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Wichita eagle. [volume] (Wichita, Kan.) 1886-1890, January 06, 1887, Image 3

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032490/1887-01-06/ed-1/seq-3/

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$fts Wixchitix -glaiX kqz : txtirstfaij pCorruiug, garmarrj 6, 1887.
&M2
gmtpBr fwwjle
r. r. tjj tables.
Denver, Memphis A, Atlantic.
west. :A""1E OF STATIONS. eart.
Mixed Train. Mired Train,
o- 1. No. 2.
H0. Lvl J ieAr 7iX)r.
7-05 Bum; io 7.-05
7;2i A:uU 6:45
10nO &Conwajr Springs
10.30 Hilton .". 5:10
10.5J Norirlch .1:20
11:38 Belmont 4.5.
11 S3 Alameda 4.3j
12rr.H Arr, . Lv 45
12.55 Lv Klnpnan Ar -
1H5 Pcnaloea 3:05
1:53 luka Junction 20
2:15 Turon '-30
Trains No. 1 and 2 run dally. Train No. Swill wait
at Turon until Train No 1 arrives. Trains will -tip
at all station. ,
F1TZOERALD & JIAIXORT COShTC'X CO.
D.J. THAYER, SAll'MIUXT,
Chief Engineer and Gen'l M'ns'r. Train Jiaster.
St. ., It. S. As W. R. 11.
EAST EOCN9 TRAINS.
Train leaves Wichita 9.33 a. m. and 7: W p.m.
Train arrives from the east....8.1U a, m. and 720 p.m.
WEST B0UM.
Train leaves S0a. ni.nnd 8 p. m
Train arrives Wx m. .d7:30i. m.
Wichita & Colorado.
Train Ie.tvo3 for Hutchinson 9:15 a.m. aid X) p.m.
Train arrives from Hutchinson. .3:21 a.m.and7.Gp.m
S. V. 11. K.
Arrive
.... 7.10 u m.
....1 1.1. a. in
3 25 a, m.
7:Wi, m.
.. 2.4up. in.
I eaves
.... 7:10p. in,
...12:15 p. in.
... i5e. m.
2Mp. m.
.. . 8.25a. m.
7.40 p.m.
3o!n? North, Ijsoager
SoIuk North. Accommodation ..
.Joins South. P3M;ni;fr
Going South, Paj.enjrer
aoliiy South, Accommodation ..
0 olnz Nort h, 1'ssenger
Cola? North. Accommodation...
Coin; hout, PaA-uuger
doing South. Accomiao-nUou ..
Coins Norik, PiGoenger
Coins South, I'seer
"Wichita AVestcrn.
Arrica.
... SOtiH. m.
... 7:15 p.m.
...1216 p.m.
Ieaies.
... 8.45 a. m.
... 7j()p.m.
... 2i p.m.
No. 2, Hall and Express.
Ko. 4, Eiprt"
Wy Krsu-ht
So. 1 Sa!1 and Hsprefifl. .
No. 3, Ej.prt-3
Way FrriKht
St. Jjouls San l'ranclsco.
Leaves.
,.6Sia.m.
. 5-0 p. in.
.l2.-rop.in.
..DA"! a.m.
. 90 p.m.
10.2p.m.
3.00 a. m.
Going Wcet, Paoscnfter.
Coin;; Wert, ienger.,
CMiliiS West, Freight
Golnc Fjwt, r-senger..
Golu Kast, I'aenKer..
Soln- Kant, Freight
Colng K-t, Freight
ATTORNEYS-AT-AW.
jTvrBATDERSON?''
Attorney at-Law, Wichita, Sedssvick comity, Kai..
OClpe In 'Jentepnif.1 lUoct. dl-itf
J. R. SITES.
Attornev
wlth Anxio
st-Law. OQee 117 E Douglas avenue.
American Loan and lnvestmet.1 uo.
JONES & MONTAGUE.
Attorney K-aH-iw. OClco iu the EHle Block, ver
Ilorj-y A C'o'R Dry Goods store. 72 )tf.
G. Y. CijientJr.
Notary Public.
CLEMENT
Attornys at Liw. R-al
cUm or titles a peclalty.
Cle i:ent 'oalldhi;.
Tuos. C. Wilsos.
& WILSON
estate law and examl
031C3 251 Main 6treet,
J. V.. HALLUWl'.LL, J. E. HUME.
Late U. S. Attorney.
HALLOWELL and HUME,
Lawyers, 142 North Main Rt.. Wichita. Kan. Ul-lt
REUBEN H. ROYS,
Attorney at Iuv, office in the Koys Block, corner
Doulsu ind Lawieacc avenuet, Wichita. Kansas.
EDWIN WHITE MOORE,
Attorney -at-Law, over Wichita National Bank, Wich
ita, K.421.US.
W. K. Cakuslk, A. N" J. Ccook-, L. L. Cahuslc.
Carlisle, Crook and Carlisle,
Lawyer. 'P.oomiJ and 4 over 217 East Douglas av
enue: - j
Vf. 1". CAill'EEIJ- JAS- u IVEB.
CAMPBELL & DYER,
Attorneys at Law, Wichita. Kan. 10Stf
SMYTH & BROOKS,
Attorneys at Law. No. 123 ST. Mala fit., opposite
Kxj-toSlce. Commercial collection a specialty.
Will practice hi btate and Fc-IhiuI courts.
