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The Liberal democrat. (Liberal, Kan.) 1911-1924, February 03, 1921, Image 8

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1921
THE LIBERAL DEMOCRAT
LEGION POST AND AUXIL
IARY HARD TO BEAT
TOPEKA, Feb. 3. A good live
American Legion post and a Women's
' Auxiliary, in those towns whose posts
are fortunate enough to have an aux
iliary and they now number 95 in
. Kansas is a combination hard to
beat when it comes to community bet
terment. Take Kingman as a per
tinent example. .Kingman with some
2500 inhabitants was without any
central place for meetings or social
affairs, and this conditions was par
ticularly apparent on the return of
the service men.
A memorial hall was planned but
through lack of funds that was a
matter of future benefit. Rather
than await such time, the American
Legion and the Auxiliary proceeded
to select a committee of eight, four
from each body, and in short order
things began to move. In two weeks
time $1300 had been contributed by
public-spirited business and profes
sional men of the city-an empty store
had been converted to suit their
needs and the club was opened with
a house-warming at which were do
nated many useful articles such as;
lounges, chairs, fables, books, pil
lows, pictures and plants, and even
including a range and dishes for the
kitchen.
From its inception this club has
been a leading factor in the town's
socisil life, for while administered
by the joint Legion-Auxiliary com
mittee, it is open to the public and
is known nt "The American Legion
Community Club." The club is used
as a meeting place for both the
Legion and the Auxiliary. The rooms
ore open daily from one until eleven
o'clock, nnd are in charge of matrons.
Games, cards and dancing nre indul
ged in, smoking is permitted; and the
thanks of the parents for providing a
wholesome place of recreation for
their sons and daughters nre con
sidered ample reward by the mem
bers of the committee who made this
community center possible. This plan
will no doubt be followed by other
posts nnd their auxiliaries through
out the state.
FROM HERE AND THERE
(By International Nbwb Service)
The Republic of Mexico celebrates
nineteen legal holidays.
Joseph S. Boggs, state highway en
gineer of Kentucky, has made the
statement that poor ronds cost the
state $25,000,000 a year.
The third finger of the left hand
(the wedding ring finger) is said to
be the first finger that a new-born
babe is able to move and the last of
which a dying person loses control.
Motor fire apparatus patented by
a Philadelphia inventor elevates a
cage at the end of a tower from
whiph .streams of water can he di- i
rected or persons resrued from burn-1
Ing buildings. I
The Australian sheep dogs nre the
smallest in the world, but are quick
and livelv. One dog can do the I
work of half a dozen men.
A Chelsea, England, patient has
died in Hanwell Asylum. She was
sent there forty-one years ago. Her
maintenance cost the Chelsea guar
dians more than $0,000.
Do You Know Him?
When a man can sit calmly with
out either blushing, grinning or
clearing his throat, while the toast
master is introducing him, be may
yet be said to have poise;
Some Enlargement
Each separate photograph on a
motion picture film is under one
square inch in size. This means that
when the picture is thrown on the
screen, 20x22. feet in size, it is mag
nified more than 63,000 times.
Deadly War Weapon
Among the latest war terrors is a
submarine tank, perfected by the
French. It is able to crawl along
river and lake beds and suddenly ap
' pear in the midst of an enemy to
open fire with powerful guns.
ICE FLOES DEMORALIZE
SHIPPING IN N. Y. HARBOR
NEW YORK, Feb. 3. Traffic in
New York harbor' was demoralized
yesterday when immense ice floes
floated down from the north rivers.
Dozens of small boats were sunk at
their moorings.
The ice field was the largest ever
sen here, ferries were delayed, ships
were torn from their moorings and
traffic was completely paralyzed. .
..
SUBMARINE WAS RAMMED
BUT BEACHED SAFELY
(Br International News Service)
- WASHINGTON, Feb. 3. The Am
erican submarine L-l was rammed by
the pilqtboat Philadelphia near Cape
May yesterday evening. The engine
room was flooded and the machinery
damaged, but the vessel beached.
The commander reports the crew
safe.
SEE GERMANY IN TRADE WAR OF 1921
ALREADY MAKING INROADS ON BRITISH
GERMAN TRADE KINGS ARE PLANNING BIG INVASION OF WORLD
MARKETS AND WILL DUMP GOODS AT EXTREMELY LOW
PRICES BRITAIN IS TAKING STEPS TO PROTECT HER MAIN
INDUSTRIES UNITED STATES WILL SOON HAVE TO ACT.
' (By International News Service)
WASHINGTON, Feb. ,3. Look
out for Germany in the trade war of
1921. The hand of the German
trader is beginning to show renewed
cunning in world markets. The bold
plan of German trade kings is to
dump goods at lower prices than
domestic makers can sell them. Cheap
labor makes it possible for Germany
to do this, and her purpose to direct
a price-cutting campaign of unpre
cedented scope in all parts of the
world is plainly revealed by latest
advices to government officials from
trade and fiscal agents abroad.
