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Belmont chronicle. [volume] (St. Clairsville, Ohio) 1855-1973, April 05, 1855, Image 1

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B. R. COW EN, EDITOR & PROPRIETOR,! "tit WWQ Mm NOT Hft Hi STTRY PAM Fffifl M fTr, "'" '
IM a,; wV-tiu LW1 Wi.li li v ,..,. LUVfi TERMS $1,50 A YEAR, IN AOYANCI
NEW SERIES, VOL. VII, NO. 26Q ST. CLAlttSVlLLE, OHIO, Tfn RSDA Y APRIL 5, 1855, WHOLE NO oil
THE BELMONT CHRONICLE-
PunLifiiiro evkrv rmmiDAT MORNING,
Office on North Ride of Mnin Strret in
the Ifeiv Masonic Hull, n few doors
Eat of the Court House, nnt a
lew door West of the Norton
fa House.
tirm or BiiMcRif rioft.
If Mill within three mounts, a n
tl panl altar tliattiuie, Syjj
rajart disCMtintiaa only at Um option of the rilitiir,
Viols arrearage are due.
' Tr.mn OFAOvnftttOtno,
MO, "if, (II lliiranr ItM, Hirer, week, tint
Every ailililinutl InMrtlon, 'a-,
early advertisements one column, 8'liiiii
Halt column, M Ml
Quarter enluuin, l"wi
I'rtoSaainiial lar.U 8tl per annum.
in. All Inters aihlresscil to ilia oilitnr must lis riaiil 10
raiire altenlinti.Ji'
)l V'No paper ihecnntinne I until all arrcarac-es arc
yaul aaicaa at tiie Dption nl tin- editors , ,
POETRY.
A DOLLAR OR TWO.
Wiih cautious step as we trend our way thtotioh,
This intricate world as o her Rltki do,
May we still on our journey lie aula to view
Tito benevolent face of a dollar or two.
For an excellent thing
Is n dollar or two.
No Wend is so true
As n dollar or two
ThrouL'h tommy or town,
As w pus up anil down,
No password so cood
As a dollar or two. j
Would ynu road yours-lf out of tlin bachelor's crew !
Andlhshanl of a pretty female sue.
You must always be ready the handsome to do, j
Although it would cost a dollar or two.
Love's arrows are lipped
Wi'h a dollar or two.
And nOixlions are untHcd
Wild a dollar or two.
The beet aid you can meet
In advancing your suit,
Is the eloquent chink
Of a dollar or two.
Would you wish your existence w ith faith to imbue, I
And enroll in the ranks of the tan (titled lew.
To enjoy a i;.ind name and well cushioned pew,
You must (reel come ('own will) u dollar ur to.
7'he gospel is preached
For a dollar or two,
And salvation Is reached I
liy a dollar or two.
You may tin tomuilmos,
Uut the Worst of all crimes
Is, to find youracli s'ioi t
( If a dollar or two.
.. i
MISCELLANEOUS.
From Putnam's Magazine.
LIVING IN THE COUNTRY.
BY MR. SPARROWGRAS.
"Wv have an invitation to a parly," said; 1
Mrs. Sparrowgrass, 'on Friday next, and I j 1
think u party is a very pleasant thing in the ;
country. There is more sociability, inor.e ( '
hospitality, warmer welcome, less dress, and 1 1
lees style, than there It in the city." Herejr
Mrs. Sparrowgruss handed me an. engraved 1
card ol ruiher formidable dimension's, which,'
1 must confess looked anything but rural. )
I took the missive with some misgivings, for 1
I have a natural horror of parties "I won- 1
der," said 1, in the most pluylul kind of bit- "
ter irony, "wl ether we frill meel out here,''
tbtt young lady that never sings herself, but 0
is always so passic nato'y fond of iiiusit: '" 1
Mrs. Bparrowgraea said -ho thought notjsbe !
aid she heurd she was married, "
"And that gentleman," I continued, 'a ho
was a stranger, lo me, thut always wanted to u
be presented to some young lady that I didn't "
know!' il
Mrs. Sparrow-grass said she believed he J ''
had gone to California.
'And that lady who prized confectionary 1
above good-breeding, und went home with r
her pockets well atuffud with mottoes, in 1
defianeu of the eighth commitndnient, und the 1
laws ui propriety!' I
Mrs. Sparrow grass suld she knew the la- a
dy to whom 1 alluded, but she assured me -lit
was yet in New York, and had not been '
aopn about our village. . I
'Then,' suid 1,'Mra' Sparrowgrass, -.ve will r
go to the party. I'm niy best shir, und the1 '
white waist, oat in Monday'! Wash.' Never
mind expense Oetme acr.uinb of bread.and 1
bring me my old white gloves. 1 um going I
to be gy. ' i
'I Ibiok,1 said Mrs. Spnrrowgrnss, 'that a '
parly in town iswthing bu'. un embairass- '
euent.'
"True," said I. i
'Don't you remember," said site, 'what a
fuss 1 used to make ubout getting my hair l'
fixed, mid ho.v put out I wus thut night when 1
you forgot the jsponioal'
'Certainly.'
'And then, when wo were all dressed and 1
tesdy, how we used to wait lor fear ol'Jget- '
ting there too early, und after we did reach '
the. house, how we always got inn Corner, 1
and made happy tvull flowers of ourselves, '
and some old Irieud!' 0 M
"Of course 1 do:"' I 1
'Where nobody took any notice of us!' " 1
'Exactly.' 1
'Then what difference did it make how 1 1
was uresscd whether I wore Honiton luce!1
or cotton edging!'
'I am afraid,' said I, 'Mrs. Sparrowgrass.if
you had made a point of wearing cotton lace
you would not have boen invited.' At this
palpable double entendre I felt that secret sat
isfaction which every man must feel when lie
hss said a good thing. It was lost upon Mrs.
