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Hutchinson gazette. [volume] (Hutchinson, Kan.) 1895-1902, September 26, 1895, Image 2

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IRELAND ' FOEEVEK.
IRISH NATIONAL SOCIETIES
IN CONVENTION.
Fifteen Hundred Delegate Meet In Chi
cago and D Incase the Best Mean of
Helping- the People of the Green Isle
Reviving Interest In the Came.
Chicago, Sept. 24. The great na
tional convention of Irish societies
was opened in the Young Men's Chris
tian association hall at 10 o'clock this
morning, wish a large representation
of Irishmen from all parts of the
country. John T. Keating, the secre
tary of the Ancient Ore er of Hiber
nians, and secretary of the local re
ception committee, estimates that
there are fully 1,500 delegates in
attendance.
The convention will last three days.
One general object is the formation of
a united open organization for the
furtherance of the Irish cause. Those
who issued the call for the convention
claim that it is not contemplated that
physical force shall be used or advised
in the attainment of the independency
of the Irish people as a nation unless
such means be deemed absolutely
necessary, and the object in view be
probable of attainment. It is believed
the convention will serve to revive in
terest and infuse new life into the
Irish cause, both in America and Great
Britain.
CONSULAR SERVICE.
It la Placed Under Civil Service Rules by
the President.
Washington, Sept 24. The presi
dent, by an executive order, issued
to-day but dated Sept. 20, has extend
ed the civil service system in a modfled
form, to all consular officers whose
compensation directly and through
fees ranges from 81 ,000 to 82,600. This
will include about one-half of the total
number of consuls who receive more
than 81,000. This change has been
gained by reviving in substance an old
order of 1M3.
Vacancies in the service will be
filled hereafter by transfer or promo
tion, by appointment of qualified
persons formerly in the employ of the
state department and by appointment
of persous selected by the president
after passing a non-competitive exam
ination. The Next House Not for Silver.
New Yohk, Sept. 24. The sound
money committee of the chamber of
commerce, of which ex-Congressman
Joseph C. Hendricks is the head, has
made a poll of the next house of rep
resentatives on the money question.
The list records eighty-eight members
for free silver, 21ti opposed to free
silver and fifty-two whose views are
not known. Of the eighty-eight put
down for free silver, thirty are Repub
licans, fifty-one Democrats and seven
Populists.
Would Disbar Loomis.
Ciiilmcothe, Mo., Sept. 24. A great
sensation was created in this city
when it was announced that disbar
ment proceedings had been begun in
the circuit court against Charles A.
Loomis, a prominent attorney and
member of the law firm of Davis,
Loomis and Davis, and late Republi
can candidate for congiess in the Sec
ond district. The charge is attempted
subordination of perjury.
Pneumatic Guns in California.
San Francisco, Sept. 24. The
United States government is now able
to blow out of the water at a day's no
tice a whole hostile fleet that might
attempt to enter the Golden Gate, the
battery of big pneumatic dynamite
guns ordered for the defense of this
port a year or more ago having ad
vanced so far toward completion that
two of the guns can be effectively fired
with only twenty-four hours prepara
tion. Holmes' Trial Date Plied.
Philadelphia, Sept. 24. Herman
E. Mudgett, alias II. II. Holmes, was
arraigned before Judge Finletter in
the sourt of oyer and terminer to-day
on the indictment charging him with
the murder of Benjamin F. Pietzel
September 2, 1894. He pleaded not
guilty.
General Schofleld to Retire.
New Yokk, Sept. 24. Lieutenant
General John M. Schofleld will retire
as commander-in-chief of the army on
September 29, and Nelson A. Miles will
at once move to Washington as senior
major general in command.
Hot Springe Hotel ill Ashe.
Hot Springs, Ark., Sept. 21. A fire
here early this morning destroyed the
Pacific hotel, the Crescent house, the
Valley livery stables, the Jewish syn
agogue and five cottages in the rear
of the Pacific hotel, causing losses of
850,000.
Deputy Sheriff Shot Down.