England is now feeling the force
of this German effort to crowd Brit
ish goods out' of British markets.
German commodities in many line'
are being delivered in London and
other English centers at prices con
siderably lower than the cost of Brit
ish manufacture. Secretary of Com
merce Alexander was informed by
Consul Clairbourne - that rare lace ;
of German origin are being offercl
for Mile in Nottingham at prices low
er than the cost of manufacture in
that irreat center of the British lace
industry. German products over a
wide rarge are being sold on British
mark at equally low figures. As
a result sharp competition is setting
in bcl'.veen the British and German
makers.
Prices Below Cost.
The German in many instances
are selling below cost to regain some
of the trade prestige lost by the
war. The drive by the -Germans
has become so daring that Colonel
Clairbourne reported thnt the British
government is giving serious consid
eration to a plan to bar certain Ger
man imports until exchange reaches
normnl.
Ability of the German manufac
turers to dump goods-elsewhere and
undersell other competing nations is
seen in the fact that German work
men nre being paid at the rate of
from 250 to 400 marks a week, rang
ing from $4 to $6 in American coin.
Britain" plans to protect certain "key"
'AMERICA'S CRIME WAVE
REACTION FROM WAR"
Detective Burns, Probably World's
Greatest Criminologist, Discusses
Crime Situation .
(By International News Service)
COLUMBUS, Ohio, Feb. 3. "Am-
I erica's crime wave is a reaction from
the "big war," according to William
.1. Burns, head of the Burns Detective
Agency, New York City. Burns came
to Columbus to spend a few days
with relatives, and this is the state-
mcnt he made when interviewed,
"This crime wave is manifest in
all the countries thnt engaged in the
war nnd is a chronological rather
than a racial, or biological, out-cropping
of criminality," Burns contin
ued. "I think this so-called crime wave
will continue through the winter.
"Thousands of men, displaced by
military service, the tenor of their
ways disturbed, have resorted to
crime as a means of gaining their
living. We must bear with it. It has
been thus since the time of the
Romans."
ADD TO BRITISH OPTIMISTIC
(Bv International New 8ervlee)
LONDON, Feb. 3. British offic
ials are expressing optimistoc feelings
regarding the settlement of the Ger
man indemnity question.
In official circles it is thought that
a satisfactory solution of the question
will be reached despite the opposition
aroused by Germany.
' It is said that no German counter
proposals will be considered unless
they are similar to the demands of
the allies.
German officials do not take kind
ly to the terms submitted to them,
but it is thought thnt sufficient pres
sure can be brought to bear to com
pel acceptance of the agreement for
mulated by the allied powers.
FOR RENT
6120 acre cattle ranch in Beaver
county, Oklahoma, three miles from
Knowles, on the Cimarron river. 600
acres in cultivation; good improve
ments. Address
M. SARGENT,
Cathedral Apt. 500,
dl68-1175c Wichita, Kansas
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL NOTES
The boys have been scanning our
building with an anxious eye to see
it shimmie but so far it hasn't even
made an attempt.
Miss Brink, addressing geography
clas: "Do they raise much coal in
Norway and Sweden?" . v
industries against the inflow of Ger.
man cheap marked products. This
is to protect her industries and pre
vent idleness among her workmen.
Slowing down of British industry has
resulted in part from the German im
portations, and caused many thous
ands to be thrown out of work.
The Treasury Department, watch
ing the financial aspects of this com
mercial drive by Germany, places
much importance upon the fact that
German industries are gradually re
cuperating with better facilities for
obtaining raw materials. An impor
tant factor, too, they say, in the Ger- j
man trade situation, is that the unit
of productive power among German
workmen is higher than that of many
leading countries at this time. Ger
man employers and workmen, they
are advised, find they are no longer
able to ask and obtain top prices.
An entirely different trade standard
in Germany, officials say, will re
sult from the new methods for fixing
the wages and profits and individual
producers,' and with increased ability
to secure raw materials and semi
manufactures. "
Officials reviewing the German
trade invasion in other fields, partic
ularly Britain, declare that while
it is a serious question affecting for-!
eign trade policy, it has had the im
mediate effect of forcing down the
artificial commodity level in British'
home markets. American officials
expect that the same German tactics
will be irt evidence in the United
States soon after formal proclama
tion of peace nnd full restoration of
trade relations. It will present almost
immediately an issue of the highest
importance for the American- Con
gress to handle- The demand will be
raised by industries encountering
this severe form of German compe
tition, that Congress must act to pro
tect them from ruin. The effect of
German "dumping" in the United
States upon the labor market might
be disastrous, especially in some of
the industries in which the pre-emi
nence she held before the w;r.