Sparrowgrass. 'Here,' she continued, 'we!
expect a simple, old fashioned entertain
ment,' Then I chimed in 'No gaa-lighls to
make your eyes ache no patent leather to
make your feet ache no fusaionabla lollies
to make your heart ache and no oterheat
et, ill-ventilated rooms, boned-turkeys, game,
ice-cream, C'narluttc Kussc, pastes, chum
pagne, and chicken -aolad, to make your head
aclie next morning.' 'There will bt oysters)
and ice-crentn'1 said Mrs. Sparrow grata, du-'
IblrrtWljr, 'I wish,' said I, 'there una a prot
I peel r apples and cider instead. The mo
, mailt I gel inside the doors, and breathe the
mingled minis of oysters und geraniums, it
will carry me bark to town, ai d for one eve
ning, at lest, ! shall forget that we are living
in the ciuntry.
J -mild be content.
To see no o h -t verduio than its own;
To leal no other brtalea than ara blown
Though iis tall woo Is.'
j but we must succumb; we will go like plain,
j sensible people, won't we!'
'If you were me, what would you wear!'
suit! Mrs. Sparrowgrass.
'Something ery plain, my dear.'
Then,' naid Mrs. Sparrowgrass, 'I have
! nothing very plain, suitable lor a party, and
tomorrow I must go to town and do a little
shopping.'
't am afraM.' said I, fnfter the second day's
huid shopping in town) -your dress is going
to be too plain, r.iy dear. Every hour brings
u fresh boy, witn u rrnh bun lie, and a Iresh
bill, to my office." Mrs. Sparrowgrass said,
'that if I thought to. perhaps she had heller
get Mini. .thing expensive when she went to '
buy li e trimming" I tlld her I thought
I hertl.es.- Would do without trimming. She
said it would b ridiculous wllhout (ilmp or
galloon, but perhaps I would prefer velvet rib
bon, un account of the BoUnOetl' I told her !
ah had better get the velvet ribbon, and o- I
mit the gimp and galloon. M s. Spnrrow
graas said, "r, ry well;' and the m St day an-1
other hoy brought mother bund e, and inuth- '
er bill, whleh convinced um ibit exir.ts fonn '
n important item in rural arohitecture 1 1
1 Den we had a dres maker lor several d.iysl 1
and the atltchlpg went on by sun-light andp
lamp liht, and on the last day Mrs. S. dis- ! '
covered that ahe had nothing lor her he id, II
and ihe new bonnet was taken to pieces to ! I
get at the leathers lor a coiffure. Then when j I
the ni,;ht fell, there fell, too, a soaking rain; ! t
and 1 hud forgotten the curriage, 80 I was o-1 8
bliged to go a mile in the mud to order one 1 t
Irom the village livery stable. Tiien I had : I
to walk back, us the man said "it was out;" j f
but he promised to send it lor us right olroight g
off. Then I d lo get dressed over again , '
Then Mrs. Sp irrowgraia could 1 ot find her "
beat handkerchief, and 1 dropped live spsr- ; I
maccti biotchea on Ihe new silk dress look- '
Ing lor it. Then she found the hank. ri hief. t
Then our girl said that the new d g had run
off with 0110 of my boots. Then I bad to go '
out in the mud in my slippers after the dog. !h
rhen I gut the boot und put it on so as to ff
make that sure. Then we waited for the; 'I
larnuge. We were ail dressed and ready n
jut no carriage. We exercised all the pa-' p
ience we could muater, on account of the b
:arnage ,und listened ut the windows to see , ft
f we could hear it. Two months have e-p
speed, and it hasn't come yet. Next day j tl
Vl heard that the party had bren tn elegant! a
ift'.tir. That everybody was there, so that m
ve Concluded the carriage had not been able 8'
0 c into lor us on account nl business. j ill
I have bought me am titer dog. I bought! bi
1 ni on. a. c nint o li s line 1 mg eara,and beau-)
ful silky Mil. He is a pup, and much ca-1
eaaed by th 1 young ones. One day he went
fflo the butcher's and came back with no!pi
nore tail th in u toad. The whole bunch of ,
oung f.parrowgraeaea began to buwl whenl
e reached the cottage, on account of hial0
all. I did not know him when I came homo: 1
nd ho could not retogniaa ma he had lost of
is organ ol recognition. Ho reminded meQU
la dog that looked as if he hud been where,
hey wanted utail merely, and hail taken his, 1 '
nd thrown the dog away. Of course I took , of
iv stick, and went lo see lliu butcher. j 'fn
lutcher said, "he suppose.! I weeomettling he
f a dog-fancier, and would like to see my '0
og look stylish." I said on tie contrary, i
ul I had bought him on account of his
and.-oiue silky tail, and that I would g:ve
I'n dollars to have it replaced. Then the
lea ol having it replaced st-euud so ludic-j''
ou that I could'not restrain u smile, audi 1
hen the butcher oaug'it the joke, and aaldl,
berg wus no way to do it except with fresh i
nitty. 1 do love a man that can enjoy a joke
u I took a fancy to that buteher. When I e"
;ot home and saw the dog, I thought less ol "
he butcher, but I put a piece of black court- j
duster on Ihe dog, and it improved his appli
ance ut once. So I f rgavo th-but' hei and
vent to bed at peacjwith all mankind.
1 lore to lie u h. d in these autumnal morn
ngs, and see the eurly sunlight on those .
trim old palisades. A vast stretch of rock,
aunt and grjy, is not it cliearfnl view from
he south window Shut your eyes lor a
ew iniuutes, and now look. That faint red
loroiee, reaching rougn-casl aiong the rug
fed lops, ten miles or more, trom C'lostt r to
PiUietedlem, is not unplatureaque. An i ul
boegh we have not the odor ot srri"i! Hluc-i !