Pise Bluff, Ark. Sept. 24. Deputy
Sheriffs Harris and Stifft of Arkansas
county were shot dead near England,
Loneoke county, while attempting to
arrest an escaped prisoner named
Lacy.
Mines at Fall Blast.
Shamokin, Pa., Sept. 24. The seven
Beading mines in the Shamokin dis
trict have been put on full time until
further notice. Five thousand em
ployes will receive S-5,000 additional
wages on account of this action.
Counterfeiting In a Penitentiary.
Frankfort, Ky., Sept 24. The dis
covery of counterfeiting money has
been made in the Kentucky peniten
tiary. Warden George has moulds he
took from Convict Dillard of Catletts
bursr. The denominations are nickels,
dimes and quarters.
Judge Maxwell AceepU.
Fremont, Neb. Sept 24. Judge
Maxwell, who was nominated by me
Populist convention for the supreme
aonrt Via arpftnted. Ha insists on
accepting the nomination, not at a
Populist, but on a non-partisan oasis.
CHICKAMAUGA PARK.
The Hlstorle Battlefield Dedicated to the
Brave of America.
CnATTAN00QAfcTenn., Sept. 20. One
of the most notable battlefields of the
world that of Chickamauga was
dedicated yesterday as park for the
edification of the American people for
all time. The dedication was conduct
ed by men who, thirty-two years ago,
fought on that field. Two generals,
with silver gray hair, who headed
thousands of men in the affray on op
posite sides, made the principal
speeches at the dedication. They .were
Generals John M. Palmer and John B.
Gordon.
The ceremonies took place at S nod-
grass hill, whose sides for a mile were
so thickly covered with dead thirty
two years ago that the survivors say
one could have walked from crest to
base, stepping from one prostrate body
to another. Fifty thousand people,
most of them veterans, witnessed the
exercises.
Governor W. h. Upham of Wiscon
sin, while going up lookout mountain,
stopped upon the skirt of his daugh
ter's dress, causing him to fall. One
leg was broken.
DUN'S WEEKLY REVIEW.
Wheat Advancd About Two Cents, and
Dropped Cent.
New York, Sept 23. R. G. Dun &
Ca's weekly review of trade says: In
spite of gold exports wheat advanced
for some days, in all nearly two cents,
mainly because a single speculator
bought, but on Friday fell about one
cent. Corn rose and foil in sympathy
with wheat, with as little reason.
Western wheat receipts for three
weeks of September have been 10,791,
660 bushels against 10,491,62'.' last
year, while Atlantic exports (flour in
cluded) have been 3,041,693 bushels
against 7,021,986 last year.
Good reports of foreign crops, weak
ness of flour in Minnesota and large
exports of flour from this country, all
work against a rise in wheat, though
scarcity of contract grades may help a
speculative advance. Pork products
have been reusonably yielding, with
prospects of a larga corn crop, but be
fore the close had a stronger tone.
The cotton market, lifting and falling
a fraction each day alternately, shows
no settled tendency, big stocks bal
ancing an undoubted but yet not
definite decrease in yield.
FORTY-SIX LIVES LOST.
Spanish Warship Wrecked by the Steam
ship Mortera.
Tampa, Fla., Sept 21. Official news
received in this city states that in the
canal at the entrance of the harbor of
Havana, the Spanish gunboat, San
chez Barcastegui, collided with the
Spanish merchant steamship, Mortera.
The former was almost immediately
sunk. The loss of life on the Mortera
is not stated.
Admiral Delagado Parejo was the
last man to leave the cruiser, being
taken off in a rowboat. The total loss
of life is now set at forty-six.
When the rowboat in which the ad
miral was about to start for the shore
shoved off, the suction occasioned by
the sinking of the Barcastegui carried
the boat down and all on board were
drowned.
Stopped by the Police.