W. A. MORRIS,
Attemey-at-Law, N. X-21 East Douglas avenue,
A. T. CARPENTER.
Attoracv -at Law. Ofllce. No. VU N Main street, up
fitalr. r.rrt to iKHlofflc Wichita. Innan. dj)vl2tf
W. C. STAMJiY.
SLUSS & STANLEY.
Atturai'TB at-Law. Wichita. Kann.s.
J. F. LAUCK.
Vltomsi at-L.-iw. Oftlce Ilrat door north of V. a.
Land offlce In Commercial Muck. Wichita, Kansas.
tnrf!slu.iitlonsUeiitoall kliuls of Ijubiuess cou
cVirIrd wlti ttie Uultel htoteB bmd ofilcc.
HATT0N Sl RUGGLES.
ttorsiyw at-lJiw, Eayle Blmk. Wichita. Knnsan.
JAMES. F. MAJOR.
AttcrnevBt-Ii. Will practice m niihanta.-.
.,,t rv.!iftl..iis a iH"cialtj'. Oillco o'.er Smith a.
11 nr
Hciaitj
8Uot'n Dough" auue. Wicslta, Kan.
D. A. MITCHELL.
Attoratf stl.sw and colVctlon agent. No.
cu-rrl, v.'lehlut. Kv.
E. D. PARSONS.
Atloracy-at 1-iw cr.J .l IUtato Ajent.
pp-sltc ilanhuttan hotel, room f.
H. E. CORN.
Atrn-i nt Ijiw. OSlce over IS Douglas avvue.
F.
P. MARTIN.
AMorney-a
:ljw. O.Tlee over Hydo & Ilnnible's
Book More, 1H Main jtrect. upita!rs, Wtel'lta. Kmi.
J. M
HUMPHREY.
Woodman's Bank bulldlns.
AtTrney-at-Law,
Main htreet.
O. W. COUXVOS. UOI1KKT M. I'lTT.
C0LLINGS&. PUTT.
Attornc s at-Iiw. Will jractico in :ate and fem
oral omrt. Oaiw In Temple block, Haln tree:, sec
ond stalnvay north of ixi ofttcc. Wichita, b.auis.
v. AP.VJIP.
(IEO. V. APAM3.
ADAMS & ADAMS.
at-Law. Will practice In stare and fed
Oaicn In Eatclo block. Wichita, Kansas.
Attornej -oral
cotutH.
HARRIS, HARRIS & VERMILLION.
Attorneys at-Iiw, Commercial block, Wichita,
Kann-cs.
0. D.
KIRK.
Attornev at-Iiw. Koim
liullillos. Vichlta. Can.
3, 17. S. Land Ofilco
W. S. MORRIS.
Attorney at Law. Oniee in Temple Block. Wichita,
KatiRs.
- . ,.,-ir i. r. astrnni.
" SAN KEY & CAMPBELL.
I-.v.ers. Wichita, Kansas. Office southwest cor
ner Market ntnvt and Douglas avo.
PHYSICIANS.
H. F0RDICE,
I'hvs'ci.inaiulSurpeou. Ofilco. Main street, over
Aldrlch &. Brown's drui' store, rooms 22 and SI, Wa
lts, -an. vJ-m
DR. B F, H ASK INS,
Om.'e. Blttln; blick. cor. Douslas aud;Markct, en
trancn to ofllce by elevate-. Oulco h-urs S to 11 am.
and 2 to 5 p u; residence MO n Topeka ave. Wichita.
Kan. 8 "
DR. G. B. M. FREE,
Ite P.es'dcnt Physician and Surpeou in the
Philadelphia Hospital. Phlli lelphli: and In Bay
View H;iul Ilil'Imore Coiuultal Ion lu German
and Eacllsh. Dv or night call promp Ivanswervtl.
Offlce over 1 V. Douglas avenue. Wichita. 22-lm
DR. N. S. COINER,
navln; attende 1 lec'ure at Cnlverdtv of Virginia.
Onlverolty of Marvlaud and Bellevue Hospital, with
three vear experience: offers his professional serv
ices to ttie cltl-aai of WIcuIia. OlMce 117 w Douglas
avenue. 15-lmt
Dr. T. L. ANDREWS,
SpecUHt In diseases of ear. nose, and throat. ORlce
Temple block, up stairs. No. 7. 12
G. M. BiBBEE, M. D
OClco and resldeuee corner of 4th and Douglas aves..
Hacker : Jackson's building, Wichita.
E. E. HAMILTON, M. D.
Specialties. DiseM-. of tho Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Catarrh and fltll-K gla.fes. Offlce southwest
corner Douglas nud Market, up stairs. Wichita, Kan.
W. M.JOHNSON,
Homocopathlst. General practice, chronic dlseases.
antt dltwes of females. Telephone No. K'J.
Office and residence over Steel A Son's hardware
torn, 117 N Main utroet, Wichita, Kan.
Offloe hoars, B to 10 a. m to t r in., and at nlpht-
dtf
PHYSICIANS.
P. D. St. JOHN, M. D
Office 219 East Dou;rls are. Residence-15"; Not th
Emporia avenue, near corner of First street. Tele
phone 157 or A. D.T.
DR. J.J. STONER.
Homeoepathlot. Office, opposite postofflce. Resi
lience, BC3 North Main street. Wichita, Kansas. Tele
phone 113.