11. d summer root's, breathing throutrh the (
.vindows, yet there is something not less de- j
iglttlul to the sense in this clear frosty at
nvapbere. Below, the manycolored wood .
hat bourgeon on ihe sides seem to reluin the
rerdurt of eurly s;iring in those cool depths .
)l shadow. As the sunlight broadens on the .
rage, the Illusion disappears, ami we beho d
nice more li e briliian't vagaries of Vegetation
.he hectic hints of yesterdty. I wish Ken- j
lett could see that pure blue sky und yonder
nelaaoboly sloop on the r.ver, working In r .
pas age down with bricks from Haveistraw, J"
ind a suil like an expanded rose leaf. It is
1 pleasunt thing to wutcb the river cruft in
;hesc autumnul mornings. Sometimes we
tee 11 w hite-breasted covey aomUW UP 111 ''e
ilataaee from shore to shore a sptead of di
mity. II to and there are troops o( shining
one with warm illuminated wings, and oth
er' creeping along in s iaduw with spectral V
pinions, like evil spirits. Yonder schooner
is not an unfair image of humanity; beating
up against adverse winds with one black ind
One white sail. That dogged old craft, just
emerging from obscurity into sunlight, is but )
a l pe of some curmudgeon passing from pov
erty to atDjeuce, and there is another, evi
di'iilly en the wrong tliok, scotching away .
'r un ' lie light of prosperity into the gl om
of MUforluae? i do not love the country I J
less because of her teaehingt by these sim
II Symbols. There are many things lo be
learned Irom watching the old wood-sloops on
ihe river.
Our neighbor has been making an improve
ment in his house. He has had a drain made
in the kitchen, with a long earthen pipe end
ing in a cess-psol at the end ol his garden.
The object of il is to carry off Ihe saperflu.
ous water from the house. It wag a great
convenience, he said, "on wash days." One
bjeclion might be urged, mid Ihat Wee, alter
every heavy rain, he found a gully in his gar
den palh, und several cart loads of gravel in
his cess-pool. Besides, ihe pipe was of an
cqunl width, and one obstruction led to ano
ther; sometimes il was a scrubbing-brush, a
piece ol to'.p, snil a handkerchief, I raid
lhat if he had made a srpia.c wooden trough,
gradually widening from end to end. it wo'd
have c. eared itself, oud then I thought it
would be u good thing for m to have sin h
u one irijlf. Thou I bad u ceaaMMl built
at the bottom of the wall, under the bunk,
which is about one hundred and fifty feet from
the kit. hen, and told my carpenter to make a
trough of ihat length. Carpenter akcd me
how big I wanted ii !" u.ld him about
right inches in diameter at the end nearest'
10 ihe heme, mi l then gradually Widening
II the way for the whole length. As I said
this, my carpenter smiled, and said he never
beard of suc h a thing. 1 told him no, lhat
the itlea was an original one of my own. He
laked me how much I would like to have it
Widened, I thought lor 11 moment, and said
'about half an inch lo a lout " He (aid Vf ry
tell, and the nesl week became wi'h two
lurset and an edifice in his e.urt lhat looked ,
ike a truncated shot tower. 1 ueked him
vhat that Waal He said It was thu big end
ny pipe. When he laid il on the ground on
Is side. I walked through it, and could not
ouch the upper side with my hand. Then
eked the carpenter w hut he meant by it. '
nd he said it wus according 10 directions. I
aid not at all, that I told him to increase I
he diameter at the rate of half an inch to ' ,
he foot, and he had made it about a foot the
not, as near as I could judge. "Spurrow- i ,
rass," said he, a little nettled, "jtst take
our pencil und put down eight inches." .
Well, that's the diameter ol the small end, ' (
believe!' I told the carpenter ho Was right i .
0 fur. Now, for every foot there is an in- t
reuse of half ar inch in the Widththat's uc- (
nrding to the directions, loo, ain't it!' 'Yes.' j
tV'ell (hen put down one hundred ai d fifty L
all' inches, how much does lhat nuke, alto- g
ether in feet!" Six feet eleven inches L
low,' aeid he, jest you take my rule, and1,,
it'iiiiire the big end of that ore pine. JC'ar-' p
enter,' said I, ! see it all: the next time 1
uild an aqueduct I will be a little mine cure- v
11 111 the figures.' .Spurrowgruss,' said he,'
oiutiiig to the pipe, -did not you tell roe a
lat wus an originul idea of your own!' I H
is.- tied ahM i bctic-rcit I i 'i s.k. . -.,.
ark of that kind. 'Well,' said he, with a ,,
irt of muthV'd laugh, 'tint is the first time t
at I did s,-e a original idee come out at the
gend." jf
Washington's Opinions.
It may not be umiss at the present time, to
iblish some of the opinions of General 1
'asliinglou, upon the prop riely ami policy!
appointing foreigners to office. The fol.J
wing, are taken from Spark's publication'
the Washington papers. s they all in
Icafe sound and just doctrine, and such as e
ight be expected from one whom the tongue I
calumny dare not touch, und one who was, C
st in war, first in peace, ami first in the 8
arts of his countrymen" Th"y are as fol-
1 9
vet
MORRISTOWN, May 17th, 1777.
lo Richard Henry Lee, D.tar Sir: I lake L
liberty to ask you what Co gress ex- u
cts lam lo do with the many foreigners ll
sy have ut different limes promoted to the 'ti
nk of officers, and iiy their last resolve two 1 d
that ol Colonel. These meis have no at. 1 n
.-huieni to tin? country, farther thun inter- b
t binds them. Our officers think it ex- 1 y
'inely bard, uller they have toiled in the a
nice, and huve susluined many losses, to g
ve strangers put over them, whose merits,
rhupa,are not epiul to their own, hut whose s.
fruntcry wl.l take 1,0 denial; it is by the u
al and activity ol our own people that ihe c
use must be supported, and not by a few h
ingry udrenturers. I am. Sic. t.