Chicago, Sept 24. Charles Wilfred
Mowbray, the Englishman who came
to this city for the purpose of teach
ing his doctrines of red flag and no
government, was stopped in the mid
dle of a speech yesterday afternoon at
Belmont park by the police. He was
so badly frightened that after a few
words of explanation, in which he
said that he did not mean to teach
violence, he hurriedly loft the plat
form and made his escape in the
crowd.
Investigating Tammany Administration.
Nkw York, Sept. 24. Seth S. Terry
and Rodney S. Dennis, commissioners
of accounts, began their first public
investigation under the law passed
by last winter's legislature appropri
ating 8100,000 for tno use of the civ's
regularly authorized investigation
committee in the work of showing up
alleged irregularities in the conduct
of the business of several municipal
departments under the late Tammany
administration.
Cheered by Noted Men.
Chicago, Sept 24. The Chicago
Methodist ministers, who have under
taken to secure through tiie pope
greater religious freedom for the Prot
estants of Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia,
have, in response to circular letters,
received encouragement from Justin
McCarthy, Charles Algernon Swin
burne and the historian, W. E. IL
Lecky.
A Repair Train In the Ditch.
Salina, Kan., Sept. 24. A Missouri
Pacific repair train, consisting of en
gine, pile driver, eight fiat cars and ca
boose, was wrectced two miles east of
Gypsum City yesterday morning. The
engine struck a steer and was thrown
from the track, instantly killing en
gineer IL G. Ferguson. Fireman
Charles Hart escaped without serious
Injury.
Parade of Italian Veterans.
Rome, Sept C4. King Humbert,
Queen Marguerite and the members of
the Italian ministry reviewed ,a pro
cession of veterans of the war of 1870,
bearing flags and decorations. The
Garibaldians, in their red shirts, had
the place of honor at the head of the
parade. Thousands witnessed the pa
rade and cheered as the Uaribaldians
marched past
Two Crops of Apples This Tear.
Excelsior Springs, Mo., Sept 24.
The farmers about here report that
the long hot season caused many cher
ry trees to bloom again and a few
apple trees are blooming for the sec
ond time. In one orchard near the
city an apple tree is bearing a second
crop. The new apples are now about
the size of hickory nuts.
Held Not to Have Been Filibusters.
Wilmington, DeL, Sept 24. Tha
jnry in the Cuban filibustering case,
after being out fifty minutes, returned
with a verdict of "not guilty."
LATE NEWS NOTES.
The son of President Tyler is living-,
an invalid, in poverty, in Georgetown,
D. C.
A moonshiner still was captured in
Dent connty, Mo., bnt the shiners got
away.
Frank Dunning and Charles Larmeu
were killed by a freight train at St
Joseph, Mo.
Germany is closely watching the
Franco-Rnwian demonstration of po
litical al'iance.
Three young men and two boys were
drowned in Lake Michigan, off Chi
cago, while swimming.
England is obstinately refusing to.
take any notice of the cholera scare on
the European continent.
Experts say that electricity is not
likely to supplant steam as the motive
power for heavy trains.
Forest fires are sweeping through
hundreds of acres of forests in the
vicinity of Santa Cruz, Cal.
Dr. William Leroy Wilcox, the old
est physician of Irving Park, 111., was
killed by a runaway horse.
Canada will co-operate with the
United States to establish a deep canal
between the great lakes and the sea.
While Miss Jennie Brown of Neligh,
Neb., was asleep, an unknown miscre
ant cut off half of her beautiful hair.
The department of justice has prom
ised to aid Attorney General Moloney
of Illinois in his fight upon the meat
trust.
Prime Minister Canova's manifesto
to Cubans has stirred np much bitter
ness in Washington by its brutal sug
gestions. A car loaded with whisky was blown
to pieces by an explosion near Leroy,
111. Conductor Murphy and Brakeman
Muldoon were badly hurt
Ex-Congressman Charles Stewart of
Texas died at San Antonio of consump
tion. He served from the Forty-ninth
to the Fifty-third congress.
E. Sultan Murad is said to have
written a letter, taking his brother,
the present sultan, to task for permit
ting the Armenian outrages.
