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The Liberal democrat. [volume] (Liberal, Kan.) 1911-1924, December 14, 1922, Image 19

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85029856/1922-12-14/ed-1/seq-19/

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TIES Un&RAL DEMOCRAT
'has
t.
.fi
ll y
Miss Kinnie Stitt was unable to
-meet her classes in high school Fri
day on account of Illness. Miss Ha
cel Bcandrett acted M abatftuM.
Cham. Keating who was badly
burned last week when a kettle of
hot beef broth scalded his face and
hands ,1s retting alonf nicely.
IN TROUBLE THROUGH
. ISSUING BAD CHECK
Take The Weather
As It Comes
'".) ' ..
Growling at the sky is poor and unprofitable
Business
Make the Best of Your Time
Save while you have the opportunity and the help
of others. Keep company with those who save,
and you will soon be saving your earnings. Many
of our well-to-do patrons started with small ac
counts at first Wh they did you can do.
Don'f Delay Any Longer
Ctkdebal DESERVE
- aeWsYSTEMu
The First National
Bank
"Get the Desire to Save, the Habit Will
Grow."
Claud Baker was arrested this week
! charged with issuing a bad check and
' his case was heard in justice court,
where he had some difficulty Convinc
ing the justice and county attorney
that he had no intention of commit
'ting fraud when he gave" the check.
The facts shotted that Me gave it in
July, and, although the' holder of the
check had written him several times
and he had been-notified at least once
by the justice that an action might
i come at any time, Mr. Baker had de
liberately ignored all and "just let
, them wait." On this statement of
1 facts the justice was of the opinion
1 that, since he had not mada the
I slightest effort to take up the check
he must have intended to let it de
i fault in the first place. Mr. Baker
I was facing a jail sentence of thirty
. days as a consequence and would
Bring or send US your
WATCH
CLOCK AND
JEWELRY
REPAIRING
We get your work done
PROMPTLY and guaran
tee our work to be SATIS
FACTORY. Give us a trial We
know we. con please you.
STONER JLY. CO.
At Wiley's
LIBERAL, .KAN.
have had it given him but for the
intervention of his banker, who prov
ed to the satisfaction of the court that
the defendant had arranged for tak
ing up all harvest checks, but the
bank had been unable to handle them
and had been obliged to turn some
of them back. Mr. Baker was per
mitted to pay the check and all costs,
and thereupon released. ' I
. Under the law, the maker of a
bad cheek may have the action
abated if he proves that he had a
deposit or credit with the bank with
in thirty days previous and that his
behavior toward the obligation since
it' accrued was that of a man who
intended to make good ; plus the pay
ment of the check and all costs.
The mere deposit is not sufficient
The, judge must be able to find that
the defendant made some effort aft
er receiving notice; or be justified in
concluding that the check was given
with fraudulent' intention.
Mr Baker escaped sentence by
the merest scratch The next case
that comes along may not fare so
well. Kingman Journal '
PIE AND CANDY SOCIAL
There will be a pie and candy so
cial at the Liberty School house, five
miles north of the city Friday, Dec.
22. Mrs. Earl Graham, teacher of
the school, gives the information that
an interesting program is being pre
pared and everyone is invited to go
and take a pie and candy. The pro
ceeds will go to the benefit of the
school.
Misses Mary Elizabeth and Olive
Stevesson of Pratt, visited several
days this week at the home of their
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Mc-Dermott.
Miss Velma Bond arrived Friday
night from Rose Hill, Kan., where she
has been visiting with relatives for
several weeks "
"Rita it with Ray."
RAILROADS AND STATE
. MAKE A COMPROMISE
Compromise between the state j
board of equalization and the Rock
Island and Frisco railroads in tax
litigation which for months has tied
up public funds in fifty-five counties
in which these two raliroads operate,
was reached Tuesday afternoon. i
The case was settled on the follow
ing basis of total tax valuation in the
fiscal year, 1922-23: Rock Island,
$42,000,000; . Frisco, $46,025,000.
The figure the board attempted to
certify to the counties arid which met
with a bitter protest from the rail
roads, were: Rock Island, $18,250
000 J Frisco, $52,625,000.
Attorneys for the roads announced
they would ask the federal district
court to dismiss injunction proceed
ings against the board, restraining it
from certifying the valuations to the
counties.
This action will, immediately re
lease the funds for the counties which
have been tied up.
Upon receipt of the certificates of
valuation from the state board of
equalization the county excise board
will meet and establish the levy for
this county It will then be possible
for the assessor's office to figure the
tax.
Just how long it will be before the
valuation certificates are received is
problematical, but it is generally thot
there will be very little delay As
soon as the necessary preliminary
work is set aside, the county assessor
will begin work " on figuring the
taxes for the county. It will be im
possible for this work to be completed
before the first of the year when the
new officers will take their places in
the court house, it is said. Guymon
Herald.
Mrs. S. E. Loomis left Friday for
Nara Visa, New Mexico, where she
