEATS, 25 CENTS.
SHEEHAN AND COYNE,
SHEEHAN AND OOYNE,
In the Musical Farce Comedy,
GROGAN S ELEVATION,
GROGAN’S ELEVATION.
With a Grand Olio of Specialties.
MONDAY. OCTOBER 24th, TONY PASTOR’S regular
season will begin.
DOCKSTADER’S
A SOLID SUCCESS.
SPTENIHO MiNISTBELSY.
VOLUNTEER vs. THISTLE.
Fall of New Babylon.
CLEVELAND’S WESTERN TRIP.
Evenings, 8:30 Saturday Matinee. 2:30,
Globe museum, 298 bowery.
MEEHAN A WILSON Proprietors.
Commencing MONDAY, OCT. 10th.
Great success ot the popular actress,
rF’AJVJNY lI3SEVRIIVGL
who will appear at every performance in her grand pan
tomimic and romantic drama, entitled the
DUMB WITNESS; OR, MURDER WILL OUT.
The Paris Musee collection of Wax Works, and other
curiosities.
Specialty and Dramatic Performances every hour.
OPEN DAILY from 11 A. M. to 10 P. M.
Admission to the Entire Exhib -ion, 10 cts.
Fifth ave. theatre, langtry.
Proprietor and Manager Mr. JOHN STETSON
EVENINGS AT 8; MATINEE SA'IU tDAY, AT 2.
MONDAY, OCT. 10, 1887.
Fourth Week and Last but Two.
MRS. LANGTRY,
Accompanied by Maurice Barrymore and her own com
pany in her successful i roductio n
AS IN A LCOKING GLASS.
Splendid Scenery and Appointme^.s.
Seats secured two weeks in advance,
LYCEUM THEATRE.—4th av. and 23d st.
DANIEL FROHMAN Manager
Begins at 8:15, with Editha’s Burglar.
THE GREAT PINK PEARL.
THE GREAT PINK PEARU
THE GREAT PINK PEARL.
THE GREAT PINK PEART,.
Wednesday Matinee—THE HIGHEST BIDDEP, pre
c-ded by EDITHA’S BURGLAR.
Regular Season commences TUESDAY, Nov. 1.
STAR THEATRE. French Opera.
Positively the Last week.
Monday and Wednesday Evenings,
LA FILLE DE MME. ANGOT.
Tuesday Evening, last time,
LA M. S JOTTE.
Thursday Evening, last time,
SERMENT D’AMOUR.
Friday, Saturday, also at the matinee,
FATINITZA.
WALLACK’S-
Under the direction of Mr. HENRY E. ABBEY.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, commencement of the
REGULAR SEASON
with the production of Sidney Grundy's comedy drama,
THE MOUSE TRAP.
THE MOUSE TRAP.
THE MOUSE TRAP.
THE MOUSE TRAP.
Seats now on
LEE AVE. ACADEMY, Williamsburg.
Commenctag Monday, Oct. 10. Wed. and Sat.
Matinees. HENRY E. DIXEY, and Rice and Dixey’s
Big Burlesque Company, in ADONIS.
Oct. 17th—JAMES O’NEILL in MONTE CRISTO.
i JwiiiH
litehy i
l Thlstt’thi'tti 4
i KB T le of a descrip- ]
j live Price-list, }
t I fes richlyilluetra- |
‘ IFw’TrxTßi X ted in colour- |
4yprifit,' of the I
I sioiiE
I which Should j
ba fqund In j
i every family and. may be obtained from All Toy J
• dealers, Stationers and Educational DenOts. The
I Price-list will be forwarded gratis on application.to
K AD. RICHTER & Co.
!' JSVZ VORK7 310. BEO AD WAY or LONDON RC.,-
1, BAjtWAk RIAC®, FENCHURCH STREET. |
NEWEST SHIES OF SILKS.
Moire Antiques and
Moire Francais.
GREAT NOVELTIES
In Plain Colors, Plaid and
Striped Effects.