G. WASHINGTON.
Vol. IV p. 432. t
I
MIEDLEBANK, June 1, 1777.
To tlie same You will, before this can
ach you, have seen Muntleur Decendary ; !
hat bis real expectations were, 1 do not 1 1.
now, but I tear if his appointment ie etuui'y
1 what I have been told la his expectation, I
w ill be attended with unhappy consequeit-;
is, 10 say nothing of the policy of entrust-) (
gthe department on the execution of which I u
e salvation ol the army depends, to a for- (
gner who has no other tie to bind him to ,
ie interests of the country than honor. 1 c
outd beg leave to observe that ty pulling s
. D. ut the head of the artillery, you will j ,
jc a very valuable officer in G.'neral Knox, j -ho
is a man of great military slanding.Hound I n
ilgment and clear conception, he will re- u
gr. If any one is put over him. .
I am, &c. G. WASHINGTON.
[Vol. IV. d. 446.]
WHITE PLAINS, July 26, 1778.
To (jov. alums, ,sq Dear air: 1 he de- c
gn ol this is to touch cursorily upon a sub- ,
ict of very great importance to the well-be- j
ig of these Slates; much more so thun will
ppeur at first view. I raran the appnint
lent ol to many foreigners to offi:e of high
ink und trust in our service
The lavish manner in which rank hashilh
rto teen bestowed on these gentlemen will '
erlainly be productive of one or the other '
.f two e vils either to make us despicable 1
11 the eyes of Europe, or become a means of '
muring them in upon us like a torrent, and '
iddinrj to our preaenl burden
J But it is neither the expenn- o- troub'eo
them I must dread; there is an evil more ex
tensive in its nature and fatal in ill ( nnae
quencet to be apprehemed, and that is tin
driving of our offi'trsoit of the service, ant
throwing not only our own srmy but our mil
ilsry councils, entire'y into the hands of for
eio-oera.
PHILADELPHIA Nov. 17, 1794.
ie junn Auims, vie, president nf tin U
S , Deal Sir; 5Iji opiiion with respect it
Integration is. thai except of Uteful ni'-chon
ic and some ptrliculsr description of met
tnd pru'essiont, ttere ii no use of eneouf
agement. I ni.fiie.,
G. WASHINGTON.
MT. VERNON, Jan. 20, 1790.
1 o joiiii c AUiini, American M nieier si
Berlin Sir, You know, my good sir, lhat i'
is not the policy of this Government to em
ploy foreigners wlntn il can well be avoldet
either in 1 ie t vn Kaailitary v.-slks of life
There ie a-p'jcft(aeelf imporiance in al
foreign Inci rs ihtanhet be gratified with
out doing inj list left, meritorious character,
among our own chmtryincn, who conceive,
and justly, Where here is no treat preponde
rance o1 etperlrnle or merlt,that they are en
titled 1 1 all the (It act in the gill of llteir Go
vernment, lam, &c
G. WASHINGTON.
o.iuie 1, ne 10 a ereigm r applying I 11 ntu ta
Dear Bin t i tt not accord w ith Ihe pol
icy of this governnvnl to bestow offlcet, civ
il or military, up-n foreigners, to the exclu-
s on ol 1 ur owi. e leans, Vhkm. .
G. WASHINGTON.
WAR DEPARTMENT, Feb. 4 1799.
instructions oltbe Secreiury o: War lo
the Inspector Gcieral, for the ctvary. t .r
the regolatfont rtstrict the recruiiing otlic ta
lo engage none avcepi natives for this cor, ,
and those only v ho from their known t-hsr-icter
and fidelity may be trustfd.
The officers, my der sir, on whom yoi
must depend ful fbe defence of this cause
listingtiished by length of service and mili
tary merit, will not submit much, If any I011
;er to the unnatural promotion of men oer
hem, who hat e nothing more then a liitle
llaueibllity, unb'iunded pride und ambition,
md u peraeveranct in the application to iup
lort their pletensionai not lo be resisted but
iy uncommon firmness, men who. In the
list instance, lei) you they wi.-h lor nolh
ng more th..n the honor of serving in so
lorinus u cause as volunteers, the next day
olicit runk without puy; the day following
ant money advanced to them, and in course
f a week want further promotion, The eX
ediency anil policy of the measure requires
3 be considered, an.l whether it is consistent
ritb justica or pru ence to promo'.e these
lilitary fortune hunters at the hazard ol our
rmy. Iloron Itiicuben, I low fn-d is alsu
mntlng to quit tit inspectorship for a com
ssssoat)a ' , 'Jiiio will he oroductive
f much discontent. In a word, although I
hink the Baron an excellent officer, I do
lost devoutly wish that we had not a single
o eigner among us, except the Marquis do
j'ltuyette, who acts upon very d.fferent prin
iples from those whicii govern the rest.
idiru I um m st (incerelv vours.
G. WASHINGTON
An Interesting Letter.
f.very reader, we doubt not, Will agree
ri h us ihat Ihe subjoined let,ter is not only
11 intereating 01. e, but ihat the concluding
antenceof it makea it a .remarkable one.
t is an exact copy f a letter written by
ieneral Win field Scott, then a captain in the
rmy, during a sojourn at his home in Peters
urgh. Va , on the 18th of June, 1311, ju-t
lie year before tiie declaration Ol war. Tiie
-iter was undressed lo an old Irieud in this
ity. and is najy4u possession of the son, J.