DR. B. A. GUYTON & SON.
Physicians and Surgeons. Ofilcc Deam block, oppo
site Occidental hotel. Residence. 737 Waur street,
corner Oak street.
DR. C. C. ALLEN.
Physician and Surgeon. Office and residence 0
DooxUa avenue. New and effectual treatment of
hemorrhoids, and diht-ase of human a specialty.
DRS. McC0Y& PURDY.
OPfi 1;7 Main otreet, over Redht & Sons' store,
Ylohita, Kan. Telephone at residence.
RUSSELL &. JORDAN.
rhysiclamt and Surgeons. Office on west nlde.of
llnln Htreet, first f talrway south of Masonic building.
Telephone to A. D. T.
L. S. 0RDWAY, M. D.
Homoajpathlst. Ofllce corner Douglas cn5
rws avenuer.. rooms 1 and 5; telephone 153.
DR. CHARLES A. WILSON,
PS-rslc -"i and Surgeon. Will continue his profes
s'( . :ia!l It.! branches. Consultation free. OSlce
mid reld( uco at 151 N Jlaln Rt.. mer Widltr &. 1111
' r'rf paint offlee. l.
E. B. RENTS, M. D.
PlivKlcian and Surgeon. O.lice over Fuller S: Son's
Grocery.
L. S. M UN SELL, M. D.,
Physician, Mirgeon and Gynecologist. Consulting
physteiaa to the eye. car an 1 S-irgienl Institute. 232
and 23-1 North JUln street, wlu-re he can be found
day or night. Does a general practice. dli
J. E. BENNETT, M. D.
Of the Ann ot "Kail & Bennett," does a general
practice, but gKes special attention to the cure o
KPILEPSY or fuliin?- flta, the OPIUM HABIT.
CATARRH, PILES and private deseascs in both i-exe.;.
Consult.itlon free and confidential. Offlre 143 North
Jiahfdt. Telephone 25. (Seo display advertisement
In this pater 121
W. A. MINNICK, M. D.
Homrepathlst. Ofilce with Dr. R. Matbews, Main
otreet, Btcond stairway north of postonice. Resi
dence, KU7 North Fonrth (.treet, near Union depot,
Wichita, Kansas. Telephone No. 141.
J. H. TILDEN, M. D.
Special attention given to Surgery and GjT.ajco
ogy. fil'euce45 S. Market. Ofilco 228 N. Main,
will visit any part of the state In consultation or to
perform Mirtlcal operations. 105 tf
DENTISTS.
D W. Smith. U. S. Ilougland.
SMITH & HOUGLARD,
Dtntlsis. Eagle building, Douglas avenue, Wichita.
Kansas.
McKEE & PATTEN.
Surgeon Dentists. Teeth extracted without pain.
Beet set artiticlal teeth, $3.10. office 217 East Doudte
avenue. Wichita, Kan.
DR J. C. DEAN.
Dentist. Oppf.iito the ia:tofllce. Teeth extracted
without pain.
DRS W. L. DOYLE &. WILSON.
Deutlste. Ofilce over Barnes & Son'a drag store,
Centennial Block. Wichita.
MUSIC TEACHERS.
HENRY HOFFMAN,-
Professional piano tuner and teicher. Terms mod
erate. i.e.ive wrders at Sh iw's music stoi e.
MRS. S T. HENDRICKS0N.
Teacher of Piano, Organ and Theory. 22 North Mar
ket street.
ARCHITECTS.
ALFRED GOULD,
Architect and superintendent,
Boston. All "-tyies of buildings.
Bank uuliding.
late of Paris and
Hoom 3, Citizens
S4-lm
J. M. GILE.
Architects rnd SurMirIntendent.s. OJiiceiu Ellott 5:
JIcNVus building, room 7.
C. W. KELLOGG.
Architect and superintendent,
tlons f or all cUuses ot buildings,
book store.
Plaus and speciflca
Oillce over Hyde'e
DUM0NT& HAYWARD.
Architects and Superhitcndcnta. Ofilco In P.vs'
block. Wichita. Knn.
w. t. rnoupKoor. a. w. trim.
PR0UDF00T& BIRD.
Architccta and Supeiiatendents. OiKeo in Ecvlo
block.
iUSCELLAKEOUS.
GEO. F. STEWART,
Electrician, 203 R Doiulas nve. up fitnirs.
electrical appliance repaired and for sale
E ery
1- ine
electriiul eiirfravi 1? on inut.il, class and stone
Also
headouartnrs for Blttsbura Incaiidnscent lampfi and
fix tires: chimneys, wicks, etc. Electric lulls and
annunciators. -13
Dr. D. T. SNOKE
Veterinary Surgeon; Rraduato of Philadelphia Vet
erinary College of '71. Proprietor of Hors.es Home,
opiKWite O. A. It. building. 1st, st. Telephone 172. das
RODGERS,
Tiie PhotOf-rapher. I'ieture-? in all s!-;e.s and styles.
He also carrier the nne-t ass-ortment of picture
frames In the city. UIe him a friendly call aud ex
amiiiO camples.
DR- E. M. CONK LING,
Cor. Main and Second streets, Wichita. Kansas.
Will guarantee to cure any case of piles. No knife,
ligature, caustics or detention from buslni'-s. Dis
eues of the tectum by the BrinkerholTpvstem a
.p'cialty.