Vandals broke into the York street
Congregational church in Newport,
Ky., tore the bible to pieces and
hacked the organ with hatchets.
Great precautions have been adopt
ed for the protection of the palace of
of tha sultan owing to the discovery of
a Macedonian plot to blow up the
buildings with dynamite.
Mrs. J. H. Brown of Springfield, I1L,
died at Duluth. She was a friend of
President Lincoln, was prominent in
churitable work, and at the time of
her death was president of the Illinois
board of foreign missions.
Ilia Sing Lee, a wealthy Chinese.
merchant of San Jose, Cal., offers a
half interest in his extensive merchan
dise business and 55,000 in cash to any
reputable young American who will
marry his daughter, Mol Lee.
General Justus McKinstry, aged 81,
who was provost marshal of St. Louia
during the war, was on Saturday mar
ried to Miss Adelaide Dickinson,
aged 39.
Corbett and Fitzslmmons have not
yet been able to agree upon a referee
lor the Dallas right.
The American athletes won every
one of the contests in the international
athletic games between the London
and New York Athletic clubs at New
York.
An unsuccessful attempt was made
to burglarize the safe of the bank of
Baldwin, Kan.
The Democrats of Iowa opened the
campaign at Cedar Rapids with
speeches by Judge Baab, candidate
for governor, and others.
The Rev. S. Simms, Baptist, was ar
rested near Gilmore, Mo., on a charge
of threatening to kill the Rev. George
Wallace, another Baptist minister.
A military train was wrecked near
Chemnitz, and thirteen persons were
killed and sixty injured.
The Mexicans at the Atlanta exposi
tion say that they will have bull fight
notwithstanding opposition.
The battle of Lexington (Mo.) was
celebrated by a reunion of blue and
gray and a barbecue.
A bie shipment of arms and ammu
nition to Cuba is said to have been
made from Philadelphia.
Dr. Parkhurst has returned from
Europe and says that Plattism i9
worse than Crokerism in New York
politics.
The Belgian consul at Montreal will
prosecute a paper that charged King
Leopold with misappropriation oi
funds of Queen Charlotte, widow of
Maximilian.
All indications are, at present that
there will be no consultation of the
Great Northern and Northern Pacific.
The Japaneso have captured two
cities of Formosa, one the old capital
of the island
Receivers have been appointed for
the St Joseph Stock Yards and Ter
minal company. The plant is ap
praised at 31,000,000 and will be oper
ated the same as usual.
The Atchison, Stockton and Denver
Railway company of Atchison has filed
articles of incorporation with a cap
ital stock of $l',00',000. It is a Mis
souri Pacific scheme to build the road
from Stockton, Rooks county, to Den
ver. Justice Hurt has decided there is no
law in Texas to prevent prize fighting,
thereby assuring the big mill.
Colonel Breckinsidge addressed 5,000
people at a Democratic barbecue in
Johnson county, Kentucky, and was
given an ovation. He indorsed the
state ticket and the financial policy of
the administration.
Minister Denby has completed at
last the arrangements for the investi
gation of the missionary riots at Cheng
Tu in the province of Szechuen.
Prairie fires are raging south of
Perry, Ok., and great damage has been
done. Thousands of acres have been
burned over and much hay has been
burned. Several people had narrow
escapes.
It is asserted that the New York
Central now holds the three world's
records in the matter of speed
Scalpers are said to have reaped a
rich harvest at Louisville and Chatta
nooga out of Grand Army excursion
tickets.
There is likely to be a lively fight
between the Southern Paclfio and the
California commission over thelatter's
vecent order reducing freight rates.
P0ST0FITCE EEP0RT,
FOURTH CLASS OFFICES IN
OPERATION 70,064.
Kansas -Heads tie List In the Dec roue
'.of Po(offlces for tha Past Tear Ok
-' lahoma- Shows the Greatest Increase
Other Interesting Information.
