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Northern tribune. [volume] (Cheboygan, Mich.) 1875-1885, July 28, 1883, Image 2

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THE NORTHERN TRIBUNE JULY 28, 1883.
Northern Tribune.
SATURDAY, JULY 28 1883.
Ill ltdU. W ( OlMV S KENOl IU KN.
C'ertnlu Moner to b Made by TUi
who I iiii ite In tbe Keicble,
Ileal Hi In I. and Remunerative Km-
ploy hk iii of Cultivating the Cran
berry. In considering the resources or our
county there is one element which has
always been overlooked, and to this the
TR'BUNE would call attention. The con
formation of the county, with its many
streams and marshes, suggests the idea
that the cultivation of the cranberry
would prove a success. Our pine barrens,
which have hitherto been deemed almost
worthless, offer, in many cases, a suit
able field for its production. From
personal observation and inquiry we IN
satisfied that Northern Michigan offers
a field for enterprise in this direction,
and money judiciously inyested in this
business is almost sure to obtain good
returns. In Wisconsin, with soil and
climate almost identical with ours, there
are large districts where the cultivation
of the cranberry is brought to its high
est perfection, and where large sums
are annually spent in improving the
peat bogs, with proportionally large
profits. Sixty years ago any one em
barking in the cultivation of the cran
berry would have been compared to a
mariner putting to sea without a chart
or compass, but now, with so much ex
perience to guide us, it is as clearly a
legitimate business, and yields as good
prospects of profit as wheat raising, and
the product is just as marketable. Tire
fact, which mav not be generally known,
is that very few cranberries are export
edthe home market consuming all
that are raised, and with a great ad
vance in price.
CHOICE OF LOCATION
The alluvial formation is the only one
in which the cranberry can be success
fully cultivated. Sand or quartz rock,
pulverized or granulated, is alluvium
separated from the drift by the waves
and currents of the ocean, or elevated by
the action of the waters. The deltas, or
rich interval lands near the outlets of
rivers are alluvium, and are formed by
the subsiding of the finer particles
brought down by streams. In fact, all
alluvial formations are caused by the
action of water.
For the successful cultivation of the
cranberry, the following requisites are
necessary: 1st, a peat or muck soil, free
from loam or clay, 2nd, sandy bottom
and sides to the stream, 3rd, a dam
and water to overflow the vines when
necessary, 4th, thorough drainage. With
out these advantages, and all of them,
there is little use in attempting the cul
tivation of the fruit.
Good unimproved cranberry soil, with
out timber, is worth from $2o to $50 an
acre. Properly preparing and planting
the ground costs from $100 to $500 an
acre. First-class meadows with three
year old vines are worth from $1,000 to
$1,500 an acre. If properly prepared, the
expenses of keeping a cranberry marsh
free from foreign growth is very small,
averaging from $:i to $10 an acre per
annum.
A meadow of suitable soil and sur
roundings, will, on an average, pay for
itself and all the expense attending the
growth of the cranberry in four years.
Instances are known, where men paid
as high as $1,000 an acre, yet the
meadow paid for itself in three years.
Many columns might be written on
this subject, but we think we have said
enough to call attention to the subject,
and in considering the inducements for
settlers to come here, the cranberry cul
ture offers one which may be made
second only to the lumber interest.
Horatio Seymour thus puts it;
"When I see tottering old men, upon
the brink of the grave, engaged in an
unseemly scramble for office, I am al
ways reminded of Holbein's picture,
"The Dance of Death." It shall never
be said of me that I took part in such a
cotillion."
These words might be intended for
Samuel J. Tilden, to whom they are
appropriate, but it is equally true that
of any one leading Democracy it may
be said he is performing the "Dance of
Death," because of a lack of votes to
succeed. Hoadly is now performing,
and there is more to follow, notwith
standing the preachers have said so
much about the wickedness of dancing.
The Boston Herald is full of he sin of
unbelief, it does not believe Tilden
originated civil service reform. It savs:
"We knew that ho was the author of
the Declaration of Independence, of the
Constitution of the I'nited States, and
of Cronin's certificate as the thre I electors
of Oregon, but we fancied that a Rhode
Island Congressmen introduced the first
civil service reform bill into Congress
At a time when Mr. Tilden was running
the Democratic State Committee of New
York. In conjunction. witll Mr, William
K Tweed,'
Tom Thumb, though not long for
earth, was never short in his accounts,
and on this account beat Polk.
An almond-eyed Chinaman has chal
lenged Dennis Kearney to fight a duel,
and it is hoped by some that Dennis will
accept challenge and bullet.
Lotteries are shut out of the mails,
saloons are taxed all the way up to $1,
500, Democrats are going to lose Ohio,
and still some people think the world
does not more.
A young man in New York deserted
his wife and three children in order to
run away with his mother-in-law. This
Conkling state beats the world for
furnishing fool tricks.
The Friends have repealed the law
forbidding the marriage of first cousins.