ThcRftYoMonCloiiCo.
STOCK OF
HATS AND CAPS, ETC.,
Has boenreino cd to No. 132 North a!n Street where
the p.-uv.c will be placed oa sale.
BARGAINS
For the next 60 d?.ys. as stock
must be sold.
KS-itememlser the number, 152 Haln
hotel Gandolfo.
SANTA FE BAKERY.
Established 1S72,
Is the Place to gfel Everything Kept in a
First-Class Bakery.
-ECKAKDT SCOTT, Props.,
144 MAIN STREET
WICHITA
Conservatory of Music
Corner of Emporia Avenue an Wiliiara Street,
south of Douslas Avenue.
Director: CATHERINE RUSSELL.
J. P. ALLEN,
DPiUGGIST
Everything Kept in a First-Glass
Drugstore.
Wichita, Kan.
W. H.STERNBERG,
Contractorand Builder
Office and Shop 349 Main St.
ni-JT-CLASS wbRK at LOWEST TRICES. Esil
mates fmraed on short notice. WICHITA. KAN.
CEASECt mtelopes.
WILD SPORT FOR HUNTSMEN ON THE
PLAINS OF MONTANA.
Swiftly Kuutiing Animals vriili tlio Hyo
of :i Hatrk-Tlio Kotl Plan's jlethod of
Cratvling Xcar tlio G:tvac TTfcin T-.vo
EalLs.
To hunt tlio antolopo cnccccsf uliy requires
more tbau ordinary skiiL With iha excep
tion of mountain sheep, antelope aro tho
mo,i difficult gamo animals of epproaeb on
this continent. A bear will ctand up and
actually seek fight; a buffalo bull xvill run at
first, but once wounded, a stand up fisn; to
the bitter end is the probable outcome; an
elk can be approached and fclaiii without ex
ercising extraordinary precouiicia, and a
deer is sometimes as dangerous and as bellig
erent as a mountain lion. On tho other
hand, the antelope first, last and all the time
depends upon his legs for safety, and itls fair
to say that they aro tho fleetest, ai they are
the mesfc graceful of quadrupeds. Thrtre is
no fun in store for the greenhorn who at
tempts to hunt thU animal without under
standing its ways and habits. Anybody can
hunt and kill a bison, a lear and many of
the other largo game animals; but tho ante
lope demands the mebt skillful of huntsmen
to compete with its keen senses of sight and
6mcil, not to s)eak of that other important
adjunct, oztromo fleetness of foot. Tho
power of scent is wonderfully acute in them,
lUi IK 3.J1113 LUiti IJICV Willi SUIUil U ljjd.il UU
COO yards and beyond with tho most astoul-'a-
ir.-o-rnr-r.ii.vM. TiiMi- t.nn,.irv nflifni, h..
yond all conception. I havo frequently rcsn
antelope with ono lejf shot away and hanging
by tho tendons alone, outrun and escape from
tho fleetest plains ponies. Their race is not
a long one (not more than six or seven inili,
and it is possible that an American hcisu
might run thorn down; butasnrulo nothing
on the praries can catch them, and the grey
hound is about the only four-footed beast in
existence that can bo depended upon to keep
pace with and possibly outrun them.
THE EYE OF A HAWK.
ITo animal in tha world possesses a keener
tight excepting the giraffe. In stalking ante
lope tlio principal point is to keep out of tight
and noxfc to keep out of smell. Don't imagine
Lccause a band i-; a couplo of miles away ap
parently feeding and nil with heads down
that none aro on tho lookout. Tha chances
aro ten to ono that you aro seen first, although
they may not move. Always hunt over
uroiren ground ami uuuuiatmg prairie. If
on horseback, dismount and skirt tho ridgo
ahead, as jour horses head always comes into
view beforo j'ou do and thko oft' your hat,
which becomes visible beforo 3-ou yourso..
can seo beyond. Do ail tho crawling possible.
Guch is tho red man's method, and he gen
erally bags threo times as much game as any
two whito men, unless tho latter adopt tha
tamo tactics. Ninety per cent, of all tho
gamo secured by Indian;! is shot ithin !)00
yard. They aro everlasting crawlers nad
simply no good at all beyond tho oOO yard
limit. On tho other hand, a whito man
plunges ahead in his natural happy go luclry
fashion, scares tho game, thus giving it a good
send off, and then blazes away while tho ani
mals ai o 0:1 a dead run.
I havo discovered many valuable pointers as
tho result of long experience, and noto a fow
of thorn for the benefit of thoso who havo a
notion to try their hand at stalking antelopo.
When a band scents or seas you they run
across the wind for about 900 or 1,000 yards,
and then turn and run straight up the wind.
Tho species aro victims of intense curiosity
and at times havo walked straight into death
traps, all tho whilo knowing and s-enting
danger, yet so unbounded is their curiosity
to investigate strango and unusual objects
that thoy aro unable to withstand tho temp
tation to look a little deeper and satisfy this
truly feminine instinct. A hunter in full
knowledge of this failin cither flags thorn or
sticks weeds into his hat whlla crawling. So
long as not seen and particularly not under
stood, the' will not run. but merely bound a
few steps at a time, then halt, or else run
around the strango object in a circle. Even
if scented, though not seen, tho antelope will
want to know more about you and the object
of your visit before taking to their heels.
WIIKK TO HUNT TIIEil.