Washington, Sept. 24 The annual
report of Fourth Assistant Postmaster
General Maxwell shows that the num
ber of postoffices in operation in the
United States on June 80, 1895, was
10,064. During the year 2,423 post
offices were establishes and 3,163 dis
continued. The total number of ap
pointments for the year was 13,142.
During the year the greatest increase
in the number of postoffices was in Ok
lahoma, 69. Nineteen states show a
decrease in the number of postoffices,
the greatest loss occurring in Kansas,
68; South Carolina losing 44, and Iowa
and West Virginia, 38 each. Fifteen
other states show a loss of from 2 to
37 each.
During the year 69,546 complaints
affecting the ordinary mail were re
ceived; 31,849 referring to letters, and
27,69? to packages. This shows an in
crease of 2,669 over last year.
Some special classes of cases, to
which the inspectors are giving much
attention, are those of robberies of
postoffices, burning of postoffices,
wrecks of postal cars, and highway
robberies of m?.ll messengers, mail
stages and railway postal cars; and
the figures submitted in the report
show that the depredations and casu
alties in these classes of cases are
gradually on the increase, although
the increase is not so uniform as dur
ing the preceding year. A gratifying
decrease in the number of postoifice
burglaiies is noted, but highway rob
beries of the mails have increased
somewhat Train robbers have grown
more bold, and do not hesitate to ply
their vocation in the older states and
near large cities, one of the most dar
ing of last year's train robberies, the
Aquia creek case, having been com
mitted within a few miles of the city
of Washington.
Under the head ot foreign cases the
report emphasizes the superiority of
the registry system of the United
States over that of most of the foreign
countries.
During the year there were 2,240 ar
rests for offenses against the postal
laws, of which number 175 were post
masters, forty assistant postmasters,
fifty clerks in postoffices, twelve rail
way postoffice clerks, thirty-seven
letter carriers, fifty-two mail carriers,
and twenty-eight were employed in
minor positions in the postal service.
The concluding pages of the report
are devoted to a series of sketches of
important cases. General Maxwell
uses strong language in referring to
the escape of Killoran, Allen and Rus
sell from Ludlow street jail, New
York, their apprehension having been
a matter of great importance to the
department.
PEARYS HARDSHIPS.
The Arctlo Explorer and His Followers
In Bad Shape When Rescued.
St Johns, Newfoundland, Sept. 24.
On arrival of the steamer Kite here
Lieutenant Peary and Hugh J. Lee
with his colored servant, Henson,
were found safe ou board. They were
found at Whale Sound on August 8,
waiting for the Kite, and had only ten
days previously returned from an
overland expedition which had proved
a comparative failure. Independence
bay, the most northern part of Green
land, was reached early iu June, but
they were deterred from going on by
insufficiency of food, and were oliged
to abandon the attempt to make fur
ther progress. Nearly all of the dogs
perished and the remainder had to be
shot, owing to the inability to provide
them with anything to eat.
Many sensational stories are current
among the crew of the extremities to
which Peary, Lee and Hansen were
reduced. According to the stories,
which the explorers decline to deny,
they were almost starved, and were
forced to eat seal and other refnse to
keep alive.
Receiver for Kansas City Time.
Kansas City. Mo., Sept. 21 Wiley
O. Cox, the banker, was appointed re
ceiver of the Kansas City Times
Newspaper company by Judge Slover,
and took charge of its business at ll
o'clock Saturday forenoon. The ap
pointment was made on application of
the Remington Paper company of
Watertown, N. Y.
The Times' plant, business, good
will, etc, is estimated to be worth
about $o0,000. It has been running
recently at a loss of about $500 a week.
Fruit Damaged In Colorado.
Dknver, Col., Sept. 24. The dam
age done to the fruit interests of the
state by the heavy snow fall is beyond
computation. In the vicinity of Den
ver fruit and shade trees were broken
by the weight of heavy snow freezing
to the limbs yet in full leaf, and
scarcely a tree for miles around es
caped injury. Reports from the in
terior show the same deplorable con
ditions, varying only in a degree.
Plead for Cuba.