An unwise thing to do, for there are
enough darlings on earth outside of
consulship, and enough lunatics with
out mixing blood with a view to their
increase.
The last congress ordered the publi
cation of the names of individuals pen
sioned by the government, and this list
will be open for the inspection of all, so
that the name of the impostor, the
wretch who through misrepresentation
has secured a pension that is only in
tended to support those who bear honor
able scars, honorably received in an
honorable conflict can be read. No one
has as much right to the Nation's protec
tion and support as those who fought her
battles, and no impostor needs exposing
more than one who would use unfair
means to obtain a pension that means a
certain mark of honor.
Telegraph operators in their bill of
grievances demand that both sexes shall
receive equal pay for equal work. This
is a just requirement, involving the
principle of fair dealing to all, and is
sure to obtain in the near future in all
departments of labor. There is no reason
why the same quality and quantity of
work performed under the same circum
stances, should noi receive the same
pay. It nevertheless remains true that
man is more available for certain kinds
of work than women, yet this should
not prevent her from receiving justice
wherever she gives her talent and work,
and anything less than equal pay for
equal work is robbery.
Europeans think Americans profuse
in praise of everything that is American
and yet, strange as it may appear, these
foreigners themselves confirm our ideas
and estimates concerning our produc
tions. Take the American girl, fo
severely criticised and condemned for
uncouthness and other imperfections,
she stands to-day the leader, throughout
civilization, for personal attractions,
correct manners, and polite behavior,
captivating whom she will by her own
superior accomplishments of body and
mind, making her decidedly the most
perfect ptece of humanity granted this
earth. The London Truth tlfus compli
ments that bewitching creation, the
American girl;
"Since American girls have become a
part of the life of European watering
places, they have made sad havoc with
the privileged supremacy of their
English sisters. So facinating, indeei,
have been the winning manners and
elegant attire of the American girls at
Trouville this season, that the English
women at that famous summer resort
have become mightily enraged, and have
resolved to taboo them, even as New
port's haughty dames threaten to taboo
the most beautiful of English women."
There is a possibility that cholera
will visit this country, if it reaches
Kuropean ports. Too much precaution
cannot be taken against the fearfnl
scourge, nnd it is time, in view of its
ravages along the Nile, that American
cities were diligent in preparing against
this destroying angel. The government
should rigidly enforce exclusion f
vessels from the Mediterranean, and a
complete system of quarrantino over
goods, baggage, persons, and vessels in
anywise suspected, while every city,
town and family should adopt severe
measures for protection. There is no
time to loose. Now is the time for action
in this matter. The condition of cel
lars, yards, alleys, and streets, should be
made absolutely clean. Juniper trees,
berries, and tar should be burned in
dwellings, attention should be paid to
diet, and everything done that common
sense would dictate as essential to clean
liness, and helpful in preparing the con
stitution to throw off disease. There is
too much tilth in Cheboygan for the
most heathy period, and in view of the
possibility of this frightful disense
reaching this country, we think it
would be opportune and wise for the
authorities to do some effectual work in
cleansing the town. There is not one
reason why this should not be done, and
every reason why it should be doue.
The Pope writes poetry in Latin, aud
whenever much of the religiou or poetry
is done up in a dead language, it is con
sidered harmless, if not appropriate.
Detroit police have raided gambling
deus, and will lesson the evil for a time.
There are other places where the curse
of gambling needs the attention of
police.
Extremes follow. Flooded St. Louis,
according to the Post, is "on the vorge
of a water famine." There are thou
sands in St. Louis who could endure a
water famine so long as whisky is
steady.
The rejuvenated Tilden, in view of
1884, is ready to affirm that he is born
again, but he is born to die, if not
slaughtered in the Democratic conven
tion, the people will kindly save tho
old man of the sea from the weighty
cares of office.
Astronomers claim that cyclones
come because of sun storms and will
appear so long as the raging cause
exists. It does not follow, however, that
furious things generated on earth are
epidemically carried to the sun, or they
would have blizzards whenever a Demo
cratic convention convenes.
"After reading of the sanitary con
dition of Egypt. I'm rather glad they
banished me. Arahi l'anha.
England undertook the management
of matters, including sanitary regu
lations, and if her ships carry germs of
cholera elsewhere, as is reported, this
in addition to her criminal neglect of
Egypt's life will bring upon this gold
worshipping nation severest condem
nation. Dorsky making fight against the im
mortal (iarfleld but shows the madness
of infamy, in one who has been faithless
as a Senator, and corrupt in manifold
practices. The memory of the dead
President can never be blackened by all
the publicly convicted wrongdoers of
earth, and no rightly disposed indi
vidual would be guilty of such treach
erous villainy. Faithful Presidents,
like Lincoln and Garfield, who served
their country and their race, will be
forever revered and loved, though slain
at their post in the discharge of duty.