An excellent time to hunt thorn is jnt be
foro sunset and when about to seek cover or
a bed. Get to (ho leeward and between thorn
and tho sun. wl.en the latter is about to drop
behind tlio IiilU; then walk slov.iy towards
tho game with a., little motion as possible.
Unless scented, f Isto 13 little danrvr of a dis
turbance cr of flight, fo- this pai ' nilar ani
mal, gifted willi Mich Leon eyecight, cannot
see anything that is between them and tlio
sun. I have ofion approached to within 100
yards of a band by adopting the tactics
named, and yet thoy did not become alarmed.
Buffalo v. ill t.lwpasito the v.indwarl, like
their cousins of the antelope family, Jmt-thoy
will rtand no suph foolishness as sun biind
ncsj. A Ystl flannel shirt is extiem j fasci
nating to antelopo; nl-o, a red Ir:.akerchief
cr anything else o u crimson In: . As a rulo
theo anftnab L.o .r;-j iu snil hands of fifty
or sixty, and if in large numbers among tho
foothill-, on the open prairie or elsewhere, a
close examination will discover them to bo
congregated in smaller groups or four or flvo
dozen, who, an.:l tho multitudo, keep closely
herded among themselves. They arc neat,
clean cut, handsome, and as dainty as a lady
in their diet, feeding as thoy do on the t.n-
derest stalks of grass and tlio delightful
prairie clover. Astonishing as it may fem,
a criprled animal is, or appears to be, tho
fleetest of them all, as ho genorailj- takes the
lead, tho whole baud following whither ho
goes.
I once mado an irapormnt discoverj in
hunting which I have frequently tried on
antelopo with marvelous success. It is to
load with two balls instead of ono. TIte
method named is of no sorvico whatever ex
cept at short range. At distances beyond
1200 yards and even a little less it proves a
failure; but I have found it to work like a
iwi unucr J tharm at 150 yards and under. Antelopo aro
9UU1 U,L'llu3lill ilUlA LlJUb il.LCl US.il! MJVb
to death they run a tremendous distance lie
forc falling: but in the case of catching two
la'U instead of onf, I have never known an
antelope run more than fif t-y yards Loforo
going to grass. Fur the Springfield breech
loader, which I use on all my hunting trips,
besides tho ordmary cartridge case which
holds too charge of powder and the conical
bullet weighing ."(X) grains, I also carry a
round ball, the calibre of the gun, which I
first iasprt in tho breech and then shovo the
metal cartridge in afterwards. At 103 yards
the spread is not inoro than three inches, ami
at loo yart bota saols are pretty apt to
catch the beast somewhere. It is surprising
how quickly an antelope will come to a halt
with two balls shot through him instead of
one. Fort Keogh Cor. Philadelphia Tiin
Toaqnin Uecomint: Civilized.
The -Tonquincso Academy' has been es
tablished at Hanoi, in Tonquin, by JJ.
Pul Bert, the Frenh resident general. An
important function of the societj- is tho initia
tion of the people of "Vnquin into a know 1
&ige of modern science .:h1 civiTiaL"on, Th
membership is limited to fortv, with en ;:a-
! limited number of correspondents, Ark-sti
saw Traveler.
TTiey Are Opposite.
"Pa. do 'pro' and 'con' mean opposite
things?"
"Yes. sen."
"Ij that tho reason why they speak of
progress' and 'congress?' "
"wi yes, so,'' Chicago "Sows.
Carson, Nov., nitrcj cro talking of
sowing wild rico on tho shores of Washoe
lako to lure wild ducks a other water
fowl to that vicinity.
THE DIME MUSEUM BARKER.
llo is Proud and Tain, bat His Sonorous
Voice is Worth Sloncy.
: lYo havo trouble in getting a profes
sional barker who is willing to assist gen
erally," said a dimo museum proprietor on
the Bowery to a reporter. "Yoa-seo e
barker i3 as proud of his calling as an ac
tor, and when ho gets through talking in
front of tha museum he dosen't want to do
anything else. They call it their act, and
goMhrough it with the samo pride that
Wilson Barrett acts the character of Clau
dian. It ia no easy matter to bark for a mu
seum; it takes training, and a groat dil of
it. A man that hasn't got a good pair of
lungs is not fitted for tha position. The
rising inflection, too, must bo used almost
exclusively, for it can be heard better.
Tho gateman at a railroad depot is no
where beside a professional barker. Tho
former in not so clear and distinct in pro
nunciation, and lias a rising inflection of
the voice for ono or two syllables, and then
a dreadful falling inflection, which bos tho
general effect of oonfounding tho listener.
But tho barker is clear and distinct, and
the passing crowd can catch on to. what ho
is saying. I confess that he is mechanioal,
as a rule, and varies his stereotyped sen
tences very little in th& course of months.
All barkers aro vain, and many aro as
capricious as prima donnas.
