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The advocate. [volume] (Meriden, Kan.) 1889-1892, July 20, 1892, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85029079/1892-07-20/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE .AJDVOCJlTZa
N. R. P. A.
Published every Wednesday by
THE ADVOCATE PUBLISHING CO.
Rooms 43 and 45 Knox Building,
TOPEKA, - KANSAS.
S. McLALLIN,
EDITOB AND BUSINESS MAN AO IB,
$1.00 PEH YEAIt.
ADVERTISING KATES.
Display matter, 20 cents per line, agate meas
urement, (14 lines to the Inch.)
Heading notices, 40 cents per line.
Address all communications to
THE ADVOCATE PUBLISHING CO.,
Topeka, Kansas.
Entered at the post offlce at Topeka, Kansas, as
second class matter.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 1892.
PEOPLE'S PARTY NATIONAL TICKET,
FOR PRESIDENT,
JAMES B. WEAVER,
OF IOWA.
FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
J. G. FIELD,
of vina ini a.
PEOPLE'S PARTY STATE TICKET.
For Associate Justice of the Supreme Court,
STEPHEN II. ALLEN,
rieasantOD, Linn county.
For Oovernor,
L. D. LEWELLINO,
Wichita, Sedgwick county.
For Lieutenant Governor,
PEKCY DANIELS,
Glrard, Crawford county.
For Secretary of State,
It. 8. OSBORNE,
Stockton, Rooks county.
For Auditor,
VAN B. ntATIIER,
Columbus, Cherokee county.
For Treasurer,
W. II. BIDDLE,
Augusta, Butler county.
For Attorney General,
J. T. LITTLE,
0 lathe, Johnson county.
For Superintendent of Public Instruction,
II. N. GAINES,
Sallna, Saline county.
For Member of Congrms.
First District F. J. CLO,Try.
8econd District. ..H. S. Kino, Kansas City.
Third District. ...T. J. Hudson, Fredonla.
Fourth district ... K. V. W h a bto n, Yates Center.
Fifth District John Davih, Junction City.
8Uth District ....Wm. Bakkk, Orworth.
Seventh dlstrlct..JaBBY simi-hon.
Medicine Lodge.
At Large W. A. Harkis, Llnwood.
Tns editor of the Alliance paper at Lawrence
has skipped the country, leaving a number of
his confidential advisers In that city and county
financially worse off than before they made his
acquaintance. Emporia Republican.
He has undoubtedly been reading
the record of Geo. T. Anthony in the
Leavenworth Times, and the exam
ple was too ranch for him.
Republican editors and managers
express much solicitude respecting
soldiers' pensions in case the People's
party should come into power. Should
the People's party get control of the
government, pension claims will be
adjusted on a basis of service in theJ
army and navy of the United States,
and not on a basis of service to any
political party.
GEO. T. ANTHONY'S SPECIAL PLEADING.
We listened to the effort of the
would-be congressman on Thursday
evening last as he endeavored to
demonstrate the blessings of a pro
tective tariff to the American people.
The little unpleasantness at Home
stead, Pa., seemed to embarrass him
somewhat, but he succeeded in wad
ing through the usual platitudes of
such occasions with his characteristic
dexterity as a special pleader.
In speaking of the wages paid to
Homestead employes he mentioned
the price paid to the highest skilled
labor, and he talked to his audience
as though none of them ever read
anything for themselves. Had the
people been totally ignorant of the
facts, and depended upon him for a
statement of them, he would have left
the impression upon his audience that
the employes of the Carnegie works
were all receiving from $250 to $275'
per month. As his audience were
mostly reading people, he succeeded
in demonstrating to the satisfation of
all present his intentional and very
marked unfairness in thus presenting
a one-sided view of the case. Had
he cared to give the facts he might
have presented a scrap of the testi
mony taken by the congressional
committee appointed to investigate
the difficulty.