Chicago 111., Sept 2. The Rev.
Dr. H. W.Thomas caused somewhat of
a sensation yesterday by declaring
from his pulpit that the time has come
for America to say that the oppression
of Cnba by Spain must come to an end.
There was a large attendance of the
best people in the city and the speaker
was frequently Interrupted by out
bursts ot applause.
Anti-Christian Proclamations.
Shanghai, Sept 24. A dispatch
from Ning-Po says that the whole
province of Che-Kiang, especially the
city of Kin Wba has been placarded
with anti-foreign and anti-Christian
proclamations.
Illinois State Fair.
SpRisoriKLD, 111 , Sept 21. The Il
linois state fair opened to-day verr
auspiciously. The exposition hall,
horticultural and farm products build
ings and machinery hall, each of which
cost 170,000 or over, were well filled.
ILLINOIS TAXATION.
Startling Report Hade by tha Bareaa
of Labor Statistics.
Springfield, I1L, Sept. 24. The
most sensational report ever issued by
a state bureau was made pnblie by the
Illinois bureau of labor statistics.
It charges that the great majority
of the wealthy taxpayers of Illinois,
and more especially of Chicago, are
perjurers; that the assessors are guilty
of malfeasance in office, that the pres
ent financial condition of Chicago is
directly traceable to the corrupt sys
tem of taxation, and that the "deplor
able condition of work is due to the
liberty-destroying methods of taxation
which prevail in Illinois."
The report is made up of a mass of
tables compiled from official reports of
assessors, banks, real estate transfers,
boards of equalization and the various
municipal departments to which the
agents of the bureau had access.
After declaring that "it is the purpose
of the report to expose existing meth
od t of taxation in Illinois, with special
reference to their effect upon the labor
interests," the board proceeds to re
view the work of former bureaus. The
stand is taken that it is idle to dwell
upon the wages and condition of the
average wage earners of the state.
The bureau contends that the condi
tion "is proved by evidence so clear
and abundant that the compilation of
any further statistics would be wasted
effort." The bureau takes the posi
tion that "taxation is the chief instru
ment of tyranny."
Mother and Baby Drowned.
Alrion, Neb., Sept. 24. A distress
ing accident, resulting in two deaths,
occurred at Bradish, 6 miles east of
this place. Bert Holton, wife and
child, were driving into the village in
a road cart When near the elevator
they were obliged to cross a canyon,
and this was filled with water to a
depth of five feet In crossing, the
cart was overturned and the three
were thrown into the water. Wife
and child were drowned.
Preachers Cheer Harrison.
Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. 24. The
Indiana conference o' the Methodist
Episcopol chnrcb, by an almost unan
imous vote, decided to admit women
into the conference as delegates.
While the conference was in ses
sion ueneral IlarriHon appeared
by invitation and made a few
felicitous remarks. He was heartily
cheered by the 300 ministers present
Avignon TTanta the Pope.
London, Sept. 24. A P is corre
spondent says that the to n council
of Avignon has agreed to spend 180,-
000 upon the restoration of the pope's
palace. One of the notable personages
of Avignon says that the next pope
will be elected at Avignon, and will
live there.
Shot His Wife and Himself.
Dallas. Texas, Sept. 24. S. F. Wil
liams of Kansas City shot and seriously
injured his wife and then killed him
self last night. Mrs. Williams is so
seriously wounded as to be unable to
make a statement The cause of the
tragedy is not known. The- couple
were guests at a local hotel.
Cuban Sympathizers Rejolcei
Wilmington, DeL, Sept 24. As a
result of the acquittal of the alleged
fihbusterers there was a large demon
stration of Cubans and Cuban sympa
thizers in the shape of a parade last
night There were 8,000 men in
the parade, who, with numerous bands
of music, marched throughout the city.
A Call to Dr. Talmage.
Washington, Sept 24. The congre
gation of the First Presbyterian
church of this city voted to extend a
call to Rev. T. DeWitt Talmage to
become pastor. Mr. and Mrs. Cleve
land are members of this church. The
question of compensation was post
poned for future consideration.