"I endeavored to get mine ono day to
bark for a special crowd passing down tho
street, but he would not do it because it
uas not Ins regular hour to go on. Thoy
are very exacting in their contracts as to
how many hours they shall bo on duty, and
., - . , - , . " '
! the proprietor who gets one to bark outsido
i of hls regular time w a genius. Thoy aro
somewhat indepoz?uent, because good bark
ers are scarce. If a greenhorn goes to bark
in front of ti museum the peojilo passing
guy him fearfuliy and do the musoum moro
harm than good. But a. veteran cannot
ha rattled, ho never suitors from stago
fright, and no matter who laughs at him,
he talks right along and pays no attention
to any one. Fow barkers over rise above
thoir condition. A barker onco, a barker
always. They got very good salaries, as
much as tamo of tho minor 'freaks' in
ths show, but livo up to thoir income. They
are fond of big diamonds, and no well
regulated barker has a shirt front unless it
is brilliantly studded with gems. Their
groat drawback, besides being vain and
too proud to do other work, is their fond
ness for tho cup. When tho matinoo is
over tho actor goes to a wet grocery and
braces up his voice with half a dozen "cock
tails. I onco had tho temerity to ask a
barker to personate some freak in tho mu
seum, and he became so furious ho wanted
to kill me. 'I, an artist, becomo a freak!'
ho cried, in a rago. He quit me, and I
had to baric for two weeks beforo I got
another. It is no easy job, though, as
Eomo imagine. " 7ew York Alail and Ex
press. The Welfare of Paris Horses.
Paris is properly named tho Enfer des
Chevaux, and only within tho last fow years
have protestations agaiiut the horriblo cru
elty inflicted en horses been anything but
idle word-. Xow we havo "cocietcs," as
in America, and a "Icaguo' formed against
vivisection. Tho "Society for tho Preven
tion of Cruelty to Animals" has a prop
erty at Arceull Cachan, valued at ?0,000,
and tho annual expense is about $4,000.
Tho tw o branch establishments are at As
niorep, and tho w holo aim of tho societies
is to save as many animals as possible from
the savants who, in tho name of humanity,
compel them to sufTor martyrdom. Some
tirao ago I visited theso homos of ihe res
cued, and found ono of tho mc3t interesting
in tho Ruo 15arrc, Asniores. Any one
who wishes to abandon a dog or cat throws
it over the wall, and tho animal falls upon
a strong netting that saves it from injury.
As soon as its cry is heard, n woman comes
from tho house, pets and feeds tho poor
creuture, then places it in a cushioned bas
ket. Every room of this threo stor' house
is heated, and against the wall3 aro baskoti
in which lie every hind of Email animals,
young and old, beautiful and ugly.
Tho superintendent of this establishment
also scok tho welfare of horse-;. Every
day she comes to Paris, and, if, sho soos a
street badly paved, immediately a letter
is written to the prefect of tho Seine. If
shs hears thr sound of a whip tho coach
man is implored not commanded: "Striko
me, but respect that poor b?3t." At the
cab stands she looks for tho animals who
need sponging, and gives a few sous to
each coachman to thai ho will moro quickly
do his duty. When sho poos a horse loo old
to work, but nevertheless compelled to
obe-, sho bu the animal and &( i. to
St. Denis, whero its la3- arc cjxmt in com
fort and happiness. I could fill columns
telling jou of tho wonders accomplished by
. handful of noblewomen whoso motto is:
'Our lovo for snimab is in proportion, to
the tortures infiictod on them by man.'
Paris Cor. Chicago TJi.3.
Won't Tnho Whi!ty with Oyetcrs.
Thcro h just now another fad going in
connection with the cr.ling of oyslen. A
largo share of tho destruction of the bi
valves is accomplished in connection with
tho imbibing of some kind of intoxicating
liquor. In the restaurants and lunch
houses tho main article of diet is tho oyster
in various forms, and nine times out of ten
something in a liquid form '3 taken to wah
hem down.
A well known eh' mist in Rochester "has
recently aiven out tho resale 01 so.o cx-
Torimentc ho has ti ied to show tho influence
of different liquor, upon tho oyster. lie
reports that he placod in a bowl of vrhisity
one oyster and "in another bowl of leer
another oyster, and left them to st?nd
over night. When tho bowls wcro-nexS in
vestigated tho cyster in tho bcr hsd dis
appeared, having been dissolved or absorbed
by tho mlt liquor. Tho 03-ster in tho bowl
of whislrj- was contracted to a hard and
leathers- lump. The deduction from the re
sult of this experiment is that malt liquor
should bo drank with tho oyster as it will
aid in the process of digest'or:, and that any
'"hard liquors' should be avoided, as they
render tho oysters indigestible. New icrk
Letter.
Palti I'ralsca Italian Opra
Apropas of Italian opora bcoring a
thing of tlio past, Mac Palti said tho other
day in Boston: "Do not say raeh n thing.
"Surely Itlin opera will nvor die; it is so
swet. go soulful, so beautiful and poetic.
Wo aro always looking after something be-j-ond
that wo havo. It is so in music as in
other things. Eat can anything bo moro
musical, more gratifying to tho car, mors
melodious than that which is coiled Italian
music It does not cra possible, for it is so
near perfection, I think that perhaps just
at present it is well for you to havo a season
or so without tho Italian opera; after that
would como a desire to hear it again, and I
think th era would b-3 a good field for an ex
cellent raortager who would form r. com
pany of good artists." Chicago Herald.
The Children's Playground.
Senator Sharon left J3, 000 for the con
struction cf a children's piavgroexnd in
Golden Gate park. San Francisco, and work
lias heert beun upon it. Tho building is to
bo of rough sandstone and will cost S-0.O00.
Tlie C.itncra in Medlcinr.