PLAIN AN l> I’ANeY
Pean de Soie and Satins,
Choice Shades tor Street and
Evening Wear.
RICH GAZES AND EVENING DRESS STUFFS.
PLAIN COLORED AND FANCY VELVETS.
Gold and Silver Effects and
Brocades.
CORSETS MADE TO ORDER.
Ladies who desire a PERFECT FITTING CORSET, aud
one that, lor comfort and durability, has no superior,
call at No. 311 Fast Twenty-seventh street, where an
HONEST WHALEBONE CORSET is made to order, in
any style, size, or shape desired, and of any color, quality
or material you may select, at PRICES TO SUIT EVERY
BODY.
A lady in attendance, who will call at your residence,
if desired.
WHAbEBONE CORSET COMPANY.
NO. 311 FAST TWENTY-SEVENTH STREET.
AGENTS WANTED. NEW YORK.
JL. STROUB’S OYSTER BAY, No.
o 2369 THIRD AVENUE, between 128th and 129th
sts., Is furnishing oysters by the quart and hundred, and
Is delivering on the half shell at all hours. The proprie
tor. John L. Stroub, is the patentee of the Clam Roaster
which Is used at most all hotels, oyster houses, and by
private families throughout the country with great satis
faction. They are sola at all the bouse furnishing store®
throughout the U. 8. Principal Depots: John L. Stroub'a
Oyster Bay, 2869 3d av.; John L. Stroub’s Family Oyster
House, 93 Canal st. ; John L. Stroub’s River View HoteL
foot of 125th street. North River. New York Citv.
Fall of
.$ 35
. 70
. 140
CORSE 1
gltwmfttu
NI B L O ’ S. 9th and Last Week.
Mr. E. G. GlLMOßEProprietor and Manager.
Reserved seats, Orchestra Circle and BaJcony, 50 cts.
LAST EIGHT PERFORMANCES,
IMRE KIRALFY’B
Grand Spectacular Success,
LAGARDERE.
. LAGARDERE.
TWO GRAND BALLETS. SPLENDID SCENERY.
Evenings at 8; Matinees Wed. and Sat. at 2.
October 17th—DENMAN THOMI S <N in
THE OLD HOMESTEAD.
VIBLO’S, EXTRA.
±1 SUNDAY. OCT. 16th—MR. ROBARTS HARPER’S
ILLUSTRATED LECTURES, ‘Subject: THREE JUBILEIS
TAR THEATRE. SPECIAL.
COMMENCING MONDAY, OCTOBER 17.
Limited Engagement of Mr.
JOSEPH JEFFERSON
808 ACRES
in
THE RIVALS,
Supported by an excellent company.
Sale of Seats Begin Thursday Morning.
M ADISON SQUARE THEATRE.
i-VjL Mr. A M. PALMERSoIe Manager
Evenings, 8-10. Saturday Matinee at 2.
REGULAR SEASON.
ENORMOUS SUCCESS
Of the wonderful play,
JIM THE PENMAN.
With the original cast.
***The matinee of “ANGELA” is postponed until
Tuesday, Oct. 18.
TTNidN SQ,. THEATRE-J. M. Hill, Man’r.
VJ “ The Henrietta is Booming.”
Evenings, B:fs. Saturday Matinee, 2.
The Comedians.
ROBSON AND CRANE,
in Bronson Howard’s comedy,
THE HENRIETTA.
Seats secured two weeks in advance.
American institute.
56th 2d and 3d aves., between 63d and 64th sts.
Grand Elevated and surface cars pass door.
Industrial GRAND ELECTRICAL EXHIBITION.
Exhibition. Everything in Electricity.
NOVEL IN-VENTIONS, MACHINERY IN MOTION.
Open day and evening. Admission 50c.
SPECIAL EXHIBIT OF FRUITS,
Aeginning Wednesday, Oct. 12, ending Saturday, Oct. 19.
JJARRIGAN’S PARK THEATRE.