Insurance Money Safe.
Topeka, Kan., Sept. 24. Judge- Ha-
zen handed down his decision in the
Bank of Enterprise-Mrs. Maria Haff
ner insurance case. The whole ques
tion was whether a creditor can gar
nishee an insurance company for bene
ficiary money payable to- a debtor.
Judge Hazen holds that the creditor
can not do so.
eleven Inches ot Snow.
Denver, Col.. Sept. 24. F. IL Bran
denburg, local weather- observer, re
ports that the snowfall in Denver Sat
urday night amounted to 11. inches,
leaving all previous Septemberrecords
far behind. The nearest approach to
it was on September 20, 1875, when
two and one-half inches of snow fell.
Masso Is Presides. '
Tampa, Fla., Sept 24. A letter re
ceived by prominent Cuban leaders
here stated that.on tne loth inst .a
constitutional convention was held at
Najasa, at which Bartalo Masso was
elected president of the Cuban repub
lic. The Mercury's Bis; Drop.
Eldorado, Kan., Sept 24. When
the cold wave struck here the ther
mometer registered 74 degrees and
within aa hour it had gone down 23
degrees. The cold wave was accom
panied by ram and considerable frost
Found Dead In His Bed.
Nevada, Mo., Sept. 23. John Ott,
an aged citizen was found dead in his
bed at his home two miles north of
Nevada. He had not been sick and his
death is supposed to have been caused
by apoplexy.
A 100,000 Fire In Indiana.
Rochester, Ind., Sept 24. Fire
broke out in Tiosa, six miles from
here, and in a short time every business
house was destroyed, also the eleva
tors, saw-mill and two dwellings.
Total loss 8100,000.
Cyeloaes In Wisconsin.
Milwaukee, Wis., Sept 81 In the
towns of Pleasant Valley and Clear
Creek, near Eau Claire, a number of
buildings were blown down in a small
cyclone, entailing a loss of about $J5,
000.
CU CURE ASTHMA.
A Leading Physician at tast Discovers
tha Remedy.
The majority of suffTers front
Asthma and kindred complaints, after
trying Doctors and numberless Reme
dies advertised as positive cures, wlth
out avail, have come to the conclusion
that there is no cure for this most) dis
tressing disease, and these same per
sons will be the more in doubt and skep
tical when they learn through the col
umns of the press that Dr. Rudolph
Schlffmann, the recognized authority,
who has treated more cases of these dis
eases than any living Doctor, has
achieved success by perfecting a rem
edy which not only gives relief in the
worst cases, but has positively cured
thousands of sufferers who were con
sidered Incurable. These were Just as
skeptical as some of our readers now
are. Dr. Sehiffmann's remedy no doubt
possesses the merit which Is claimed for
It or he would not authorize this paper
to announce that he Is not only willing
to give free to each person suffering
from Asthma, Hay Fever, Phthisic, or
Bronchitis one free liberal trial package
of his cure, but urgently requests all
sufferers to send him their name and
address and receive a package, abso
lutely free of charge, knowing that in
making the claim he does for his cur
a strong doubt may arise In the minds
of many and that a personal test, as h
offers to all. will be more convincing
and prove its merits than the publish
ing of thousands of testimonials from
others who have been permanently
cured by the use of his Asthma cure.
"Dr. Sehiffmann's Asthma Cure," as It
Is called, has been sold by all drug
gists ever since It was first Introduced,
although many persons may never have
heard of it, and it Is with a view to
reaching these that he makes this offer.
This is certainly a most generous and
fair offer.and all who are suffering from
any of the above complaints should
write to him at once and avail them
selves ot the ssrae, as positively no free
samples can be obtained after Oct. 10. Ad
dress Dr. R. Schiffnian, 325 Rosabel street,
St. Panl, Minn.
CONDENSED DISPATCHES.
The Turkish government has farmed
ont for a large sum of money the mo
nopoly of the tobacco trade in Turkey
to an English company.