It is c-r.- ct-esfced tht photography
may b-como a useful agent in medical
diagnosis, discksing symptoxss of drscas?
bf are Usey-are otherwise perceptible. Ia a
reoeet n-gntive of a child tho face? wa
showr. cs t;;ly covered with an eruption
no traces cf which could be seen on the
child until three days afterward, whoa Its
skin becae covered with spots duo to prick
ly heat. Iu another recorded case, invisible
spo were brought out oa a photograph
taken a fortnight before an attack of small
pox. Arkaraw Traveler.
DOWH m A COAL METE.
IN THE BLACK
NINETY FEET
DIAMOND'S HOME,
UNDER GROUND.
tife and labor by lamplight Seen and
Unseen rerils of the 3Iiner's Occupa
tionA Stroll Through Cndcrjjroand
Avenues " Shooting Down."
Having supplied ourselves with small lamps
we go ahead. The avenue through which wo
aro traveling is thirty or forty feet wide, tho
roof high enough to allow us to walk erect,
and tho ground dry and dusty. Ibwand
then we meet a train of three cars being
hauled bj- one mule. Sometimes these trains
Euddenl- emere from side entries, tho exist
ence of which never would havo been sus
pected b- a stranger, and final!-, as mule,
driver and train crawl out of one, evidently
of more magnitude than any -we have passed,
ifr. I remarks: '"Let's go in here." We
enter, and after traveling a quarter of a mile
land in a chamber whero men aro at work
filling cars with coal that has been blown
down with powder. Holes aro" bored into
the face of the stratum with a drill operated
b- compressed air, which is sent into tho
mino through iron pipes connecting with a
powerful compressor in tho engine room
above. Theso drills run at lightning speed,
boring a hole an inch and a half hi diameter
mid six feet deep in less than three min
utes. Then tho machine is moved to an
other point six or eight feet distant and an
other hole bored. Tho three sides of the
room aro thus penetrated with holes, into
which blasts are inserted, the fuse attached
and then the miner connects the wire of au
electrical hand dynamo with ono fuso at a
time, walks off to a safe distance and forms
tho circuit thcro is a flash, a jar, and
several hundred bushels of mineral come
down with a tremendous crash. The other
blasts are ''touched off'' in the same way, with
Binnlar results, and then tho man with the
drill and the electrical battery loads them on
his "tool car,'' moves out to tho main line
and hunts up another chamber.
Returning to tho main nvenuo wo move
forward until wo arrive at a chamber where
a machino is at work. These machines are
also operated by compressed air, moving
back and forth against tho wall of coal and
breaking it down by penetrating it with a
powerful iron fork. Tho imploment is placed
on tracks that move on an iron track, and is
so constructed that tho prong will cover an
arc of six feet in its immediate front. The
truck nnd tho machino can be moved at ease
and without the loss of much time, and w hen
operated on full time does tho work of ten
men. Mr. Brandenberger, tho general super
intendent of tho mine, whom wo met at this
point, stated that tho difficulty with tho ma
chines was that they tvero constantly getting
out of order, and, it being necessarj' to take
them out of the mino for repair, which some
times cost as much as tho machine when new,
ho did not think there was much saved in the
long run over hand mining. Sometimes a
machino would ba virtually ruined from a
sudden fall of slate or shalo or contact with
a mass of sulphuret of iron. When at work,
moving back and forth, sending their iron
tongues into the black bosom of six a foot vein
of coal, each attack being followed b' a crash
and a tumble of perhaps a ton of mineral,
the- present an effect on the senses both won
derful and startling. They aro somewhat more
dangerous than hand mining, from tho fact
that the3' aro moro sudden in thoir effects,
and at ill times and in all mines tho operator
must look out for sudden falls of slate.
A general stroll through the mino covered
a distance of about two miles, nnd led through
man- avenues and streets running at right
angles or parallel to each other, just like
streets and nvenues in n cit-, and laid out
with as much mathematical precision. In all
mines in this part of tho country pillars of
coal aro left standing to support the roof,
nud these pillars mn3" bo compared with the
buildings covering blocks of ground in the
city, the entries, us thoy arc called b3 miners,
being the streets surrounding the buildings.
The end of the avenue, or whero actual mining
is going on, is called a chamber, nnd during
our walk we found men at work in nearly all
of tho latter. Through ever- avenue is laid
nn iron tramway over which the coal must
bo hauled in the dummy cars to tho bottom
of the shaft. In tramping about you are apt
to como in collWon with a train of these dum
mies nt an- moment, mid to avoid accidents
recesaes aro unk into tho walls nt regular dis
tances, into which yon can step and bo per
fectly safe.
Hero ami thero wide avenues are driven oil
from the main avenue to distant poi'ti
when smaller ones nro pushed out like the
roots of a tree, with the exception tliat they
generally run at regular angles to each other,
so that in tho course of time a labyrinth is
formed out of which tho unfamiliar explorer
would r.'vcr find his way except by the
merest accident The miner soon becomes
as familiar to them, however, as does any
resident of a city to its streets, and when he
enters tho mino never gets lost or confused in
the journey to his chamber. He is assisted,
however, very materially b;- the numbering
of every avenue, a placard lieing hung up at
tho entrance of each on wlu'ch is iainled the
proper numbers. In our journey wc passed
through about fifty of these avenues. In one
or two of them we were comjiol'od to ?toop
considerably in moving forward, but in all
others tho ceilings were not; "rss than seven
feet high. .