1, Edwards, Ei-q. Great events make great
ICR, It seems to have been the purpose ol
ie young so.'dur to leave a service of inac
on and return to the law. Wc are left in
.-ubt whether' he would have become ns re
owned ul tilt) bar us lit basin the field; but,
a tha'. us 11 may, war soon followed, und the
oung captain, by a course of service micx
inpled in biiiliuncy and duration, has risen
:ep by slep in the career of distinction, until
t the end of forty-four years he finds him
elf, on Ibis vein rated anniversary, crowned
nil the hlgJieat military honor which the
luntry can bestow. Truly has he "written
is history will) his sword," 11 history tree
oin a stain and which every American may
r.id with prid--. Ininmniftlis fnlijet lioit'jri-us.
THE LETTER.
PETERSBURG, June, 1811.
"I be ieve wc huve very little village news
. give you, nor e'o I know whalwould pleuse
oU lit mat 1
"Ol ' mi, m If that personage who fills so
irge a space in every man's own Imagine
ion, and so tn.ull a one in the imagination
I every othor 1 cun suy but little perhaps
iss would pleise you more. Since my re
urn to Virginia, my time has been passed in
asy transitions from pleasure to study, from
tudv to pleasure; in my guyt-ty forgetting
he sttident,Jiu thestudeut forgetting my gny
ly. I have generally been in the office of
iy friend, Mr, Leigh, though not unmindful
I 'the studiel connected with my present
iFofeeaion, but you will easily conceive my
nililary urdot has suffered ubutemeiit. In
cetl, il is my Jebign, us soon as circumstances
vill permit.tolhrow the leather out of my cap
,nd resume iin asy hand. Yet, should war
ume at last, my enthusiasm will be rekin
lied; and then who knows but thut I may
et write my hiatory with my sword!
WINFIELD SCOTT.
EDWARDS, Esq., Washington."
To NAKcfiEMox DRors. Grate three !em
ns, with ailargc piece of loaf-sugar, then
icrspe the Sagai inlo a plate, ond add ha f a
.easpooulul vf flour; mix well, and beet it in
to a light ofkte, wiih thi white of an egg;
irop it upon w hile paper, and 'put il in a
moderate ui tn, on a tin plate.
f Tin. Battle rut.n el the ..10 (llano
A eorretpo'ndent nf the v. o. Pitari'ni
' writing frm Brownsviik In F' bruary list
! Iati
I I have just returnee from a vis ; lo Ihe
battle p,on, ds of Pt'o AUo and R--ci ,i
Is Peine, but SCareely a reatige remains to
denote Ihose fields which res' und so much to
the gallantry tf our regular army. On the
. fofnrrr field a cannon bull is Otcaatoitally
pirked tip, which Ie the only indication that
It was ovi r used, except for the peaeelol
purpoaea of grating the largt herds which
ut preaen' roam irter it.
At ihe (leasee de la Patina the faint 0 -lines
of the ri-doubt winch ihe Vefieena oc
cupied on the west bank t t the R. ..ca are
; s,till visible, but so overgrown with brush and
, umlerg-owih that they can rOarC'lf be lo'.
. lowed. One Or t tie ireeattll sli .wmaiks
I of the strife, and a few shrrds ol cloth, oid
times ind an occasional battered CtntCtn are
I also to be found in t1 e Chaparral j but ihero
, It nought else to ahowthat hero wee Ihe
1 scene of the in t closely contested liuts of
the war, where bayoneta w , r 0 ten eroased,
and w here har d to hand bVhts w ere frequent
as the scutteretl combatatita met beneath the
shade tl -..!( .. i.-.i mimosa or amidet the
tu nglt d brt ahWood
Oid Fort Brown, where the first hoatilo
cannon w as (in d. although in ruins, ia an
object of much liitereeti I s magtiuea are
tumbling in, itsnitches are filling up and the
curtains, flanks and faces of its bastions are
. crumbling a way 1 till it could Oaaily bo put
in (Lining order should the Conduct "i our
'M x.can neighbor.-- Btabe it lieeesaury.
This fori, together with n W Port B-o.vu
and Brttwnsvine, lakes ' its nsmn Irom the
gallant Major Jacob Brown, who tell mon al
ly wounded in its defenee. He was struck
by a cannon ball on the Othot May, but lin
gered until 9th, w hen he expired w ith the
distant booming of the guns on the field o
' Resaca de la Pulma, ringingjin his ears. He
ws8 a moat gallant and accomplished officr,
and hid he lived would have played an im
portant pari in the war. His reply, while.
, lying wounded, to the summons ut the Mex
ican Generul .o surrender the Fort, is worthy
of being remembered: "1 shall never snrren-
der it," was his answer, "so long as there is
; 11 man left to w ork the guns," lie wai I111-
ried within tht walls he so gallantly defe.ideJ,
btitw hen it was sbai doned, I ia remaina were 1
j removed lo ihe new fort, some 300 yards
I above the ola one, and deposited at the loot
Jollhe flag-ataff,where each day the sume sta:s 1
I and siri pes under which he fell wave over,'
i his humble grave. Alongside his grave jl
. observed a liny mountl, and upon inquiry
found that it contained the remains of one, I
of his grandchildren. Major Brow n has left 1
but two tor- iing children, both daughteit, I
and married to officers of '.he army. By a j
1 singular coincidence, botii have been -reaid- ( 1
ing at tills post for several years past.
Mutamoras remains unchanged, ailuulugH
the marked Want of eneroy in the Mexican
people as compared with their Anglo-Saxon
neighbors. Scarcely a single new building
has been erected since the cify was evacuu
tetlTry the American Army. Tha blanketed '
citiiena lounge on the corners ol the st eets, '
nioking 1 therr eigaretteot ani-epeeulating on
the next rcvo utioni or aramb -ing" ihe
barhari inaol the North, as they have done
(lie las; p,utrteruf a century.