From the testimony of Mr. Mo-
Luckie, burgess of Homestead, he
might have gained some very inter
esting facts had he been searching
for the simple truth. It seems that
the muoh boasted Bliding scales of
Mr. Carnegie's workmen, which is
supposed to possess such remarkable
elasticity, and to afford the workmen
such fair opportunities to participate
in the profits of the company's busi
ness, is all based upon the price of a
single product of the works steel
billets. As the price of steel billets
should go up the price of labor
should advance, and when the price
of billets should go down the price
of labor should go down.
Having secured the assent of the
workmen to the wonderful "sliding
scale," which was heralded over the
country as a triumph of practical co
operation in the manufacture of
American steel, the magnanimous Mr.
Carnegie, the great philanthropist
and humanitarian, was ready for bus
iness. It seems from the testimony there
had been difficulty on a former occa
sion in the satisfactory anjustment of
the sliding scale which had been set
tled at the time not altogether to the
satisfaction of the company. At this
point we will introduce a little of Mr.
McLuckie's testimony, in order to
give an insight into the business. He
says:
I believe there are three points In It (the new
scale) that differ from the old scale. The first Is
a change In the minimum, the second Is the
change In the ttme of expiration of the scale, and
the third a redaction In wages. The converting
department shut down June 29 on account of a
disagreement between the company and Its em
ployes, I have heard there was some trouble at
the mill occasioned by the attempt to land Pink
erton men, but did not witness the battle. On
Invitation of, the committee to make any state
ment I desire, I wish to be put on record to this
effect: I think it a most gtgantlo conspiracy on
the part of this company and Its representatives,
aided and abetted by vicious legislation, created
with a view of depriving the worklngmen of this
country of their most sacred rights under the con
stitution, of life, liberty and the pursuit of happi
ness. I think that the fact has been pretty
clearly demonstrated, and if an opportunity
were afforded, I think we would have no diffi
culty In establishing the truth.
That opinion Is based on observation and the
preparations, building of fences and bringing In
of Plnkerton guards, and the consequential man
agement of that mllL Three years ago at this
same mill we had trouble of a similar character.
After considerable trouble the firm finally signed
the scale. The capacities of the mill were at
that time quite limited.
Then came the McKlnley tariff bill, reducing
the tariff on the very identical article on which
our wages were based, viz, steel billets, and
raising the tariff on all other articles of produc
tion. It was a gigantic conspiracy to rob the
laboring man of a fair day's wages for a fair
day's work.
The Carnegie company hold the mortgages on
their employes' property to a considerable ex
tent. There are employes who have bank de
posits; to what extent I don't know. Our people,
as a general thing, believing the Plnkertons to
be a horde of cut-throats, thugs and lawless In
vaders, employed in the submission of honest
labor Into accepting the demands of capitalists,
accounts for their dislike of the Plnkertons.
There would have been no reslstence to a law
fully constituted authority of the state. There
has been, however. In the coke region, and In
many other parts of the country.
Judge Taylor here Interposed an objection to
any such "sweeping declarations," as he termed
them.
Mr. Oates Your Idea, then. Is that the com
pany, after having obtained a scale of wages
based on the market value of steel billets, caused
the duty on steel billets to be reduced.
Mr. McLuckle Yes, sir. They shortly con
verted the Duquense works Into a billet plant,
increased the production, flooded the country so
that prices may be reduced, and thus affect our
wages. The Duquense produces large amounts
of billets.
Judge Taylor I understand you to give It as
your opinion as to the cause of reduction on the
selling price of billets. The reduction of the du
ties thereon and the increased production by
this company.
Mr. McLuckle That is the idea exactly, sir.
Question How could this company make more
money by selling their billets cheaper?
Answer Simply because It Is a very small Item
In the productive capacity of their mills.
Question Why should the firm want this re
duction, when they certal nly lose by It.
Answer Because every article produced Is
based on that particular Item of steel billets.