The ground under foot was s-toooth and dry,
th- atmosphere puro and tho temperature
about CO Fahrenheit. Tho volume of air sent
through all j ru$ of the mine by mealis of the
fan keep, it clear of smoke, foul gas or the
unpleasant odor emitted from the small oil
lamps worn in the caps cf the workmen.
Upon first entering the mino the darkness u
intense, but in a few moments the eyes aj
pecr to overcome it. and a sort of weird twi
light surrounds you, through which objects
mav bi seen several rods. Tle further tho
min- is penetrated the les intense the dark
ness soenrj to baconie. As might naturally
ba supposed, tho acoustics of the mine are
perfect. Low tones and even whispers of tho
human voice may ho heard great distances.
During the journey we Iieard a tremendous
crash whch appeared to be within a few feet
of us, but my compacion, seing that I was
somewhat startled, remarked that it was
caused by too -Shooting ijown" of a inast of
coal nearly 1,0.0 feet away. Distance and
locality cut as much of a figure in a raise as
they do on the surfare of the earth. 3ners
will tell you that -room No. 20 is a quarter
of a mile away: that is to ra it you must
go down 2Jo. 13 to No. 15, turn to the right
and walk foar bJoeks, then to tha left one
block, and yon can't help finding it." Fol
lowing these direction- yoa are as certain tc
roach Ko. 30 in a mino as you would be in
reaching a similar number by means of a sim
ilar direction on any street ia Chicago.
BslleTiHo (Ills.) Cor. Chicago Herald.
A Dl3ter to nnmanltr,
il. Bartholeray S Ililaire, the ca icnl
French senator and academician, who has for
years been sj. -daily studying the cod:::on of
India, says that in his opinion it w aid I e
a disaster to humanity if anythir iboald
iat erfers to check the work England is doing
ia Emdcstan- Chicago TTuses.
The stidhill region near Colunba S. C,
is dotted with many Indian moands which
contain valcabie relics.
A CoirreUott.
OSca Boy I couHa't get in throag-i
the door so I clam ia the window.
Employer (with a rigiiiftc-t emphasis ca
the "clam') Yon dum in tho window, did
yoc?
"WcD, clirn. then." Tid Bi.
Bunnell &
leal Estate
We take pleasure in showing tlie city and
our list of INSIDE and OUTSIDE property
to investors. Also
WRITE INSURANCE
In the leading AMERICAN and POREIG-3ST
Companies.
ZIMMERLY'S ADDITION.
Now is die time to buy lots in this" addition
while they are cheap.
ONE MILE SOUTH ON LAWRENCE AVE.
Street cars and large brick
School house in connection. For further
formation call at 6n S Market st.
0. B. STOCKER,
-DVLIt I.'-
C
E
2ST
T
E
R
P
I
E
C
E
S
-lantels,
Fire Clay,
Grates,"
Fire Brick,
IMARELE- DUST--TTIT1TE SAX.!), LATH
Lime, Hair, New York and Michigan Plaster.
Louisville and
YARD and OFFICK:-Ou Water Street, Utwvcn
and Klrt Street.
FOR SALE
Improved and Unimproved City Property
on the best improved streets in the city.
Lots on the inside on street car lines and in
outside additions. Suburban lots on the east
side in Maple Grove addition.
Business lots and business blocks for sale
at special bargains. Several fine tracts near
the city for sub-dividing and plating.
Improved farms and grass lands in all
parts of the county; also ranches in this and
adjoining counties.
All parties wishing to buy would do well
to call and examine my list before buying
elsewhere.
. A. THOMAS,
The Oldi-st Real Estate Agency in Wichita.
HORACE ItENNIE.
W. II. HERt'E-t
FItKD'K. J. MOOUE,
THE MERGER
( J f B
B I I B
eo l-ofnto A In
u LulliU B ill
CAPITAL
City and Farm Property Bought and Sold.
OFnCT-Riv.nK 1 ar.d . abore 2U
N. Uln Strtt.
!ir
SV' .j- -u"r,
-T,v-i 33i--slw"
irtrX-i-5f-. '
nI-2fJ3fr r-iiLJ-.-rt
JfJHt-Jg J-ESSgHSy fioH. n
Kv?SLiJR SU?-- V
iSIm
SHIB!S3rSBP'
'rMS5MRr?fcjS:
- iBWPii'"
The Oldest and Largest House in the Cii.
ALDRICH & BROWN,
Wholesale and Retail Druggists,
Nos. 138 and 140 Main street WICHITA, KAN.
Morehouse
ant
in-
3r
Portland
Ccmc n t.
Wichita, KansQil
Dc!li Av-nu
fJCiKU jJiIH
W. H.ORiWm
THOH M V'.. oUrj !:,
vesimen
$2oo,ooo.
WICHITA. KAN".
GfANDOLFO CAFE.
Finest : Restaurant : in : Kansas.
VTZ XAZK A 8F CUTY OT TSW-t.- riOll.'
ASO KARZ COJOCTXX
" J1 XA1Z Str.
4 Brr-rm Haw. JC r KJs K.
IW W. TLr-OrtT tor ICE CR.K ta mtj Cf Jw
nl to XxbU ur k. pra-U tSU
ixchange.
3i3"5:i$'i" 3'.we-BK.
-iM? St5?"' .'fH 1 " ?-
I fllll - -.-..... LS----,
fin
A3-gf"gggai

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