CoN'iRECSlOSAL MoBALITr. The Louls-f.
Viile J unial relates Ihe following!
We were infinitely amused throe or four 1
weeks ag t by a practical j oka in Washington
Ciiy upon it number of nice men ol Congreee.
1 w as loo good lj be lelt unpu -I a led.
A couple of merry fell iwt, one of them a j
iliatinguisbed member of Coogresa from 1
Southern Slate, and the uther, a distinguished .
ex editor from Kentucky, concocted a letier.;
purport i ng to be addressed by a young l idy-
to a Very fine looking gentleman. It ws
got up In firai-rate atyic. Tho pretended young j 1
lady set forth there 'u thai she had several i
times seen the gentleman she Was address-
ing, lhat she w is captivated by his fine face (
and manly form, that her heart waa deeply
louche. I by all aha saw ami heard of him, thai
she ntusl make his acquaintance beloro bis
departure Irom the city, ihut ihe had ; iptd 1
and preyed be would forget her aeemlng'bold- 1
Hits us it was I lie first imprudent act III er
life, 'bat the had a w ays moved in tlld high, el
circles of the Capitol, that s e would be t n
a certain square of a t ertain stret ctjpie ise
Iy 1J o'clock un the lollowjng 'iy In a '
dres. which the deacri bed with great par en- '
larliy, and lhat she hoped and iruited he
w ould meet her and ihus ff..rd her an ojijior- '
! tunity of a brief intercourse with ihe 'Jul ul
her heart, The wigs had between ihiiiy'
and forty copies tl tins letter wlMn hv "11
femilj fricol of theira, and liter sent
these eopiee lo between thirty and forty
members of Congress, selccling theat of
coursu who were known to entertain a very,
exalted opinion of their own personal fast i-
netione,
Everything being thus arrangeJ, the two
jokers culled upon us and another young gen
tleman, explained whal they had dune, and
invited 11a togtl into their carriage, ride ,
with them to the point of assignation, and
see the sights. We unnceitatingly content
ed, and we ;-aw sights sure enough. Riding
UDOO the designated square, we beheld the I
whole ol the thirly or lurty members, North- .
ern men and Si tnhern men. Whig.-, Demo
crals, and Know -Nothings, walking to and
fro, all gazing earnestly in every direction
and at every female figure lo discover the ob
ject of tbeif anxious search.
We concluded, that, if a few more copies 1
of the letter had been sent to members of the
House ol Representatives, the House would
have had to adjourn for the want of a quorum.
,
A VEBV MCE I'LAIN Rice Puddino. Take
half a teacupm! of the be.t rice, put ii.'iu a
small e,ie-diah with throe tahlespnoijfula of
moist sugar. Fill up the dish with tniik and
water in equal proportions, and bske very
slowly , It cap. be rate 11 cold,
J
From the N. Y. Observer.
LETTER FROM GRANT THORBURN.
WRITTEN ON HIS 83D BIRTHDAY.
Winsted. Conn. Feb. 18, 1855.
mt. rnnteti rnia tat I enter on my
e :-l ly.i. id year. RgCPpt the) my bearing
ami sr. ing me not to Bl ute, ( um not II Bti
ble of 1 ny mav-r al decay for the a( fi iv
y, an During that fe ad, I have ba n on
Iy one d.iy , ndned o 1 1 Itouee i,y ilchm ss;
G lodn-as and mercy n e rellowcd ma .i
thedayso: my li" : I awe tne giv, r of u i
g -od a large debt of gruti'u .
Ami a- here is but a al,-j between nc and
death I ue it 10 gei traUeOS yel to c me,
to tell what I saw and hi aru ot Tlo.inaa
Prt M, Perhape ciice Keen r.o: a m .n on
e irlh, who traced bin fr.,111 ii a ( rnrtl- to his
grove, except Hyotlf, f'srver and I were
f DowUborera in ihe same shop. Paine
avl Cefver were bun. in the same town in
Bog and , Pa ii- and I boarded with Ctreee,
I OMei. beam Carver, h't w Ie, snd i'a.i. -, i.a
We four sat hy tin ire on a A n er night, ie-
bterea tne kerne ol nis i f -, l think i,c w it
the worst member of th body pel:! c I near
Matin all my journey through die. Hem.--ried
a rrepecteble I dy, wlu died eleven
no mi' s thefeOtter, in cons quer.ee o! rutal
tr almei.t. He then unrr.e , a el it.gbte.- of
the Co.l.ctor 1 the Poet ol Lewis) a.ier
Ukree y,-are ahe obtargjM a tjfurce for iik
treatment! In 1773, while be held an 1 Oca m the Cut 1
tom 11 rUse, (glvM him by his 1st! er-in-law.)
h W is d t cted in Uknig bribes from t ie 1
emugglere, tnd fl-d to Ameri. a He w is 1
mode S'-c t-oy lo the pr c ,ie Comtl) t re ol i
Congreat, i,d lo k an oath of 1 ffi .- lo k' p 1
their seer. t. He broke thil oath by r!;vul-
g ng tho project of a Cecret mission :o the
Court ot Franco ',y Silas Dean. He v.s (
diemietcd with diegraee. S.e ;ii J ur.ial t
of Congress in 1774 or j ) T!r treachery ;
wat the cause of much trouble in Congreaa, 1
and in tho Court of Louis XVI. (
We next find him in Paris, helping R ,b I
esp'ene in 1,'s labors of love l eatabl -Ii the r
freedom ol the Pies, and the right ot sp"ech. t
by meant of tha guillotine. He quarrelled
with R bbie, anJ was chalked lor the guillo t
t.ne. Gjd, willing to make the wra'li ol i
Paine to preiae Him, aent an angel wl.o de- 1
livered him cut of prison. 'For particulara I
nf this miracle ,aee the Life of Th rbum, lOlat t
P'?ft) Is
In 1801, when KingThotpaa the First ast
tended the throng ot nis kingd m, he In ttot-1 v
ly deapatehed a national frigate to convey to ! a
jur snores the venerated Thom ia Paine. lie I
irrived early iii the year 1802, spoke with
lim at the Cit; Hotel, Bowery, a few hou's
ifler his arrival. He found letters urging
lim on to Washington, (then a facr day's "
numey.) He started 11 xt morning. At l
UtorgetoWn a inessencer was sent lor.vsrd "
to announce hit approach! a least wa. goi -ready,
and a. I thoae of like 'h:nk ng were
rited. Paine entered late, ?i!s trr' D
id, hit beard unsborn, and rei ing ine a dru - 1
Itc-n man. A look of coinatefnation si. ne 1
forth from evi-ry face; mirth eeat i; ne ht'
tnethay went ou', leeving Pain aim e on '
i i ciair last asleep. X xt ,1 ,y he re a ved 2
e tera and ina'.ructiona to r torn te New
f,,rk. , t!