EDWARD HARRlGANProprietor
M. W. HANLEYManager
EDWARD HARRIGAN as JEREMIAH MCCARTHY,
In his Original Local Comedy,
THE LEATHER PATCH.
DAVE BRAHAM AND HIS POPULAR ORCHESTRA.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
1 ATH STREET THEATRE. Cor. 6th av.
MONDAY. OCTOBER 10.
Matinee Saturday only during this engagement.
BEizrariu PAmsa
in two plays a double bill.
The Ring and The Keeper,
AND
MY SWEETHEART.
WTINER’S PEOPLE’S THEATRE,
XVA BOWERY, opposite Spring st
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY, at 2.
Unprecedented Success.
ZIAMOR MGHTS,
Introducing the Picturesque
MARINE CUTLASS DRILL
and all the Grand Scenic and Mechanical
Cf/ECTS FROM WALLACK S THEATRE.
MUSEUM. Eroadway.
IN | WOODWARD’S I SEAL.
LONDONI WATER | ggffi
STREET. | WONDERS. I SEAL.
THE LARGEST SH< W ON| EARTH.
ADMISSION, 25 CTS. CHILDREN, 10 CTS.
Performance continuous from 11 A. M. to 10 P. M.
DALY’S THEATRE, Broadway & 30th st-
Under the management of
MR. AC GUSTIN DALY.
EVERY NIGHT AT 8:1J,
Pinero s Successful London Comedy.
“A hit before the first act was over.”—
DANDY DICK. Times.
•‘Crisp, witty, rollicking,”— Commer
cial. “It caused an uproar of merri
ment.”— Tribune. Mats. Wed’sy A Sat.
Theatre comiquf, 125th street.,
Between Third and Lexington avenues.
MONDAY, OCT. 10th, and during the week,
LIGHTS O’ LONDON,
With elaborate Scenery and a Perfect Cast.
MONDAY, OCT. 17th, HELD BY THE ENEMY.
CADEMY OF music, 14th st. and Irv
ing Place.—Every eve’g at 8; Saturday Mat. at 2.
A DARK SECRET.
A DARK SECRET.
A DARK SECRET.
Standard the acre. B’way & 33d st.
CROWDED HOUSES NIGHTLY 11
Every Evening "Wednesday and Saturday Matinees.
THE ARABIA xV NIGHTS;
Or, Aladdin's Wonderful Lamp.
BIJOU OPERA HOUSE, Broadway and
30th st—Evenings at 8; Mat. Wed. and Saturday.
LAST WEEK. I SALSBURY'S TROUBADOURS,
CONTINUED I in their greatest success,
SUCCESS. | THE HUMMING BIRD.
qpHEISS’S. THEISS’S.
ALHAMBRA COURT AND MUSIC HALL,
14th street, near Third avenue.
THE “MONSTER ORCHESTRION ”
BANJO! BAhJO!! BANJO !!!
BANJO INSTRUCTION, $5 COURSE. PUPILS IN
STRUCTED FOR THE STAGE, OR HOME AMUSE
MENT. ELEGANT BANJOS, ALL PRICES. DORE
BROTHERS, 112 West 35th street.
‘‘NEVER KNOWN TO FAIL”
fTABBANT’S
> EXTRACT OF
A CUBEBS AND COPAIBA
is an old, tried remedy, superior
to any preparation hitherto in-
MBV vented, combining in a very
lUslhighly concentrated form the
IrJlmedical properties of the Cu
|fe|bebs and Copaiba. Its neat,
few portable form, freedom from
O taste and speedy action (it fre
3/ quently cures in three or four
Mr days, and always in less time
than any other preparation)
/ make “Tarrant’s Extract” the
f most desirable remedy ever
manufactured.
To prevent fraud, see that each package has a red strip
across the face oi label, with the signature of TARRANT
& CO., N. Y., upon it.
Price SI.OO.
SOLD by all druggists.
CRATEFUL-COMFORTING.
EFPS'S COCOA.
BREAKFAST.