will visit for some time at the Imme
of her son.
AUTO OVERTURN PROVES ,
'FATAL TO THE DRIVER
Charles H Dinger of Belmont
township,-died Thursday of injuries
received in the overturn of his car
.the Monday previous. The funeral
j services were held Sunday at the
Methodist church of Zenda, by Rev.
j E. M. Ely of Pretty Prairie, an old
friend of the family, and Rev. W, H.
Patterson of Zenda, and burial made
in the Cleveland cemetery. The Ma
j sonic lodge had charge of the hnrial
service.
Mr. Dinger, accompanied by his
wife and their son Wiltard, had gone
to the home of a daughter, Mrs.
Ethan Gracey who was very ill. Mrs.
Dinger remained to care for her and
he and his son started home. A
quarter of a mile or so south of the
Gracey place he came to a small
bridge where he somehow lost con
trol or the car and it swerved to the
side and went off turning completely
over and pinning Mr. Dinger be
' neath Vilard was thrbwn. clear.
Mr. Dinger sustained some internal
injuries in the chest and abdomen,
which at first did not threaten to be
serious, but in the course of a few
days brought on his death. Kingman
Journal.
WORK STOPS ON THE
K. & O. RAILROAD
PAMI AND VAlMSi PRODUCTS
Protect Your Home from
the World's Worst Vandals
pHEIR names are Wear, Warp, and Rot.
They steal, they mar, they bend, they break.
They leave behind them a trail of ugliness and ruin.
Fire does far less damage than they.
At a hundred places in your home where there are
bare, or poorly painted surfaces, these vandals are
robbing you night and day.
Stop their destructiveness ! Shield your property !
Protect your walls, floors and furniture with paint
and varnish products. As long as the paint and
varnish coating is sound, Wear, -Warp, and Rot are
powerless
The cost of painting is trivial compared with the loss
caused by this constant vandalism. And when you
buy paint and varnish iducts, buy only the best, as
the better the paint the greater the return.
Devoe Products are time-tested and proven, backed
by the 168 years' experience of the oldest paint manu
facturing concern in the U. S. Founded 1754.
Yocum Hardware Co.
Liberal,
Kansas
, All. work of construction has stop
ped on the Kansas & Oklahoma rail
road in east Stevens. The first three
. miles of road has been completed up
to the new townsite of Woods. About
a mile west of Woods the grade was
built and then the company confront
ed their first difficulty in the way of
securing right-of-way. The land
owners here refused to allow the road
; i-ight-of-way without remuneration.
The graders then moved to the Trav
ers ranch where right-of-way was
given through this property. As we
i understand the situation this is about
I all of the right-of-way that will be
' donated. The balance of the way,
' something like tun or twelve miles.
will have to be bought. Several ru
mors are going the rounds as to the
future outcome of the road. The re
maining distance to Hugoon, the
road as scheduled, passes through a
lot of valuable farms, and in one in
stance a set of improvements must
be moved This is also through that
part of the township where the farm
ers were opposed to the bond issue,
so it is expected that the right-of-way
problem will be stubbornly fought.
Hugoton Hermes.
SOONER WHEAT IS SOLD
TO GENOA, ITALY
Prevent this Destruction by Using
DEVOE MARBLE FLOOR FINISH VARNISH. A pale, clear, translu.
cent elastic varnish for uie on floors.
DEVOE PALE INTERIOR VARNISH. A brilliant, durable varnish
. that dries with glass-like smoothness for use on interior upright surface.
. DEVOE VELOUR FINISH. A flat, washable oil paint for use on walb
r and ceilings. .
H Kansas 2A
First sale of Oklahoma wheat to
Genoa, Italy, was made this week
when two boat loads were sold f. o. b.
New Orleans, according to D. B. Sib
ley, sales manager of the Southwest
Wheat Growers' Association, who
made the sale.
The wheat was 11 raised in Okla
homa and pooled by the Oklahoma
Wheat Growers' Association. The
market was very favorable at the
time the wheat was disposed of and
was sold direct to exporters. The
two boats contained 16,000 bushels of
wheat.
Much of the wheat is sold direct to
cereal manufacturers, exporters, for
eign countries, and in this manner the
beBt prices are obtained by the South
west Wheat Growers' Association,
the sales agency through which the
Oklahoma and Texas wheat is mar
keted. Forgan Eagle.
EVERY TOWN HAS ONE.
A liar.
A sponger.
A smart aleck.
A blatherskite.
Some pretty girls.
Some not so pretty.
A girl who giggles.
A weather prophet.
A neighborhood feud.
A woman who tattles.
A justice of the peace.
A man who knows it all.
One Jacksonian Democrat
More loafers than it needs.
Men who see every dog fight.
A boy who cuts up in church.
A few meddlesome old women. .
A stock law that is not enforced.
A few that know how to run the
affairs of the county.
A grown young man who laughs
every time he says anything.
A girl who expects a letter every
time the train comes in.
Lots of people who know how to
run the county paper.
Exchange.
Miss Viola Wyatt returned,.Friday
to Plains, after visiting here several
days with friends.
Miss Alma Pile spent the week end
with her parents here. Miss Pile is
teaching in the schools at Hooker.
Clara Carson left last week for
Wichita and Hutchinson where she
expects to visit for several weeks.
Mrs. 'Earl Graham was shopping
here Friday evening.

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