Two children of Emery Slausen, liv
ing two miles west of Arena, Wis.,
were burned to death in their home.
Kirby S. Tnpper, deputy customs
collector at the port of Charleston, 8.
C, shot and mortally wounded him
self. A fire in Hot Springs, Ark., de
stroyed the Pacific hotel on Central
avenue, the Crescent house adjoining,
the Valley livery stables, the Jewish
synagogue and five cottages in the
rear of the hotel, involving a loss of
$50,000.
Judge Blake, in the district court of
Helena, Mont, held the anti-gambling
law unconstitutional. The effect of
the decision is to leave the old terri
torial law licensing gambling in force.
Secretary Olney is said to be ready
to recognize Cuban belligerency as
sooq as Cleveland gives the word.
Preparations are being made to have
the fish commission placed under con
trol of the agricultural department
It is said to be doubtful if the senate
would confirm Hornblower to a seat
on the supreme bench even if Hill sup
ports. President Cleveland is said to have
determined to repudiate the third
term idea in a speech at the Atlanta
exposition.
NaTal officers say that the reason
American whites do not enlist in the
navy more is because they have to
meet negroes on an equality.
The Jefferson Davis monument will
be erected in Monroe Park, Richmond,
Va.
Senator Gorman has taken the stump
in Maryland for the state Democratic
ticket.
Lewis Thurman, a farmer, shot and
killed Albert Walker, colored, near
Fayette, Mo.
Frank Dyer and Buz Lncky were
convicted of the Blackstone, I. T.,
train robbery.
Mexicans deny that any of their re
tired army officers have recruited in
the Cnhan service.
The loss of Mrs. Langtry's diamonds
will, it is said, seriously affect her ca
reer upon the stage. ,
Martha Dalton, who escaped from
jail at Salem, 111., was captured at
Sumner and committed suicide.
In a Chicago and Altonfreight wreck
near Joliet, 111., two tramps were
killed and a third person injured.
No indictments against legislative
bootllers have been returned by the
Sangamon county, Illinois, grand jury.
DAMACES for libel.
A Virginia Paper Brought to Term by
the American Book Company.
A dispatch from Norfolk, Va, says:
'The American Book company of Mew
York has lust gained a signal victory in tha
courts of Virginia and has received an ao
tolute and complete vindication after along
and exhaustive trial by special Jury in the
Circuit court ot this city. The Pilot news
paper of this city, upon the awarding of
toe contract tor scnooi nooks to the Amer
ican Book company, printed a long article
written and nrn rcvl h, P V Rvrt an
agent and attorney forGinn & Co., of New
York, in which it was charged that the
state superintendent bad been bribed by
the American Book company. The Pilo
Has immediately sued for libel, and, after
a Ave weeks' trial, which created an Im
mense amount of interest throughout tha
state, a verdict for punitive damages was
recently awarded, and the jury found that
the statements made were false and a
deliberate libel Not only so, but tha
company, npon unimpeachable evidence,
was proved to have dealt honorably and up
rightly In every particular In their negotia
tions with the state officials. It was furth
er proved at the trial that no better term
had been made wth any other state for
school books. In tact the attorney-general
of Virginia stated that the American Book
company 'teemed to throw open their whole
basin est to as,' and after full and complete,
examination of all the original contracts
made with the various states he expressed
himself as absolutely satisfied that the
prices were the same in all cases and that
no discrimination whatever had been made
against the state of Virginia. Furthermore
he mentioned that none of the statements
of the American Book company had been
accepted until every one of them had been
absolutely verified by direct reference to
the governors of tome fifteen states, with
whom contracts had been made. This
proved concluslvelythat the representations
of the American Book company were cor
sect In to to. This celebrated case hat thoa
ended In a complete triumph in every re
spect for the American Book company, and
hat shown in clear contrast the clean and
business-like methods in which they carry
on their great industry at compared with .
the attempted use of political pulla and
tnitatatemeata by their opponent.' 'Cat
M0O Irtimna.

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