“By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws which
govern the operations of digestion and nutrition, and by
a careful application of the tine properties of well-selected
Cocoa, Mr. Epps has provided our breakfast tables with a
delicately flavored beverage which may save us many
heavy doctors’ bills. It is by the judicious use of such ar
ticles of diet that a constitution may be gradually built
up until strong enough to resist every tendency to dis
ease. Hundreds of subtle maladies are floated around us
ready to attack wherever there is a weak point. Wo may
escape many a fatal shaft by keeping ourselves well forti
fied with pure blood and a properly nourished frame.”—
Civil Service Gax ’tte.
Made simply with boiling water or milk. Sold only in
halt pound tins by Grocers, labeled thus:
JAMES EPPS & Mg,
GOOD NEWS
BllSill
Greatest Inducements ever offered
Now’s your time to get up orders fo?
owr celebrated Teas and
Coffees and secure a beautiful
Gold Band or MotM Kofle China Tea
ESfeii Set, or Handsome Decorated Gold
Rand Moss Rose Dinner Set, or Gold Band Moss
Decorated Toilet Set For ftall particulars address
THE GREAT AMERICAN TEA CO M
IP. o. Box 260.] Si enass Vesey st. Kew Yeeit
FERBrNE'UMEii;
BOTTLER OF
Gsc. Ehrat’s New York,
“ “ Franciskaner “ “
Jos. Schli z Brewing Co’s. Milwaukee,
Rochester and Imported
IAOEB BEER,
FOR THE TRADE, FAMILY USE AND EXPORT.
NOS. 155 AND 157 WEST 20th ST.,
(Between Sixth and Seventh Avenues.) NEW YORK.
BROOKLYN DELIVERIES. TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS.
ESTABLISHED HALF A CENTURY.
HAVE
KOT FOUND HEg
THAT WILL WELL REPAY Ahf
INVESTIGATION
BY in OSE ® e TO SECVR6
THE BEST SAFE
MARV/N SAFE CO.
NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA,
LONDON. EHCLAfaD.
mm
tAotwfj
Co
CLOTHS
FOB EOITIRSS A® DLBTEBB.
Plaid, Stripe and. Check.
PLAIN CLOTHS
of the newest colorings, fou
Ladies’ Dresses, &e,
cX3 1 <)t£ 61. t
dFariwtji, fa,
ESTABLISHED 1807.
B.M.Cowparthwait & Co>
Furniture, Carpets, Bedding,
Stoves, Crockery, Every thing
for Housekeeping.
Ncs. 153, 155, 157, 159, 161, 163, 16®
Chatham Street, Nos. 193,195,197,199,
201, 203, 205 Park Row,
NEW YOHK,
Between City Hall or Bridge Entrance and Chatham
Square Elevated Station.
Goods sent everywhere every
day. Liberal terms or cash
count. New price lists mailed on
application.
CASH or ( {{EDIT.
JORDAN &
MORIARTY,
IC7, 167 1-3, 169, 171, 173 CHATHAM ST,
207, 207 1-2, 209, 211, 213 PARK. ROW,
NEW YORK.
Furniture, Carpets,
©il Cloths, Sodding,
Stoves, B.efrigerators*
&c., &0., &0.
JORDAN & MORIARTY
Airmen.
EXCELSIORI
The ffustly Celebrated and
World-Famed
EXCELSIOR s
Lager bee|
MANUFACTURED BY
GEORGE BECHTEL
IS STBICTXT
It is the FINEST FLAVORED?
and MOST WHOLESOME Beer I
before the public. It is pro* ’
nounced the
BEST AND PUREST BEER ;
by eminent Physicians and ChemJ
ists, and they recommend it for
INVALIDS as well as th© robust. j
It has received J
Aril] i)ALS , 1
from PHILADELPHIA, NEW ■
YOKE, PARIS, SYDNEY ■
JAPAN for excellence andpuri«h S
ty, and 8
STANDS UNRIVALED’. J
Tills celebrated beer is now pnt up Da.
bottles expressly for FAMIjLY
USE and Exportation.