W . 11 Aan n Burr return .1 from E jr ipe,
vbither he hai fl -J after his duel with 11 U- 1
I'on, he kept his office ii X -sail street, e:'r ; '
ny seed store. From him I received .i.e ac-. '
Wont as ah.ive stated. 1 "
Paine, on hie return, aa enable ti t
odginge. Carver to jk imn in tor old r.c h
juaioUnca suke. lie died at Greenwich, of -1
Iviiriuui tremona, in ISOD. n
To ivturu Irom this oil Infilel to myse!',)''
air n .v ne-r the end o' my journey. It ia -
1 eoineiience worth noting thut ou the IStbi'
il A, oil, 1734. I first sail d trcm Sco'l nd.j"
ind on the 13 h of April, Lb."j4, I first enter- -id
m;' dwelling in this place, being sixty I'
-ears Complete. The y ird ol my dwelling is 1 h
leparated irom the Preabvteritn cbureb and
ta place of skulis by u loooe. If it so w ills '
leaven, here my bonvs w ill rcet "till time e
thall be no more." c
The partner Whom God bee given me, it a P
ight to my paih m.ik.ug smooth my tra k
o the Banki of Jordan. She imti, ' known
be t)cr iptures from ber youth op." A thank '
ul heart compl t s my happ'uesa. I was 11
lorn It th February, 1778, Y. u a. &?. ,P
GRANT THORBURN.
UeRDcae tn the RoTal Kamilt or Rut- ,
iIA Wr extract the following interesting .(
icoount ol muadre In the it y . l' .ini y ol
B'i-iia, (run the Philadelpb a Ledger.
Tne Srtt aurroise, on the annonnceaientof ,
ihe d. ath of the t zar, was that ht h id fallen 0
a victim lo some conspiracy. Titers would t
reem, however, lobe no trmuds for this t
oapician. Yet the almost univertal ouapi-1 .
sion ol murder was nut extraordinary, wh ;u
it is considered how 11 any of the royal III 0
( Russia have died forcible deaths. What .
with the dissensions among (lie Imperial ,
family, and wbal with the t'ooipiraciea 1 n.
ihe pari 01 li e nobility to remove an 1 bnox- .
ions Ctar.no t'yna-ty ofdviflBeJ riiicca ims
ever s t.ll't r- so much from the tleel and ,
-ord, since Ihe days ol Ihe Roman CtesTs.
ralleyi-omi's famous definition uf the chara tt
er of ihe Russian Government, lhat it wns
-u despotism tempered by attatsluation,"
as be true na it wee witty, 01 rather, siat (
viuy because of its truth. During t lie eor
icr period nf Czarisin, nearly every emperor
lestioyed tomo rival or was himselt e'e.troy ,
td. Even in the last century, the mu d r of
1 Russian prince almost, universally attended ,
r precedec the acressinn of a new monarch
o the t r Be, The blot dy drama w as o en
id by a father killing hit own son, and closed f
iy a sou consenting to the murder of bit j
ether. r
Tha incident to which we first ollude, wss
;be secret rxeculioi' 'of ADxis, on'. -tn of j
Pe'er the Greet, by rrJer of his father, A,
D., 1713. Tha Prii c waa bo' ill) to 'be
new measures introduced, by the Cja' lav.-r
ii-glhe old Boy. t paily, wh. h tdhtre c
the ancient usurps and eusloiua bl h a 11 - .
try. For this t'eler reiulved to dts aht-iil (
l im. AlexV, knowing what thit meant, fled
a'r-a,!. but b-ing discovered, aa dragged
back to Riiisit, compelled to ren-mor tho
auci eai on, tried b a-erei judges, an.l barba
rt usly 1 t lo death. The next great tragedy
Which Occurred in the itemmofr family, waa
Ihercut erofPeterihe Third, by direction
n hit wife, who Immttlately ssremied the
;' .one aft Catherine Ike Second. Thit wooi
tu celebra dn eaa for .hcr profligtta life
than foi li-, political griiius. was the grand
mother of Nlchelte. Her itMrumnt in the
iia isinaiion of her hnaband waa Pilneo a I
aile 'iri fi, one of her paramooea, 0 man of
B -ri,:' s atatore, U lobtequentiy enbletJt
'"-i'y praded bimaefl ibruugh Europe, and
-11 1 1, wei I w it . terror and curjuaity evarv
where la the pareon who, when the Bmpf
rur resitted, had thiotiled ihe unhappy vic
lim ith hia own hand, A brother ef ihia
m natal went te Italy, here a Princess of
the Romanoff line reaided, whom Catharine
-. n conequeme ofhef belter title to
the throne, a d having inveigled the poor girl
into a mock marri-ge, trapped heron beard a
Russian fngite, and carried Iter a prisoner 10
Cronatadt. The miaorable viciim of this
atrocious paifidy im drowned in her ce'l
tubaaq ientty by an Inundation of the Neva.