Mrs. Lang try, the public beauty with
so many homely spots, received in her
unwomanly treatment of her husband,
and her loud conduct with I vulgar ape
of Wall street, is preparing a book on
America. We are told that there is no
end to the making of books, but
the book of this nondescript
woman will bo remarkably small,
appearing in the eyes of the public,
about as small as the authoress, who
has signally failed as an artiste. A
foreign lecturer or actress failing in
tho United States, and wreaking ven
geance through a book is one way of not
finding out what this country thinks of
certain questionable characters who
known nothing of us;
A deaf mute of Mercer county, Ky.,
has invented an electrical instrument
which enables him to hear an ordinary
einversation.
The stats geologist of North Carolina
states that in western North Carolina
there are N peaks above 6000 feet: Oil
between 5,000 and 6,000, and 143 be
tween 4,ooo and 6400, a total of H6
above 4,000 feet.
Miss Susan Turner of New Haven
writes to the Ohio adjutant general that
she was sergeant in the 105th Ohio
volunteers during the war, known as
.Tim. wounded in five battles, and would
like her iension.
There are now oniy three men in the
Dritish Mouse of commons who were
there when Victoria ascended the
throne, 4U years ago. They are Mr. Olad
sone, Mr. Talbot, member for (ilamor
ganshore, and Mr. Villiers, member for
Wolverhampton. Earl Grey is the only
living member of the cabinet that was
in office at that time.
II en l ili in Wealth!
Dr. E. C. West's Nerve and Drain
Treatment: a specific for Hysteria, Diz
ziness, Convulsions, Nervous Headache,
Mental Depression, Loss of Memory,
Spermatorrhea, Impotency, Involuntary
Emmissions, Premature Old Age, caused
by over-exertion, self-abuse, or over-indulgence,
which leads to misery, decay,
and death. One box will cure recent
cases. Each box contains one month's
treatment. One dollar a box or six boxes
for five dollars; sent by mail and prepaid
on receipt of price. vYo guarantee six
boxes to cure any case. With each order
received by us for six boxes, accompanied
by five dollars, we will send the purchas
er our written guarantee to return the
money if the treatment docs not effect
cure, uiiaraiiiees issued oniy wnen
tho treatment is ordered direct from us.
Address: JOHN C. WEST A: ('., Sole
Proprietors, 1S1 A: l8fl Madison St. Chica
go, III. Sold by all druggists.
FRUIT TREES.
. 0. DA VIS, Dealer.
SILL luofe paly as will Bourleli in this cli
mate. I'rm c(l liy nctiuil trial.
neejdenee uum- Cumt liwusc, wu Imhnh
Street 871aotf
in Coal, Salt, Lime, Hair, Hay,
Forwarders, aod Dealers
Land Plaster, Calcine Plaster, Cement, Shingles, &c. Agents for the
following line ot steamers,
Grtimmond's Mftfkinaw Lille Consisting of the popular steamers, At-
lantic, Capt. Nicholson, Master; Flora, Capt. Jones, Master. Tickets for
sale to Cleveland, Toledo, and intermediate points.
Northern Michigan Line consisting of the fine steamers Champlain,
Capt. Casey, Master; Lawrence, Capt. Goo. Thorpe, Master. Tickets
for sale to Chicago, Milwaukee and intermediate ports.
Smith & Adams' North Shore Lille consisting of the elegant steamer
Messenger Capt. E, Bouchard, Master; A. C. Van Raalte, Capt. J. W.
Brown, Master.
Freight received, handled with care and forwarded by each of tlio'
lines, prompt! to destination.
Our Stock of Lime, Hair, Cement, Salt, Land Plaster, Calcine Plaster, Hay, &c
comprises the best in the market, and will be sold as low as the lowest. Call and
ascertain prices before purchasing.
LOW PRICE !
And Good Honest Goods
ARE SURE TO BRING TRADE.
We Have a Large Stock of
OP THE LATENT STYLES WHICH WE WILL SELL POK A
SMALL MARGIN A HOVE COST.
Ladies and Gents' Fine Shoes,
OP EVERY VARIETY. THE REST IN TOWN. NOW IS THE
TIME TO PURCHASE.
A. W. WESTGATE & SON.
store opposite the Postofflce.
PAQUETTS' NEW BLOCK.
Merchant Tailor !
HAS JUST RECEIVED A
Choice Line o
For The Spring Trade. All the Latest Styles of Fancy Mix-
tures For
NOBBY BSINESS SUITINGS.
Fancy Pantings in Different Shades.
11 Fine Line ef French & English Worsteds for Dress Suits.
NEAT DESIGNS FOR
SPRING OVERCOATINGS !
IS THE - DIFFERENT (J HARES.
ca.ll And See tlerr.l
Wagon and Blacksmith Shop !
For Bltcktmithing and Wagon making make
HENRY A. BLAKE,
A call . All Work dOM promptly and on honor. Impairs of all kinds
promptly attended to. First door north of his Foundry, Main
Eroftt, Cheboygan, Mioh.

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