ALL COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BB ADDRESSED
GEO. BECHTEL,
Stapleton, Staten Island, N.
MBBaCMMI.tIWI I i. <, Ml i“Til - dr
Itliswnawus.
Deafness CJurecL
By using the invention of a DEAF MAW, by which
he cured himself. No case of fiulure yet reported. Send
for circular and particulars to
B. N. HUhSTIS EAR DRUM CO.,
6 East. 14th street, New York.
WHAT A FEW PEOPLE SAY OF DIT
BAIRD S GRANULES—How Artists Appreciate
Them—The New System of Cure and How It Works—How
DYSPEPSIA, MALARIA, PILES, HABITUAL CONSTI*
PATION, HEADACHES are CUBED by BEGULATINS \
the GLANDS of SECRETION and EXCRETION as th. *
LIVER, PANCREAS, KIDNEYS and GLANDS of the.
STOMACH and INTESTINES.
Your, reporter met on th®
street a day or two ago a prom-,
inent newspaper man, and hd
/ said his b een an inva*
lid for years, and had foundr
Z*'SETS immediate and sure relief by
takiigDr. Baird’s Granules.
/?/ i . A Prominent artist writes*
•i 'll They are i udeed the most won-,
derlul thing I ever saw.”
, An artist from Connecticut.'
the proprietor of a large arft
'■ > gallery there, says he had a
). friend that was promptly cured
by their use.
x A prominent artist, and that
'<2-—York city, sent to Dr. Baird on
Saturday morning for two box
es, saying: “The box I tried proved so beneficial that I
wish to continue their use.”
A prominent business man of Newark. N. J., jays: “I
suffered much from habitual constipation. I never saw
anything to equal them in prompt and curative effects.’ 1
Others write that they have been cured of piles of lon£
standing by their use, in five days. Certainly for all de
rangements of the body, due to improper action of tha
glandular system, as the glands of secretion and exceed
tion, “ they promptly and surely cure.” Being purely
vegetable, they are harmless. •
A gentleman from Newark, N. J., orders them th®
fourth time, and says: “ Ail those that have taken yout.
Granules would uot be without them for anything. Alt
recommend them very highly. I never took any medi
cine that helped me so much as your Granules, andX
can tell you I have spent lots of money already for m#
compiaint, dyspepsia and kidney trouble.
“My brother would not be without them, neithQjf
would Mrs.
Being founded on a new principle of cure, viz., by ac 6»
ingon secretory and excretory system of the body, the
result of their use shows it to be the only correct prin
ciple.
Dr. Baird may be consulted at his office, 157 West 23(3
st., New York, every day, 10 to 12 A. M. and 1 to 2:30 j
M., except Saturday, when not later than 12 M. J
11 zvstrengthens, enlarges and devel J® J
| r ei iezione«r r y i D &| J
Borating Pills, sl. All postpaid. Address K ■
9 New England medical Institute, B M
H No. 24 Trenr nt Row. Boston. Mns«. ■»
HAIR behoved EEES 4
lion orlujury with ‘•Vill.-y Solvoue.” Sealed
lar> 6 cents. Wileox Sneelllo Lo., Philadelphia, l‘a»
■VANS Y PIO ST "
Safe* Certain nnd Effectual. Particular*.
B WILCOX SPECIFIC CO., P.Mia., Pa., 1
yDISEASES 6f Men Only; Blood PoisOfit j
| E skin diseases, inflammation; obstructions bladderC J
kidneys and other organs; weakness, nervous and generaS
df bihty; mental, physical prostration, &c., successfully B
treated and radically cured ; remarkable cures
i i old cases which have been neglecled or unskillfuiir.
‘reated; uo experiments or failures, it being m
\hat a physician who confines himself exclusively to thu- B
jtudy of certain classes o’, diseases, and who treats thou*i
Bands every year, must acquire greater skill in thosif
toranonet u»an one in gaueial piaudce. Dxb
hu. *7l 12U Buruat. wetwean 6th kuu 7Ui

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