RAILROADS ARE CUTTING
FORCES OVER COUNTRY
The fact that the Rock Island is
cutting off many employees in the
local yards is not really a sign of
hard times according to a railroad
At-!
man or u.,s c.ly !
According to this gentleman, who
is in position to know, a lot of em-
ployees were added during the gov-
ernment control whose duties were I
merely to create a multiplicity of red j
tape, yet who Jiad no active part in J
the work of the roads. i
While it was claimed that not !
enough men could be secured to run I
the roads many new positions were j
created and filled. His idea of the j
matter is that the railroad manage- j
ment did this to increase the operat- j
ing expense to discredit government !
control.
Now that the roads are back in i
private hands these men are being ;
dispensed with, and his conclusion is j
that the roads are merely getting I
back to a pre-war help basis, the un-
necessary employee being turned off j
in the interest ""of economy. .
He is authority for the statement j
that no men are being laid off in the j
operating department for the reason
that none can be spared, and only the j
figureheads being dispensed with. I
If this be true the fact should '
cause no concern. If the roads are j
merely returning to a pre-war help
basis the laying off "of men cannot be i
contributed to "hard times'" but j
merely conservative management.
PERSHING TALKS ON
DISARMAMENT PROGRAM
Veteran Soldier Says Unsafe to Dis
arm Uuless International Agree
ment Reached
(By International Newa Service)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 3. General
J." J. Pershing yesterday appeared
before the House naval affairs com
mittee, rfhd in the course of his talk
stated it'would be unwise and unsafe
for America to disarm and interna
tional agreement could be for limit
ing armament.
VICE-PRESIDENT MARSHALL
IS AN ''EXPERT LOAFER"
(By International Newa Service)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 3, Here is
one man who announces himself as
an "expert loafer" and it is Vice
President Marshall,
The Vice-President made this con
fession at the annual banquet of the
Monday Evening Club here:
"I am the most expert loafer in
America, and also preside oyer a body
of experts."
HENRY FORDSON'S DOWN
BUT CARS NOT REDUCED
The price of the Fordson tractor
has been reduced $140, but accord
ing to the announcement, there will
be no cut in the price of the cars or
trucks.
The Liberal Auto Supply Company
has received notice of the reduction
in Fordson's. and have priced their
stock at the new quotation.
This cost should make business pick
up in the Fordson line, as this popu
lar implement of farming was consid
ered a good buy at the original price.
Val eole, salesman of the Michelin
Tire Company, was here Tuesday,
calling on the Tire Hospital on West
Second street.
Local nimrods- report the arrival
of wild duck in this part of Kansas.
A few mallard were seen on the Cim
arron river just north of town yes
terday. The birds seemed unusually
tame, according to the hunter, and he
could have slaughtered several of
them had. he chosen. About the first
of February the mallard and a few
green wing teal begin their flight for
the north, where they nest during
the summer. They are soon followed
by the pin tail, but this latter duck
holds back as a usual thing, until
there is a break in the weather far
ther north. When the wild geese make
their appearance in this part of the
country, it Is a sure sign that our
cold weather is at an end, but that
will likely be several weeks yet. Be
fore you go hunting for duck it will
be a wise thing for you to call .on
the county clerk and obtain a li
cense. The set "Books of Knowledge" is
appreciated by all.
A cup of Seal Brand Coffee at the
Star Grocery Friday and Saturday
afternoon. Served by the Ladies Food
Sale Committee.
TYRONE ROUTE TWO .
Mrs. Ireland and son, Floyd, and
Mr. and Mrs. Newman spent Friday
evening at the O. P. Bookless home.
Clyde, Carpenter has been sick for
sever:. 1 days.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Jay Fleming have
been visiting the Harrison families.
Rev. Fooshee, wife afld two child
ren visited with the O. P. Bookless
family last Sunday.
Geo. Bookies and wife spent Saturday-
night at Walter Scott's.
John McAlister and family spent
Monday at Claude Carpenter's.
Quite a number from here attend
ed the Equity rally and dinner at
Tyrone Saturday. A nice time and
a good dinner is reported.
;
Is that good old
battery of
TO bring back its snappy motor-spinning power may
require only a skillful repair. No matter what your
battery's make, bring it in for Golden Rule Service.
We don't have to sell a fixed number of batteries each
month; that's not the USL Policy. Often when a man
thinks his battery is done for and wants to buy a new
USL, we show him how he can save money. . We repair
his battery and give him an adjustment guarantee for
eight "months. That is Golden Rule SERVICE, -
We are expert at keeping electrical systems in tune so they
will treat batteries right. It is important to remember this.