T ' w:,, ii we allude waa the
mord r of Paul the F rsi, fathi r of Nicholas,
with the knowledge If not ihe connivence of
A' -x ittder, li e toedcressor ol the lata c'aar.
Pan' was a "t Upon al night, in Ins c'asmber,
tnd asaareinated after a prot scd atrujgle,
In which he fought wPh ovsperate reflation,
iii ugh unarmed end in hia ahlrt. At the pe
rlo ; of Ihit bl mdy tragedy, Itt. h, as wss an
nfant. But his eld-r bl other, Alexander,
Oal a young n.an. ard was, it it genenlly
lelieved, aware of whtt was about to occur.
Rem re for tha act is said to havejBmbitter-
td tha closin-days of Alexander. It is asser
ed by some hia oriaps that even this Prince
ell t victim ia 1 Violent death: ft is certain
hat he died suddenly, when on a teur in the
-rim--s, and as he l ad become quiie u ipopu
ai With a large pirty in his domin ons, it it
101 iinpoteible that he was poisond. In all
lies? cases of assassination, it was at first
?n out that the Ciar died of syop'exy, nor
lid the truth appear uotil the lapse or years
.ad rend -red harm'ess the -"iblication of the
sets. In a deapetiam i ke Russia, when a
'rince it lo be depo-ed. titers io generally no
ourte left but to take his li'e. He c-nnot
afely be ask- d to abdicate, fur he would be a
old man Who could thua 'bell the cat;' and
i.ile he iivca, even after abdication, there is
Iwaya dinger of revolution in hia favor.
Ience Tai'eyran a't remark.
Kanzas Again.
Othtr queetioni may ba important which
ew agit tie the public mind, but all of them
ngetner are of not a lithe of ihe importanco
I tha setl.eineniol Kai.zss as a Free State.
Lud why Preeent tariflk, preaont Recipro-
ty, Treatica.presi ut Atisntic Steamer lines
u y b.' cf importonce lo those inteiested.but
ie c inaiderntion ol tiiein can be postponed,
.us.uj or averting temporary odvantage
fext year, or ten years, hence, thtse ques
ot s 1 an ait be legislated on, bjt allow Ktn
as to be a v: and colonized by slaveh ,ld
rs ana nv nc-d to ;. ol pu-poes, and
lereaiter it ia too iate to prevent mischief.
1 1 iui n u .;. w un . is opened which never
i'i be heult i. rhe Free States Will never
. is true, admit -, slave S;te irom Kantae,
'hoy are it determined and fixed on ihat
1 . 1 a- .... y are agaiuat cue annexation of
. kingdom of ) my. By pouring into
.a it ...e wholii nor'hern emigration new,
.. qnetliqnmay b.. setlied for al, time, h
i-y be st:.-ltd .01 a tier ofBlatea reaching
1 Ca ...mo. It may ba Battled for New
lex Co aa well s Kaiutae, for an area large
Bough Lo embrac-u.be twelve la.-geet Staiea
1 the pr'i-nt Union. It iny b.' settled for
fty miii.ns of people, wlio will som day
op ,1 ita it, twice as many peopje as now in
joil oiir IJ.iion. Not only so. but tne chir-dt-r
o: '.i.eir ii.d.istry .their iulelligence.their
oiiJition, their ia.vs, tReir habits, their poy
rty or opulence, and the very grade of their
ration, ean bo deteruiiued now by the
?"p!e of the N 'ith.
We appreLend ihe press is inert. indiJar
ilt, treacheroua to its dmy at mis juticiure.
a.i ihe presses of the North -outd publish
ilormation relative to the arraugemanta and
lana o. the emigration anterpriaest it they
-ould announce where iheol&eere and agents
1 u.J Be consulted; too price of paeasgethow
.ie ccinpaaiet ctn be join- d, they can doub
t the aulonisation, and give il aid and dtTeO;
ion-
We sdvlte the ttoloiiitta ta sellle nearest
, M ,-suur;, along the very boundary line, in
ider lo raite a barrier lo protect the wider
eirito y. As fur danger, it it mere buga
:tl. A quiet, modest man, last fall, offered
. prraonata Eii Tuayer, (or whose head tha
liesuuri bullies had oll'ered a price. The
hivalry had no reward ta pay, but barj the
tiujng rebuke which the offer c.ouveyed
it h meckum and decency Thore may b-j
it is, but let a tingle freeman be killed, by
nen wiio put the pretended agencies of free
nfeO at work to pollute a free land, and de
grade a portion ot i's cultivators tu brutes,
mJ ihe last nailie put in the coffin of the
mtriarchal (!) inatitutiun which d sgrtcet
md d' grades the whole continent.
We nail with joy thep o;rts of th t army
i." freemen, on Hie march la tx'.end freedom
imd civilization ever a virgin soil. Tu pil
;r n t of thr. MayCo.tcr were brnt on ne ho
ier. 110 more honorable missisr.. IndreJ.the
aliant 11.00 who went ibelr way lo the vaat
ilains at (Ceneee, realize what the founders
f Plymouth did not, the certain 'and glorioua
onstqoencea of their mittiun. Tha pro g
ett of tbtss apostles of freedom, at every
spot, at every city, along every river and ca
ul, is wormy oi celebration, sa old John
Uan.t tleclared iho Declaraimn of Indapen--nee
to be, by "guns, bells, b mfires and l.
j . i lalions." Toledo Blade.
...J7"The minsipn hous 1 of M,rahfield the
.te ic-s d.-nce 01 Websieh, fc tome tcret of
he homestead turroundiug if, nut included in
be tale of property to take place en the Jdih

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