They can do It without the tariff, if they had our
scale signed and our wages based on the prices
of these billets; they could have done much bet
ter than they have done. If they could get the
minimum basis low enough It would pay them to
take all the tariff off.
Question Do you know the difference between
here and England In the price of billets?
Answer I understand 7 difference. There
was a conspiracy by this company to do by legis
lation what they did not succeed In doing with
the deputies three years ago.
Judge Taylor You think this conspiracy con
sisted of who?
Mr. McLuckle I think the Pacific railroad
people were connected.
Question And who else?
Answer n. C. Frlck and the Carnegie Inter
ests. I think there was a large circle If you care
to gather them up.
Question Any members of Congress?
Answer The bill was passed.
Question Then a majority of congress must
have been In it?
Answer I did not say so. I am not here for
the purpose of insulting this committee.
Here is the scheme in a nutshell
Having secured the agreement of the
workmen to the "sliding scale" based
upon the price of steel billets, the
company at once proceeds deliberate
ly and systematically to secure a re
duction in the price of this product
of the works, and, as usual, congress
stands ready to render all needed as
sistance m carrying out the plan.
The first step was to secure a reduc
tion in the duty on steel billets, while
it was increased on all the other
products of the company's manufac
ture. The next step was to convert
the Duquense works into an exclusive
billet plant in order to flood the coun
try with an "overproduction." By
this forced process, a result of delib
erate conspiracy, the price was forced
down and the wonderful "sliding
scale" was made to take a slide down
wards. Mr. Anthony did not think it worth
while to mention these trifling mat
ters, any more than the other unim
portant fact that all the workmen
were not receiving $275 per month
for their services. If the people of
Kansas were not a reading people he
might perhaps deceive enough of
them to gain a respectable vote in the
state; but such deliberate conceal
ment of facts, and evident unfairness
in the treatment of questions of pub
lic interest must forfeit the respect of
intelligent and thinking men and
women.
A PROPOSITION TO MR. BURTON.
In your speech in this city on
Thursday, the 14th inst., we under
stood you to say that the government
cannot make money, and that it was
absolutely necessary for the govern
ment to borrow money to carry on
the war.
If we correctly understood you, we
now offer you the columns of The
Abvocate to any reasonable extent to
prove these propositions. We deny
that there is any other authority un
der the constitution of the United
States to make money than the au
thority of the government.
We deny that there is any other
American money in existence except
that which has been made by this
authority.
We deny that the government ever
borrowed a single dollar to carry on
the war after the first six months
from its beginning.
We deny that a single dollar of the
interest bearing bonds of the United
States were ever issued to obtain
money to carry on the war.
We challenge you to prove your
propositions. This is a campaign of
argument, you know, Mr. Burton.
Please give us your proofs.
WHAT THE PROHIBITIONISTS THINK OF
FARMER SMITH.
We clip the following from the pro
ceedings of the recent Prohibition
convention in this city:
Mrs. S. F. Grubb, of Lawrence, president of
the W. C. T. U. of Kansas, offered the following
resolution:
Resolved, That as a logical conclusion we feel
less faith in the proposed "enforcement of the
prohibitory law" by the Republican party II they
succeed in electing their ticket from the fact
that the man who heads It, A. Yf. Smith, delib
erately insulted ex-Governor St. John for the
sole reason of his being, and because he was the
apostle of prohibition, and through him the Pro
hibitionists of Kansas. He did this when he In
troduced the measure into the state legislature
to change the name of the county called after St.
John.
The resolution was received with cheers, and
was adopted unanimously.
WATCH THEM.
The Advocate gave the warning
last week that this state was being
colonized for the purpose of defeating
the will of our citizens at the coming
election. A clipping from the Kansas
Commoner, published in another col
umn of this issue, shows that Wichita
has received an installment from Ten
nessee. Watch these fellows. They
have been brought here for corrupt
purposes. No former resident of an
other state can gain a residence that
will entitle him to vote at the coming
election. Challenge every devil of
them and see that they do not vote.

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