We sell only the USL Battery, which has long life
Machine-Pasted Plates. USL Batteries are shipped to
us "Dry-Charged." This avoids all before-sale deterio
ration and you are assured a perfect battery with every
bit of its life intact
If you haoe trouble with your automobile battery and require recharg
ing or repairing, come to us at once and enjoy our Qolden Rule Servkt
Liberal
Soulb Kansas Avenue '
' -s Liberal, Kansas
TION, WHICH WILL SET INDIA IN REVOLT
EXTREMISTS FANNING FLAMES OF SEDI-
SIR MICHAEL O'DWYER, FORMER GOVERNOR OF THE PUNJAB,
UTTERS WORD OF WARNING AND ASSERTS RIGOROUS MEAS
URES MUST BE TAKEN TO CURB AGITATORS WHO. WITH
ENORMOUS FUNDS AT THEIR COMMAND, ARE CARRYING ON A
CAMPAIGN OF DANGEROUS PROPAGANDA. , '
By William L. Mallabar
(By International News Service)
LONDON, Feb. - 3. "Extremists
are setting India ablaze."
"The time for toying with sedition
in this vast Empire is passed."
"The. law must be rigorously and
impartially applied.
"Sedition is being preached
throughout the country and unless
the authorities wake up the fire will
gain such control that it will be al
most impossible to subdue it.".
These are but a few of the start
ling statements madghv Sir Michael
O'Dwyer, formej: Governor of the
Punjab, in a series of articles he has
written on Indian unrest for a prom
inent London newspaper.
"Of the three hundred millions in
India not 1 per cent have any know
ledge of English and only 6 per cent
can write their name in any lan
guage," is another of O'Dwyer's as
sertions. "The agitators with enormous
funds are carrying on their propagan
da. Some of them being in the pay of
foreign governments; while on the
other ide, the Government which is
now paralyzed by the 'Indian mem
bers, is helpless as it does not possess
strong men at the helm.
Extremists Have Power.
"The extremists are saying thafj
they will make our rule in India im
possible, which is quite within their
power" is an extract given by O'Dwy
er from a letter of a European plant
er, which adds: "I would prefer to
live in a purely native state than in
India, supposed to be governed by
us, but in reality governed by extre
mist agitators."
Gandhi is the man to whom the
Ango-Indians point as the main
cause of unrest in India at the pres
ent moment and O'Dwyer denounces
him as a "scheming, revolutionary fa-
Frect Harrison and family and
Floyd Hook left Thursday for Okla
homa county, where they went to
take Gladys rfook to her home. She
has been staying with her .sister, Mrs.
Elsie Harrison for some time.
Mrs. Fern Fleming, Ruby and Tol
liver Harrison took dinner at Delt
Harrison's Sunday. The E. A. Stroup
family called in the afternoon.
Virgil Akers and family of Tyrone,
spent Sunday -at Clyde Carpenter's.
Next Sunday will be educational
All our repairs
- on arty make
of batter - are
guaranteed for
6 mqngk&
yours getting balky?
Oil & Supply Company
natic." , . -
"It can be stated with certainty
that the present extremist movement
is heading straight for the disorgani
zation of trade and commerce and for
the ruin of every British. interest. It
is for anarchy and rebellion and the
one way to meet it and break this
movement is to enforce the law irre
spective of persons, class or caste,"
continues O'Dwyer. v
"All those who are heading the
revolutionary conspiracy Gandhi,
the Ali brothers and Sagput Rai
should be dealt with under the law
before it is too'late." -Gaining
Popular Support.'
"The masses of the Indian'popula
tion expect and they hace a right to
expect a just and firm government
which will maintain order nad pro
mote prosperity. Now they see order
and prosperity threatened seriously
and are at a loss to understand how
how such things can be. They are
being slowly alienated for Gandhi's
latest program is' mainly addressed to
the simple and credulous classes."
Sir Charles McLeod, senior part
ner of the firm of McLeod & Com
pany, of Calcutta, Bombay and New
York, adds his voice to -the demand
for the suppression of Gandhi. ' .
MsLeod has spent many yesrs of
his life in India. He vas for thirty
years in Begnl and is now chairman .
of the East India section of the Lon
don Chamber of Commerce. He says:
"Gandhi and all his kind ought to
have ben put under lock and key long,
since. This is not oly my private
opinion of the arch agitator and all
his works; it is the opinion of the
Indian trading community itself.
"The Indian merchant doesn't want
politics that are going to ruin hia
business. The Gandhis are out for
nothing but their own hand and the.
Indian merchat knows it."
some special music and a good ser
day at Crescent. A short program
mon will be the order of service.
Let all who will, come.
Rev. Fooshee and wife visited at
Dan Wilking's Monday. '
Mrs. Leslie Hood was operated on .
last week. Her friends .hop for a
speedy recovery.
Dave Ireland and family, Mr. and
Mrs. C. A. Newman and George Mor
row spent Saturday evening at A.
Stroup's.' -
as
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Telephone 101
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